National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bus evaluation project

  1. American Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation. Second Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    This report presents results of the American Fuel Cell Bus (AFCB) Project, a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses operating in the Coachella Valley area of California. The prototype AFCB was developed as part of the Federal Transit Administration's (FTA's) National Fuel Cell Bus Program. Through the non-profit consortia CALSTART, a team led by SunLine Transit Agency and BAE Systems developed a new fuel cell electric bus for demonstration. SunLine added two more AFCBs to its fleet in 2014 and another in 2015. FTA and the AFCB project team are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This report summarizes the performance results for the buses through June 2015.

  2. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-02-01

    This report evaluates a fuel cell electric bus demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. This evaluation report covers two years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2013.

  3. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-09-01

    Second report evaluating a fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) demonstration led by British Columbia Transit (BC Transit) in Whistler, Canada. BC Transit is collaborating with the California Air Resources Board and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL published its first report on the demonstration in February 2014. This report is an update to the previous report; it covers 3 full years of revenue service data on the buses from April 2011 through March 2014 and focuses on the final experiences and lessons learned.

  4. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation Results: Second Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is on inAutomo&veProject

  5. BC Transit Fuel Cell Bus Project: Evaluation Results Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is on inAutomo&veProject

  6. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation Team Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation...

  7. Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review showing status of U.S. and international fuel cell transit bus evaluations.

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen Program Review Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen Program Review This paper, presented at the 2001 DOE...

  9. VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) Details hydrogen fuel cell buses being evaluated in service at AC Transit. Presented at the APTA Bus and...

  10. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethylether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operation in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges have continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. As of late June 2002, it appears that the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head is being installed on the system to alleviate this problem and get the shuttle bus back in operation. In summary, the conversion is completed but there have been operational challenges in the field. They continue to work to make the shuttle bus as reliable to operate on DME-diesel blends as possible.

  11. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. In late June 2002, the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head was installed on the system to alleviate this problem and the shuttle bus operated successfully on DME blends from 10-25 vol% on the shuttle bus loop until September 30, 2002. During the period of operation on the campus loop, the bus was pulled from service, operated at the PTI test track and real-time emissions measurements were obtained using an on-board emissions analyzer from Clean Air Technologies International, Inc. Particulate emissions reductions of 60% and 80% were observed at DME blend ratios of 12 vol.% and 25 vol.%, respectively, as the bus was operated over the Orange County driving cycle. Increases in NOx, CO and HC emissions were observed, however. In summary, the conversion of the shuttle bus was successfully accomplished, particulate emissions reductions were observed, but there were operational challenges in the field. Nonetheless, they were able to demonstrate reliable operation of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel blends.

  12. Safety evaluation of a hydrogen fueled transit bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.; Thomas, J.K.; Hovis, G.L.; Wu, T.T.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen fueled vehicle demonstration projects must satisfy management and regulator safety expectations. This is often accomplished using hazard and safety analyses. Such an analysis has been completed to evaluate the safety of the H2Fuel bus to be operated in Augusta, Georgia. The evaluation methods and criteria used reflect the Department of Energy`s graded approach for qualifying and documenting nuclear and chemical facility safety. The work focused on the storage and distribution of hydrogen as the bus motor fuel with emphases on the technical and operational aspects of using metal hydride beds to store hydrogen. The safety evaluation demonstrated that the operation of the H2Fuel bus represents a moderate risk. This is the same risk level determined for operation of conventionally powered transit buses in the United States. By the same criteria, private passenger automobile travel in the United States is considered a high risk. The evaluation also identified several design and operational modifications that resulted in improved safety, operability, and reliability. The hazard assessment methodology used in this project has widespread applicability to other innovative operations and systems, and the techniques can serve as a template for other similar projects.

  13. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The laboratory studies have included work with a Navistar V-8 turbodiesel engine, demonstration of engine operation on DME-diesel blends and instrumentation for evaluating fuel properties. The field studies have involved performance, efficiency and emissions measurements with the Champion Motorcoach ''Defender'' shuttle bus which will be converted to DME-fueling. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have completed engine combustion studies on DME-diesel blends up to 30 wt% DME addition.

  14. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

  15. St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

    2008-07-01

    The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

  16. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-03-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

  17. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2013-01-01

    SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

  18. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

  19. SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2011-10-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

  20. RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proc, K.; Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.

    2005-08-01

    A summary of the data NREL collected from a project to evaluate the in-use performance of buses from the Regional Transportation District of Denver operating on B20.

  1. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    44646-2.pdf More Documents & Publications SunLine Transit Agency, Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus:...

  2. Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SunLine Transit Agency Report details the six-month evaluation of the ThunderPower hydrogen fuel cell bus demonstrated at SunLine Transit Agency. sunlinereport.pdf More Documents...

  3. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and...

  4. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  5. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

  6. Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malmö Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project Bengt Ridell Carl Bro and the Municipality of Malmö started a long- term co-operation regarding conversion from diesel to CNG on the city busses. Now in the region Skåne more than 330 buses, 80 trucks and about 1000 cars are running on CNG

  7. Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Norton, P.; Clark, N.

    1999-05-01

    The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

  8. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

  9. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  10. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report-- Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  11. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

  12. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2009-05-01

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

  13. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) involvement. Included are specifications for the fuel cell bus and information about its operation. BurbankBus, the city's mass transit entity, received a grant from the California Air Resources Board to fund its zero-emission bus demonstration and is collaborating with DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus performance. DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory will collect and analyze performance and operations data for at least one year. Researchers will use the data to better understand the technology and determine future development work. In addition, demonstration information will help fleets make informed purchase decisions.

  14. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the fuel cell transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA). This document provides a description of the demonstration sites, funding sources, and data collection activities for fuel cell transit bus evaluations currently planned from FY10 through FY12.

  15. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location.

  16. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects Fact Sheet. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel...

  17. Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Project (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB:...

  18. American Fuel Cell Bus Project Evaluation: Second Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat Is on in St.27American Fuel

  19. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report #2, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-06-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006, comparing similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. It covers November 2007 through February 2010. Results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and road calls), and a summary of achievements and challenges encountered during the demonstration.

  20. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results This...

  1. CTTRANSIT Operates New England's First Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus DOE Hydrogen Program (Fact Sheet) 42407.pdf More Documents & Publications Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices...

  2. Project financial evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The project financial section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  3. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  4. SunLine Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expands Horizons with Fuel Cell Bus Demo. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet). SunLine Expands Horizons...

  5. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the Burbank Bus Fleet

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's involvement.

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)...

  7. Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, Teresa A.

    Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title of the project?) Excellent Very Good Good Fair Unsatisfactory COMMENTS: #12;Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for REU) #12;Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Poster Presentation PROJECT.#.: ...Title.. PARTICIPANTS: DATE

  8. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. 44646-1.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  9. Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority: Compressed Natural Gas Transit Bus Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Melendez, M.

    2006-04-01

    Evaluates compressed natural gas (CNG) powered transit buses at Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), providing a comparison between them and standard diesel transit buses.

  10. MAES RESEARCH PROJECT REVIEW EVALUATION FORM*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    MAES RESEARCH PROJECT REVIEW EVALUATION FORM* PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR'S (PI) NAME: PROJECT NUMBER: MONB00__________ TITLE OF PROJECT: STARTING DATE: DURATION DATE: REVIEWER'S NAME: DEPT: PHONE: ITEMS: COMMENTS (PLEASE PRINT) 1. Identify specific outcomes and impacts during the life of the existing project

  11. The multifamily building evaluation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    In 1991 the New York State Energy Office embarked on a comprehensive multi-year study of multifamily housing in New York City. The principal objective of the evaluation was to determine the degree to which new windows and boiler/burner retrofits installed in 22 multifamily buildings located in the New York City region save energy and whether the savings persist over a minimum of two years. Window and boiler retrofits were selected because they are popular measures and are frequently implemented with assistance from government and utility energy programs. Approaches prospectively, energy consumption monitoring and a series of on-site inspections helped explain why energy savings exceeded or fell short of expectations. In 1993, the scope of the evaluation expanded to include the monitoring of domestic hot water (DHW) consumption in order to better understand the sizing of combined heating/DHW boilers and water consumption patterns. The evaluation was one of ten proposals selected from over 100 candidates in a nationwide competition for a US Department of Energy Building Efficiency Program Grant. The Energy Office managed the project, analyzed the data and prepared the reports, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory served as technical advisor, and EME Group (New York City) installed meters and dataloggers, collected data, and inspected the retrofits. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority collaborated with the Energy Office on the DHW monitoring component. Results did not always follow predictable patterns. Some buildings far exceeded energy saving estimates while others experienced an increase in consumption. Persistence patterns were mixed. Some buildings showed a steady decline in energy savings while others demonstrated a continual improvement. A clear advantage of the research design was a frequent ability to explain results.

  12. 1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martland, Carl D. (Carl Douglas)

    Methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Basic techniques of engineering economics, ...

  13. 1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martland, Carl D.

    1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: ...

  14. Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation Project Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation Project Public Health Air Surveillance Evaluation (PHASE) Project Evaluating, Developing, and Delivering Air Quality Characterization Data to Environmental Public data as part of the EPHT Network. The evaluation portion of this project is scheduled for completion

  15. Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title......

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlberg, Teresa A.

    Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for Project Technical Report PROJECT .#.: ..Project Title...... #12 of the project?) Excellent Very Good Good Fair Unsatisfactory COMMENTS: #12;Judge Evaluation Scoring Form for REU and click! PROJECT TITLE REU Site: Computing Research for Undergraduates: Visualization, Virtual

  16. Hydrogen powered bus

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-22

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  17. Project evaluation : a practical asset pricing method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a practical approach to project evaluation using techniques of modern financial economics, with a sample application to oil development under a complex tax system. The method overcomes shortcomings of ...

  18. Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies This report provides a...

  19. Section 1, Page 1 [This is my section of a 3-person project on bus rapid transit. This section, Section 1, is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfson, Sabina

    1 : (1) bus stations with amenities, (2) well designed vehicles, (3) a mechanism for rapid fare provide a high level of transit service using vehicles with rubber tires. The above features allow) Reduced pollution due to less fuel use per person. (4) Increased land development and value around

  20. SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

  1. Evaluating the utility of dynamical downscaling in agricultural impacts projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating the utility of dynamical downscaling in agricultural impacts projections Michael evaluate here whether this computationally intensive approach significantly alters projections circulation model (GCM) output--to produce fine-spatial-scale climate projections for impacts assessments. We

  2. Strategic evaluation central to LNG project formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, D.; DiNapoli, R.N.; Yost, C.C.

    1995-07-03

    An efficient-scale, grassroots LNG facility of about 6 million metric tons/year capacity requires a prestart-up outlay of $5 billion or more for the supply facilities--production, feedgas pipeline, liquefaction, and shipping. The demand side of the LNG chain requires a similar outlay, counting the import-regasification terminal and a combination of 5 gigawatts or more of electric power generation or the equivalent in city gas and industrial gas-using facilities. There exist no well-developed commodity markets for free-on-board (fob) or delivered LNG. A new LNG supply project is dedicated to its buyers. Indeed, the buyers` revenue commitment is the project`s only bankable asset. For the buyer to make this commitment, the supply venture`s capability and commitment must be credible: to complete the project and to deliver the LNG reliably over the 20+ years required to recover capital committed on both sides. This requirement has technical, economic, and business dimensions. In this article the authors describe a LNG project evaluation system and show its application to typical tasks: project cost of service and participant shares; LNG project competition; alternative project structures; and market competition for LNG-supplied electric power generation.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Bus Networks in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Atanu; Ramadurai, Gitakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Through the past decade the field of network science has established itself as a common ground for the cross-fertilization of exciting inter-disciplinary studies which has motivated researchers to model almost every physical system as an interacting network consisting of nodes and links. Although public transport networks such as airline and railway networks have been extensively studied, the status of bus networks still remains in obscurity. In developing countries like India, where bus networks play an important role in day-to-day commutation, it is of significant interest to analyze its topological structure and answer some of the basic questions on its evolution, growth, robustness and resiliency. In this paper, we model the bus networks of major Indian cities as graphs in \\textit{L}-space, and evaluate their various statistical properties using concepts from network science. Our analysis reveals a wide spectrum of network topology with the common underlying feature of small-world property. We observe tha...

  4. Evaluating Design Project Creativity in Engineering Design Courses Postdoctoral Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salustri, Filippo A.

    Evaluating Design Project Creativity in Engineering Design Courses I. Chiu Postdoctoral Fellow to evaluating creativity using both the literature and our experiences with evaluating design project creativity design project creativity and include the evaluation within the grading framework. We will focus

  5. Student Project Presentations -Evaluation Form Faculty/Facilitators: Student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Page 1 Student Project Presentations - Evaluation Form Faculty/Facilitators: Student: Title will receive these comments as written, so please write clearly. #12;Page 2 Student Project Presentations

  6. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated This document from the U.S....

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects...

  8. 1 -NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation The New Hampshire Coverts Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    1 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation The New Hampshire Coverts Project In Their Own, sexual orientation, or veteran's status. #12;2 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation of responses to open-ended question (#12) 19 #12;3 - NH Coverts Project: 1995-2002 Program Evaluation

  9. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Office of Pesticide Programs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated A jump...

  10. Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete...

  11. The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pennsylvania 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Project (WHEP) Originally Written By: Edward L. Neilson, Jr. and Delwin E. Benson, Ph.D. Adapted From the 4-H Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Program National..........................................................................................................................3 A Real Life Project

  12. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel...

  13. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell...

  14. School Bus Emissions Study | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    School Bus Emissions Study School Bus Emissions Study 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: international Truck and Engine Corporation deer2003slodowske.pdf More Documents &...

  15. Senior Project Evaluation Rubric: In the course of the senior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Senior Project Evaluation Rubric: In the course of the senior design project students will be evaluated on their ability to: Exemplary Proficient Fair Poor Identify and analyze the technical challenges posed by a significant research or implementation project. The student is able to define and articulate

  16. Assessment of the progress of CEI 2010 Projects Project Evaluation Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of the progress of CEI 2010 Projects Project Evaluation Form Project Reference Campus to scarcity of funding Integration of the CEI project into the strategic plan of the UPF The indicators: Impressive achievements in ERC grants and FP7 projects 15% of Spanish "Severo Ochoa" Centres of Excellence

  17. Evaluation of Technology Risk in Project Cogeneration Project Returns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thoennes, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    The economic returns of a cogeneration project are a direct function of the project margin, that is, the difference between revenues and expenses. Revenues and expenses, of course, are made up of both variable and fixed components. The revenues...

  18. Project Title: Evaluating Criteria of Play in Entertainment Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Project Title: Evaluating Criteria of Play in Entertainment Products Bachelor of Arts Internship Organisation Supervisor: Natasha Barnes, CEO Academic Supervisor: Dr. Donald Matheson Project Reference Number projects with the University of Canterbury Bachelor of Arts Internship Program (please see other project

  19. Measuring Up: How to Track and Evaluate Local Sustainability Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Join this EPA Local Climate and Energy webinar to learn how to measure and evaluate the results of local climate, energy, and sustainability projects.

  20. Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Economic...

  1. Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia or organization) DOT - $92,292.15 Total Project Cost $92,292.15 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 1, 2013 ­ June 30, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Local governments

  2. Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt(s) and Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization) Caltrans $90,315 Total Project Cost $90,315 Agency ID Description of Research Project As virgin material sources become increasingly scarce, and the volume

  3. A Computerized Tree Growth Projection System for Forest Resource Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Computerized Tree Growth Projection System for Forest Resource Evaluation in the Lake States Allen L. Lundgren Burton L. Essex Abstract: A computerized tree growth projection sys- tem has been developed for the Lake States Region as part of a larger Forest Resources Evaluation Program (FREP

  4. A REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    A REACTIVE APPROACH FOR MINING PROJECT EVALUATION UNDER PRICE UNCERTAINTY Meimei Zhang. This method often undervalues a mining project since it ignores future price uncertainty and does not allow on metal price. This paper also demonstrates that the "reactive" approach can estimate the mine project

  5. Container evaluation for microwave solidification project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.A.

    1994-08-01

    This document discusses the development and testing of a suitable waste container and packaging arrangement to be used with the Microwave Solidification System (MSS) and Bagless Posting System (BPS). The project involves the Rocky Flats Plant.

  6. A Methodology for Decisionmaking in Project Evaluation in Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Methodology for Decisionmaking in Project Evaluation in Land Management Planning A. Weintraub Abstract: In order to evaluate alternative plans, wildland management planners must consider many the evaluation of plans under alternative value systems. Alternatives are compared through a small set of values

  7. Energy Conservation Project Evaluation by Investment Equivalents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Using discounted cash flow techniques, a new parameter for the quick economic evaluation of energy conservation ideas is calculated. The meaning of the calculated value, an 'Investment Equivalent of Energy Saving', is: 'The maximum amount...

  8. Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

  9. MCA Based Performance Evaluation of Project Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakshi, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Multi-criteria decision support systems are used in various fields of human activities. In every alternative multi-criteria decision making problem can be represented by a set of properties or constraints. The properties can be qualitative & quantitative. For measurement of these properties, there are different unit, as well as there are different optimization techniques. Depending upon the desired goal, the normalization aims for obtaining reference scales of values of these properties. This paper deals with a new additive ratio assessment method. In order to make the appropriate decision and to make a proper comparison among the available alternatives Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and ARAS have been used. The uses of AHP is for analysis the structure of the project selection problem and to assign the weights of the properties and the ARAS method is used to obtain the final ranking and select the best one among the projects. To illustrate the above mention methods survey data on the expansion of optic...

  10. Electrical system architecture having high voltage bus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian Douglas (East Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL)

    2011-03-22

    An electrical system architecture is disclosed. The architecture has a power source configured to generate a first power, and a first bus configured to receive the first power from the power source. The architecture also has a converter configured to receive the first power from the first bus and convert the first power to a second power, wherein a voltage of the second power is greater than a voltage of the first power, and a second bus configured to receive the second power from the converter. The architecture further has a power storage device configured to receive the second power from the second bus and deliver the second power to the second bus, a propulsion motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus, and an accessory motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus.

  11. SL-ST Software Configuration and Management System (SCaM) Project - Project Evaluation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomé, R; Hatziangeli, Eugenia; Last, I; Ninin, P; Sobczak, H; CERN. Geneva. SPS and LEP Division

    1998-01-01

    This document is the output of the evaluation work done as part of the survey phase of the SCaM project. It contains the evaluation of commercial Software Configuration Mangement tools against previou sly captured User Requirements. Recommendations regarding the best solution are made by the project team. They will serve as a basis for the implementation of a software configuration management syste m and the derivation of a software configuration management procedure for SL and ST.

  12. EVALUATION PLAN PROJECT TRACS: EMPIRICALLY INVESTIGATING TRANSFORMATION THROUGH RELATEDNESS, AUTONOMY, AND COMPETENCE SUPPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    EVALUATION PLAN ­PROJECT TRACS: EMPIRICALLY INVESTIGATING TRANSFORMATION THROUGH RELATEDNESS OF CONTENTS PROJECT OVERVIEW 1 LOGIC MODEL 3 EVALUATION ACTIVITIES 4 BREAKDOWN OF TASKS: PROJECT TRACS TEAM, INTERNAL EVALUATOR, AND EXTERNAL EVALUATOR 15 TIMELINE OF EVALUATION ACTIVITIES 16 #12;1 I. PROJECT

  13. ProjectIT-Time: Integrated Management, Evaluation and Measurement of Information Systems Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    's business needs, developers employ some methods to direct the system's development life cycle, designedProjectIT-Time: Integrated Management, Evaluation and Measurement of Information Systems Projects to configure processes through the developed architecture that includes improvement in activities, products

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance DC Bus Film Capacitor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by GE Global Research at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high performance DC bus...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Performance DC Bus Film Capacitor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by GE Global Research at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high performance DC bus...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Bus and Truck Radial Materials for Fuel Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by PPG at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced bus and truck radial materials...

  17. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  18. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  19. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  20. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  1. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B.; Barron, W.F.; Kamel, A.M.; Santiago, H.T.

    1992-09-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  2. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. ); Barron, W.F. ); Kamel, A.M. ); Santiago, H.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  3. Bus Centric Rapid Transit 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banasiak, J.

    2011-01-01

    ? BRT Partially-Dedicated Curbside Lanes ? BRT Peak-Hour Dedicated Lanes ? BRT Barrier-Separated Lanes ? Rail 3 TSM vs. Dedicated 21 Table 6-3: Mesa Corridor Project BRT Capital Cost Comparison El Paso RTS Corridors 5 BRT Concept 1. Pay....500 $0.000 $0.000 n/a n/a Mesa $27.100 $5.420 $8.130 $13.550 50% FY 2012 Dyer $30.560 $6.112 $9.160 $15.290 50% FY 2013 Montana $42.790 $8.550 $9.700 $24.540 57% FY 2013 Total Costs* $135.950 $55.582 $26.990 $53.380 *** State Comprehesive Mobility...

  4. Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency Project/Program

  5. Project Report Evaluation of TDWR Range-Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, John Y. N.

    Project Report ATC-310 Evaluation of TDWR Range-Velocity Ambiguity Mitigation Techniques J. Y. N the degree of mitigation offered by existing phase diversity methods to these problems. Using optimized-OOG·OOO2. 16. Abstract Range and velocity ambiguities pose significant data quality challenges

  6. Preliminary findings from the evaluation of Project ESCAPE 25-Alive 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledingham, Christopher Michael

    2009-05-15

    This study was conducted as part of the evaluation process of a federally funded physical activity initiative undertaken by a large urban school district. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to provide evidence of effectiveness of Project...

  7. DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of each route. The shuttle bus departure and arrival times may be impacted by traffic, weather, or other logistical interruptions. Headquarters employees are reminded of the...

  8. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  9. CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: California Environmental Protection Agency, Air...

  10. Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase Texas Hydrogen Highway - Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase...

  11. AVTA: Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Hybrid Shuttle Bus...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Hybrid Shuttle Bus Testing Results AVTA: Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Hybrid Shuttle Bus Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies...

  12. Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  13. Interprocessor bus switching system for simultaneous communication in plural bus parallel processing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, R.; Fischler, M.S.; Husby, D.E.

    1991-01-15

    A bus switching apparatus and method for multiple processor computer systems comprises a plurality of bus switches interconnected by branch buses. Each processor or other module of the system is connected to a spigot of a bus switch. Each bus switch also serves as part of a backplane of a modular crate hardware package. A processor initiates communication with another processor by identifying that other processor. The bus switch to which the initiating processor is connected identifies and secures, if possible, a path to that other processor, either directly or via one or more other bus switches which operate similarly. If a particular desired path through a given bus switch is not available to be used, an alternate path is considered, identified and secured. 11 figures.

  14. Interprocessor bus switching system for simultaneous communication in plural bus parallel processing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Robert (Aurora, IL); Fischler, Mark S. (Warrenville, IL); Husby, Donald E. (DeKalb, IL)

    1991-01-01

    A bus switching apparatus and method for multiple processor computer systems comprises a plurality of bus switches interconnected by branch buses. Each processor or other module of the system is connected to a spigot of a bus switch. Each bus switch also serves as part of a backplane of a modular crate hardware package. A processor initiates communication with another processor by identifying that other processor. The bus switch to which the initiating processor is connected identifies and secures, if possible, a path to that other processor, either directly or via one or more other bus switches which operate similarly. If a particular desired path through a given bus switch is not available to be used, an alternate path is considered, identified and secured.

  15. Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

    1999-05-03

    The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

  16. A unified evaluation of iterative projection algorithms for phase retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchesini, S

    2006-01-01

    Iterative projection algorithms are successfully being used as a substitute of lenses to recombine, numerically rather than optically, light scattered by illuminated objects. Images obtained computationally allow aberration-free diffraction-limited imaging and allow new types of imaging using radiation for which no lenses exist. The challenge of this imaging technique is transfered from the lenses to the algorithms. We evaluate these new computational ``instruments'' developed for the phase retrieval problem, and discuss acceleration strategies.

  17. BUS [353] BUS 142 Financial Accounting (50) [BUS, ECO] (3-0)3 Hamdi Aydin [PT] (2) BUS 152 Statistics for Social Sciences (85) [BUS,ECO,PSIR] (3-0)3 Ouz Solyali (2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köprülü, Kahraman Güçlü

    ) ENGL 101 (1) (IR) 10:40-11:30 BUS 152 (1) CNG 100 (4) (AA-MA) TUR 102 (2) 10:40-11:30 BUS 152 (1) TUR 102 (2) 11:40-12:30 BUS 152 (1) CNG 100 (4) (AA-MA) TUR 102 (2) 11:40-12:30 BUS 152 (1) TUR 102 (2) 12) 15:40-16:30 PSIR 106 CNG 100 (1) (MB-ZZ) PSIR 106 BUS 142 (1) 15:40-16:30 PSIR 106 CNG 100 (1) PSIR

  18. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the ATR Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwtiz

    2011-05-01

    Near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project, subject of this determination, will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3) and associated switchgear. More specifically, INL proposes transitioning ATR to 100% commercial power with appropriate emergency backup to include: • Provide commercial power as the normal source of power to the ATR loads currently supplied by diesel-electric power. • Provide backup power to the critical ATR loads in the event of a loss of commercial power. • Replace obsolescent critical ATR power distribution equipment, e.g., switchgear, transformers, motor control centers, distribution panels. Completion of this and two other age-related projects (primary coolant pump and motor replacement and emergency firewater injection system replacement) will resolve major age related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues make the project a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #2 (Footprint change). The addition of a new PC-4 structure to the ATR Facility to house safety-related SSCs requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., structural qualification, fire suppression) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions of the housed equipment. 2. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps requires careful attention and analysis to ensure it meets a project primary object to maintain or reduce CDF and does not negatively affect the efficacy of the currently approved strategy. 3. Evaluation Criteria #5 (Create the need for new or revised safety SSCs). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps, based on the pre-conceptual design, will require the addition of two quick start diesel generators, their associated power coordination/distribution controls, and a UPS to the list of safety-related SSCs. Similarly to item 1 above, the addition of these active SSCs to the list of safety-related SSCs and replacement of the E-3 bus requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., seismic qualification, isolation of redundant trains from common fault failures) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions.

  19. Summary of monitoring station component evaluation project 2009-2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Darren M.

    2012-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is regarded as a center for unbiased expertise in testing and evaluation of geophysical sensors and instrumentation for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring (GNEM) systems. This project will sustain and enhance our component evaluation capabilities. In addition, new sensor technologies that could greatly improve national monitoring system performance will be sought and characterized. This work directly impacts the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring mission by verifying that the performance of monitoring station sensors and instrumentation is characterized and suitable to the mission. It enables the operational monitoring agency to deploy instruments of known capability and to have confidence in operational success. This effort will ensure that our evaluation capabilities are maintained for future use.

  20. Practical Multifactor Approach to Evaluating Risk of Investment in Engineering Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Practical Multifactor Approach to Evaluating Risk of Investment in Engineering Projects Abraham informed decisions regarding the economic viability of engineering projects. In most building construction projects, sophisticated risk assessment methods are not used because the detailed input information

  1. Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01

    Fact sheet describing the project startup for evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 hybrid-electric delivery trucks.

  2. Multicriteria decision analysis applied to the evaluation of road projects at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libre de Bruxelles, Université

    Multicriteria decision analysis applied to the evaluation of road projects at the design stage in this publication. #12;Multicriteria decision analysis applied to the evaluation of road projects at the design evaluation of road projects in a sustainable development perspective" English version Title: Multicriteria

  3. Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-17

    Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates.

  4. Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

    1994-06-01

    A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

  5. A. Dias and P.G. Ioannou Company and Project Evaluation Model for Privately-Promoted Infrastructure Projects Page 1 of 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dias and P.G. Ioannou Company and Project Evaluation Model for Privately-Promoted Infrastructure Projects Page 1 of 16 COMPANY AND PROJECT EVALUATION MODEL FOR PRIVATELY-PROMOTED INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS and project profiles. Example applications of the model include the evaluation of the Eurotunnel

  6. Effects of the Bus Regulatory Reform Act of 1982 on the Texas intercity bus industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuenzer, Karen Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    . The passage of the Bus Regulatory Reform Act of 1982 was an effort to decrease operating costs and increase ridership by allowing bus companies to discontinue unprofitable routes, have freedom over the setting of fares, and enter into new, competitive markets...

  7. Real-time Bus Information on Mobile Devices Stuart D. Maclean, Daniel J. Dailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - terface design. An overview of the system architecture is provided, together with some preliminary usage is not available. This mobile MyBus information system is the project discussed in this paper. It emphasises brows estimates suggest that the figure will reach the billion mark by 2004[1]. Of these, a substantial num- ber

  8. EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES AND THEIR CONNECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 CLOUD AMOUNT CHANGES #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF INTERNATIONAL SATELLITE CLOUD CLIMATOLOGY PROJECT (ISCCP) D2 Climatology Project (ISCCP) D2 dataset exhibits a 2.6% per decade decrease in the global all-cloud cloud

  9. Stochastics and Statistics Optimal decision indices for R&D project evaluation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stochastics and Statistics Optimal decision indices for R&D project evaluation of evaluating research and development (R&D) projects in the pharma- ceutical industry by using appropriate to various decision-based analytic approaches to sequential choice of projects, with special motivation from

  10. Research Summary The `Faith Woodland' project in Maulden Woods: an evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary The `Faith Woodland' project in Maulden Woods: an evaluation A pioneering `Faith Woodland' project at Maulden Wood in Bedfordshire was evaluated in 2007, nearly two years after woodlands in future. The Faith Woodlands leaflet produced through the project has the strapline `Different

  11. US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program: ADIS Algorithm Evaluation Project Plan Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, C W; Lenderman, J S; Gansemer, J D

    2011-02-24

    This document is an update to the 'ADIS Algorithm Evaluation Project Plan' specified in the Statement of Work for the US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program, as deliverable II.D.1. The original plan was delivered in August 2010. This document modifies the plan to reflect modified deliverables reflecting delays in obtaining a database refresh. This document describes the revised schedule of the program deliverables. The detailed description of the processes used, the statistical analysis processes and the results of the statistical analysis will be described fully in the program deliverables. The US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program is work performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under IAA HSHQVT-07-X-00002 P00004 from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

  12. INRIA, Evaluation of Theme Robotique Project-team e-Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laugier, Christian

    INRIA, Evaluation of Theme Robotique Project-team e-Motion March 2009 Project-team title : e-Motion Scientific leader : Christian Laugier Research center : INRIA Grenoble Rh^one-Alpes Common project 4 1 #12;Changes in staff Number of scientific staff that joined or left the project-team during

  13. Evaluation and Improvement of the Procurement Process in Construction Projects Proceedings IGLC-7 219

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    Evaluation and Improvement of the Procurement Process in Construction Projects Proceedings IGLC-7 219 EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE PROCUREMENT PROCESS IN CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Luis F. Alarcón1 , Rodrigo Rivas2 , and Alfredo Serpell3 ABSTRACT A methodology to diagnose and evaluate the procurement

  14. Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Erik A.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream. Preliminary cost estimates are summarized for each habitat project and economic benefits are calculated for Deer Creek.

  15. Understanding bus travel time variation using AVL data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstle, David G

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of bus automatic vehicle location (AVL) data are well documented (see e.g., Furth et al. (2006)), ranging from passenger-facing applications that predict bus arrival times to service-provider-facing applications ...

  16. University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems Project Monitoring & Evaluation for Timely Responses (METR) ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems 1 Project Monitoring & Evaluation This course covers project monitoring & evaluation for timely responses (METR) that will increase students will be able to conduct, EXTERNAL PROJECT EVALUATION Independently and credibly evaluate development projects

  17. SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Fact sheet describes the demonstration of a hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (HHICE) bus at SunLine Transit Agency.

  18. Efficient Verification of the PCI Local Bus using Boolean Satisfiability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aloul, Fadi

    IWLS'00 Page 1 Efficient Verification of the PCI Local Bus using Boolean Satisfiability Fadi A is to study the application of Boolean Satisfiability to the verification of the PCI Local Bus. The novel such as achieving high speed testing. To demonstrate how our method works, we have modeled the PCI Local Bus

  19. Technology in Motion Vehicle (TMV) To promote truck and bus safety programs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology in Motion Vehicle (TMV) Goal To promote truck and bus safety programs and technologies messages at multiple venues Demonstrate proven and emerging safety technologies to state and motor carrier stakeholders Promote deployment of safety technologies by fleets and state MCSAP agencies Evaluate program

  20. Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    industrial energy- efficiency and electric power projects.of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projectsof Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects

  1. Degree project 30hp, (20 weeks) at Q-linea AB, Uppsala. The project is aimed to test and evaluate image analysis algorithms for analysis of images obtained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    Degree project 30hp, (20 weeks) at Q-linea AB, Uppsala. The project is aimed to test and evaluate-lineas sepsis project. Based on a novel and proprietary molecular platform, Q-linea develops fully automated

  2. Handicap Parking Tulsa Transit Bus Stop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    Handicap Parking N S W E Bike Rack Tulsa Transit Bus Stop Building Entrance Parking Founders Hall..........Tulsa Graduate College C Wing Floor 1..........Security Office/Police Dispatch Floor 1..........Center of Applied Research for Non-Profit Organizations Floor 1..........OU-Tulsa Enrollment & Student Financial

  3. x Objects and Services x Bus Arbitration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    -layers of a CAN controller. The LLC provides acceptance filtering, overload notification and recovery management) Frame I Local Intelligence Local Intelligence Local Intelligence Local Intelligence bus lines © Ci it is the task of every node to decide if the message has to be accepted or not. So Acceptance Filtering has

  4. Energy DataBus (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    NREL has developed the Energy DataBus, an open-sourced software that collects massive amounts of energy-related data at second-to-second intervals; stores it in a massive, scalable database; and turns it into useful information.

  5. Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    Africa compared to the sector-wide baseline Best Plant 10th Percentile Project #5 - off-grid solar Project #Africa compared to the all-fossil baseline Best Plant 10th Percentile 25th Percentile Project #5 - off-grid solar Weighted Average Project #

  6. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project March 2012. [1] Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared and Assimilation System models. Citation: Johnson, M., et al. (2012), Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness

  7. Savannah Harbor Expansion Project General Re-Evaluation Report and Environmental Impact Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12; Savannah Harbor Expansion Project General Re-Evaluation Report and Environmental Impact, was engaged to conduct the IEPR of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) Draft General Re-Evaluation review of the Economic Appendix and model and the Cost Engineering Appendix in the summer of 2010

  8. Sodety ofPetroleumEfl@lom I Perhxmance Evaluation of Waterflood Project in Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . q Sodety ofPetroleumEfl@lom I SFE 26937 Perhxmance Evaluation of Waterflood Project in Southern in the 1920's and continued until early 1970's. Around the mid 70's, new wet:: were drilled and a waterflood project was started which is still in progress. During the course of the waterflood project, some problems

  9. Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Develops Student-Stakeholders Project DevelopsProject FundingServices|

  10. Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyde, Dan; Fast, Matthew

    2009-12-31

    The Southern Nevada Alternative Fuels Program is designed to demonstrate, in a day-to-day bus operation, the reliability and efficiency of a hydrogen bus operation under extreme conditions. By using ICE technology and utilizing a virtually emission free fuel, benefits to be derived include air quality enhancement and vehicle performance improvements from domestically produced, renewable energy sources. The project objective is to help both Ford and the City demonstrate and evaluate the performance characteristics of the E-450 H2ICE shuttle buses developed by Ford, which use a 6.8-liter supercharged Triton V-10 engine with a hydrogen storage system equivalent to 29 gallons of gasoline. The technology used during the demonstration project in the Ford buses is a modified internal combustion engine that allows the vehicles to run on 100% hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen gives a more thorough fuel burn which results in more power and responsiveness and less pollution. The resultant emissions from the tailpipe are 2010 Phase II compliant with NO after treatment. The City will lease two of these E-450 H2ICE buses from Ford for two years. The buses are outfitted with additional equipment used to gather information needed for the evaluation. Performance, reliability, safety, efficiency, and rider comments data will be collected. The method of data collection will be both electronically and manually. Emissions readings were not obtained during the project. The City planned to measure the vehicle exhaust with an emissions analyzer machine but discovered the bus emission levels were below the capability of their machine. Passenger comments were solicited on the survey cards. The majority of comments were favorable. The controllable issues encountered during this demonstration project were mainly due to the size of the hydrogen fuel tanks at the site and the amount of fuel that could be dispensed during a specified period of time. The uncontrollable issues encountered during this project were related to the economy and the budget cutbacks required during the project duration, which resulted in fewer bus drivers than expected the ultimate shut down of the City’s downtown bus operations.

  11. A risk evaluation for the fuel retrieval sub-project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, B.S.

    1996-10-11

    This study reviews the technical, schedule and budget baselines of the sub-project to assure all significant issues have been identified on the sub-project issues management list. The issue resolution dates are identified and resolution plans established. Those issues that could adversely impact procurement activities have been uniquely identified on the list and a risk assessment completed.

  12. Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; Lefranc, Maurice; Roy, Joyashree; Winkler, Harald; Spalding-Fecher, Randall

    2003-03-12

    Calculating greenhouse gas emissions reductions from climate change mitigation projects requires construction of a baseline that sets emissions levels that would have occurred without the project. This paper describes a standardized multiproject methodology for setting baselines, represented by the emissions rate (kg C/kWh), for electric power projects. A standardized methodology would reduce the transaction costs of projects. The most challenging aspect of setting multiproject emissions rates is determining the vintage and types of plants to include in the baseline and the stringency of the emissions rates to be considered, in order to balance the desire to encourage no- or low-carbon projects while maintaining environmental integrity. The criteria for selecting power plants to include in the baseline depend on characteristics of both the project and the electricity grid it serves. Two case studies illustrate the application of these concepts to the electric power grids in eastern India and South Africa. We use hypothetical, but realistic, climate change projects in each country to illustrate the use of the multiproject methodology, and note the further research required to fully understand the implications of the various choices in constructing and using these baselines.

  13. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

  14. Evaluation of two public housing projects : Baghdad and Mosul, Iraq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atto, Faida Noori Salim

    1984-01-01

    Stage nine of the design process of the projects deals with the design of the cluster, which is a basic social and administrative unit proposed for settlement. The cluster represents a unit of approximately 200 persons. A ...

  15. The use of process metrics to evaluate product development projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellam, Benjamin A. (Benjamin Alexander), 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Product development success is an important strategic factor in today's business environment. The ability to accurately predict the outcome of product development projects would be a useful strategic tool. This research ...

  16. Project Profile: Evaluating the Causes of Photovoltaics Cost Reduction: Why

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Develops Student-Stakeholders ProjectBaseload CSP Plants | Department

  17. Appendix J: Peer reviewer project/program evaluation form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This is a sample PEER Review Evaluation Form to be completed by reviewers after presentations and before leaving the review site.

  18. Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Hydraulic Hybrid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    custom cycles that best represent Miami-Dade's residential operation. NREL will use the Drive-Cycle Rapid Investigation, Visualization, and Evaluation (DRIVE) analysis tool to...

  19. Evaluation of the Impact of EISA Federal Project Investments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Wendel, Emily M.; Morris, Scott L.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Halverson, Mark A.; Livingston, Olga V.; Loper, Susan A.

    2012-12-31

    The DOE's Federal Energy Management Program has been charged by Office of Management and Budget to conduct an evaluation on actual and verifiable energy savings and carbon emissions reductions from federal energy management investments made across the Federal government as a result of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This study presents the findings from that evaluation.

  20. Performance Evaluation and Opportunity Assessment for St. Bernard Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, B.

    2011-06-01

    This report describes efforts by IBACOS, a Department of Energy Building America research team, in the St. Bernard Project, a nonprofit, community-based organization whose mission is to assist Hurricane Katrina survivors return to their homes in the New Orleans area. The report focuses on energy modeling results of two plans that the St. Bernard Project put forth as 'typical' building types and on quality issues that were observed during the field walk and Best Practice recommendations that could improve the energy efficiency and durability of the renovated homes.

  1. Performance Evaluation and Opportunity Assessment for St. Bernard Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickson, Bruce

    2011-06-01

    This report describes efforts by IBACOS, a Building America research team, in the St. Bernard Project, a nonprofit, community-based organization whose mission is to assist Hurricane Katrina survivors to return to their homes in the New Orleans area. The report focuses on energy modeling results of two plans that the St. Bernard Project put forth as 'typical' building types and on quality issues that were observed during the field walk and best practice recommendations that could improve the energy efficiency and durability of the renovated homes.

  2. 0-6487-P1 / 5-6235-01-P1 USER'S GUIDE FOR PET: PROJECT EVALUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    0-6487-P1 / 5-6235-01-P1 USER'S GUIDE FOR PET: PROJECT EVALUATION TOOLKIT Dr. Kara Kockelman Dan 5-6235: Implementation of Project Evaluation Toolkit for Abstracted Networks AUGUST 2012 Performing of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. #12;User's Guide for PET: Project Evaluation Toolkit

  3. Development of a rotary engine powered APU for a medium duty hybrid shuttle bus. Interim report July 1995--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBroom, S.T.

    1998-07-01

    Under contract to the TARDEC Petroleum and Water Business Area, sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, SwRI has procured and installed a rotary Auxiliary Power Unit on a medium-duty series hybrid electric bus. This report covers the specification and distillation of the APU and the lessons learned from those efforts.

  4. AVTA: Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Hybrid Shuttle Bus Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following report describes testing results of the Idaho National Laboratory's demonstration hybrid shuttle bus. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  5. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. 45670-2.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  6. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype...

  7. Rubric Development for Assessment of Undergraduate Research: Evaluating Multidisciplinary Team Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newell, James A.

    Rubric Development for Assessment of Undergraduate Research: Evaluating Multidisciplinary Team Projects James A. Newell, Heidi L. Newell and Kevin D. Dahm Department of Chemical Engineering Rowan courses involving multidisciplinary student teams working on semester-long or year-long research projects

  8. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  9. West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE.Projects atWe WantinOfficeWest

  10. Project IV Summary: The human capital intervention evaluations undertaken in Projects I through III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhongping

    , health-risk behavior. The current project would address the ultimate "so childhood are predictive of adult labor market outcomes and of avoiding serious adult crime as well as the role of health risk teen behaviors on adult

  11. An innovative dynamic bus lane system and its simulation-based performance investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Hong

    The strategy of exempting bus from other traffic through exclusive bus lanes (XBL) is prevalent. Rather than just deploying the XBL system, in this study, a new innovative dynamic bus lane (DBL) operation system which is ...

  12. Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winiarz, Christine Eve

    2007-01-01

    Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

  13. Orion Bus Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpen Energy InformationBus

  14. Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper with FormalCheck Annette Bunker properties of a VCI-compliant PCI 2.1 bus wrapper model in the formal verification tool, FormalCheck. Though a wrapper that takes VCI transactions as input and generate PCI 2.1 [Gro95] transactions as output, await

  15. Verifying a Virtual Component Interfacebased PCI Bus Wrapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface­based PCI Bus Wrapper with FormalCheck Annette Bunker properties of a VCI­compliant PCI 2.1 bus wrapper model in the formal verification tool, FormalCheck. Though a wrapper that takes VCI transactions as input and generate PCI 2.1 [Gro95] transactions as output, await

  16. Evaluating U.S. Army Corps of EngineersEvaluating U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water projects: aiding decisions with cost-water projects: aiding decisions with cost-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Evaluating U.S. Army Corps of EngineersEvaluating U.S. Army Corps of Engineers water projects: aiding decisions with cost-water projects: aiding decisions with cost- benefit analysisbenefit analysis into classanalysis, transitioned into class focused on this CRS projectfocused on this CRS project #12;Why Now

  17. Senior Design Evaluation Rubric: Technical Communication This develops the CIS Senior Design rubric criterion, "In the course of the senior design project, students will be evaluated on their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Senior Design Evaluation Rubric: Technical Communication This develops the CIS Senior Design rubric criterion, "In the course of the senior design project, students will be evaluated on their ability revision. · To evaluate the final project. · To measure departmental progress toward expected outcomes

  18. A Model for the Bus System in Cuernevaca (Mexico)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinho Baik; Alexei Borodin; Percy Deift; Toufic Suidan

    2005-10-19

    The bus transportation system in Cuernevaca, Mexico, has certain distinguished, innovative features and has been the subject of an intriguing, recent study by M. Krbalek and P. Seba. Krbalek and Seba analyzed the statistics of bus arrivals on Line 4 close to the city center. They studied, in particular, the bus spacing distribution and also the bus number variance measuring the fluctuations of the total number of buses arriving at a fixed location during a time interval T. Quite remarkably, it was found that these two statistics are well modeled by the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) of random matrix theory. Our goal in this paper is to provide a plausible explanation of these observations, and to this end we introduce a microscopic model for the bus line that leads simply and directly to GUE.

  19. Product-form solution techniques for the performance analysis of multiple-bus multiprocessor systems with nonuniform memory references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiola, G.; Marsan, M.A.; Balbo, G.

    1988-05-01

    Recursive relations are derived for the exact computation of the steady-state probability distribution of some queueing models with passive resources that can be used to analyze the performance of multiple-bus multiprocessor system architectures. The most general case that was shown to admit a product-form solution is described, and a recursive solution is obtained considering different processor access rates, different memory selection probabilities, and an FCFS bus scheduling policy. Several simpler cases allowing easier model solutions are also considered. Numerical evaluations of large computing systems with nonuniform memory references show the usefulness of the results.

  20. BurbankBus' clean fuel fleet now includes a zero-emission hydrogen-fueled bus. BurbankBus, which provides transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bus fixed-route fleet consists of 17 compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This fleet has been running on 100% CNG for about two years. The city's trash trucks are also run on CNG, and its light- duty vehicle

  1. Evaluating IPCC AR4 cool-season precipitation simulations and projections for impacts assessment over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Joellen

    Evaluating IPCC AR4 cool-season precipitation simulations and projections for impacts assessment to assess model bias and evaluate whether assumptions about the independence of model projections and error is currently being used in a variety of ways for regional impacts projection. However, more work is required

  2. Possible future projection of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) with the evaluation of model performance in Coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    Possible future projection of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) with the evaluation of model assessment of future projected rainfall will be important for policy framework. Evaluation of models performance in Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) P. Parth Sarthi , Soumik Ghosh, Praveen

  3. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

  4. The Indigenous Health Outcomes Patient Evaluation (IHOPE) project uses advanced statistical modelling techniques, and "real-world" whole-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    The Indigenous Health Outcomes Patient Evaluation (IHOPE) project uses advanced statistical students have worked on the project to date, with three of these now having been awarded their degrees. The IHOPE project is funded by a Project Grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council

  5. Performance and emissions of propane, natural gas, and methanol fuelled bus engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetz, W.A.; Petherick, D.; Topaloglu, T.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of six transit bus engines (three diesel, one propane (LPG), one natural gas for vehicles (NGV), and one methanol) has been performed. The purpose of the program was to assess the exhaust emissions and fuel consumption of current state-of-the-art large alternative fuel engines. Engine dynamometer test work was performed at the Ontario Research Foundation (ORF) which allowed a detailed comparison of several alternative-fuelled engines versus their diesel counterparts. Test data includes steady-state brake-specific fuel consumption maps, torque and horsepower curves. Transient performance, fuel consumption and emissions information came from computer-controlled engine dynamometer runs of the Advanced Design Bus (ADB) test cycle.

  6. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  7. Comparison of LNG, CNG, and diesel transit bus economics. Topical report, July 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powars, C.A.; Moyer, C.B.; Luscher, D.R.; Lowell, D.D.; Pera, C.J.

    1993-10-20

    The purpose of the report is to compare the expected costs of operating a transit bus fleet on liquefied natural gas (LNG), compressed natural gas (CNG), and diesel fuel. The special report is being published prior to the overall project final report in response to the current high level of interest in LNG transit buses. It focuses exclusively on the economics of LNG buses as compared with CNG and diesel buses. The reader is referred to the anticipated final report, or to a previously published 'White Paper' report (Reference 1), for information regarding LNG vehicle and refueling system technology and/or the economics of other LNG vehicles. The LNG/CNG/diesel transit bus economics comparison is based on total life-cycle costs considering all applicable capital and operating costs. The costs considered are those normally borne by the transit property, i.e., the entity facing the bus purchase decision. These costs account for the portion normally paid by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Transit property net costs also recognize the sale of emissions reduction credits generated by using natural gas (NG) engines which are certified to levels below standards (particularly for NOX).

  8. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The IRPhEP is patterned after its predecessor, the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions and other miscellaneous types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in an OECD NEA Handbook entitled, “International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.” The first edition of this Handbook, the 2006 Edition spans over 2000 pages and contains data from 16 different experimental series that were

  9. The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty

    2009-06-10

    The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

  10. Study on Evaluation of Project Management Data for Decommissioning of Uranium Refining and Conversion Plant - 12234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usui, Hideo; Izumo, Sari; Tachibana, Mitsuo; Shibahara, Yuji; Morimoto, Yasuyuki; Tokuyasu, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuo; Tanaka, Yoshio; Sugitsue, Noritake

    2012-07-01

    Some of nuclear facilities that would no longer be required have been decommissioned in JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). A lot of nuclear facilities have to be decommissioned in JAEA in near future. To implement decommissioning of nuclear facilities, it was important to make a rational decommissioning plan. Therefore, project management data evaluation system for dismantling activities (PRODIA code) has been developed, and will be useful for making a detailed decommissioning plan for an object facility. Dismantling of dry conversion facility in the uranium refining and conversion plant (URCP) at Ningyo-toge began in 2008. During dismantling activities, project management data such as manpower and amount of waste generation have been collected. Such collected project management data has been evaluated and used to establish a calculation formula to calculate manpower for dismantling equipment of chemical process and calculate manpower for using a green house (GH) which was a temporary structure for preventing the spread of contaminants during dismantling. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to dismantling of equipment, the relation of dismantling manpower to each piece of equipment was evaluated. Furthermore, the relation of dismantling manpower to each chemical process was evaluated. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. In the calculation formula to calculate project management data related to use of the GH, relations of GH installation manpower and removal manpower to GH footprint were evaluated. Furthermore, the calculation formula for secondary waste generation was established. In this study, project management data related to dismantling of equipment and use of the GH were evaluated and analyzed. The project management data, manpower for dismantling of equipment, manpower for installation and removal of GH, and secondary waste generation from GH were considered. Establishment of the calculation formula for dismantling of each kind of equipment makes it possible to evaluate manpower for dismantling the whole facility. However, it is not easy to prepare calculation formula for all kinds of equipment that exist in the facility. Therefore, a simpler evaluation method was considered to calculate manpower based on facility characteristics. The results showed promise for evaluating dismantling manpower with respect to each chemical process. For dismantling of contaminated equipment, a GH has been used for protection of the spread of contamination. The use of a GH increases manpower for installation and removal of GH etc. Moreover, structural materials of the GH such as plastic sheets, adhesive tape become a burnable secondary waste. To create an effective dismantling plan, it is necessary to carefully consider use of a GH preliminarily. Thus, an evaluation method of project management data such as manpower and secondary waste generation was considered. The results showed promise for evaluating project management data of GH by using established calculation formula. (authors)

  11. Project Plan for the evaluation of REDC waste for TRU-waste radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, L.; Yong, L.; Chapman, J.

    1996-09-01

    This project plan describes the plan to determine whether the solid radioactive wastes generated by the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) meet the Department of Energy`s definition of transuranic wastes. Existing waste characterization methods will be evaluated, as well as historical data, and recommendations will be made as necessary.

  12. Discrimination discovery in scientific project evaluation: A case study$ Andrea Romei, Salvatore Ruggieri and Franco Turini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruggieri, Salvatore

    Discrimination discovery in scientific project evaluation: A case study$ Andrea Romei, Salvatore, experimentation with real data. This paper contributes by presenting a case study on gender discrimination in a dataset of scientific research proposals, and by distilling from the case study a general discrimination

  13. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2001-08-14

    UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

  14. Work-in-Progress project report : CESTA-Machine Translation Evaluation Widad Mustafa El Hadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ville Montréal (Québec) - Canada, H3C 3J7 felipe@IRO.UMontreal. CA Antony Hartley University of Leeds Centre for Translation Studies Woodhouse Lane LEEDS LS2 9JT UK a.hartley@leeds.ac.uk Andrei Popescu Belis University CESTA, the first European Campaign dedicated to MT Evaluation, is a project labelled by the French

  15. Demonstration Project for Fuel Cell Bus Commercialisation in China | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta Electric PowerSupportEnergy

  16. Updatingga Tradition The NewYellowShuttleBus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    bus prototype with a natural gas powertrain. This prototype will have added amenities to support can be manufactured with several drivetrains, including, but not limited to, compressed natural gas, liquid natural gas, propane and bio-diesel. #12;

  17. Distributed shared memory multiprocessors using multistage bus networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Ravishankar

    1996-01-01

    Distributed shared memory (DSM) multiprocessors rely heavily on the interconnection network performance. The Multistage Bus Network (MBN) is analyzed in this thesis for a DSM environment. The MBN avoids some of the shortcomings of the conventional...

  18. Evaluation of the WIPP Project`s compliance with the EPA radiation protection standards for disposal of transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Rucker, D.F.; Silva, M.K.; Walker, B.A.; Channell, J.K.; Clemo, T.M.

    1998-03-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) proposed rule to certify that the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets compliance with the long-term radiation protection standards for geologic repositories (40CFR191 Subparts B and C), is one of the most significant milestones to date for the WIPP project in particular, and for the nuclear waste issue in general. The Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) has provided an independent technical oversight for the WIPP project since 1978, and is responsible for many improvements in the location, design, and testing of various aspects of the project, including participation in the development of the EPA standards since the early 1980s. The EEG reviewed the development of documentation for assessing the WIPP`s compliance by the Sandia National Laboratories following the 1985 promulgation by EPA, and provided many written and verbal comments on various aspects of this effort, culminating in the overall review of the 1992 performance assessment. For the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) compliance certification application (CCA), the EEG provided detailed comments on the draft CCA in March, 1996, and additional comments through unpublished letters in 1997 (included as Appendices 8.1 and 8.2 in this report). Since the October 30, 1997, publication of the EPA`s proposed rule to certify WIPP, the EEG gave presentations on important issues to the EPA on December 10, 1997, and sent a December 31, 1997 letter with attachments to clarify those issues (Appendix 8.3). The EEG has raised a number of questions that may have an impact on compliance. In spite of the best efforts by the EEG, the EPA reaction to reviews and suggestions has been slow and apparently driven by legal considerations. This report discusses in detail the questions that have been raised about containment requirements. Also discussed are assurance requirements, groundwater protection, individual protection, and an evaluation of EPA`s responses to EEG`s comments.

  19. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

  20. Using Causal Mapping Methods to Identify and Analyse Risk in Information System Projects as a Post-Evaluation Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winstanley, Graham

    system risk areas in future projects. Key word: Causal Mapping, Post-evaluation, Lessons Learned definition of risk management is "the identification of the hazards and possible problems, the evaluation1 Using Causal Mapping Methods to Identify and Analyse Risk in Information System Projects

  1. AC 2010-903: EVALUATION OF A STUDENT TEAM PROJECT IN AN INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE ENGINEERING COURSE FOR AEROSPACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AC 2010-903: EVALUATION OF A STUDENT TEAM PROJECT IN AN INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE ENGINEERING COURSE, cognitive architecture, unmanned ground vehicles, robotics, and software engineering Lyle Long, Pennsylvania Education, 2010 #12;Evaluation of a Team Project in an Introduction to Software Engineering Course

  2. FSRM 588: FINANCIAL DATA MINING 16:958:588:01 FALL 2013, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 208 BUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    FSRM 588: FINANCIAL DATA MINING 16:958:588:01 FALL 2013, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 208 BUS 1. Course Information · Instructor: Han Xiao · Office: Hill Center 451 · Office Hours: Monday 3:00-4:30 pm and boosting Milestone 15 Dec 10 Text Mining HW6 16 Dec 17 Project presentation 16 Dec 20 Final Writeup 1 #12;

  3. 1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

  4. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  5. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  6. Evaluation of S2 for correlated wave functions and spin projection of unrestricted Mbller-Plesset perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Evaluation of S2 for correlated wave functions and spin projection of unrestricted Mbller to evaluate S2 for unrestricted MQller-Plesset perturbation theory (UMPn), coupled clusters (UCCSD), quadratic configuration interaction (UQCISD), and Brueckner doubles (UBD) methods, and to evaluate UMP3 and UMP4 energies

  7. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

    2005-12-15

    The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

  8. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2006-12-20

    This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

  9. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

  10. Evaluation of Bus and Truck Automation Operations Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, H. S. Jacob; Zhang, Lan; Lin, Lin; Batni, Deepa

    2004-01-01

    increments. The Promodel simulation model is used as a toolAn Event-Based Simulation Tool – ProModel Promodel Versioncan be defined with the Promodel Simulation Language, where:

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation for California Transit Agencies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPowerScenario AnalysisFuel Cell Basics

  12. Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation Results (Presentation) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDan O"HaganTalley,Surrogate NormalStack

  13. Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »Tankless WaterEnergyJanuary28-982This form is

  14. Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »Tankless WaterEnergyJanuary28-982This form isValidation:

  15. VTA Prototype Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Interim Results (Presentation) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs Search USAJobs SearchWater-SavingofCode |Department of Energy VTA

  16. RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe Heat LetterPresidentEnergy

  17. Glass Ceramic Dielectrics for DC Bus Capacitors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  19. Project identification and evaluation techniques for transportation infrastructure : assessing their role in metropolitan areas of developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vimal, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Project identification and evaluation of transportation infrastructure play a vital role in shaping and sustaining the forms of cities all over the world. These cities differ substantially in character and urban form and ...

  20. Verifying the Performance of the PCI Local Bus using Symbolic Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying the Performance of the PCI Local Bus using Symbolic Techniques S. Campos E. Clarke W. To demonstrate how our method works, we have modelled the PCI local bus and analyzed its temporal behavior, PCI Local Bus #12; 1 Introduction Model checking is a technique for verifying finite­state hardware

  1. Optical bus waveguide metallic hard mold fabrication with opposite 45 micro-mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    Optical bus waveguide metallic hard mold fabrication with opposite 45º micro-mirrors Xinyuan Doua In this paper, 3-to-3 metallic hard mold for optical bus waveguide with opposite 45º micro-mirrors was successfully fabricated using electroplating method. The optical bus waveguide pre-mold with 45º surfaces

  2. New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on the evaluation of compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel hybrid electric bus propulsion systems in New York City Transit's transit buses.

  3. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance for Geothermal Resource Evaluation Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood; Joel Renner

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report on the evaluation of geothermal resource potential on and around three different United States (U. S.) Air Force Bases (AFBs): Nellis AFB and Air Force Range (AFR) in the State of Nevada (see maps 1 and 5), Holloman AFB in the State of New Mexico (see map 2), and Mountain Home AFB in the State of Idaho (see map 3). All three sites are located in semi-arid parts of the western U. S. The U. S. Air Force, through its Air Combat Command (ACC) located at Langley AFB in the State of Virginia, asked the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) for technical assistance to conduct technical and feasibility evaluations for the potential to identify viable geothermal resources on or around three different AFBs. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is supporting FEMP in providing technical assistance to a number of different Federal Agencies. For this report, the three different AFBs are considered one project because they all deal with potential geothermal resource evaluations. The three AFBs will be evaluated primarily for their opportunity to develop a geothermal resource of high enough quality grade (i.e., temperature, productivity, depth, etc.) to consider the possibility for generation of electricity through a power plant. Secondarily, if the resource for the three AFBs is found to be not sufficient enough for electricity generation, then they will be described in enough detail to allow the base energy managers to evaluate if the resource is suitable for direct heating or cooling. Site visits and meetings by INL personnel with the staff at each AFB were held in late FY-2009 and FY-2010. This report provides a technical evaluation of the opportunities and challenges for developing geothermal resources on and around the AFBs. An extensive amount of literature and geographic information was evaluated as a part of this assessment. Resource potential maps were developed for each of the AFBs.

  4. Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulton, J.C.

    1994-10-01

    Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

  5. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Relining Lateral A – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson Michael C. Popp Texas Water Resources Institute... Texas A&M University TR-221 May 2003 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – Relining Lateral A – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John...

  6. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson Michael C. Popp Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A... and the public. This is anticipated to occur sometime in late 2003 or early 2004. TR-246 October 2003 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final M...

  7. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

  8. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

  9. Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Irick, David Kim; Kenney, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

  10. Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2006-01-26

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

  11. A Member of The Texas A&M University System Reducing School Bus Stop-Arm Violations in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Member of The Texas A&M University System Reducing School Bus Stop-Arm Violations in Texas Video Technology in Identifying School Bus Stop-Arm Violations #12;REDUCING SCHOOL BUS STOP-ARM in Identifying School Bus Stop-Arm Violations By Patricia A. Turner Associate Research Scientist Texas

  12. Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

    2008-11-19

    The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

  13. Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter - 12167

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Jim; Kurasch, David; Sullivan, Dan; Crandall, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the vitrification melter used in the West Valley Demonstration Project can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW) after completion of a waste-incidental-to-reprocessing evaluation performed in accordance with the evaluation process of DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. The vitrification melter - which consists of a ceramic lined, electrically heated box structure - was operated for more than 5 years melting and fusing high-level waste (HLW) slurry and glass formers and pouring the molten glass into 275 stainless steel canisters. Prior to shutdown, the melter was decontaminated by processing low-activity decontamination flush solutions and by extracting molten glass from the melter cavity. Because it could not be completely emptied, residual radioactivity conservatively estimated at approximately 170 TBq (4,600 Ci) remained in the vitrification melter. To establish whether the melter was incidental to reprocessing, DOE prepared an evaluation to demonstrate that the vitrification melter: (1) had been processed to remove key radionuclides to the maximum extent technically and economically practical; (2) would be managed to meet safety requirements comparable to the performance objectives for LLW established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and (3) would be managed by DOE in accordance with DOE's requirements for LLW after it had been incorporated in a solid physical form with radionuclide concentrations that do not exceed the NRC concentration limits for Class C LLW. DOE consulted with the NRC on the draft evaluation and gave other stakeholders an opportunity to submit comments before the determination was made. The NRC submitted a request for additional information in connection with staff review of the draft evaluation; DOE provided the additional information and made improvements to the evaluation, which was issued in January 2012. DOE considered the NRC Technical Evaluation Report as well as comments received from other stakeholders prior to making its determination that the vitrification melter is not HLW, does not require permanent isolation in a geologic repository, and can be disposed of as LLW. (authors)

  14. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  15. Discharging a DC bus capacitor of an electrical converter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kajouke, Lateef A; Perisic, Milun; Ransom, Ray M

    2014-10-14

    A system and method of discharging a bus capacitor of a bidirectional matrix converter of a vehicle are presented here. The method begins by electrically shorting the AC interface of the converter after an AC energy source is disconnected from the AC interface. The method continues by arranging a plurality of switching elements of a second energy conversion module into a discharge configuration to establish an electrical current path from a first terminal of an isolation module, through an inductive element, and to a second terminal of the isolation module. The method also modulates a plurality of switching elements of a first energy conversion module, while maintaining the discharge configuration of the second energy conversion module, to at least partially discharge a DC bus capacitor.

  16. Field evaluation of recycled plastic lumber (RPL) pallets. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Miele, C.R.; Francini, R.B.; Yuracko, K.; Yerace, P.

    1997-10-01

    One significant component of the waste stream, discarded plastic products and packaging, continues to be a growing portion of the municipal solid waste (MSW). There has been considerable work done in characterizing the quantity and types of plastics in different waste streams, collection methods, separation, sorting as well as technologies for processing post-consumer mixed plastics. The focus in recent years has been the development of markets for recycled plastic products, which constitutes the second half of the material flow diagram cycle shown in Figure 1. One key product that holds significant promise for plastics recycling to be both technically feasible and economically viable is Recycled Plastic Lumber (RPL). The contents of this report forms the second phase of a two-phase pilot project on developing specifications and standards for a product fabricated from RPL. Such standards and specifications are needed to prepare procurement guidelines for state and federal agencies interested in purchasing products made from recycled materials. The first phase focused on establishing a procedure to evaluate RPL product,s such as pallets, in a laboratory setting while this phase focuses on field evaluation of RPL pallets in service. This effort is critical in the development of new markets for RPL products. A brief summary of the findings from Phase 1 of this effort is presented next.

  17. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE`s predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  18. Evaluation of surface water treatment and discharge options for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; MacDonell, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under its Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program, is responsible for conducting response actions at the Weldon Spring site in St. Charles County, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits and two small ponds, and (2) a 3.6-ha (9-acre) quarry located about 6.4 km (4 mi) southwest of the chemical plant area. Both of these areas became chemically and radioactively contaminated as a result of processing and disposal activities that took place from the 1940s through 1960s. The Weldon Spring site, located about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis, is listed on the National Priorities List of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Nitroaromatic explosives were processed by the Army at the chemical plant area during the 1940s, and radioactive materials were processed by DOE's predecessor agency (the Atomic Energy Commission) during the 1950s and 1960s. Overall remediation of the Weldon Spring site is being addressed through the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project, and it consists of several components. One component is the management of radioactively and chemically contaminated surface water impoundments at the chemical plant area -- i.e., the four raffinate pits, Frog Pond, and Ash Pond which was addressed under a separate action and documented in an engineering evaluation/cost analysis report. This report discusses the evaluation of surface water treatment at the Weldon Spring site.

  19. Sustainable biomass products development and evaluation, Hamakua project. Final draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The PICHTR Sustainable Biomass Energy Program was developed to evaluate the potential to cultivate crops for energy production as an alternative use of lands made available by the closing of large sugar plantations. In particular, the closing of the Hamakua Sugar Company on the island of Hawaii brought a great deal of attention to the future of agriculture in this region and in the state. Many options were proposed. Several promising alternatives had been proposed for cane lands. These included dedicated feedstock supply systems (DFSS) for electrical energy production, cultivation of sugarcane to produce ethanol and related by-products, and the production of feed and crops to support animal agriculture. Implementation of some of the options might require preservation of large tracts of land and maintenance of the sugar mills and sugar infrastructure. An analysis of the technical, financial, and other issues necessary to reach conclusions regarding the optimal use of these lands was required. At the request of the Office of State Planning and Senator Akaka`s office, the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) established and coordinated a working group composed of state, county, federal, and private sector representatives to identify sustainable energy options for the use of idle sugar lands on the island of Hawaii. The Sustainable Biomass Energy Program`s Hamakua Project was established to complete a comprehensive evaluation of the most viable alternatives and assess the options to grow crops as a source of raw materials for the production of transportation fuel and/or electricity on the island of Hawaii. The motivation for evaluating biomass to energy conversion embraced the considerations that Hawaii`s energy security would be improved by diversifying the fuels used for transportation and reducing dependency on imported fossil fuels. The use of waste products as feedstocks could divert wastes from landfills.

  20. Project Managers Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    consider the welfare of society as a whole. Background In 1986, the Evaluation Network (ENet) and the Evaluation Research Society (ERS) merged to create the American Evaluation...

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

  2. Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2005-09-29

    Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural response of these blades. The trends were used to identify geometries and rotor configurations that showed the greatest promise for achieving beneficial aeroelastic response. The ADAMS code was used to perform complete aeroelastic simulations of selected rotor configurations; however, the results of these simulations were not satisfactory. This report documents the challenges encountered with the ADAMS simulations and presents recommendations for further development of this concept for aeroelastically tailored small wind turbine blades.

  3. Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-06-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

  4. Evaluation of Possible Surrogates for Validation of the Oxidation Furnace for the Plutonium Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, A.

    2007-12-31

    The Plutonium Disposition project (PuD) is considering an alternative furnace design for direct metal oxidation (DMO) of plutonium metal to use as a feed for potential disposition routes. The proposed design will use a retort to oxidize the feed at temperatures up to 500 C. The atmosphere will be controlled using a metered mixture of oxygen, helium and argon to control the oxidation at approximately 400 torr. Since plutonium melts at 664 C, and may potentially react with retort material to form a lower melting point eutectic, the oxidation process will be controlled by metering the flow of oxygen to ensure that the bulk temperature of the material does not exceed this temperature. A batch processing time of <24 hours is desirable to meet anticipated furnace throughput requirements. The design project includes demonstration of concept in a small-scale demonstration test (i.e., small scale) and validation of design in a full-scale test. These tests are recommended to be performed using Pu surrogates due to challenges in consideration of the nature of plutonium and operational constraints required when handling large quantities of accountable material. The potential for spreading contamination and exposing workers to harmful levels of cumulative radioactive dose are motivation to utilize non-radioactive surrogates. Once the design is demonstrated and optimized, implementation would take place in a facility designed to accommodate these constraints. Until then, the use of surrogates would be a safer, less expensive option for the validation phase of the project. This report examines the potential for use of surrogates in the demonstration and validation of the DMO furnace for PuD. This report provides a compilation of the technical information and process requirements for the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide by burning in dry environments. Several potential surrogates were evaluated by various criteria in order to select a suitable candidate for large scale demonstration. First, the structure of the plutonium metal/oxide interface was compared to potential surrogates. Second the data for plutonium oxidation kinetics were reviewed and rates for oxidation were compared with surrogates. The criteria used as a basis for recommendation was selected in order to provide a reasonable oxidation rate during the validation phase. Several reference documents were reviewed and used to compile the information in this report. Since oxidation of large monolithic pieces of plutonium in 75% oxygen is the preferable oxidizing atmosphere for the intended process, this report does not focus on the oxidation of powders, but focuses instead on larger samples in flowing gas.

  5. The ADVANCE project: Formal evaluation of the targeted deployment. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation ConcEpt (ADVANCE) was an invehicle advanced traveler information system (ATIS) that operated in the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. It was designed to provide origin-destination shortest-time route guidance to a vehicle based on (a) an on-board static (fixed) data base of average network link travel times by time of day, combined as available and appropriate with (b) dynamic (real-time) information on traffic conditions provided by radio frequency (RF) communications to and from a traffic information center (TIC). Originally conceived in 1990 as a major project that would have installed 3,000 to 5,000 route guidance units in privately owned vehicles throughout the test area, ADVANCE was restructured in 1995 as a {open_quotes}targeted deployment,{close_quotes} in which approximately 80 vehicles were to be equipped with the guidance units - Mobile Navigation Assistants (MNAs) - to be in full communication with the TIC while driving the ADVANCE test area road system. Volume one consists of the evaluation managers overview report, and several appendices containing test results.

  6. Evaluation of measurement reproducibility using the standard-sites data, 1994 Fernald field characterization demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautman, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    The US Department of Energy conducted the 1994 Fernald (Ohio) field characterization demonstration project to evaluate the performance of a group of both industry-standard and proposed alternative technologies in describing the nature and extent of uranium contamination in surficial soils. Detector stability and measurement reproducibility under actual operating conditions encountered in the field is critical to establishing the credibility of the proposed alternative characterization methods. Comparability of measured uranium activities to those reported by conventional, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-certified laboratory methods is also required. The eleven (11) technologies demonstrated included (1) EPA-standard soil sampling and laboratory mass-spectroscopy analyses, and currently-accepted field-screening techniques using (2) sodium-iodide scintillometers, (3) FIDLER low-energy scintillometers, and (4) a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Proposed advanced characterization techniques included (5) alpha-track detectors, (6) a high-energy beta scintillometer, (7) electret ionization chambers, (8) and (9) a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer in two different configurations, (10) a field-adapted laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) technique, and (11) a long-range alpha detector. Measurement reproducibility and the accuracy of each method were tested by acquiring numerous replicate measurements of total uranium activity at each of two ``standard sites`` located within the main field demonstration area. Meteorological variables including temperature, relative humidity. and 24-hour rainfall quantities were also recorded in conjunction with the standard-sites measurements.

  7. Doing It: A Process to Screen, Design, Implement, and Evaluate Industrial Eco-Efficiency Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, J.; Robertson, C.; Klein, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    implementers as they plan and manage Eco-Efficiency projects can address some of these barriers. This paper elaborates on a process designed by the authors, and discusses examples of its application to a variety of projects....

  8. Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio: EnergyGlenwillow,Iowa:Bus Rapid

  9. Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment ofEnergyJoe Olencz About Us JoeFuel Cell Bus Workshop

  10. NREL Energy DataBus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE Baterias Industriais JumpNREL Energy DataBus

  11. NREL Energy DataBus/Contact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE Baterias Industriais JumpNREL Energy DataBusNREL

  12. Bus passenger origin-destination estimation and travel behavior using automated data collection systems in London, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This research explores the application of archived data from Automatic Data Collection Systems (ADCS) to transportation planning with a focus on bus passenger Origin-Destination (OD) inferences at the bus-route level and ...

  13. Running time variability and resource allocation : a data-driven analysis of high-frequency bus operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez-Martínez, Gabriel Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Running time variability is one of the most important factors determining service quality and operating cost of high-frequency bus transit. This research aims to improve performance analysis tools currently used in the bus ...

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Monitoring and Evaluation of the University of British Columbia Food System Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a project/report". #12;UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Monitoring was developed to monitor and evaluate the UBCFSP, as well as direct future projects. A focus group was held involving the UBCFSP partners in order to develop a series of priority actions for the project. Through

  15. Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

    2011-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

  16. Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 MGT 6359: BUSINESS STRATEGIES FOR SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 1/11 MGT 6359: BUSINESS STRATEGIES FOR SUSTAINABILITY Professor and management tools Corporate environmental programs Sustainable development Environmental marketing and capitalizing on these opportunities. #12;Bus Str Sustainability Spring 2011 2/11 Course Outline The course

  17. Bus Fleet Type and Age Replacement Optimization: A case study utilizing King County Metro fleet data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    and fuel economy. Fuel price, emissions costs, and initial bus age have little impact on optimal replacement policies. However, discount rate and diesel bus price, annual utilization (in 0% FTA subsidy scenario) and fuel price (in 80% FTA subsidy scenario) have the highest impacts on per-mile costs. #12;2 1

  18. Aalborg Universitet Distributed Bus Signaling Control for a DC Charging Station with Multi Paralleled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    been reported in order to verify the validity of proposed approach. Keywords--EV charging; flywheelAalborg Universitet Distributed Bus Signaling Control for a DC Charging Station with Multi., & Savaghebi, M. (2015). Distributed Bus Signaling Control for a DC Charging Station with Multi Paralleled

  19. Round-like behavior in multiple disks on a bus Phillip B. Gibbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Phillip B.

    disks, poten- tidly resulting in an aggregate I/O throughput at nearly bus bandwidth. This paper reports on each bus. Previous work related to disk I/O performance and mod- eling (e.g., [RW94, Wil95, HP96, Shr97

  20. FPGA-BASED 3D GRAPHICS PROCESSOR WITH PCI-BUS INTERFACE, AN IMPLEMENTATION CASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FPGA-BASED 3D GRAPHICS PROCESSOR WITH PCI-BUS INTERFACE, AN IMPLEMENTATION CASE STUDY Hans Holten of a 3D graphics processor. Practical design issues dealing with a PCI-bus based reconfigurable FPGA prototyping board are discussed. PCI drivers and bandwidth issues are discussed. An analog VGA video output

  1. NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

  2. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  3. A Cost Benefit Analysis of a V2G-Capable Electric School Bus Compared to a Traditional Diesel School Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Average Electricity Carbon Emission Rate 1.18 lbs/kWh Cdr Diesel Carbon Emission Rate 22.2 lbs/kWh D Miles $0.106/kWh PR Regulation Price for V2G Revenue $28/MWh R Range of Battery 100 miles rd Discount Rate of Replacement Battery $300/kWh CD Seating Capacity of Diesel Bus 32 CE Seating Capacity of Electric Bus 24 Cer

  4. Overview of the use of the PCI bus in present and future high energy physics data acquisition systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Praag, A; Matheys, J P; Van de Vyvre, P; Anguelov, T; Georgiev, G; Piperov, S; Vankov, I; Gillot, D; Guglielmi, A M; Orel, O; Sytin, A N

    1995-01-01

    Overview of the use of the PCI bus in present and future high energy physics data acquisition systems

  5. TECHNICAL EVALUATIONS AND ANALYSIS OF CURRENTLY FUNDED PROJECTS AND DATABASE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -visit based evaluations performed by Energetics during the time period May 2001 ­ April 2002. These site evaluations performed under contract to the DOE Hydrogen Program over the past six years. The results-visit Evaluations, Analyses, and Databases. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review NREL/CP-610

  6. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  7. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

  8. Evaluating reservoir production strategies in miscible and immiscible gas-injection projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, Iman

    2004-11-15

    Miscible gas injection processes could be among the most widely used enhanced oil recovery processes. Successful design and implementation of a miscible gas injection project depends upon the accurate determination of the minimum miscibility...

  9. The application of simulation to project evaluation for real estate developers in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Yongchun

    2006-01-01

    For developers in China to calculate project financial returns in order to make investment decisions, the traditional Excel model only gives "point estimate" (i.e. a single value) for each input variable, and therefore the ...

  10. Development of the Cummins L10 engine to operate on natural gas for heavy duty transit bus applications. Final report, August 1988-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welliver, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This report covers all of the activities of a program undertaken to develop a natural gas fueled engine using the Cummins L10 diesel engine as the base engine. The base diesel engine is a 10 liter turbocharged jacket water aftercooled carcass that develops 270 hp at 2100 rpm. The design goals included developing a natural gas version at 240 hp with 750 lb-ft of peak torque with exhaust emission level demonstration meeting the 1991 EPA Urban Bus Emission Mandate. Additional goals included demonstrating diesel like vehicle performance and diesel like reliability and durability. Two fuel delivery systems were evaluated, one mechanical and the other electronic closed loop. Field and laboratory test engines were utilized to document reliability. Results of this program led to the production release of the gas engine for transit bus applications and California Air Resources Board certification during 1992.

  11. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects. A Review and Empirical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-04-01

    "Community wind" refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an "absentee" project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

  12. Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project: Tractive Energy Analysis Methodology and Results from Long-Haul Truck Drive Cycle Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaClair, Tim J

    2011-05-01

    This report addresses the approach that will be used in the Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) project to evaluate the fuel savings potential of various truck efficiency technologies. The methods and equations used for performing the tractive energy evaluations are presented and the calculation approach is described. Several representative results for individual duty cycle segments are presented to demonstrate the approach and the significance of this analysis for the project. The report is divided into four sections, including an initial brief overview of the LSDC project and its current status. In the second section of the report, the concepts that form the basis of the analysis are presented through a discussion of basic principles pertaining to tractive energy and the role of tractive energy in relation to other losses on the vehicle. In the third section, the approach used for the analysis is formalized and the equations used in the analysis are presented. In the fourth section, results from the analysis for a set of individual duty cycle measurements are presented and different types of drive cycles are discussed relative to the fuel savings potential that specific technologies could bring if these drive cycles were representative of the use of a given vehicle or trucking application. Additionally, the calculation of vehicle mass from measured torque and speed data is presented and the accuracy of the approach is demonstrated.

  13. CONSULTING FIELD PROJECTS -MARKETING Summer 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    1 CONSULTING FIELD PROJECTS - MARKETING BUS 195(a) Summer 2015 Weekly team meetings: Monday problems, assessing client marketing challenges and opportunities and generally adding value to the client's marketing operations. The course culminates in a final client presentation before the semester ends

  14. Project Update Report May 21, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Project Update Report May 21, 2010 Chengrui Cai Integrated Retail and Wholesale Power System. Climate Module 4. Metronome example 5. Case study: IEEE 14 Bus transmission power flow 6. Work plan and other types of files #12;Structure of GridLab-D Core CBLAS Climate data market Transmission

  15. Evaluation of biological treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater with pac addition. Project summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1988-07-01

    The purposes of the study were to: (1) attempt to find the cause of the formation of the viscous floating mass of mixed liquor solids (VFMLS), (2) generate additional research data for total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal from pharmaceutical wastewater using the PACT process, (3) evaluate the efficiency of PACT in removing specific organics, (4) evaluate the effectiveness of PACT in reducing effluent aquatic toxicity, and (5) evaluate the use of a selector to improve the settling characteristics of the mixed liquor. One control unit, two PACT units, and a unit equipped with a series of selector basins were operated.

  16. An Approach to Evaluating Requirements Engineering Methods for Applicability to Time-to-Market Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberlein, Armin

    is required to modify the product to meet the new requirements, thus increasing the cost and delaying this conclusion is that the easier it is to achieve one or more of the three schedule-reduction objectives the reduction of schedule time not just within the RE stage of a project, but over the entire product life cycle

  17. Evaluation results for an energy-efficient office new construction project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, G.; Brohard, G.; Kolderup, E.

    1998-07-01

    As part of an energy efficiency research and development project, a major northern California utility in conjunction with the California State Automobile Association (CSAA) designed, built and analyzed the most energy efficient office building in California. The 1,419 m{sup 2} building is located in Antioch, California and has been occupied since June 1994. Before the utility invited CSAA to participate in the research project, the district office was to be built as specified by CSAA's corporate construction guidelines, which would have minimally satisfied California's Title-24 energy standards. However, by applying an integrated design concept, the design team reduced the building's projected energy consumption by 70% at a cost competitive with electric and gas utility supply costs. The savings are achieved with variable-aperture daylighting; dual-fan, dual-duct HVAC; high performance glazing; energy efficient computers; and several other measures. Based upon the data collected from the end-use metering system installed by the utility, the actual energy savings are about 64%, closely matching the DOE-2 modeled energy savings projections.

  18. Application of analytic hierarchy process in upstream risk assessment and project evaluations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mota-Sanchez, Freddy

    2009-06-02

    making, specifically when several parameters or variables—mostly uncertainties or risk variables—are being considered for different investment options. This method has been used in a large number of applications in several research areas where evaluation...

  19. Project Startup: Evaluating the Performance of Frito Lay's Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is evaluating the in-service performance of 10 medium-duty Smith Newton electric vehicles (EVs) and 10 comparable conventional diesel vehicles operated by Frito Lay North America in the Seattle, Washington, area. Launched in late 2013, the on-road portion of this 12-month evaluation focuses on collecting and analyzing vehicle performance data, such as fuel economy and maintenance costs, to better understand how to optimize the use of such vehicles in a large-scale commercial operation. In addition to the on-road portion of this evaluation, NREL is analyzing charging data to support total cost of ownership estimations and investigations into smart charging opportunities. NREL is also performing a battery life degradation analysis to quantify battery pack health, track battery performance over time, and determine how various drive cycles and battery charging protocols impact battery life.

  20. Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

    2006-10-30

    This study presents an analysis of several recently published methods for quantifying the uncertainty in economic evaluations due to uncertainty in future oil prices. Conventional price forecasting methods used in the industry typically...

  1. Creating a practical model using real options to evaluate large-scale real estate development projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hengels, Adam (Adam P.)

    2005-01-01

    Real Options analysis has only begun to be recognized as way to evaluate real estate and is considered "beyond the cutting edge" of financial analysis. Several academic papers have looked at ways that real estate can be ...

  2. The necessities for building a model to evaluate Business Intelligence projects- Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrokhi, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    In recent years Business Intelligence (BI) systems have consistently been rated as one of the highest priorities of Information Systems (IS) and business leaders. BI allows firms to apply information for supporting their processes and decisions by combining its capabilities in both of organizational and technical issues. Many of companies are being spent a significant portion of its IT budgets on business intelligence and related technology. Evaluation of BI readiness is vital because it serves two important goals. First, it shows gaps areas where company is not ready to proceed with its BI efforts. By identifying BI readiness gaps, we can avoid wasting time and resources. Second, the evaluation guides us what we need to close the gaps and implement BI with a high probability of success. This paper proposes to present an overview of BI and necessities for evaluation of readiness. Key words: Business intelligence, Evaluation, Success, Readiness

  3. SSAASSSAP and SSASMP profiles were projected over a 1 cm vertical grid and difference between them was evaluated in terms of RMSD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SSAASSSAP and SSASMP profiles were projected over a 1 cm vertical grid and difference between them was evaluated in terms of RMSD: Minimizing SSA makes it possible to obtain new values for parameters relating

  4. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    stream_source_info tr230.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 442152 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name tr230.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 TR-230 July 2003 Economic and Conservation... Institute Texas A&M University TR-230 July 2003 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell...

  5. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson Michael C. Popp Texas Water... stakeholders and the public. This is anticipated to occur sometime in mid 2004. TR-248 January 2004 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main...

  6. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson Michael C. Popp Texas Water... Resources Institute Texas A&M University TR-220 May 2003 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) – 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal – Preliminary M. Edward Rister Ronald...

  7. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson Michael C. Popp Texas Water Resources... April 2004 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Maverick County Water Control and Improvement District No. 1 (Eagle Pass) – Lining Main Canal – Final M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C...

  8. Simulating service reliability of a high frequency bus route using automatically collected data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milkovits, Martin Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    High frequency bus routes are subject to a variety of influences that can affect the quality of service provided to passengers. Since they have short headways and high passenger demand interaction between buses can easily ...

  9. Round-like behavior in multiple disks on a bus Rakesh Barve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matias, Yossi

    . This paper reports on a performance impair- ment that results from a previously unknown form of con- voy.g., RW94, Wil95, HP96, Shr97]) has focused on the disk drive, downplaying the importance of bus con

  10. TCAT to Receive Ithaca's First 'Cutting-Edge' Fuel Cell Bus ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TCAT to Receive Ithaca's First 'Cutting-Edge' Fuel Cell Bus September 6th, 2013 By Kerry Close Within two years, TCAT riders may be able to make their commute on a "clean,...

  11. Leveraging infrastructure : sustainable bus rapid transit route planning in Beirut, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabti, Jumana M., 1976-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis applies the concepts of urban design, public transportation planning, economic development, and sustainability, to the routing and site plan of a two-kilometer bus rapid transit (BRT) line segment into downtown ...

  12. Evaluation of the potential for fish passage through the N Reactor and the Hanford generating project discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The potential for juvenile downstream-migrating salmonids to encounter both the Hanford Generating Project (HGP) and N Reactor discharges was evaluated. Three general scenarios were assessed for fish exposure: (1) HGP plume centerline passage followed by N Reator plum centerline passage, (2) HGP plume centerline passage including intersection with the N Reactor plume, and (3) noncenterline plume passage through the edge of first the HGP and then the N Reactor plume. It is highly unlikely that a fish would pass through both plume centerlines because of the location of the two discharges and because of river-mixing characteristics near the discharges. For the set of conditions that we evaluated, exposure to elevated temperatures would be of insufficient duration to result in mortalities to fish that might encounter both the HGP and N Reactor plumes.

  13. Using a Monte-Carlo-based approach to evaluate the uncertainty on fringe projection technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molimard, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    A complete uncertainty analysis on a given fringe projection set-up has been performed using Monte-Carlo approach. In particular the calibration procedure is taken into account. Two applications are given: at a macroscopic scale, phase noise is predominant whilst at microscopic scale, both phase noise and calibration errors are important. Finally, uncertainty found at macroscopic scale is close to some experimental tests (~100 {\\mu}m).

  14. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1Activity Hydrogenthe U.S.

  15. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1Activity Hydrogenthe U.S.the U.S.

  16. Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2010-12-01

    Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

  17. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex Facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning Evaluation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has evaluated alternatives for demolishing the buildings at the Portsmouth Site. Two remedial alternatives were developed for consideration. This Proposed Plan describes the required no-action alternative (Alternative 1) and a D&D alternative (Alternative 2). The preferred alternative is Alternative 2, controlled demolition of the process buildings and complex facilities.

  18. Response to ISRP comments about Project 35018: Evaluate recreational and commercial mark-selective fisheries.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, WDFW. To better coordinate the evaluation of selective fishing gears and techniques between the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, we have combined in case fish tagged at the dam migrate back down the river. Comment: Reconcile the definitions for soak

  19. The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echohawk, John Chris; Dorries, Alison M; Eberhart, Craig F; Werdel, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

  20. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  1. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5 < MHKKembla < MHK Projects2 <Messina

  2. Annex III-evaluation of past and ongoing enhanced oil recovery projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The Infill Drilling Predictive Model (IDPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp (SSI) for the Bartlesville Project Office (BPO) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The model and certain adaptations thereof were used in conjunction with other models to support the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission`s (IOGCC) 1993 state-by-state assessment of the potential domestic reserves achievable through the application of Advanced Secondary Recovery (ASR) and Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques. Funding for this study was provided by the DOE/BPO, which additionally provided technical support. The IDPM is a three-dimensional (stratified, five-spot), two-phase (oil and water) model which uses a minimal amount of reservoir and geologic data to generate production and recovery forecasts for ongoing waterflood and infill drilling projects. The model computes water-oil displacement and oil recovery using finite difference solutions within streamtubes. It calculates the streamtube geometries and uses a two-dimensional reservoir simulation to track fluid movement in each streamtube slice. Thus the model represents a hybrid of streamtube and numerical simulators.

  3. Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, A K

    1983-09-01

    This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

  4. Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Bergin

    2005-10-14

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

  5. Development and test case application of a waste minimization project evaluation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjeldgaard, E.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Saloio, J.H.; Varnado, G.B. (ERC Environmental and Energy Services Co., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The authors have developed and applied a methodology to evaluate and prioritize proposed waste minimization activities affecting Department of Energy (DOE) programs. The approach provides a systematic and defensible method for selecting a set of waste minimization proposals that maximizes the benefits to DOE while maintaining costs within a specified budget. The report discusses the development of a structured set of evaluation criteria to characterize waste minimization issues; techniques for documenting the anticipated and potential costs, risks, and benefits of waste minimization proposals; and a method of translating disparate data into a figure of merit for each proposal. A test case demonstration of this prioritization approach was applied to proposals currently being considered at two DOE weapons production facilities. Recommendations are provided for combining this approach with the existing DOE proposal selection process. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of a photoelectric aerosol sensor for real-time PAH monitoring. Project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramamurthi, M.; Chuang, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    In this study, the performance of a Gossen, GmbH Model PAS 1000i Photoelectric Aerosol Sensors (PAS) was evaluated for monitoring the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) on airborne find particles. The response of the PAS to PAH vapors and to airborne particles of various sizes were determined. Estimated levels of PAH provided by the PAS were compared to the concentrations of PAH sampled and measured traditionally.

  7. Impact evaluation of an energy savings plan project at ARCO Petroleum Products Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Dixon, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at ARCO Petroleum Products Company (ARCO) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial procsses. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at ARCO as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (ARCO`s Proposal and Completion Report). The ECM itself consists of removing one stage of a six-stage compressor so that its inlet control valve can be opened wider, thereby saving the energy that was previously lost at the valve due to pressure drop. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 2,112,800 kwh/yr. The ECM cost $367,650 to install, and ARCO received a payment of $158,460 from Bonneville and $82,902 from its serving utility, Puget Sound Power & Light Company, for the acquisition of energy savings. The ECM would not have been installed without the acquisition payment offered under the E$P Program. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.3 mills/kWh over the ECM`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 15.8 mills/kWh.

  8. Impact evaluation of an energy savings plan project at ARCO Petroleum Products Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.; Dixon, D.R.

    1992-08-01

    This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at ARCO Petroleum Products Company (ARCO) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial procsses. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at ARCO as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (ARCO's Proposal and Completion Report). The ECM itself consists of removing one stage of a six-stage compressor so that its inlet control valve can be opened wider, thereby saving the energy that was previously lost at the valve due to pressure drop. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 2,112,800 kwh/yr. The ECM cost $367,650 to install, and ARCO received a payment of $158,460 from Bonneville and $82,902 from its serving utility, Puget Sound Power Light Company, for the acquisition of energy savings. The ECM would not have been installed without the acquisition payment offered under the E$P Program. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.3 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 15.8 mills/kWh.

  9. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

  10. The ACP (Advanced Computer Program) Branch bus and real-time applications of the ACP multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, R.; Areti, H.; Atac, R.; Biel, J.; Cook, A.; Fischler, M.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Zmuda, T.

    1987-05-08

    The ACP Branchbus, a high speed differential bus for data movement in multiprocessing and data acquisition environments, is described. This bus was designed as the central bus in the ACP multiprocessing system. In its full implementation with 16 branches and a bus switch, it will handle data rates of 160 MByte/sec and allow reliable data transmission over inter rack distances. We also summarize applications of the ACP system in experimental data acquisition, triggering and monitoring, with special attention paid to FASTBUS environments.

  11. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; Spane, Frank A.; USA, Richland Washington; Gilmore, Tyler J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  12. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Chris E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Vermeul, Vince R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Bonneville, Alain [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Sullivan, E. Charlotte [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Johnson, Tim C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Spane, Frank A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA; Gilmore, Tyler J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richland Washington USA

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number of geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.

  13. Geophysical Monitoring Methods Evaluation for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Strickland, Chris E.; USA, Richland Washington; Vermeul, Vince R.; USA, Richland Washington; Bonneville, Alain; USA, Richland Washington; Sullivan, E. Charlotte; USA, Richland Washington; Johnson, Tim C.; USA, Richland Washington; et al

    2014-12-31

    A comprehensive monitoring program will be needed in order to assess the effectiveness of carbon sequestration at the FutureGen 2.0 carbon capture and storage (CCS) field-site. Geophysical monitoring methods are sensitive to subsurface changes that result from injection of CO2 and will be used for: (1) tracking the spatial extent of the free phase CO2 plume, (2) monitoring advancement of the pressure front, (3) identifying or mapping areas where induced seismicity occurs, and (4) identifying and mapping regions of increased risk for brine or CO2 leakage from the reservoir. Site-specific suitability and cost effectiveness were evaluated for a number ofmore »geophysical monitoring methods including: passive seismic monitoring, reflection seismic imaging, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, pulsed neutron capture logging, cross-borehole seismic, electrical resistivity tomography, magnetotellurics and controlled source electromagnetics. The results of this evaluation indicate that CO2 injection monitoring using reflection seismic methods would likely be difficult at the FutureGen 2.0 site. Electrical methods also exhibited low sensitivity to the expected CO2 saturation changes and would be affected by metallic infrastructure at the field site. Passive seismic, integrated surface deformation, time-lapse gravity, and pulsed neutron capture monitoring were selected for implementation as part of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site monitoring program.« less

  14. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  15. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  16. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    with installed wind project costs in both 2008 and 2009, asfor installed wind power project costs in 2009. For example,to the estimated cost of other wind power projects built in

  18. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

  19. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, Jagdish C

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  20. Evaluating the ability of process based models to project sea-level change This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Evaluating the ability of process based models to project sea-level change This article has been) 014051 (8pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/1/014051 Evaluating the ability of process based models to project for publication 13 March 2013 Published 27 March 2013 Online at stacks.iop.org/ERL/8/014051 Abstract We evaluate

  1. Increasing throughput of multiplexed electrical bus in pipe-lined architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asaad, Sameh; Brezzo, Bernard V; Kapur, Mohit

    2014-05-27

    Techniques are disclosed for increasing the throughput of a multiplexed electrical bus by exploiting available pipeline stages of a computer or other system. For example, a method for increasing a throughput of an electrical bus that connects at least two devices in a system comprises introducing at least one signal hold stage in a signal-receiving one of the two devices, such that a maximum frequency at which the two devices are operated is not limited by a number of cycles of an operating frequency of the electrical bus needed for a signal to propagate from a signal-transmitting one of the two devices to the signal-receiving one of the two devices. Preferably, the signal hold stage introduced in the signal-receiving one of the two devices is a pipeline stage re-allocated from the signal-transmitting one of the two devices.

  2. University of British Columbia, Faculty of Land and Food Systems FRE 521E: Project Monitoring & Evaluation in International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    changes in development project outcomes, informing processes for better design of future projects, and, offering informed recommendations for policy change in support of development projects as well of this course, with a special focus on assistance interventions through (aid) development projects and programs

  3. 45cm long compression-molded polymer-based optical bus Ray T. Chen and Suning Tang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    45cm long compression-molded polymer-based optical bus Ray T. Chen and Suning Tang Microelectronics of an optical bus using compression-molding technique. The linear dimension of such a waveguide is well beyond to determine the optimal dimension of the molding tool design for single- and multimode waveguides. A molded

  4. Components for a high-bandwidth low-latency optoelectronic bus network M. Gruber, S. Sinzinger, J. Jahns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    -integrated optical test systems I and II (cf. Fig. 3). Test system I simulates the relay of optical signals from. With the experimental test setup of Fig. 2 all the optical interconnect patterns needed in the bus module could L4 MT-connector C fixed to plate 3 Fig. 2: Experimental test setup for the bus module with planar

  5. Plug-in vs. wireless charging: Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an electric bus system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    Plug-in vs. wireless charging: Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an electric bus t In this study, plug-in and wireless charging for an all-electric bus system are compared from the life cycle t Wireless charging, as opposed to plug-in charging, is an alternative charging method for electric vehicles

  6. The Full Costs of Urban Transport. Part I: Economic Efficiency in Bus Operations; Preliminary Intermodal Cost Comparison and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Fisher; Philip Viton

    1974-01-01

    costs o f bus c o n s u m e r and i n a cost service. the Ino n a l planning c o n s u m e r and exploration costs be aContra Costa bus s m a l l e r and as p o l i c e , s h e r

  7. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polacek, Matt

    2009-07-15

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

  9. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Evaluating the resilience of deepwater systems to recover from oil spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Evaluating ­ information that would profoundly help the Oil & Gas sector (and environmental government bodies) to monitor and potentially predict the impact of oil & gas operations. Research context: Gutierrez (1st super.) has to

  10. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing: It is the objective of this project to evaluate air drill openers for the production of cereal grains under varying-seeded into spring wheat stubble at Havre in 2003 is presented in Table 1. Yield performance data for all air drill

  11. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed and Fertilizer Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing Cropping Systems Cooperating Dealers and Manufacturers OBJECTIVES: It is the objective of this project to evaluate air drill manufacturer loan and dealer support of additional state-of- the-art air drill equipment being made available

  12. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing: It is the objective of this project to evaluate air drill openers for the production of cereal grains under varying-seeded into spring wheat stubble at Havre in 2001 is presented in Table 1. Yield performance data for all air drill

  13. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing: It is the objective of this project to evaluate air drill openers for the production of cereal grains under varying and shallower planting depths. Yield performance data for all air drill opener trials conducted by NARC

  14. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed Boot and Furrow Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing of this project to evaluate air drill openers for the production of cereal grains under varying cropping-seeded into spring wheat stubble at Havre in 2004 is presented in Table 1. Yield performance data for all air drill

  15. Evaluation of Orion/BAE Hybrid Buses and Orion CNG Buses at New York City Transit: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

    2005-05-01

    This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses the NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric transit buses operated by New York City Transit.

  16. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt028apeboan2012...

  17. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. apearravt028boan2010...

  18. DC Bus Capacitor Manufacturing Facility for Electric Drive Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt028apeboan2011...

  19. Adaptive Low-Power Bus Encoding Based on Weighted Code Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    -based adaptive encoding algorithm is proposed to improve the energy saving by adaptively changing the code/hardware complexity or higher energy savings. I. INTRODUCTION As technology scales down to deep submicron meter to limited energy savings. In the category of probabilistic-based bus encoding methods, the transition

  20. On-Board Diesel & Hybrid Diesel-Electric Transit Bus PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    On-Board Diesel & Hybrid Diesel-Electric Transit Bus PM Mass and Size-Resolved Number Emissions AND cost-effective ­ 2003 -- Purchase 2 hybrid diesel-electric buses ­ Emissions Testing ­ gases Particulate Mass -- filter #12;Motivation · Ultrafine (UF) particle health effects · Diesel vehicle exhaust

  1. Digital Architecture for Driving Large LED Arrays with Dynamic Bus Voltage Regulation and Phase Shifted PWM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - This paper introduces a digital architecture suitable for driving a large number of High Brightness LightDigital Architecture for Driving Large LED Arrays with Dynamic Bus Voltage Regulation and Phase distinct performance advantage over conventional lighting technology. Higher optical efficiency, long

  2. Submitted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Networking PERFORMABILITY OF A TOKEN BUS NETWORK UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, William H.

    of stochastic Petri nets, provide a convenient representation for computer networks and are formal enough network loads. Keywords: Performability, Fault-Tolerant Computer Networks, Stochastic Petri NetsSubmitted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Networking PERFORMABILITY OF A TOKEN BUS NETWORK

  3. 2015/06/03(new-updates) The 2015 Academia Sinica Shuttle Bus Service Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) NTU Fu Bell NTU Multi-Purpose Classroom Building ()( 3 ) Bus Kong Monument) NTU Information Building( near to Starbucks on Xinhai Road) A.S. 2. 09:40 A.S. NTU

  4. Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    home energy manage- ment systems (HEMS) and the distribution feeder. One such simulation tool is Grid1 Bus.py: A GridLAB-D Communication Interface for Smart Distribution Grid Simulations Timothy M to completion without allowing the real-time interaction of Smart Grid controls, such as home energy management

  5. Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus by re-dispatching generator outputs, using a normal vector found at a voltage collapse boundary or a low voltage boundary (LVB). This method uses the normal vector as an indicator to change the generation

  6. FIBER-OPTIC BUS-ORIENTED SINGLE-HOP INTERCONNECTIONS AMONG MULTI-TRANSCEIVER STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,ooffer substantial advantages in power budget and the maximum number of stations that can be interconnected withoutFIBER-OPTIC BUS-ORIENTED SINGLE-HOP INTERCONNECTIONS AMONG MULTI-TRANSCEIVER STATIONS Yitzhak Birk among a set of stations, each equipped with multiple, say c, transmitters and receivers. It employs cz

  7. Standards Governing All Advertising in or upon Transportation Services Bus Vehicles or Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standards Governing All Advertising in or upon Transportation Services Bus Vehicles or Property 1. Transportation Services shall not display or maintain any advertisement that falls within one or more of the following categories: a. Demeaning or disparaging. The advertisement contains material that demeans

  8. Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper Using an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying a Virtual Component Interface-based PCI Bus Wrapper Using an LSC-Based Specification Peripheral Component Interface (PCI) transaction as the VSIA expected integrators to use the VCI standard safety properties. We then specify both the VCI protocol and the PCI protocol using Live Sequence Charts

  9. The Overall Energy Balance of the Hydrogen Bus in Berkeley, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Overall Energy Balance of the Hydrogen Bus in Berkeley, CA T. W. Patzek1 , K. Kappler, A. F Energy Roadmap (8), tabulates the planned hydrogen production capacity in the U.S., shown here as Table 1 with an extra column to specify the main energy/hydrogen sources for a hydrogen economy. As one can see, almost

  10. Where's My Bus Stop? Supporting Independence of Blind Transit Riders with StopInfo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    in the Seattle area with information entered by the community, primarily as they waited at these stops and Society]: Social Is sues--Assistive technologies for persons with disabilities General Terms Design]. They often search for physical landmarks such as the bus shelter, benches, or transit sign as a cue

  11. IAC-09.C3.2.8 A REDUNDANT POWER BUS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The idea behind the proposed Power Bus is to have power conversion (from solar panels) and power storage") which contain, each: a solar panel; energy storage batteries with the corresponding power converters in a distributed way. For instance: i) accumulating the power from all solar panels towards the load(s); ii

  12. 2005 International Truck & Bus Safety & Security Symposium 447 SAFETY AND SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES OF IMPORTANCE TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 International Truck & Bus Safety & Security Symposium 447 SAFETY AND SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, Tennessee USA 37932 E-mail: TruettLF@ORNL.gov ABSTRACT All travelers have concerns about safety and security

  13. Mobile Journey Planning for Bus Passengers Desmond Rainsford and William A Mackaness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the area of Location Based Services (LBS) is the delivery of journey plans to a mobile device. Few journey over mobile devices. The application is novel in the modelling of the pedestrian elements1 Mobile Journey Planning for Bus Passengers Desmond Rainsford and William A Mackaness Geography

  14. APPLIED STOCHASTIC MODELS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY Appl. Stochastic Models Bus. Ind., 2005; 21:251263

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Haipeng

    APPLIED STOCHASTIC MODELS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY Appl. Stochastic Models Bus. Ind., 2005; 21 and modelling call centre arrival data. A method is described for analysing such data using singular value, more formal statistical analysis. For example, a short- term forecasting model for call volumes

  15. APPLIED STOCHASTIC MODELS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY Appl. Stochastic Models Bus. Ind., 2006; 22:297311

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Haipeng

    APPLIED STOCHASTIC MODELS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY Appl. Stochastic Models Bus. Ind., 2006; 22 Non-parametric modelling of time-varying customer service times at a bank call centre Haipeng Shen1 are interested in modelling the time-varying pattern of average customer service times at a bank call centre

  16. High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

  17. A Study of the Key Variables Affecting Bus Replacement Age Decisions and1 Total Costs2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    A Study of the Key Variables Affecting Bus Replacement Age Decisions and1 Total Costs2 3 Jesse operational3 and maintenance (O&M) per-mile costs increase as buses age. From a purely economic4 perspective, there is a cost tradeoff between the lower O&M costs of newer fleets and their5 higher initial capital costs

  18. Evaluation Project 4492

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXuRod Hunt (208) 386-5254 Washington575MAY

  19. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ FY

  20. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ FY39

  1. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ FY3944

  2. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ

  3. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ7-26-2011

  4. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest andverification1DJ7-26-201158

  5. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest

  6. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 NNSA-B-10-0336

  7. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011

  8. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment,

  9. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment, or

  10. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment, or or

  11. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment, or

  12. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment,

  13. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or equipment,10-2011

  14. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or

  15. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,

  16. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment, or

  17. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment, or

  18. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,

  19. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,6

  20. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,69

  1. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,69

  2. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or equipment,69

  3. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or

  4. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or or9-06-2011

  5. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or

  6. Evaluation Project 4492

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNationalWIPPnon-proliferationtest9-12-2011 or9-12-2011

  7. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

  8. Comprehensive experimental studies were conducted as part of this project in order to evaluate the unsaturated hydraulic and shear strength properties of Eagle Ford clay. The clay was subjected to cycles of wetting and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Comprehensive experimental studies were conducted as part of this project in order to evaluate conducted to evaluate the effect of soil placement conditions (i.e., soil conditions immediately after compaction operations). Project Summary Background Research Performed by: Center for Transportation Research

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trends in Tax Equity for Renewable Energy. ” Project Financefirms/ _________. 2010b. “Renewable Energy Money Still Goinggoing-overseas/story/renewable- energy-money-still-going-

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Trends in Tax Equity for Renewable Energy. ” Project Financefirms/ _________. 2010b. “Renewable Energy Money Still GoingTreasury Grant Program on Renewable Energy Deployment in

  11. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  12. Computer Vision Project Topics Project Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    (contour projection?). step5: choose a tolerance value(3 or 5 pixels) to evaluate the image with eachComputer Vision Project Topics CSc I6716 Spring2011 #12;Project Reports 1. Introduction (problem up with Nikolaos Markou? · Key Components ­ The project is to find a target image from bunch

  13. Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN

    2005-11-29

    A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

  14. A bimodal spacecraft bus based on a cermet fueled heat pipe reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polansky, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochow, R.F. [Novatech, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Gunther, N.G. [Gunther Associates, San Jose, CA (United States); Bixler, C.H. [Consultant, Mannford, OK (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Bimodal space reactor systems provide both thermal propulsion for the spacecraft orbital transfer and electrical power to the spacecraft bus once it is on station. These systems have the potential to increase both the available payload in high energy orbits and the available power to that payload. These increased mass and power capabilities can be used to either reduce mission cost by permitting the use of smaller launch vehicles or to provide increased mission performance from the current launch vehicle. A major barrier to the deployment of these bimodal systems has been the cost associated with their development. This paper describes a bimodal spacecraft bus with performance potential to permit more than 70% of the instrumented payload of the Titan IV/Centaur to be launched from the Atlas IIAS. The development cost is minimized by basing the design on existing component technologies.

  15. Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLake Paiute ReservationResourcesMarch2 DOE1Evaluation

  16. St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor GuidelinesPlasma Physics Lab

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipment Certification Guide

  18. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel CellFuel CellMaterials Meetings

  19. Fuel Cell Transit Buses: ThunderPower Bus Evaluation at SunLine Transit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel CellFuel CellMaterials

  20. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of EnergySummary: The FirstInfrastructureTests

  1. SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of EnergySummary: The

  2. The monitoring, evaluation, reporting, and verification of climate change mitigation projects: Discussion of issues and methodologies and review of existing protocols and guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.; Sathaye, J.

    1997-12-01

    Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, the US and other countries are implementing, by themselves or in cooperation with one or more other nations (i.e., joint implementation), climate change mitigation projects. These projects will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or sequester carbon, and will also result in non-GHG impacts (i.e., environmental, economic, and social impacts). Monitoring, evaluating, reporting, and verifying (MERV) guidelines are needed for these projects in order to accurately determine their net GHG, and other, benefits. Implementation of MERV guidelines is also intended to: (1) increase the reliability of data for estimating GHG benefits; (2) provide real-time data so that mid-course corrections can be made; (3) introduce consistency and transparency across project types and reporters; and (4) enhance the credibility of the projects with stakeholders. In this paper, the authors review the issues and methodologies involved in MERV activities. In addition, they review protocols and guidelines that have been developed for MERV of GHG emissions in the energy and non-energy sectors by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies. They comment on their relevance and completeness, and identify several topics that future protocols and guidelines need to address, such as (1) establishing a credible baseline; (2) accounting for impacts outside project boundaries through leakage; (3) net GHG reductions and other impacts; (4) precision of measurement; (5) MERV frequency; (6) persistence (sustainability) of savings, emissions reduction, and carbon sequestration; (7) reporting by multiple project participants; (8) verification of GHG reduction credits; (9) uncertainty and risk; (10) institutional capacity in conducting MERV; and (11) the cost of MERV.

  3. Speaker adaptation and the evaluation of speaker similarity in the EMIME speech-to-speech translation project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wester, Mirjam; Dines, John; Gibson, Matthew; Liang, Hui; Wu, Yi-Jian; Saheer, Lakshmi; King, Simon; Oura, Keiichiro; Garner, Philip N.; Byrne, William; Guan, Yong; Hirsimaki, Teemu; Karhila, Reima; Kurimo, Mikko; Shannon, Matt; Shiota, Sayaka; Tian, Jilei; Tokuda, Keiichi; Yamagishi, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of speaker adaptation research carried out in the EMIME speech-to-speech translation (S2ST) project. We focus on how speaker adaptation transforms can be learned from speech in one language ...

  4. Speaker adaptation and the evaluation of speaker similarity in the EMIME speech-to-speech translation project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wester, Mirjam; Dines, John; Gibson, Matthew; Liang, Hui; Wu, Yi-Jian; Saheer, Lakshmi; King, Simon; Oura, Keiichiro; Garner, Philip N.; Byrne, William; Guan, Yong; Hirsimäki, Teemu; Karhila, Reima; Kurimo, Mikko; Shannon, Matt; Shiota, Sayaka; Tian, Jilei; Tokuda, Keiichi; Yamagishi, Junichi

    This paper provides an overview of speaker adaptation research carried out in the EMIME speech-to-speech translation (S2ST) project. We focus on how speaker adaptation transforms can be learned from speech in one language ...

  5. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North...

  6. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American...

  7. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) - Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau...

  8. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 54" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB...

  9. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - Curry Main - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North...

  10. PinBus Interface for Interoperable, Grid-Responsive Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-12-02

    A very simple appliance interface was suggested by this author and his co-authors during Grid-Interop 2007. The approach was based on a successful collaboration between utilities, a major appliance manufacture, and the manufacturer of a load control module during the U.S. Department of Energy’s Grid Friendly Appliance project. The suggested approach was based on the assumption that demand-response objectives could be effectively communicated to and from many small electrical loads like appliances by simply agreeing on the meaning of the binary states of several shared connector pins. It was argued that this approach could pave the way for a wave of demand-response-ready appliances and greatly reduced expenses for utilities’ future demand-response programs. The approach could be supported by any of the many competing serial communication protocols and would be generally applicable to most end-use devices.

  11. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl

    2008-11-20

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

  12. Report of early site suitability evaluation of the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, J.L.; Andrews, W.B.; Fasano, G.A.; Herrington, C.C.; Mattson, S.R.; Murray, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ballou, L.B.; Revelli, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Ducharme, A.R.; Shephard, L.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dudley, W.W.; Hoxie, D.T. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Herbst, R.J.; Patera, E.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Judd, B.R. [Decision Analysis Co., Portola Valley, CA (United States); Docka, J.A.; Rickertsen, L.D. [Weston Technical Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This study evaluated the technical suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of radioactive waste. The evaluation was conducted primarily to determine early in the site characterization program if there are any features or conditions at the site that indicate it is unsuitable for repository development. A secondary purpose was to determine the status of knowledge in the major technical areas that affect the suitability of the site. This early site suitability evaluation (ESSE) was conducted by a team of technical personnel at the request of the Associate Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Geologic Disposal, a unit within the DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Yucca Mountain site has been the subject of such evaluations for over a decade. In 1983, the site was evaluated as part of a screening process to identify potentially acceptable sites. The site was evaluated in greater detail and found suitable for site characterization as part of the Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE, 1986) required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). Additional site data were compiled during the preparation of the Site Characterization Plan (SCP) (DOE, 1988a). This early site suitability evaluation has considered information that was used in preparing both-documents, along with recent information obtained since the EA and SCP were published. This body of information is referred to in this report as ``current information`` or ``available evidence.``

  13. CNG and Diesel Transit Bus Emissions in Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, A. (a); Kado, N. (a,b); Okamoto, R. (a); Gebel, M. (a) Rieger, P. (a); Kobayashi, R. (b); Kuzmicky, P. (b)

    2003-08-24

    Over the past three years, the California Air Resources Board (CARB), in collaboration with the University of California and other entities, has investigated the tailpipe emissions from three different latemodel, in-use heavy-duty transit buses in five different configurations. The study has focused on the measurement of regulated emissions (NOX, HC, CO, total PM), other gaseous emissions (CO2, NO2, CH4, NMHC), a number of pollutants of toxic risk significance (aromatics, carbonyls, PAHs, elements), composition (elemental and organic carbon), and the physical characterization (size-segregated number count and mass) of the particles in the exhaust aerosol. Emission samples are also tested in a modified Ames assay. The impact of oxidation catalyst control for both diesel and compressed natural gas (CNG) buses and a passive diesel particulate filter (DPF) were evaluated over multiple driving cycles (idle, 55 mph cruise, CBD, UDDS, NYBC) using a chassis dynamometer. For brevity, only CBD results are discussed in this paper and particle sizing results are omitted. The database of results is large and some findings have been reported already at various forums including last year's DEER conference. The goal of this paper is to offer an overview of the lessons learned and attempt to draw overall conclusions and interpretations based on key findings to date.

  14. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping Plant M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R... District No. 2 (San Benito) page xiv of 82 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Interconnect Between Canals 39 and 13-A1 and Replacement of Rio Grande Diversion Pumping...

  15. Evaluation of Canal Lining Projects in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas: 2011 Ratings and Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonaiti, Gabriele; Karimov, Askar; Fipps, Guy

    2011-01-01

    ........................................................................................ 18 Figure 11. Cuts/tears caused by vandalism or traffic, and quickly enlarging due to shrinkage .................. 19 Figure 12. Steel anchors added to try to keep the liner from shrinking and floating .................................. 20 Figure.../tears caused by vandalism or traffic, and quickly enlarging due to shrinkage - 20 - Figure 12. Steel anchors added to try to keep the liner from shrinking and floating - 21 - Polyurethane Of the nine (9) polyurethane projects, one (1...

  16. Adiabatic two-photon quantum gate operations using a long-range photonic bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony P. Hope; Thach G. Nguyen; Arnan Mitchell; Andrew D. Greentree

    2014-12-01

    Adiabatic techniques have much potential to realise practical and robust optical waveguide devices. Traditionally photonic elements are limited to coupling schemes that rely on proximity to nearest neighbour elements. We combine adiabatic passage with a continuum based long-range optical bus to break free from such topological restraints and thereby outline a new approach to photonic quantum gate design. We explicitly show designs for adiabatic quantum gates that produce a Hadamard, 50:50 and 1/3:2/3 beam splitter, and non-deterministic CNOT gate based on planar thin, shallow ridge waveguides. Our calculations are performed under conditions of one and two-photon inputs.

  17. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  18. A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo NewYanbu,Information on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus

  19. South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin Jump to:SolkarSector Programmes Jump to:Bus Rapid

  20. UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:TucsonLLC Jump to:UDIGEF Fuel Cell Bus

  1. Developing a Natural Gas-Powered Bus Rapid Transit Service: A Case Study

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls on asPublicationsFuelsSchool Bus *offers

  2. Report of the Peer Review Panel on the early site suitability evaluation of the Potential Repository Site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Yucca mountain Site Characterization Project Office (YMPO) assigned Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Technical and Management Support Services (T&MSS) contractor to the YmPo, the task of conducting an Early Site Suitability Evaluation (ESSE) of the Yucca mountain site as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. First, the assignment called for the development of a method to evaluate a single site against the DOE General Guidelines for Recommendation of Sites for Nuclear Waste Repositories, 10 CFR Part 960. Then, using this method, an evaluation team, the ESSE Core Team, of senior YMP scientists, engineers, and technical experts, evaluated new information obtained about the site since publication of the final Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1986) to determine if new suitability/unsuitability findings could be recommended. Finally, the Core Team identified further information and analyses needed to make final determinations for each of the guidelines. As part of the task, an independent peer review of the ESSE report has been conducted. Expertise was solicited that covered the entire spectrum of siting guidelines in 10 CFR Part 960 in order to provide a complete, in-depth critical review of the data evaluated and cited in the ESSE report, the methods used to evaluate the data, and the conclusions and recommendations offered by the report. Fourteen nationally recognized technical experts (Table 2) served on the Peer Review Panel. The comments from the Panel and the responses prepared by the ESSE Core Team, documented on formal Comment Response Forms, constitute the body of this document.

  3. The 4-H Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    As a 4-H volunteer, you will find that projects are useful tools for teaching a wide variety of skills to young people. This publication will help you plan and evaluate 4-H learning projects.

  4. Project Results: Evaluating FedEx Express Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference) | SciTechProjectITERFebruary 5,

  5. Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptions |(Conference) | SciTechProjectITERFebruary 5,Although the

  6. Testing, Evaluation, and Qualification of Bio-Oil for Heating Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearchEnergy TestTestingTesting, Evaluation,

  7. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  8. Statistical Characterization of School Bus Drive Cycles Collected via Onboard Logging Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duran, A.; Walkowicz, K.

    2013-10-01

    In an effort to characterize the dynamics typical of school bus operation, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers set out to gather in-use duty cycle data from school bus fleets operating across the country. Employing a combination of Isaac Instruments GPS/CAN data loggers in conjunction with existing onboard telemetric systems resulted in the capture of operating information for more than 200 individual vehicles in three geographically unique domestic locations. In total, over 1,500 individual operational route shifts from Washington, New York, and Colorado were collected. Upon completing the collection of in-use field data using either NREL-installed data acquisition devices or existing onboard telemetry systems, large-scale duty-cycle statistical analyses were performed to examine underlying vehicle dynamics trends within the data and to explore vehicle operation variations between fleet locations. Based on the results of these analyses, high, low, and average vehicle dynamics requirements were determined, resulting in the selection of representative standard chassis dynamometer test cycles for each condition. In this paper, the methodology and accompanying results of the large-scale duty-cycle statistical analysis are presented, including graphical and tabular representations of a number of relationships between key duty-cycle metrics observed within the larger data set. In addition to presenting the results of this analysis, conclusions are drawn and presented regarding potential applications of advanced vehicle technology as it relates specifically to school buses.

  9. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-10-24

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

  10. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicle Evaluation Richard Parish, Leslie Eudy, and Ken Proc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Laboratory (NREL) Fleet Test & Evaluation (FT&E) team in Golden, Colorado, is dedicated to evaluating and documenting the performance and operational characteristics of advanced vehicle technologies, and NREL was unable to characterize its performance. A new prototype fuel cell bus from ISE Research

  11. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Grace Brush, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Dan Bain, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School. Through this project, the team proposes to develop a variety of resources: a set of general, web

  12. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  13. Evaluation of the Energy-Related Inventions Program. Volume 1. Analysis of case studies of supported projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rorke, M.G.; Bronfman, L.M.; Soderstrom, E.J.

    1983-02-01

    This volume reports the analysis of the results of 30 case studies of grantees funded by the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP). ERIP is one of several federal programs supporting invention and innovation in the private sector. It is a relatively small program with an annual budget of $5 to 6 million that focuses its attention on the independent inventor or small business with an energy-related invention. Support to the inventory or small business comes primarily in the form of a grant. The overall goal of the program is to stimulate innovation by individuals and small businesses and to assist in the development of promising energy-related inventions for eventual commercialization. This volume is an aggregation and synthesis of the data gathered in the case studies. (Volume 2 contains the case studies.) The case studies explore in-depth the characteristics, perceptions, and experiences of inventors and agency personnel who have participated in the ERIP. Thus they are a rich source of information for use in evaluating the process by which the program's goals and objectives are implemented and for evaluating the program;s usefulness in producing the results intended by the legislative mandate.

  14. Evaluation of the effects of underground water usage and spillage in the Exploratory Studies Facility; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, E.; Sobolik, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Analyses reported herein were performed to support the design of site characterization activities so that these activities will have a minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste and a minimal impact on underground tests performed as part of the characterization process. These analyses examine the effect of water to be used in the underground construction and testing activities for the Exploratory Studies Facility on in situ conditions. Underground activities and events where water will be used include construction, expected but unplanned spills, and fire protection. The models used predict that, if the current requirements in the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements are observed, water that is imbibed into the tunnel wall rock in the Topopah Springs welded tuff can be removed over the preclosure time period by routine or corrective ventilation, and also that water imbibed into the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded tuff will not reach the potential waste storage area.

  15. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R.

    2009-07-30

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  16. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    2008-01-15

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  17. Cloudnet Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

  18. GigaplaneTM: A High Performance Bus for Large SMPs July 16, 1996 5.0 Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagersten, Erik

    Architecture", Proceedings COMPCON 93. [5] HP T Series product information at http://reality.sgi.com/employees/lm_engr/lmbench/lmbench-sum- mary (on 3/15/96) [8] John L. Hennessey and David A. Patterson, "Computer Architecture A Quantitative 20 625 9.09 1200 TABLE 2. Comparison with other SMP Buses System/Bus/CPU Max # CPUs Sustainable

  19. Investigation of path dependence in commercial lithium-ion cells for pure electric bus applications: Aging mechanism identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    Investigation of path dependence in commercial lithium-ion cells for pure electric bus applications dependence of aging of lithium ion batteries. Considered the conditions of path dependence specific October 2014 Available online 13 October 2014 Keywords: Lithium-ion battery Path dependence Thermal aging

  20. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

  1. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 90-070-2181, HUD Lead-Based Paint Abatement Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sussell, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Officer for Policy Development and Research, an investigation was made into possible hazardous working conditions during the HUD Lead Based Paint Abatement Demonstration (SIC-1521). The demonstration took place in 172 vacant housing units in several different cities. The abatement methods used included abrasive removal, chemical removal, heat gun removal, encapsulation, enclosure, and replacement. Evaluations were made during the demonstrations and it was determined that the workers were exposed to lead (7439921) with the highest exposure levels coming during the heat gun method of removal. Exposures to volatile organic compounds were low. Maximum personal and general area airborne lead concentrations were 916 micrograms/cubic meter and 1296 micrograms/cubic meter, respectively. Soil sampling indicated that lead paint abatement in some cases resulted in increases in soil lead levels 1 to 3 feet from the exterior walls. The author concludes that workers were potentially overexposed to lead during lead abatement. The author recommend specific measures concerning training, work practices, engineering controls, safety programs, risk assessment, respiratory protection programs, medical monitoring and surveillance.

  3. Evaluation and application of SOX measurement procedures for kraft recovery furnaces. Project report July 1976-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.K.; Blosser, R.O.; Newport, D.B.; Oglesby, H.S.

    1980-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the sulfuric acid (SO3/H2SO4) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from kraft recovery furnaces using an extractive sampling system. The Goksoyr and Ross controlled condensation technique was chosen. Equipment was designed and fabricated to evaluate the effect of coil length, grit porosity, temperature, flow rate, and concentration upon the efficiency of capture of H2SO4 in the modified Grahm condenser. The optimum design and operating conditions to minimize SO3/H2SO4 losses in filter holders used in the sampling train for particulate separation were determined, and the effects of recovery furnace particulate upon SO3/H2SO4 losses were investigated. Sampling of five representative Kraft recovery furnace stack gases showed that the SO3/H2SO4 concentrations varied from 0 to 2.98 ppm, while the range of SO2 concentrations was from 14 to 416 ppm. A comparison of these emissions with the SO3/H2SO4 and SO2 emissions from oil and coal fired utility boilers shows the kraft recovery furnace emissions to be much lower.

  4. OptoelectronicOptoelectronicOptoelectronic PackagingPackagingPackaging forforfor 16-Channel16-Channel16-Channel OpticalOpticalOptical BackplaneBackplaneBackplane BusBusBus usingusingusing VolumeVolumeVolume HologramHologramHologram OpticalOpticalOptical E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    and popularity of multi-core and 64bit processors in High Performance Computing (HPC) systems, the demandVolumeVolume HologramHologramHologram OpticalOpticalOptical ElementsElementsElements forforfor HighHighHigh PerformancePerformancePerformanceAbstractAbstract Optical backplane bus not only can fulfill the ever increasing bandwidth demands in high performance

  5. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States: Project on advanced oil recovery and the states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic, social, and political benefits of improved oil recovery to the nation as a whole. Individual reports for major oil producing states have been separately published. The individual state reports include California, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). TORIS is a tested and verified system maintained and operated by the Department of Energy`s Bartlesville Project Office. The TORTS system was used to evaluate over 2,300 major reservoirs in a consistent manner and on an individual basis, the results of which have been aggregated to arrive at the national total.

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. )

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  7. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  8. A superconducting cavity bus for single Nitrogen Vacancy defect centres in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Twamley; S. D. Barrett

    2009-12-18

    Circuit-QED has demonstrated very strong coupling between individual microwave photons trapped in a superconducting coplanar resonator and nearby superconducting qubits. In this work we show how, by designing a novel interconnect, one can strongly connect the superconducting resonator, via a magnetic interaction, to a small number (perhaps single), of electronic spins. By choosing the electronic spin to be within a Nitrogen Vacancy centre in diamond one can perform optical readout, polarization and control of this electron spin using microwave and radio frequency irradiation. More importantly, by utilising Nitrogen Vacancy centres with nearby 13C nuclei, using this interconnect, one has the potential build a quantum device where the nuclear spin qubits are connected over centimeter distances via the Nitrogen Vacancy electronic spins interacting through the superconducting bus.

  9. Manifold, bus support and coupling arrangement for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parry, G.W.

    1988-04-21

    Individual, tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are assembled into bundles called a module within a housing, with a plurality of modules arranged end-to-end in a linear, stacked configuration called a string. A common set of piping comprised of a suitable high temperature resistant material (1) provides fuel and air to each module housing, (2) serves as electrically conducting buses, and (3) provides structural support for a string of SOFC modules. Ceramic collars are used to connect fuel and air inlet piping to each of the electrodes in an SOFC module and provide (1) electrical insulation for the current carrying bus bars and gas manifolds, (2) damping for the fuel and air inlet piping, and (3) proper spacing between the fuel and air inlet piping to prevent contact between these tubes and possible damage to the SOFC. 11 figs.

  10. Ferdinand Project Middleware List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://java.dzone.com/articles/case-study-how-lastfm-uses] - hornetq-vm: VM for testing of clustered scenarios [http://sourceforge.net/projects/hornetq-vm/] EvaluationFerdinand Project Middleware List Jaroslav Keznikl2 , Michal Malohlava1 , Lukás Marek1 , Petr Tma1 phone +420-266053831 #12;FERDINAND PROJECT MIDDLEWARE LIST PURPOSE The purpose of this report

  11. TEAM PROJECT: WORKING PROTOTYPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .) Value: the report is worth 10% of the Team Project grade. #12;Next steps: You will evaluateTEAM PROJECT: WORKING PROTOTYPE Due: Week of April 5-8 at time to be scheduled with GTA Format that will be polished into the final project for which you will create a final report and give a final presentation

  12. Project Description 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanDeGrift, Tammy

    Project Description 1 Introduction This project will investigate "commonsense computing": what, and 3. Apply our findings to changes in classroom pedagogy in ways that can be rigorously evalu- ated. 1 0736572 #12;In the exploratory part of this project, which we are proposing here, we will concentrate

  13. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

  14. 324 Building Compliance Project: Selection and evaluation of alternatives for the removal of solid remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    Six alternatives for the interim storage of remote-handled mixed wastes from the 324 Building on the Hanford Site have been identified and evaluated. The alternatives focus on the interim storage facility and include use of existing facilities in the 200 Area, the construction of new facilities, and the vitrification of the wastes within the 324 Building to remove the majority of the wastes from under RCRA regulations. The six alternatives are summarized in Table S.1, which identifies the primary facilities to be utilized, the anticipated schedule for removal of the wastes, the costs of the transfer from 324 Building to the interim storage facility (including any capital costs), and an initial risk comparison of the alternatives. A recently negotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) change requires the last of the mixed wastes to be removed by May 1999. The ability to use an existing facility reduces the costs since it eliminates the need for new capital construction. The basic regulatory approvals for the storage of mixed wastes are in place for the PUREX facility, but the Form HI permit will need some minor modifications since the 324 Building wastes have some additional characteristic waste codes and the current permit limits storage of wastes to those from the facility itself. Regulatory reviews have indicated that it will be best to use the tunnels to store the wastes. The PUREX alternatives will only provide storage for about 65% of the wastes. This results from the current schedule of the B-Cell Clean Out Project, which projects that dispersible debris will continue to be collected in small quantities until the year 2000. The remaining fraction of the wastes will then be stored in another facility. Central Waste Complex (CWC) is currently proposed for that residual waste storage; however, other options may also be available.

  15. New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project Jump to: navigation, search Name New York City Transit Diesel...

  16. FSRM 588: FINANCIAL DATA MINING 16:958:588:01 FALL 2012, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 208 BUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    FSRM 588: FINANCIAL DATA MINING 16:958:588:01 FALL 2012, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 208 BUS 1. Course Information · Instructor: Han Xiao · Office: Hill Center 451 · Office Hours: Wednesday 4

  17. STAT 588: DATA MINING/MACHINE LEARNING 16:960:588:01 FALL 2011, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 202 BUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    STAT 588: DATA MINING/MACHINE LEARNING 16:960:588:01 FALL 2011, TUESDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 202 BUS 1. Course Information · Instructor: Han Xiao · Office: Hill Center 451 · Office Hours: Wednesday 5

  18. Evaluation of Preindustrial to Present-day Black Carbon and its Albedo Forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, Drew; Berntsen, T.; Bisiauxs, M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; McConnell, J.R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-03-05

    As a part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against the observations including 12 ice core records, a long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using the NCAR Community Land and Sea-Ice model 4 with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000, which includes the SNICAR BC-snow model. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations to using recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to the differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology among models; 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However,models agree well on 2.5~3 times increase in the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day, which matches with the 2.5 times increase in BC emissions. We find a large model diversity at both NH and SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfrauch and Ispra. However, the models fail to capture the Arctic BC seasonality due tosevere underestimations during winter and spring. Compared to recent snowpack measurements, the simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of observations except for Greenland and Arctic Ocean. However, model and observation differ widely due to missing interannual variations in emissions and possibly due to the choice of the prescribed meteorology period (i.e., 1996-2000).

  19. The Delta Farmers Institute is initiating a project to evaluate salinity in the Fraser River Estuary. They are likely to receive some funds from the province as well as other interested parties. What they would

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Fraser River. Specifically they would like to run a salinity model to provide some analysis on howThe Delta Farmers Institute is initiating a project to evaluate salinity in the Fraser River salinity will be affected by: Change to the Fraser River hydrology in a drought year The impacts

  20. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleanup Project- June 2007 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Idaho Cleanup Project- June 2007 June 2007 Evaluation to determine whether the Idaho Cleanup Project is...

  1. PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the Weldon Spring,7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJNewS..PUBLIC HEALTH

  2. The Energy DataBus: NREL's Open-Source Application for Large-Scale Energy Data Collection and Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL’s Energy DataBus is used for tracking and analyzing energy use on its own campus. The system is applicable to other facilities—including anything from a single building to a large military base or college campus—or for other energy data management needs. Managing and minimizing energy consumption on a large campus is usually a difficult task for facility managers: There may be hundreds of energy meters spread across a campus, and the meter data are often recorded by hand. Even when data are captured electronically, there may be measurement issues or time periods that may not coincide. Making sense of this limited and often confusing data can be a challenge that makes the assessment of building performance a struggle for many facility managers. The Energy DataBus software was developed by NREL to address these issues on its own campus, but with an eye toward offering its software solutions to other facilities. Key features include the software's ability to store large amounts of data collected at high frequencies—NREL collects some of its energy data every second—and rich functionality to integrate this wide variety of data into a single database [copied from http://en.openei.org/wiki/NREL_Energy_DataBus].

  3. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    and evaluate web-based application which could utilize sensor data. In this project, we focused on two aspectsDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden Y E T I A N A Web This thesis describes the project "A new Web Server for sensors". The project has created a demonstration web

  4. Manifold, bus support and coupling arrangement for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parry, Gareth W. (East Windsor, CT)

    1989-01-01

    Individual, tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are assembled into bundles called a module within a housing, with a plurality of modules arranged end-to-end in a linear, stacked configuration called a string. A common set of piping comprised of a suitable high temperture resistant material (1) provides fuel and air to each module housing, (2) serves as electrically conducting buses, and (3) provides structural support for a string of SOFC modules. The piping thus forms a manfold for directing fuel and air to each module in a string and makes electrical contact with the module's anode and cathode to conduct the DC power generated by the SOFC. The piping also provides structureal support for each individual module and maintains each string of modules as a structurally integral unit for ensuring high strength in a large 3-dimensional array of SOFC modules. Ceramic collars are used to connect fuel and air inlet piping to each of the electrodes in an SOFC module and provide (1) electrical insulation for the current carrying bus bars and gas manifolds, (2) damping for the fuel and air inlet piping, and (3) proper spacing between the fuel and air inlet piping to prevent contact between these tubes and possible damage to the SOFC.

  5. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    cloud. This thesis project designed, implemented, and evaluated the use of open shortest path firstDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden A M I R R O O Z B

  6. Cummins Engine Company B5.9 Propane Engine Development, Certification, and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The ADEPT Group, Inc.

    1998-12-18

    The objective of this project was to successfuly develop and certify an LPG-dedicated medium-duty original equipment manufacturer (OEM) engine that could be put into production. The engine was launched into production in 1994, and more than 800 B5.9G engines are now in service in the United States and abroad. This engine is now offered by more than 30 bus and truck OEMs.

  7. Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1. Letter from W. Murphie to M. Galanti, "Record of Decision for the Site-wide Waste Disposition Evaluation Project at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOEPPPO03...

  8. TEAM PROJECT: USER TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEAM PROJECT: USER TESTING Due: Wed April 21 (section 2) Thu April 22 (section 1) Now that you have: usability inspection, Neilsen's heuristic evaluation, pluralistic walk through, or GOMS analysis (without part of your project. You might consider a joint session with another team! Format: 3-4 page report

  9. Clear Creek, Texas Flood Risk Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ) of 1996 requires four distinct steps for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects for an evaluation of economic benefits and costs for projects were conducted and displayed in the Economic Appendix ­ Economic Evaluation. The non-Federal projects (FEMA buyout and detention on Marys Creek) augments

  10. Reconfiguration of Manhattan Bus Stopping Frequency Objective: Perform research and field studies that evaluate the energy and cost saving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    --that describes a way to improve transportation effectiveness while simultaneously reducing air pollution, energy, air, and climate change. In the realm of sustainable transportation, one promising response, more atmospheric pollution, and slower times to passenger destinations--especially when aggregated over

  11. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  12. Audit of Bus Service Subsidies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, WR-B-97-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p uBUS SERVICE SUBSIDIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING

  13. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) – Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station – Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2006-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of ...

  14. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: United Irrigation District of Hidalgo County (United) - Rehabilitation of Main Canal, Laterals, and Diversion Pump Station - Preliminary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2005-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a three-component capital renovation project proposed by the United Irrigation District to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). The proposed...

  15. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 - 72" Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal and Multi-Size Pipeline Replacing Delivery Canal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.; Ellis, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for the capital renovation project proposed by Edinburg Irrigation District Hidalgo County No. 1 to the North American Development Bank (NADBank...

  16. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - 48" Pipeline Replacing Wisconsin Canal - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, Edward; Lacewell, Ronald; Sturdivant, Allen; Robinson, John; Popp, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American...

  17. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    project is to analyze and evaluate the level of performance, from the network point of view, that canDegree project in Communication Systems Communication Systems, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden I S A A C test this approach in a real environment, a prior providers' survey was utilized to evaluate

  18. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    for instrumentation (PXI) modules. The main objective of this project is to evaluate how different PXI modules workDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden W I L LY W A N G Evaluating the use of PXI modules in tests of a radio base station KTH Information and Communication

  19. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    & Sciences Project Title Visualize Physical Principles with Virtual Lab Modules Audience Undergraduate provide easy access to digital information, but don't provide experience with right- hand screws, electric of the last generation of physics students. The result is that today's students don't have an intuitive

  20. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    . Pedagogical Issue One of the challenges in teaching the Introduction to Computer Music course is the lack flow and practices. These resources will provide an online space through which students will be able piece of this project will be an animated studio walkthrough requiring user interaction and providing

  1. Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

    1996-09-01

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has initiated the development of `Design Guidelines for Bus Transit Systems Using Alternative Fuels.` This report provides design guidelines for the safe uses of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). It forms a part of the series of individual monographs being published by the FTA on (the guidelines for the safe use of) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes for the subject fuel the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

  2. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    and competitive activities which in this thesis project were evaluated in a educational process contextDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden F R A N C I S C O interaction in areas, such as health care, computer games, and robotics. Although many research projects have

  3. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    of the main achievements of this thesis project. Evaluation of the measurement results indicates that fiberDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden M O Z H G A N for small cell backhaul. This thesis project investigates if a small cell network's requirements can

  4. The Piazza Project Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ives, Zachary G.

    The Piazza Project Presented by: Mengmeng Liu and Shirley Cohen CIS 650 #12;Agenda · Project aspects #12;Piazza Project Members AnHai Doan Oren Etzioni Steven Gribble Zack Ives Alon Halevy Jayant (PDMS): · n mediated peer schemas as few as (n - 1) mappings between them ­ evaluated transitively · m

  5. Degree project in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    by a review of related work. The overall project's goal is to create and evaluate an authorization schemaDegree project in Communication Systems Second level, 30.0 HEC Stockholm, Sweden A L E X I S M A R #12;#12;i Abstract This master's thesis project began at the Karolinska University Hospital

  6. Annual Merit Review Evaluates Impact of Sustainable Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Merit Review Evaluates Impact of Sustainable Transportation Projects Annual Merit Review Evaluates Impact of Sustainable Transportation Projects June 5, 2015 - 11:32am...

  7. PROJECT TITLE: Evaluation of Seed and Fertilizer Opener Configurations for Optimizing Seed and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    and Fertilizer Placement in Simultaneous, Single-Pass Operations with Air Drills under Differing Cropping Systems to evaluate air drill openers and systems for the production of cereal grains under varying cropping was limited primarily to evaluation of "double-shoot" air drill openers using a research-scale `Concord' air

  8. GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

    2010-06-17

    This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

  9. Design, Evaluation and Validation, and Analysis of a Five-Dimensional Leadership Questionnaire for a Project Leader in an International Scientific Research Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfinger, Roman

    2008-01-01

    The basic goal of the study is to develop a five dimensional leadership questionnaire for a project leader in an international scientific research laboratory and to verify statistically the independency of the individual questions from each other to ensure low overlap in content and meaning by achieving low correlation coefficients. This leadership questionnaire is designed to examine the behavior, personality, and character attributes of a project or experiment team leader in an international scientific research laboratory as perceived by her/his team members during the planning, design, implementation, and execution of the project itself. The leadership questionnaire is applied to a sample of about 40 participants from different international scientific research laboratories. This sample should represent in age, rank, and profession the whole population of employees and team members currently working in different international scientific research laboratories dealing with physics, informatics, and engineeri...

  10. Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Rehabilitation of Alamo Main Canal - Final 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.

    2005-01-01

    ). The proposed project primarily consists of relining the Alamo Main canal and installing a flow-management system in the Alamo Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings...

  11. STAT 563: REGRESSION ANALYSIS 16:960:563:01 SPRING 2012, THURSDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 203 BUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jornsten, Rebecka

    STAT 563: REGRESSION ANALYSIS 16:960:563:01 SPRING 2012, THURSDAY 6:40-9:30 PM, SEC 203 BUS 1 or by appointment · Email: hxiao@stat.rutgers.edu · Text: Introduction to Linear Regression Analysis, by Montgomery distribution Supplementary Reading 2 3 Feb 02 Simple linear regression Ch. 2 4 Feb 09 Simple linear regression

  12. Abstract--In this paper, a hierarchical control scheme is pro-posed for enhancement of Sensitive Load Bus (SLB) voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    ) are often connected to the utility grid or microgrid through a power-electronic interface converter. Microgrid is a local grid consisting of DGs, energy storage systems and dispersed loads which may operate Load Bus (SLB) voltage quality in microgrids. The control structure consists of primary and secondary

  13. Step-By-Step Procedure on how to Request Advertisements in UH Shuttles 1. REVIEW POLICY -Read the Shuttle Bus Advertising Program policy available online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasser, Adrian

    Step-By-Step Procedure on how to Request Advertisements in UH Shuttles 1. REVIEW POLICY - Read the Shuttle Bus Advertising Program policy available online http://www.uh.edu/pts/pdfs/UHShuttleAdvertisingPolicy.pdf 2. COMPLETE APPLICATION - Complete the Request for UH Shuttle Advertising application available

  14. Stop Fee Pick-up Place Bus Leaves By Stop 1 $50 Ontario Love's Travel Stop and Country Store, 1041 NW Washington Ave 7:00 AM, MDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Stop Fee Pick-up Place Bus Leaves By Stop 1 $50 Ontario Love's Travel Stop and Country Store, 1041 Ave 5:30 PM Stop 4 Ontario Love's Travel Stop and Country Store, 1041 NW Washington Ave 8:30 PM, MDT ONTARIO ROUTE 1 Boise Winnemucca 2:30 PM ** 45 minute lunch stop prior to leaving Bend Take Home Saturday

  15. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  16. performance evaluation for multiprocessors programmed using ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-06-13

    data taken off the bus was large enough that the shared bus seemed to slow down the ... matical Sciences subprogram of the Office of Energy Re- search, U.S.

  17. Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.

    1999-01-01

    The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

  18. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Reinvestment Act of 2009. My office also provides project management assistance, project oversight, and performance evaluation. Overview of the EM Mission The mission of...

  19. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisition and Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for the EM Complex. My office provides project management assistance, independent project oversight, and performance evaluation. My office is also responsible for effective...

  20. Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

    1997-08-01

    This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.