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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Leslie Eudy at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's fuel cell bus evaluations.

Eudy, L.

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster discusses hydrogen fuel cell transit bus evaluations conducted for the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT). It was presented at the 2006 HFCIT Program Review.

Eudy, L.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review showing status of U.S. and international fuel cell transit bus evaluations.

Eudy, L.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation Results (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on the results from the DOE fuel cell bus evaluation given at the Transportation Research Board's 87th annual meeting, January 14, 2008.

Eudy, L.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

5

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. In late June 2002, the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head was installed on the system to alleviate this problem and the shuttle bus operated successfully on DME blends from 10-25 vol% on the shuttle bus loop until September 30, 2002. During the period of operation on the campus loop, the bus was pulled from service, operated at the PTI test track and real-time emissions measurements were obtained using an on-board emissions analyzer from Clean Air Technologies International, Inc. Particulate emissions reductions of 60% and 80% were observed at DME blend ratios of 12 vol.% and 25 vol.%, respectively, as the bus was operated over the Orange County driving cycle. Increases in NOx, CO and HC emissions were observed, however. In summary, the conversion of the shuttle bus was successfully accomplished, particulate emissions reductions were observed, but there were operational challenges in the field. Nonetheless, they were able to demonstrate reliable operation of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides preliminary results from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluation of a protoptye fuel cell transit bus operating at Connecticut Transit in Hartford. Included are descriptions of the planned fuel cell bus demonstration and equipment; early results and agency experience are also provided.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary K. Proc, R. Barnitt, and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task No. FC05.9400 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38364 August 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

10

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Testing and Evaluation of Batteries for a Fuel Cell Powered Hybrid Bus  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted performance characterization and life-cycle tests on various batteries to qualify them for use in a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus. On this bus, methanol-fueled, phosphoric acid fuel cells provide routine power needs, while batteries are used to store energy recovered during bus braking and to produce short-duration power during acceleration. Argonne carried out evaluation and endurance testing on several lead-acid and nickel/cadmium batteries selected by the bus developer as potential candidates for the bus application. Argonne conducted over 10,000 hours of testing, simulating more than 80,000 miles of fuel cell bus operation, for the nickel/cadmium battery, which was ultimately selected for use in the three hybrid buses built under the direction of H-Power Corp.

Miller, J.F.; Webster, C.E.; Tummillo, A.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

RTD Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: Interim Review Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the data NREL collected from a project to evaluate the in-use performance of buses from the Regional Transportation District of Denver operating on B20.

Proc, K.; Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The prototype fuel cell bus was manufactured by Van Hool and ISE Corp. and features an electric hybrid drive system with a UTC Power PureMotion 120 Fuel Cell Power System and ZEBRA batteries for energy storage. The fuel cell bus started operation in April 2007, and evaluation results through October 2009 are provided in this report.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

Chandler, K. (Battelle); Norton, P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Clark, N. (West Virginia University)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fourth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fourth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from April 2008 through October 2008. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous three evaluation reports.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

SunLine Transit Agency Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Fifth Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This is the fifth evaluation report for this site, and it describes results and experiences from October 2008 through June 2009. These results are an addition to those provided in the previous four evaluation reports.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Study on Intelligent Control Strategy of Battery-Electric Bus Based on the Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How to use the lithium-ion power battery effectively, how to improve the discharging efficiency and the cycle-life of the power battery is a hotspot of research in battery-electric vehicle(BEV) field. The fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method is used ... Keywords: battery-electric bus, CAN-bus, control strategy, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method

Lin Cheng; Zhou Hui; Sun Fengchun; Nan Jinrui

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) Fuel Cell Transit Bus: Second Evaluation Report and Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at Connecticut Transit (CTTRANSIT) in Hartford for one prototype fuel cell bus and three new diesel buses operating from the same location. The evaluation period in this report (January 2008 through February 2009) has been chosen to coincide with a UTC Power propulsion system changeout that occurred on January 15, 2008.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report and Appendices, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006 compared to similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. This evaluation report includes results from November 2007 through October 2008. Evaluation results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, fuel cell bus operations at Golden Gate Transit, and evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and roadcalls).

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of Truck and Bus Automation Scenarios: Operations Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards The design for this project assumes that the ABUS system will operate on a dedicated right- of-waystandards. Like the ABUS system, the BDL system operates on a dedicated right-of-way

Botha, Jan; Day, Jennifer E.; Adibhatla, Nagabhargavi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SunLine Transit Agency SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report L. Eudy and K. Chandler Prepared under Task No. HT12.8210 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-57560 January 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

25

Early Results from DOE/NREL Transit Bus Evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation at 2005 American Public Transportation Association Conference provides status of NREL/DOE evaluations of New York City Transit and King County Metro hybrid electric buses.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA-B-10-0412 Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to support the Bio-Response Operational Testing and Evaluation (BOTE) project. The BOTE project would...

27

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the hydrogen transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA).

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Cogeneration project evaluation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a guide for evaluating and implementing cogeneration projects in North Carolina. It emphasizes economic assessment and describes cogeneration technologies and legal guidelines. Included are hypothetical projects to illustrate tax and cash flow calculations and a discussion of cogeneration/utility system interconnection. In addition, the manual contains utility rate schedules and regulations, sources of financing, equipment information, and consulting assistance.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, compressed natural gas (CNG), criteria emissions, demographic, E85, Energy Commission, environmental justice Category: Natural Gas for School Fleets, CNG Station, LNG or L/CNG Station · Bear Valley Unified School to the wholesale or retail distribution and sales stations. The projects will be assessed in two separate rounds

30

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus project is a joint development effort to produce a safe, near-zero emission, 32 passenger bus that is propelled by electric power with continuous on-board hydrogen powered battery recharging. A key initiative in the hydrogen bus development effort is a rigorous evaluation of operational safety. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., the prime contractor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, has developed a hazard analysis methodology designed to provide a systematic, comprehensive identification and evaluation of hazards. Although originally developed to support nuclear/chemical facility safety basis documentation, the SRS Methodology has widespread applicability to operations and/or systems that utilize hazardous materials and energy. This methodology was used to perform an overview hazard analysis for the H2Fuel Bus project to focus attention on those hypothetical circumstances that pose the greatest threat to the populace and property. The hazard analysis yields a listing of all known H2Fuel Bus hazards, postulated accident scenarios describing possible hazardous releases or conditions, an assessment of the scenarios in terms of frequency of occurrence and consequence, and binning in frequency-consequence space to assess the relative severity of postulated scenarios.

Hovis, G.L.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Evaluation Methods for Rail Transit Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation Methodsfor Rail Transit Projects Robert AEvaluation Methods for Rail Transit Projects Robert A.pie EVALUATION METHODS FOR RAIL TRANSIT PROJECTS ROBERT

Johnston, Robert A.; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the Burbank Bus Fleet  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's involvement.

34

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to perform machining work at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) in Kansas City, Missouri to evaluate parts that have undergone testing....

35

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASTs UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real-world bus operation world bus operation Ballard: developing strategies to Ballard:...

36

Dept. of Energy/Dept. of Transportation Gas Turbine Transit Bus Demonstration Program: program plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the program plan for a cooperative project of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA) of the Department of Transportation and the Division of Transportation Energy Conservation (TEC) of the Department of Energy to test and evaluate the use of gas-turbine engines in transit buses. UMTA is responsible for furnishing buses from UMTA grantees, technical direction for bus/engine integration, and coordination of operational use of buses in selected cities. TEC is responsible for providing gas turbines, data acquisition/reduction services, and management for the complete project. The project will be carried out in three phases. In Phase I, prototype turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be tested at a test facility to obtain baseline data. Five turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in revenue service in one city. In Phase II, preproduction turbine engines will be used. One turbine-powered bus and diesel-powered bus will be baseline tested and ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities. In Phase III, production gas turbine engines will be used. Only the turbine-powered bus will run baseline tests in this phase. Ten turbine-powered buses will be evaluated in two cities.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Uncertainty, information and project evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical method for project evaluation using techniques of financial economics which were developed originally for valuing stock options and other financial assets. It is based on the formulation and ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Pilot Program As part of the Children's Environmental Health Project, the Arizona

39

July 4, 1997 The Stanford InfoBus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 4, 1997 1 of 30 The Stanford InfoBus and Its Service Layers Augmenting the Internet Project Computer Science Department Stanford University, CA 94305 The Stanford InfoBus is a prototype service layers pro­ vided by the Stanford InfoBus: protocols for managing items and collections (DLIOP

Gravano, Luis

40

Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority: Compressed Natural Gas Transit Bus Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates compressed natural gas (CNG) powered transit buses at Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), providing a comparison between them and standard diesel transit buses.

Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Melendez, M.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Orion Bus Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bus Industries Bus Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Orion Bus Industries Place Ontario, Canada Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2001 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2002/3002_hybird_buses.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Orion Bus Industries is a company located in Ontario, Canada. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Orion_Bus_Industries&oldid=381704" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

42

Analysis of a diesel-electric hybrid urban bus system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid bus powered by a diesel engine and a battery pack has been analyzed over an idealized bus-driving cycle in Chicago. Three hybrid configurations, two parallel and one series, have been evaluated. The results indicate that the fuel economy of a hybrid bus, taking into account the regenerative braking, is comparable with that of a conventional diesel bus. Life-cycle costs are slightly higher because of the added weight and cost of the battery.

Marr, W.W.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ahlheim, M.C. [Regional Transportation Authority, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ultralight Stainless Steel Urban Bus Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While stainless steel buses are certainly not new, this study reveals opportunities for substantial improvements in structural performance.The objective of this project was to investigate the mass saving potential of ultra-high strength stainless steel as applied to the structure of a full size urban transit bus.The resulting design for a low floor,hybrid bus has an empty weight less than half that of a conventional transit bus.The reduced curb weight allows for a greater payload,without exceeding legal axle limits. A combination of finite element modeling and dynamic testing of scale models was used to predict structural performance.

J. Bruce Emmons; Leonard J. Blessing

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

The multifamily building evaluation project  

SciTech Connect

In 1991 the New York State Energy Office embarked on a comprehensive multi-year study of multifamily housing in New York City. The principal objective of the evaluation was to determine the degree to which new windows and boiler/burner retrofits installed in 22 multifamily buildings located in the New York City region save energy and whether the savings persist over a minimum of two years. Window and boiler retrofits were selected because they are popular measures and are frequently implemented with assistance from government and utility energy programs. Approaches prospectively, energy consumption monitoring and a series of on-site inspections helped explain why energy savings exceeded or fell short of expectations. In 1993, the scope of the evaluation expanded to include the monitoring of domestic hot water (DHW) consumption in order to better understand the sizing of combined heating/DHW boilers and water consumption patterns. The evaluation was one of ten proposals selected from over 100 candidates in a nationwide competition for a US Department of Energy Building Efficiency Program Grant. The Energy Office managed the project, analyzed the data and prepared the reports, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory served as technical advisor, and EME Group (New York City) installed meters and dataloggers, collected data, and inspected the retrofits. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority collaborated with the Energy Office on the DHW monitoring component. Results did not always follow predictable patterns. Some buildings far exceeded energy saving estimates while others experienced an increase in consumption. Persistence patterns were mixed. Some buildings showed a steady decline in energy savings while others demonstrated a continual improvement. A clear advantage of the research design was a frequent ability to explain results.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON (PRODUCTION TESTING) by R o y B . E v a n s , D a v i d E . B e r n h a r d t P r o g r a m s 'and P l a n s S o u t h w e s t e r n R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h L a b o r a t o r y U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h , E d u c a t i o n a n d Welfare P u b l i c H e a l t h S e r v i c e E n v i r o n m e n t a 1 H e a l t h S e r v i c e E n v i r o n m e n t a l C o n t r o l A d m i n i s t r a t i o n B u r e a u of R a d i o l o g i c a l H e a l t h D r a f t e d - O c t o b e r 1969 P u b l i s h e d - May 1 9 7 0 S e c o n d P r i n t i n g - A u g u s t 1 9 7 0 This page intentionally left blank ABSTRACT Project Rulison i s a Plowshare experiment t o i n v e s t i g a t e the f e a s i b i l i t y o f nuclear explosive s t i m u l a t i o n of n a t u r a l gas production. The detonation of t h e e x p l o s i v e took place on September 1 0 , 1969. Production t e s t i n g a c t i v i t i e s w i i l be i n i t i a t e d s i x months or more a f t e r t h e d e t o n a t i o n and w i l l e n t a i l f l

46

1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.011 examines methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Topics covered include: ...

Martland, Carl D.

47

1.011 Project Evaluation, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodologies for evaluating civil engineering projects, which typically are large-scale, long-lived projects involving many economic, financial, social, and environmental factors. Basic techniques of engineering economics, ...

Martland, Carl D. (Carl Douglas)

48

NREL: Energy Analysis - The Energy DataBus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share The Energy DataBus Register for a Demo Screen capture of the Energy DataBus's dashboards. Register for free download and install at your organization. As part of its ongoing mission to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created the Energy DataBus-a system for organizations to store and process their energy data (or any time-series data). This is a special system that allows NREL to conduct energy informatics (EI) research and development, while delivering this research to the industry in the form of plug-ins to DataBus. Organizations that have DataBus can use these plug-ins for their own energy data research. DataBus is part of NREL's portfolio of EI projects and was developed to be

49

Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Transportation & Development Policy Focus Area: Public Transit & Infrastructure Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: www.itdp.org/microsites/bus-rapid-transit-planning-guide/ The Bus Rapid Transit Planning Guide is the most comprehensive resource for planning a bus rapid transit (BRT) system, beginning with project preparation all the way through to implementation. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

50

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rear bike rack image Rear bike rack image The Laboratory provides shuttle bus services, contracted through MV Transportation Services. Routes run throughout its 200-acre facility, downtown Berkeley, local off-site facilities, UC Campus, Downtown Berkeley BART, and Rockridge BART stations. Shuttles offer free wifi onboard. Riders are asked to adhere to riding instructions. Active shuttle stops are marked with this sign: Bus sign image Shuttles run Monday through Friday, except Laboratory holidays. There is no weekend service. Special service for tours, group travel, etc. is available for a fee. All shuttles are equipped with Nextbus which uses GPS technology to enable riders to obtain real-time information on bus arrivals. Contact Bus Services at busservices@lbl.gov or 510-486-4165 to provide

51

Downtown Minneapolis Bus Layover Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Express Bus Demand by Provider #12;2008 2030 Local 41 49 Express 72 125 Total 113 174 Maximum Layover? ·! What is our current demand for bus layover facilities? ·! How will demand increase as the region seeks;Local/ Limited (steady all day) Express (Peaked) Time of Day #of Buses Downtown Bus Layover Demand #12

Minnesota, University of

52

Final Report for the H2Fuel Bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus is the world's first hydrogen-fueled electric hybrid transit bus. It was a project developed through a public/private partnership involving several leading technological and industrial organizations, with primary funding by the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goals of the project are to gain valuable information on the technical readiness and economic viability of hydrogen fueled buses and to enhance the public awareness and acceptance of emerging hydrogen technologies.

Jacobs, W.D.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects...

55

South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Name South Africa-GTZ Bus Rapid Transit Johannesburg Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner City of Johannesburg Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2006 Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References GTZ's Contribution to the Johannesburg Rea Vaya Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Project [1] Sustainable Urban Transport Project [2] Johannesburg started planning a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system in November 2006. For the city of Johannesburg and on behalf of KfW Entwicklungsbank, GTZ is working to create a network of bus routes totalling 120 kilometres

56

Bus Stop - Environment Connection: Do Characteristics of the Built Environment Correlate with Bus Stop Crime?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Correlate with Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett Anastasiawith Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett Anastasia Loukaitou-Correlate with Bus Stop Crime? Robin Liggett, Anestasia

Liggett, Robin S; Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia; Iseki, Hiroyuki

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Polylith Software Bus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a system called Polylith that helps programmers prepare and interconnect mixed-language software components for execution in heterogeneous environments. Polylith's principal benefit is that programmers are free to implement functional requirements separately from their treatment of interfacing requirements; this means that once an application has been developed for use in one execution environment (such as a distributed network) it can be adapted for reuse in other environments (such as a shared-memory multiprocessor) by automatic techniques. This flexibility is provided without loss of performance. We accomplish this by creating a new run-time organization for software. An abstract decoupling agent, called the software bus, is introduced between the system components. Heterogeneity in language and architecture is accommodated since program units are prepared to interface directly to the bus, not to other program units. Programmers specify application structure in terms of ...

James M. Purtilo

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Bus application of oxygen-enrichment technology and diesel-electric hybrid systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) mandate very strict limits on particulate, smoke, and other emissions from city buses. The use of alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas (CNG) or methanol, can help transit operators, such as the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), meet the mandated limits. However, the capital investment needed to convert the fueling infrastructure and buses is large, as is the expense of training personnel. If a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus can be implemented with the help of oxygen-enrichment technology or a diesel-electric hybrid system, this large investment could be postponed for many years. The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) initiated this project to evaluate the possibility of applying these technologies to CTA buses. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a limited number of engine tests and computer analyses and concluded that both concepts are practical and will help in a {open_quotes}clean diesel{close_quotes} bus that can meet the mandated limits of the CAA amendments. The oxygen enrichment of combustion air depends on the availability of a compact and economical membrane separator. Because the technology for this critical component is still under development, it is recommended that an actual bus demonstration be delayed until prototype membranes are available. The hybrid propulsion system is ready for the demonstration phase, and it is recommended that the CTA and RTA commence planning for a bus demonstration.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of a Current Source Active Power Filter to Reduce the DC Bus Capacitor in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Knoxville, TN, 37996, USA tolbert@utk.edu Abstract ­ In hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), a battery-source inverter, dc bus capacitor, Electric vehicle, Harmonic current, Hybrid electric vehicle. I. INTRODUCTION Electric Vehicle Traction Drive Shengnan Li Student Member, IEEE The University of Tennessee Department

Tolbert, Leon M.

60

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Economic Evaluation of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Available Alternative Fuel School Bus Products--2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of the currently available (and soon to be available) model year 2004 alternative fuel school bus and school bus engine products. It includes information from Blue Bird Corporation, Collins Bus Corporation, Corbeil Bus, Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, Thomas Built Buses, Inc., Clean Air Partners, Cummins Westport, and Deere & Company.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Manhattan Project: Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer EVALUATIONS OF TRINITY Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer EVALUATIONS OF TRINITY (July 1945) Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 The War Enters Its Final Phase, 1945 Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Late Spring 1945 The Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 Safety and the Trinity Test, July 1945 Evaluations of Trinity, July 1945 Potsdam and the Final Decision to Bomb, July 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945 The Atomic Bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 1945 Japan Surrenders, August 10-15, 1945 The Manhattan Project and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Only minutes after the world's first ever atomic explosion, Leslie Groves and Robert Oppenheimer (above) began composing their report for the Secretary of War and President Truman. There was a sense of urgency surrounding this notification, as Truman had already arrived at Potsdam (outside of Berlin) to confer with other Allied leaders on the conclusion of the war with Japan. Now that the potential of the bomb had been proven, the calculations behind the Potsdam negotiations were dramatically different.

63

COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS DEMONSTRATION BUS 7. Author{s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: 1) fuel consumption, 2) tire wear, and 3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, Which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Cheng-ming Wu; Ron Matthews; Mark Euritt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has partnered with Proterra, a Colorado-based bus manufacturer, to bring its first fuel cell bus to the area. The bus design features a battery-dominant plug-in hybrid...

65

Evaluating flexibility in railroad construction projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to valuate flexibilities in a large-scale railroad construction project. In general, a railroad construction project involves a large amount of flexibilities due to its long construction period and conflicts ...

Oh, Choong Ryun, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Bus industry market study. Report -- Task 3.2: Fuel cell/battery powered bus system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the commercialization of fuel cells for transportation, Georgetown University, as a part of the DOE/DOT Fuel Cell Transit Bus Program, conducted a market study to determine the inventory of passenger buses in service as of December, 1991, the number of buses delivered in 1991 and an estimate of the number of buses to be delivered in 1992. Short term and long term market projections of deliveries were also made. Data was collected according to type of bus and the field was divided into the following categories which are defined in the report: transit buses, school buses, commercial non-transit buses, and intercity buses. The findings of this study presented with various tables of data collected from identified sources as well as narrative analysis based upon interviews conducted during the survey.

Zalbowitz, M.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

GOFER: A system for evaluating projects in the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an APL program for evaluating investment projects in the oil and gas industry. It discusses the financial issues and the programming considerations involved.

Frank B. Arthur

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Evaluating Clean Development Mechanism Projects in the Cement Industry Using a Process-Step Benchmarking Approach Secondary menu...

69

Berkeley Lab: Special Bus/Shuttle Service Reservations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Service Special Service Buses and/or Vans are available for special service by reservation. Costs are: $136.50 required 2 hour minimum $68.25 per vehicle each additional hour Bus image Bus image Buses accommodate: 41 passengers (26 Seated plus 15 Standing) (and up to 2 wheelchair passengers) Vans accommodate: 15 passengers To arrange special service shuttle transportation: Fill out the request form below A valid project id is required for special service requests Complete the form and click on the "send" button The request for special bus service will be sent to busservices@lbl.gov and reviewed. A confirmation will be sent back via email to the requestor regarding the status. For additional information contact: Kori Porter at 486-5112 or email busservices@lbl.gov.

70

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Agency/Company /Organization: Global Environment Facility Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Adaptation, Policies/deployment programs Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/ENVIRONMENT/Resources/DevCC1_Adaptation.pd Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond Screenshot References: Economic Evaluation of Climate Change Adaptation Projects: Approaches for the Agricultural Sector and Beyond[1] Overview "This paper identifies key challenges and solutions for carrying out

71

On Bus-Stop Crime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Martin Wachs, “Crime in Public Transit Systems: AnOn Bus-Stop Crime B Y A N A S TA S I A L O U K A I T O U - Sas common settings for crime, pro v i d i n g cover for

Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia; Liggett, Robin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006) Each year since 1996, EIA's Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the projections included in previous editions of the AEO. Each year, the comparison adds the projections from the most recent AEO and updates the historical data to the most recently available. The comparison summarizes the relationship of the AEO reference case projections since 1982 to realized outcomes by calculating the average absolute percent differences for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2006. Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review, 2006 Report

73

Switching surge test results ehv substation bus configurations  

SciTech Connect

The industry has been actively engaged in, and has presented many results of, ehv switching surge test programs associated with transmission line designs. It would seem equally important that similar efforts be staged relative to ehv switching surge capabilities of the terminal equipment as it would normally be found in its variety of configurations. Toward this end, a series of switching surge test programs on a number of substation bus configurations was conducted. Particular emphasis was placed on the determination of switching surge characteristics of the air gaps found in ehv substation bus designs. The test data are presented with pertinent data evaluations in an attempt to provide a more refined basis for the application of final judgments to bus designs for 345, 500, and 750 kV substations.

Hertig, G.E.; Kelly, W.B.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electrical system architecture having high voltage bus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical system architecture is disclosed. The architecture has a power source configured to generate a first power, and a first bus configured to receive the first power from the power source. The architecture also has a converter configured to receive the first power from the first bus and convert the first power to a second power, wherein a voltage of the second power is greater than a voltage of the first power, and a second bus configured to receive the second power from the converter. The architecture further has a power storage device configured to receive the second power from the second bus and deliver the second power to the second bus, a propulsion motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus, and an accessory motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus.

Hoff, Brian Douglas (East Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

from the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space, the project evaluation indicated that the porosity, void space, and permeability of the target formations were lower than expected, and that the pressure in the formations increased with low injection rates. These results confirm the complex nature of the formations and demonstrate the importance of extensive drilling, formation evaluation, and testing to characterize and identify appropriate formations for CO 2 storage within the Appalachian Basin prior to injection. In addition to providing a significant geologic understanding of the formation, the project also provided several "lessons learned," ranging from practices

76

Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

PinBus Interface Design  

SciTech Connect

On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and the Melter Feed Hold Tank February 2013 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley, New York This page is intentionally blank. WASTE-INCIDENTAL-TO-REPROCESSING EVALUATION FOR THE WVDP CFMT AND MFHT CONTENTS Revision 0 i NOTATION (Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Units).................................................. v 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose. ................................................................................................................. 2

79

Enterprise Service Bus Implementation Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define an implementation profile for International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61968 using technologies commonly found on an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB). More specifically, this document describes how message payloads defined by parts 3 through 9 of IEC 61968 are conveyed using Web Services and the Java Message Service (JMS). The goal is to provide details that are sufficient to enable implementations of IEC 61968 to be interoperable.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

McKay, R.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment is heavy and costly * Slow response time of the fuel cell adversely affects regenerative energy recovery potential and efficiency Barriers to full fuel cell bus...

82

NREL: Technology Transfer - Renewable Hydrogen Bus Teaches ...  

The bus filled up at NREL’s on-site hydrogen fueling station, which dispenses hydrogen made with wind and solar energy.

83

A comprehensive study on IEC61850 process bus architecture and spit bus based differential protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEC61850 communication standard for digital substation automation creates a new way to think about conventional protection scheme and configuration of substation. The presence of communication link in process bus makes a revolutionary change for future ... Keywords: IEC61850, bus fault detection unit (BFDU), nonconventional instrumental transformer (NCIT), process bus, sampled measured value (SMV)

Mojaharul Islam; Hong-Hee Lee

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

Bleakly, Denise Rae

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2009) Each year since 1996, EIA's Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the projections included in previous editions of the AEO. Each year, the comparison adds the projections from the most recent AEO and updates the historical data to the most recently available. The comparison summarizes the relationship of the AEO reference case projections since 1982 to realized outcomes by calculating the average absolute percent differences for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2009. Annual Energy Outlook Restrospective Review, 2009 Report pdf images Table 1. Comparison of Absolute Percent Difference between AEO Reference Case Projections

86

Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barron, W.F. [Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong); Kamel, A.M. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt); Santiago, H.T. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Barron, W.F. (Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong)); Kamel, A.M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)); Santiago, H.T. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Alternative Fuel School Bus Information Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 4-page Clean Cities fact sheet provides a list of important resources for learning more about alternative fuels in school buses. It includes information regarding Alternative Fuel School Bus Manufacturers, Alternative Fuel HD Engine Manufacturers, Alternative Fuel School Bus Operators, and Key Web Resources for Alternative Fuels.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Interprocessor bus switching system for simultaneous communication in plural bus parallel processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bus switching apparatus and method for multiple processor computer systems comprises a plurality of bus switches interconnected by branch buses. Each processor or other module of the system is connected to a spigot of a bus switch. Each bus switch also serves as part of a backplane of a modular crate hardware package. A processor initiates communication with another processor by identifying that other processor. The bus switch to which the initiating processor is connected identifies and secures, if possible, a path to that other processor, either directly or via one or more other bus switches which operate similarly. If a particular desired path through a given bus switch is not available to be used, an alternate path is considered, identified and secured. 11 figures.

Atac, R.; Fischler, M.S.; Husby, D.E.

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL Energy DataBus/Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » NREL Energy DataBus/Partners < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Energy Databus Commercial Partners Buffalo.png Buffalo Software offers Databus Support and Maintenance contracts, Installation of Databus and also offers feature development for new custom databus features. We have some committers on the NREL Energy Databus project and can easily customize and help make the Energy Databus meet your company's needs. We also offer training on Databus as well as certification to ensure your devices work with Databus. Buffalo Software (303) 517-8902 Magpie.jpg

91

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Instructions for Riders  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Riders Instructions for Riders Shuttle stops are marked with this sign: Bus sign image Tips for riders: When you see a shuttle bus approaching WAVE AT THE DRIVER so the driver knows you want to board the bus For safety reasons, shuttle bus drivers can only pick-up and drop-off passengers at designated stops. Shuttle services are for Berkeley Lab employee and guest use only. All riders are required to show ID when boarding off-site buses. Acceptable ID's are: LBNL badge, UC Berkeley student and faculty ID badge, DOE badge, or UCOP badge. Guests are required to present a visitor bus pass, email, or permission from Lab host, written on official letterhead. See Site Access for more information. As you board, tell the driver the building number of your destination. The driver will be able to assist you with directions.

92

Shuttle Bus and Couriers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus and Couriers Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is inappropriate and against the

93

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Instructions for Bicyclists  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Bicyclists Instructions for Bicyclists Front bike rack image Rear bike rack image Front bike rack Rear bike rack Bicyclists are required to wear helmets while riding at the Berkeley Lab. LBNL buses are equipped with bicycle racks in the front and rear of the bus. Use bicycle rack at your own risk. Berkeley Lab does not assume liability for damage to your bicycle. If you experience difficulties, or notice the bicycle rack is not working properly, please notify the bus operator and/or contact the bus supervisor at 486-4165 or email busservices@lbl.gov and/or post your comments with specific information on the Operations Suggestion box. Loading a bicycle on the bus: Prepare your bicycle for loading by: removing water bottles, pumps and other loose items that could fall off while the bus is in motion.

94

Quantitative motor function evaluation: the VAMA project experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims at reviewing the experience maturated over the past decade by this group in the framework of the VAMA (Italian acronym for “evaluation of motor ability in the elderly”) project. The objective of that research programme was ... Keywords: Biomechanics, Data Mining, Motor Ability Assessment, Movement Analysis, Musculoskeletal Modelling

Aurelio Cappozzo; Valentina Camomilla; Ugo Della Croce; Claudia Mazzà; Giuseppe Vannozzi

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) 2000.03.01 - 2006.02.28 Site(s) SGP General Description The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties

96

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2008) Each year since 1996, EIA's Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced a comparison between realized energy outcomes and the projections included in previous editions of the AEO. Each year, the comparison adds the projections from the most recent AEO and updates the historical data to the most recently available. The comparison summarizes the relationship of the AEO reference case projections since 1982 to realized outcomes by calculating the average absolute percent differences for several of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2008. Annual Energy Outlook Restrospective Review, 2008 Report Revisions to Gross Domestic Product and Implications for the Comparisons

97

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Regulations School bus drivers must turn off bus engines as soon as possible at loading

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators must turn off the bus engine immediately after

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus USA School Bus USA to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus USA on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean School Bus USA Clean School Bus USA is a public-private partnership that focuses on reducing children's exposure to harmful diesel exhaust by limiting school bus idling, implementing pollution reduction technologies, improving route

100

INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis and Development of a Project Evaluation Process.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration has responsibility, assigned by the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-501; 16 USC 839), for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. One aspect of this responsibility is evaluation of project proposals and ongoing and completed projects. This report recommends formalized procedures for conducting this work in an accurate, professional, and widely respected manner. Recommendations and justifications are based largely on interviews with federal and state agencies and Indian tribes in the Northwest and nationally. Organizations were selected that have evaluation systems of their own, interact with the Fish and Wildlife Program, or have similar objectives or obligations. Perspective on aspects to be considered were obtained from the social science of evaluation planning. Examples of procedures and quantitative criteria are proposed. 1 figure, 2 tables.

Coutant, Charles C.; Cada Glenn F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 5.2 Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribution of ballast for evaluation in this project: Advance Transformer, Aromat, Aurswald, Delta Power

103

Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Policy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Policy on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Policy School bus drivers or drivers of other vehicles that the school district

105

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the ATR Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement  

SciTech Connect

Near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project, subject of this determination, will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3) and associated switchgear. More specifically, INL proposes transitioning ATR to 100% commercial power with appropriate emergency backup to include: • Provide commercial power as the normal source of power to the ATR loads currently supplied by diesel-electric power. • Provide backup power to the critical ATR loads in the event of a loss of commercial power. • Replace obsolescent critical ATR power distribution equipment, e.g., switchgear, transformers, motor control centers, distribution panels. Completion of this and two other age-related projects (primary coolant pump and motor replacement and emergency firewater injection system replacement) will resolve major age related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues make the project a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #2 (Footprint change). The addition of a new PC-4 structure to the ATR Facility to house safety-related SSCs requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., structural qualification, fire suppression) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions of the housed equipment. 2. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps requires careful attention and analysis to ensure it meets a project primary object to maintain or reduce CDF and does not negatively affect the efficacy of the currently approved strategy. 3. Evaluation Criteria #5 (Create the need for new or revised safety SSCs). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps, based on the pre-conceptual design, will require the addition of two quick start diesel generators, their associated power coordination/distribution controls, and a UPS to the list of safety-related SSCs. Similarly to item 1 above, the addition of these active SSCs to the list of safety-related SSCs and replacement of the E-3 bus requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., seismic qualification, isolation of redundant trains from common fault failures) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions.

Noel Duckwtiz

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Evaluation of the Storms Pool Improved Waterflood Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of the performance of the Storms Pool Improved Waterflood Project has been completed. This project was designed to evaluate the efficiency of polymer flooding in a reservoir which had been extensively waterflooded. The project was conducted in a 100-acre pattern in the Waltersburg sandstone of the Storms Pool Field, located in White County, Illinois. This field is typical of many old oil fields in the Illinois Basin. A total of 703,000 barrels of biopolymer-thickened water was injected, which represents about 23% of the pore volume. The project was terminated early, as expenses were greatly exceeding revenues. The project resulted in little or no incremental oil production. The lack of response is attributed mainly to the conditions in which the polymer was injected. The project indicates that the injection of a polymer which acts dominantly to increase viscosity has little potential for increasing oil recovery under the conditions where a waterflood has been successful, the mobility ratio is favorable, and when initiated in the latter stages of the flood. The movable oil saturation is thought to have been lower than anticipated by the operators. Biodegradation of the polymer probably occurred, as evidenced by the lack of polymer in offset wells and in back-produced injection water. The lack of data collected and/or reported prevented a thorough analysis of the project. Field equipment and procedures appeared adequate for the mixing, filtration, and injection of polymer made up in river water. Some problems occurred during those periods of the year when the river water contained a large amount of dispersed fines. The use of a river water is questioned due to the problems of removing dispersed fines and to the increased protection required to prevent biodegradation of the biopolymer. 26 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Norton, D.K.; Dauben, D.L.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Fuel Cell Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility & High Impact 3 FCEB Development Timeline since 2000 California Air Resources Board Transit Rule Early demonstrations of single prototypes DOE begins funding NREL technology validation for FCEBs First multiple bus fleet demonstrations in California FTA initiates National Fuel Cell Bus Program and

108

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BUS++  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUS++ BUS++ New generation platform for building energy, ventilation, noise level and indoor air quality simulations. A network assumption is adopted, and BUS++ allows both steady-state and dynamic simulations on a desired level of accuracy. BUS++ includes modern solution routines and has passed the most commonly used rigorous air flow and heat transfer test cases. However, only a limited number of special applications are completed. Keywords energy performance, ventilation, air flow, indoor air quality, noise level Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Special expertise needed for utilizing all potential calculation features. Common knowledge of building components needed for using special applications with graphical user interfaces. Users 20 users in VTT Building Technology and other companies in Finland.

109

Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emissions School Low Emissions School Bus Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emissions School Bus Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emissions School Bus Grants The Lower-Emission School Bus Program (Program) provides grant funding for

111

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transit and School Bus Transit and School Bus Users Group to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit and School Bus Users Group on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions Natural Gas Transit & School Bus Users Group

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Retrofit School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Reimbursement The Illinois Department of Education will reimburse any qualifying school

113

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Conversion Research to someone by E-mail School Bus Conversion Research to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research

114

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emissions Bus Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan As part of a state effort to identify strategies to expand the availability

115

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean School Bus Clean School Bus Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean School Bus Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean School Bus Requirements Full-size school buses equipped with an engine from Model Year (MY) 1993 or older may not be used to transport school children in Rhode Island.

116

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Retrofit School Bus Retrofit Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Grant Program The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administers the Clean Diesel

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement The Mississippi State Department of Education requires public school

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Pilot School Bus Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Pilot Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Pilot Program The Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles will approve up to three participants for a pilot program to operate Type II school buses that are

119

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Emissions School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Funding The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Fuel Cell Bus National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) The goal of the NFCBP is to facilitate the development of commercially

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Idle Reduction Requirement All local boards of education in North Carolina have adopted idle reduction

122

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects JayantEnergy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects Table ofEnergy-Efficiency And Electric Power Projects The Impact Of

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Project Startup: Evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 Hybrid-Electric Delivery Trucks (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the project startup for evaluating Coca-Cola's Class 8 hybrid-electric delivery trucks.

Not Available

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of the Wilmington Field micellar-polymer project  

SciTech Connect

A review of the performance of the City of Long Beach micellar-polymer pilot has been completed. The pilot area was the Hx/sub a/ sand of the Upper Terminal VB Zone in the Wilmington Field. The Upper Terminal producing zone is an unconsolidated oil-bearing sandstone. Oil production from the Upper Terminal zone had been steadily declining despite pressure maintenance programs initially using gas injection and, most recently, waterflooding. The micellar-polymer pilot was an attempt to find a means of arresting the decline of oil production. Marathon Oil Company provided the City of Long Beach with a micellar-polymer - Maraflood (TM) - design. The projected oil recovery beyond waterflooding for the Maraflood (TM) process is about 137,000 barrels, or 10% pore volume, of incremental oil. This recovery is approximately two-thirds of expected recovery based upon core flood results and a simple simulation model evaluation of volumetric sweep efficiency. The model study assumed optimal phase behavior was achieved and tertiary oil was displaced by a unit mobility flood. A more sophisticated chemical flood simulator could have been used; however, its results would have been easily challenged because quantitative phase behavior and rheological data were not available. The actual recovery efficiency is high when compared with the recovery efficiency estimated from core flood and simulation model results. Consequently, the project appears to be a technical success. Unfortunately, the project must be considered uneconomic based upon a total project cost of around $9.7 million. The poor economics are attributed to operating problems associated with fluid production from an unconsolidated sand and corrosion problems due to the presence of Desulfovibrio bacteria. 17 references, 41 figures, 26 tables.

Fanchi, J.R.; Duane, N.C.; Hill, C.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule Shuttle Bus Route and Schedule The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is

128

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Incentive Any county that uses compressed natural gas (CNG) for the operation of any

129

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars

130

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel School Bus Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel School Bus Regulations The Virginia Board of Education may not unreasonably limit the authority of

131

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Emissions Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Emissions Reduction Each full-sized school bus with a Model Year (MY) 1994 or newer engine that transports children in the state must be equipped with specific emissions

132

Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group Meeting Archives to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: Natural Gas Transit (and School Bus) Users Group Meeting Archives on...

133

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Retrofit Retrofit Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Retrofit Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School Bus Retrofit Program The goals of the Connecticut Clean School Bus Program are to: 1) establish grants for municipalities and local and regional school boards to reimburse

134

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development

135

3 One-Line Diagram and Bus/Branch Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-line diagram and bus/branch model Ohm’s law Losses Kirchoff’s law Power flow calculations (different model idealizations) Reference bus Power System & LMP Fundamentals – WEM 301 © 2008 ISO New England Inc.

Eugene Litvinov Director; Marginal Loss Pricing; Market System; Major Components; Line Line; Line Line

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigation Projects in the Electric Power Sector, OECD andfor the California Electric Power Sector. Berkeley, CA:Energy Efficiency and Electric Power Projects. LBNL-48242.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SunLine Tests HHICE Bus in Desert Climate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the demonstration of a hybrid hydrogen internal combustion engine (HHICE) bus at SunLine Transit Agency.

Not Available

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Philippines: rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report No. 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AID's overall evaluation of its Philippine Rural Electrification (RE) program, consisting of eight successive projects, had limited effect on the rural poor and the economic development process. This program began in 1965 and has since energized 844 (59% of the national total) Philippine municipalities, 9088 (27%) barrios, 1,159,434 (20%) households, and 101 new cooperatives; resulting in a change of schedule for total national energization from 1980 to 1987. To improve the productive capacity of the poor, cooperatives were organized and lent funds to extend electrical power into their areas. Many of the poor, however, could not afford its installation, continued use, or more than one or two light bulbs a month. Community lighting, such as street-lighting, indirectly helped the poor in various ways, such as by providing greater personal security. Those with sufficient financial resources or skills were able to use the electricity for entrepreneurial activities. RE impact upon development occurred in areas with a concentrated population, available technical skills and capital, and access to large and diverse markets. Active promotion of electricity-dependent investments and projects also increased program impact.

Mandel, D.H.; Allgeier, P.F.; Wasserman, G.; Hickey, G.; Salazar, R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Eubank Field, Kansas: a formation evaluation and secondary recovery project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Basal Chester sand, an oil reservoir pertaining to the last stage of the Mississippian, is located some 3,000 ft below the Permian reservoir of the Hugoton Gas Field (Kansas). Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (Anadarko) has acquired significant acreage in Haskell County (Kansas), a part of the Eubank Field. The Basal Chester sand in the Eubank Field as deposited in a paleovalley system that was incised in the Sainte Genevieve and Saint Louis limestones. Anadarko plans to develop a secondary recovery project in the Eubank Field, and this thesis was proposed to evaluate the Chester in terms of reservoir and fluids properties. The purpose of this thesis is to provide recommendations to implement a waterflood project at Eubank Field. All of the wells in this field have well logs, five wells were cored, and a 26 square-mile, 3-D seismic survey was performed in 1995. I have summarized all of the data available to date-well logs, production data, core data, PVT data, pressure transient tests, wellborn sketches-and organized these data into an electronic database. My focus in this work is twofold: well log interpretation and analysis of the oil production data-flow rates mostly, since very few pressure data are available. The log analysis follows Holditch's guidelines and Schlumberger's textbooks. I also present a well log-derived permeability profile for most welts, where this permeability profile is used to guide the development of my overall reservoir description. To perform production data analysis, I use the decline type curve analysis method. This approach allows a quick estimate at current conditions of the oil-in-place, drainage area, as well as the permeability of the formation and requires formation and fluid properties as input. I have evaluated all existing data for 43 production wells.

Dexheimer, Dominique

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Annual Progress Report Fish Research Project Oregon : Project title, Evaluation of Habitat Improvements -- John Day River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes data collected in 1983 to evaluate habitat improvements in Deer, Camp, and Clear creeks, tributaries of the John Day River. The studies are designed to evaluate changes in abundance of spring chinook and summer steelhead due to habitat improvement projects and to contrast fishery benefits with costs of construction and maintenance of each project. Structure types being evaluated are: (1) log weirs, rock weirs, log deflectors, and in stream boulders in Deer Creek; (2) log weirs in Camp Creek; and (3) log weir-boulder combinations and introduced spawning gravel in Clear Creek. Abundance of juvenile steelhead ranged from 16% to 119% higher in the improved (treatment) area than in the unimproved (control) area of Deer Creek. However, abundance of steelhead in Camp Creek was not significantly different between treatment and control areas. Chinook and steelhead abundance in Clear Creek was 50% and 25% lower, respectively in 1983, than the mean abundance estimated in three previous years. The age structure of steelhead was similar between treatment and control areas in Deer and Clear creeks. The treatment area in Camp Creek, however, had a higher percentage of age 2 and older steelhead than the control. Steelhead redd counts in Camp Creek were 36% lower in 1983 than the previous five year average. Steelhead redd counts in Deer Creek were not made in 1983 because of high streamflows. Chinook redds counted in Clear Creek were 64% lower than the five year average. Surface area, volume, cover, and spawning gravel were the same or higher than the corresponding control in each stream except in Deer Creek where there was less available cover and spawning gravel in sections with rock weirs and in those with log deflectors, respectively. Pool:riffle ratios ranged from 57:43 in sections in upper Clear Creek with log weirs to 9:91 in sections in Deer Creek with rock weirs. Smolt production following habitat improvements is estimated for each stream. Preliminary cost estimates are summarized for each habitat project and economic benefits are calculated for Deer Creek.

Olsen, Erik A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy DataBus (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

NREL has developed the Energy DataBus, an open-sourced software that collects massive amounts of energy-related data at second-to-second intervals; stores it in a massive, scalable database; and turns it into useful information.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission or Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission or Alternative Fuel Bus Acquisition Requirement on AddThis.com...

143

Evaluating winter orographic cloud seeding: Design of the Wyoming Weather Modification Pilot Project (WWMPP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the Wyoming Weather Modification Pilot Project (WWMPP) is presented. This project, funded by the State of Wyoming, is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of cloud seeding with silver iodide in the Medicine Bow and Sierra Madre ...

Daniel Breed; Roy Rasmussen; Courtney Weeks; Bruce Boe; Terry Deshler

144

US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program: ADIS Algorithm Evaluation Project Plan Update  

SciTech Connect

This document is an update to the 'ADIS Algorithm Evaluation Project Plan' specified in the Statement of Work for the US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program, as deliverable II.D.1. The original plan was delivered in August 2010. This document modifies the plan to reflect modified deliverables reflecting delays in obtaining a database refresh. This document describes the revised schedule of the program deliverables. The detailed description of the processes used, the statistical analysis processes and the results of the statistical analysis will be described fully in the program deliverables. The US-VISIT Identity Matching Algorithm Evaluation Program is work performed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under IAA HSHQVT-07-X-00002 P00004 from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

Grant, C W; Lenderman, J S; Gansemer, J D

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Multi-Project Baselines for Evaluation of Industrial Energy-Efficiency and Electric Power Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal and oil. Although coal-fired plants use coal as primarycarbon-intensive than coal-fired plants. Project 2 is basedexample, the hypothetical coal-fired plant in India (Project

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

Morris, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Substation Bus Ampacity Uprating: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuous increase in demand for electric power has pushed some of the components in the Con Edison system to their design limits. These limits, established in the past, were often selected with general and conservative assumptions. Consequently, Con Edison requested the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the possibility of raising the rating of their 3,000A substation bus to a higher value.The first step in the investigation was to conduct a feasibility study ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

A risk evaluation for the fuel retrieval sub-project  

SciTech Connect

This study reviews the technical, schedule and budget baselines of the sub-project to assure all significant issues have been identified on the sub-project issues management list. The issue resolution dates are identified and resolution plans established. Those issues that could adversely impact procurement activities have been uniquely identified on the list and a risk assessment completed.

Carlisle, B.S.

1996-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

149

Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating greenhouse gas emissions reductions from climate change mitigation projects requires construction of a baseline that sets emissions levels that would have occurred without the project. This paper describes a standardized multiproject methodology for setting baselines, represented by the emissions rate (kg C/kWh), for electric power projects. A standardized methodology would reduce the transaction costs of projects. The most challenging aspect of setting multiproject emissions rates is determining the vintage and types of plants to include in the baseline and the stringency of the emissions rates to be considered, in order to balance the desire to encourage no- or low-carbon projects while maintaining environmental integrity. The criteria for selecting power plants to include in the baseline depend on characteristics of both the project and the electricity grid it serves. Two case studies illustrate the application of these concepts to the electric power grids in eastern India and South Africa. We use hypothetical, but realistic, climate change projects in each country to illustrate the use of the multiproject methodology, and note the further research required to fully understand the implications of the various choices in constructing and using these baselines.

Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; Lefranc, Maurice; Roy, Joyashree; Winkler, Harald; Spalding-Fecher, Randall

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change July 1, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | Joshua DeLung Twelve Dartmouth College students stopped at the U.S. Department of Energy Monday in a Big Green Bus, a 1989 MCI coach with an engine modified to run on waste vegetable oil. The students' goals are to promote alternative fuels and sustainable living with the slogan "Vehicle for Change" on this sixth-annual cross-country educational tour.

151

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Fuel Cell Bus Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) held a Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on June 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Annual Merit Review. The workshop plenary and breakout session brought together technical experts from industry, end users, academia, DOE national laboratories, and other government agencies to address the status and technology needs of fuel cell powered buses. Meeting Summary Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Presentations Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview & Purpose, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, DOE Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology, Nico Bouwkamp, CaFCP and Leslie Eudy, NREL Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications, Tom Madden, UTC Power, LLC

152

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change Big Green Bus: A Vehicle for Change July 1, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | The Big Green Bus rolled into Washington, D.C., and parked outside the Department of Energy offices Monday to showcase its clean energy features. | Photo Courtesy of Joshua Delung | Joshua DeLung Twelve Dartmouth College students stopped at the U.S. Department of Energy Monday in a Big Green Bus, a 1989 MCI coach with an engine modified to run on waste vegetable oil. The students' goals are to promote alternative fuels and sustainable living with the slogan "Vehicle for

153

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Project Technologies: Demand Response  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of a limited number of demand response technologies and implementations deployed in the SGIG projects.

Fuller, Jason C.; Prakash Kumar, Nirupama; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evaluating Uncertainties in the Projection of Future Drought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainty in the projection of future drought occurrence was explored for four different drought indices using two model ensembles. The first ensemble expresses uncertainty in the parameter space of the third Hadley Centre climate model, ...

Eleanor J. Burke; Simon J. Brown

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in S. Africa: Darling wind farm. Cape Town: Energy andon total generation. Even wind farms may be able to reliablyProject 3 is the Darling wind farm, a plan to install 5 MW

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of two public housing projects : Baghdad and Mosul, Iraq  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stage nine of the design process of the projects deals with the design of the cluster, which is a basic social and administrative unit proposed for settlement. The cluster represents a unit of approximately 200 persons. A ...

Atto, Faida Noori Salim

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Multiproject baselines for evaluation of electric power projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the coal and natural gas power plants. The coal plant coulda new natural gas plant and imported hydroelectric power (natural gas power project may claim that it offsets electricity from a coal power plant

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NREL Energy DataBus/Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Databus Factsheet Energydatabusfacthseet.pdf Read more about the Energy Databus Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNRELEnergyDataBusResources&oldid662041...

159

Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

Shankar, Shobha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Performance Evaluation and Opportunity Assessment for St. Bernard Project  

SciTech Connect

This report describes efforts by IBACOS, a Department of Energy Building America research team, in the St. Bernard Project, a nonprofit, community-based organization whose mission is to assist Hurricane Katrina survivors return to their homes in the New Orleans area. The report focuses on energy modeling results of two plans that the St. Bernard Project put forth as 'typical' building types and on quality issues that were observed during the field walk and Best Practice recommendations that could improve the energy efficiency and durability of the renovated homes.

Dickson, B.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ecuador rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report 21  

SciTech Connect

The direct and indirect benefits of rural electrification in Ecuador warrant A.I.D.'s continued sponsorship of such programs. This assessment of A.I.D.'s 1964-75 sponsorship of four electrification projects in Ecuador concludes that, although implemented along with other development projects such as road construction, the program was a key factor in upgrading the towns of Santa Elena, Santo Domingo de los Colorados, Daule, and Ambato into regional market and service centers. The main benefits of this program, which was not originally designed to benefit the poor, were job creation, access to agricultural product processing facilities, and increased opportunities for small commercial enterprises.

Kessler, J.L.; Ballantyne, J.; Maushammer, R.; Simancas, N.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Fuzzy regression model of R&D project evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineering and technology play an important role in strengthening the competitive power of a company and in surviving a severe competition in the world. About 70% of the total R&D investment in Japan comes from the private sector. It is the most important ... Keywords: AHP, Fuzzy regression model, Management of technology and engineering, Project management, R&D

Shinji Imoto; Yoshiyuki Yabuuchi; Junzo Watada

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Evaluation of the Impact of EISA Federal Project Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE's Federal Energy Management Program has been charged by Office of Management and Budget to conduct an evaluation on actual and verifiable energy savings and carbon emissions reductions from federal energy management investments made across the Federal government as a result of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. This study presents the findings from that evaluation.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Wendel, Emily M.; Morris, Scott L.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Halverson, Mark A.; Livingston, Olga V.; Loper, Susan A.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study on Electric Control System for a Full Hybrid Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For efficient and reliable operation of a novel hybrid powertrain assembled in the bus, a set of control strategy combined with the structural characteristics was researched. Based on the identification of the driver's intension, this paper presented ... Keywords: full hybrid bus, eletric control system, stretegy, fuel economy

Zhiguo Kong, Hongxiu Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Database Agency/Company /Organization: EMBARQ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.brtdata.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/global-bus-rapid-transit-brt-database Language: English Related Tools European Green Cars Initiative Guidelines and Toolkits for Urban Transport Development in Medium Sized Cities in India Making Car Sharing and Car Clubs Work: Final Report ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS This tool provides public access to current data about bus rapid transit systems around the world, including data for the design, performance, and cost of these systems. The database can be filtered by location or

167

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology Lesl lie Eud dy - NREL Nico Bouwkamp - CaFCP DOE/FTA FCB Workshop DOE/FTA FCB Workshop June 7, 2010 - Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Transit Agencies FCB Demonstrations Reasons for participation Reasons for participation - Government regulations to reduce emissions - Public pressure Public pressure - Agency desire to be 'green' - Funding opportunity Funding opportunity - Learn about the newest technology 2 - Challenges: Performance Challenges: Performance Bus should match conventional bus performance Bus should match conventional bus performance - Operate 7 days/week, up to 20 hr/day - Complete day of service with one tank of fuel Complete day of service with one tank of fuel - Keep up with duty-cycle

168

A Model for the Bus System in Cuernevaca (Mexico)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bus transportation system in Cuernevaca, Mexico, has certain distinguished, innovative features and has been the subject of an intriguing, recent study by M. Krbalek and P. Seba. Krbalek and Seba analyzed the statistics of bus arrivals on Line 4 close to the city center. They studied, in particular, the bus spacing distribution and also the bus number variance measuring the fluctuations of the total number of buses arriving at a fixed location during a time interval T. Quite remarkably, it was found that these two statistics are well modeled by the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) of random matrix theory. Our goal in this paper is to provide a plausible explanation of these observations, and to this end we introduce a microscopic model for the bus line that leads simply and directly to GUE.

Jinho Baik; Alexei Borodin; Percy Deift; Toufic Suidan

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluating the Consistency between Statistically Downscaled and Global Dynamical Model Climate Change Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The consistency between rainfall projections obtained from direct climate model output and statistical downscaling is evaluated. Results are averaged across an area large enough to overcome the difference in spatial scale between these two types ...

B. Timbal; P. Hope; S. Charles

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of the Wilmington field micellar/polymer project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Long Beach micellar/polymer pilot in the Wilmington field has been evaluated. Actual recovery efficiency is about two-thirds of coreflood and simulation model estimates. This relatively high recovery efficiency represents a technically successful flood. Oil recovery was less than optimal, however, because of problems associated with production from an unconsolidated formation and the presence of Desulfovibrio bacteria.

Fanchl, J.R.; Carroll, H.B.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Evaluation of Using Infrared Thermography for quantifying Heat Losses From Buried Heat Distribution Pipes in chicago Housing Authority's Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of using infrared thermography for quantifying heat losses from buried heat distribution pipes in Chicago Housing Authority's Projects

Gary Phetteplace

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system  

SciTech Connect

A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Evaluating the Impact of Development Projects on Poverty: A Handbook for Practitioners Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate User Interface: Other Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTISPMA/Resources/handbook.pdf Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) Gold Standard Program Model Energy Development Index (EDI) ... further results A handbook that seeks to provide project managers and policy analysts with

175

Evaluation of economics of hotel/motel solar hot water projects  

SciTech Connect

Experience gained by the Ames Laboratory in managing projects in the Solar Hotel/Motel Hot Water initiative is used to evaluate economic factors. The analysis studies costs and trends from a limited number of projects. Initial analysis, based on cost data presented in the project proposals, shows that cost estimates vary widely for various reasons. Further analysis, based on incurred costs as projects are completed, is a continuing process. These actual costs are normalized to the extent possible to provide consistent comparisons between the systems of various projects. Correlations between proposed costs and actual costs are made to assist future evaluation of similar projects. Several projects, which were offered a grant to participate in these Hotel/Motel demonstrations, have declined to accept the grant on economic grounds. Economic analysis of these projects provides rationale for the apparent cost ineffectiveness. Systems now in operation have provided fuel cost savings data which are presented to show system payback periods. Finally, results of economic analysis of these projects are presented together with initial conclusions regarding cost-effective solar hot water system design.

Struss, R.G.; Brohl, E.C.; Sidles, P.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of 19 projects to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. The projects' total value is approximately $35.8 million over four years, with $27.6 million of DOE funding and $8.2 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Coal is the Nation's most abundant energy resource, supplying nearly 50 percent of domestic electricity. In order for low-cost electricity from

177

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Sather Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation project that was recently installed at Sather Manufacturing (Sather) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install ECMs in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Sather as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Bather`s Proposal and Completion Report). The project consists of replacing an o d coreless induction furnace with a new, more efficient, induction furnace. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,122,000 kWh/yr, or 0.13 average megawatts. On a per-ton basis, this project will save 447 kWh/ton, which is a reduction of approximately 41% of electricity consumed per ton of steel produced. The project cost $293,469 to install, and Sather received payment of $123,780 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Based on a simple payback analysis calculated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and conversations with Sather management personnel, it was determined that this project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 10.8 mills/kWh over the project`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 24.9 mills/kWh.

Sullivan, G.P.; Spanner, G.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)* Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of Projections in Past Editions (1982-2006)* The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections, although there are a few exceptions. It is assumed that current laws and regulations that have sunset dates, but which are regularly renewed, are extended for modeling purposes. Thus, the AEO generally provides a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. While the analyses in the AEO focus primarily on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases; more than 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

179

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route DOE HQ Shuttle Bus Schedule and Route The DOE Shuttle Buses follow the same schedules between the two main Headquarters locations, Forrestal and Germantown. The buses start their routes at each Headquarters facility at the same times, see the schedule below. The subsequent stops at the other facilities are relative to the departure time of each route. Headquarters employees are reminded of the statutory provisions that authorize and limit the use of the shuttle bus service. Specific authority for the use of appropriated funds to pay for transportation for official purposes is contained in section 1344(a)(1) of Title 31, U.S. Code. Use of this transportation for any other purpose is inappropriate and against the law.

180

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Planned Changes to the LBNL Shuttle Bus System Speaker(s): Steve Black Date: December 5, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 BACKGROUND: Several recent issues of Today At Berkeley Lab, including for today, December 1, have called our attention to the planned changes to the Lab's shuttle bus system. If you have not yet viewed the description of the planned new system and the maps showing the new routes it is advisable for you to do so as the changes are significant, not just a "fine tuning". Several EETD staff members and shuttle bus riders have expressed serious concerns about the changes, which has prompted us to set up this special seminar. DESCRIPTION: Steve Black, who is fairly new to the Lab, has responsibility for a number of Laboratory support services

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Sustainable transport at MIT : improving area bus services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyday each member of the MIT community makes a decision about how they will travel to school or work. Using the Commuter Habit Survey and information regarding local bus services as guides, this report analyzes the ...

Beasley, Aimee K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Lessons Learned: Battery-Electric Transit-Bus Opportunity Charging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details the results of a study of battery-electric bus opportunity charging. This document is an interim report pending conclusion of further experiments with at least one other rapid-charging system and battery type.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Isolated Phase Bus Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on design, operating experience, and maintenance practices associated with the isophase bus system. The information is meant to be useful for system engineers, component engineers, maintenance personnel, and their supervision in understanding and maintaining this system. This document is an update to Isolated Phase Bus Maintenance Guide (EPRI report TR-112784), and the scope has been expanded to include boundary components, such as potential transformers (PTs) and current...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service (NPS) views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other NPS tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr for this tunnel to a much larger figure national

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Sather Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation project that was recently installed at Sather Manufacturing (Sather) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install ECMs in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Sather as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Bather's Proposal and Completion Report). The project consists of replacing an o d coreless induction furnace with a new, more efficient, induction furnace. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,122,000 kWh/yr, or 0.13 average megawatts. On a per-ton basis, this project will save 447 kWh/ton, which is a reduction of approximately 41% of electricity consumed per ton of steel produced. The project cost $293,469 to install, and Sather received payment of $123,780 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Based on a simple payback analysis calculated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and conversations with Sather management personnel, it was determined that this project would not have been implemented without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 10.8 mills/kWh over the project's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 24.9 mills/kWh.

Sullivan, G.P.; Spanner, G.E.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evaluation of the home-energy-rating concept and the Massachusetts Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on the results of an evaluation of a home-energy-rating concept based on a Massachusetts pilot project. The focus of the evaluation was on: (1) the compatibility of the Massachusetts rating with the RCS program, (2) who would use the rating and how, (3) qualitative estimates of benefits and costs, and (4) recommendations for further use and testing of the rating. In addition the evaluation of the rating concept also attempted to determine what if any effect the home energy rating has on the demand for energy audits, on the propensity of customers who received ratings to undertake recommended energy-efficiency home improvements, and on changes in mortgage-lending procedures for energy-efficient homes. The evaluation consisted of telephone and in-person discussions with the project developers, the various professional user groups, the recipients of the energy ratings, and control groups of audit customers that did not receive the energy rating. The evaluation was designed to determine the results of the pilot project, assess the project's effectiveness, and analyze the potential for transferring the rating procedure to other geographic locations.

Frankel, M.L.; Duberg, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluation of the home-energy-rating concept and the Massachusetts Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on the results of an evaluation of a home-energy-rating concept based on a Massachusetts pilot project. The focus of the evaluation was on: (1) the compatibility of the Massachusetts rating with the RCS program, (2) who would use the rating and how, (3) qualitative estimates of benefits and costs, and (4) recommendations for further use and testing of the rating. In addition the evaluation of the rating concept also attempted to determine what if any effect the home energy rating has on the demand for energy audits, on the propensity of customers who received ratings to undertake recommended energy-efficiency home improvements, and on changes in mortgage-lending procedures for energy-efficient homes. The evaluation consisted of telephone and in-person discussions with the project developers, the various professional user groups, the recipients of the energy ratings, and control groups of audit customers that did not receive the energy rating. The evaluation was designed to determine the results of the pilot project, assess the project's effectiveness, and analyze the potential for transferring the rating procedure to other geographic locations.

Frankel, M.L.; Duberg, J.A.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The IRPhEP is patterned after its predecessor, the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions and other miscellaneous types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in an OECD NEA Handbook entitled, “International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.” The first edition of this Handbook, the 2006 Edition spans over 2000 pages and contains data from 16 different experimental series that were

J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Project Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

issues related to the capital intensity and long lifetime ofto the increased capital intensity of the economy. Suppose

Smal, Kenneth A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fossil Asset and Project Evaluator (Energy Book System Modules) Methodologies: Highlighting the Strengths, Weaknesses and Unique Capabilities of Option Evaluation Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of EPRI's fossil generation asset management activities, two important analysis software products have been developed in recent years: Generation/Fossil Asset Evaluator and its companion Project Evaluator (CM-113198-P3-R2 and CM-113198-P4-R2). These tools are modules of EPRI's Energy Book System (EBS), which consists of modules for o Generation (Asset and Project Evaluator) o Wholesale trading (Contract Evaluator) o Retail (Product Mix) o Risk management (Risk Manager) Fossil Asset Evaluator e...

2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Responses to Public Comments on the Draft Waste- Responses to Public Comments on the Draft Waste- Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and Melter Feed Hold Tank 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing responses to the comments received from the public and from state and county agencies on the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Draft Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing (WIR) Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank (CFMT) and the Melter Feed Hold Tank (MFHT), referred to hereafter as the Draft Evaluation. As a matter of policy and to provide greater transparency in its efforts to cleanup waste at the WVDP, DOE made the Draft Evaluation available for public and state review and comment, as

192

Evaluation, 1979: a look at conservation projects and activities at Seattle City Light  

SciTech Connect

The attempt at systematic evaluation of energy conservation activities and programs at Seattle City Light is reviewed. In 1979, 22 projects/activities were evaluated and categorized in-house, i.e., commercial/industrial; residential; outreach efforts;support activities; (not targeting the public); research, development, and demonstration; and in-house conservation activities. Details of each of these projects are presented. Four studies conducted by outside consultants are: Evaluation of the Seattle City Light Neighborhood Energy Conservation Program (Battelle Institute); Seattle City Light Conservation Office Evaluation Plan Review (Communication Design); Residential Customer Conservation Attitude and Awareness Study (Communication Design); and A Case Study of Seattle City Light's Utility/Bank/Contractor Insulation Program (Brown and Caldwell). Summaries of the reports are included as appendices.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPMEP) is funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L.96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). The UBNPMEP is coordinated with two Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) research projects that also monitor and evaluate the success of the Umatilla Fisheries Restoration Plan. This project deals with the natural production component of the plan, and the ODFW projects evaluate hatchery operations (project No. 1990-005-00, Umatilla Hatchery M & E) and smolt outmigration (project No. 1989-024-01, Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River). Collectively these three projects monitor and evaluate natural and hatchery salmonid production in the Umatilla River Basin. The need for natural production monitoring has been identified in multiple planning documents including Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Volume I, 5b-13 (CRITFC 1996), the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 1990), the Umatilla Basin Annual Operation Plan, the Umatilla Subbasin Summary (CTUIR & ODFW 2001), the Subbasin Plan (CTUIR & ODFW 2004), and the Comprehensive Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 2006). Natural production monitoring and evaluation is also consistent with Section III, Basinwide Provisions, Strategy 9 of the 2000 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, NPCC 2004). The Umatilla Basin M&E plan developed along with efforts to restore natural populations of spring and fall Chinook salmon, (Oncorhynchus tshawytsha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), and enhance summer steelhead (O. mykiss). The need for restoration began with agricultural development in the early 1900's that extirpated salmon and reduced steelhead runs (Bureau of Reclamation, BOR 1988). The most notable development was the construction and operation of Three Mile Falls Dam (TMD) and other irrigation projects which dewatered the Umatilla River during salmon migrations. CTUIR and ODFW developed the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan to restore fisheries to the basin. The plan was completed in 1990 and included the following objectives which were updated in 1999: (1) Establish hatchery and natural runs of Chinook and coho salmon. (2) Enhance existing summer steelhead populations through a hatchery program. (3) Provide sustainable tribal and non-tribal harvest of salmon and steelhead. (4) Maintain the genetic characteristics of salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. (5) Increase annual returns to Three Mile Falls Dam to 31,500 adult salmon and steelhead. In the past the M&E project conducted long-term monitoring activities as well as two and three-year projects that address special needs for adaptive management. Examples of these projects include adult passage evaluations, habitat assessment surveys (Contor et al. 1995, Contor et al. 1996, Contor et al. 1997, Contor et al. 1998), and genetic monitoring (Currens & Schreck 1995, Narum et al. 2004). The project's goal is to provide quality information to managers and researchers working to restore anadromous salmonids to the Umatilla River Basin. The status of completion of each of BPA's standardized work element was reported in 'Pisces'(March 2008) and is summarized.

Contor, Craig R.; Harris, Robin; King, Marty [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

BWRVIP-244: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Nondestructive Evaluation Development 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides 2010 results of the nondestructive evaluation NDE development task of the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project BWRVIP Inspection Focus Group. The scope of activity includes applications of various NDE techniques to boiling water reactor vessels and vessel internals components.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Start Up Experience: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UPS operates 140 Freightliner Custom Chassis compressed natural gas (CNG)-powered vehicles with Cummins B5.9G engines. Fifteen are participating in the Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project being funded by DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies and the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies.

Walkowicz, K.

2001-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

BWRVIP-269: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Nondestructive Evaluation Development 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) activities conducted in the previous year within the NDE Development task of the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Inspection Focus Group. The scope of the ongoing NDE Development task includes the reactor vessel and its internal components. This task attempts to develop solutions for the more difficult ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

197

BWRVIP-199: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of the Monticello 300 Degree Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U. S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Monticello 300 Capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Applying fuzzy engineering economics to evaluate project investment feasibility of wind generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a fuzzy engineering economic decision model is derived to evaluate the investment feasibility of wind generation project. A straightforward vertex parameters' fuzzy mathematics operation using the function principle is derived as an alternative ... Keywords: decision-making, function principle, fuzzy mathematics, fuzzy ranking, mellin transform, wind electricity

J. N. Sheen

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hood River Monitoring and Evaluation Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hood River Production Program Monitoring and Evaluation Project is co-managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (CTWSRO) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The program is divided up to share responsibilities, provide efficiency, and avoid duplication. From October 2002 to September 2003 (FY 03) project strategies were implemented to monitor, protect, and restore anadromous fish and fish habitat in the Hood River subbasin. A description of the progress during FY 03 is reported here. Additionally an independent review of the entire program was completed in 2003. The purpose of the review was to determine if project goals and actions were achieved, look at critical uncertainties for present and future actions, determine cost effectiveness, and choose remedies that would increase program success. There were some immediate changes to the implementation of the project, but the bulk of the recommendations will be realized in coming years.

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analysis of U.S. School Bus Populations and Alternative Fuel Potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities final report provides information concerning different school bus types, school bus populations, school bus miles and fuel use, school bus emissions, alternative fuel school buses, and potential for alternative fuel school bus use through 2010. It is intended to provide general information concerning the size of the school bus market in the U.S., as well as to provide some quantification of the potential for alternative fuel use in school buses in the U.S., and what that might mean for petroleum displacement and emissions reductions.

Laughlin, M.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Research development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Interim report, August 1, 1991--April 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress in the Georgetown University research, development and demonstration project of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. The topics addressed in the report include vehicle design and application analysis, technology transfer activities, coordination and monitoring of system design and integration contractor, application of fuel cells to other vehicles, current problems, work planned, and manpower, cost and schedule reports.

Romano, S.; Wimmer, R.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The most crucial data for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available. A comprehensive fish health monitoring regimen was incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation study for Umatilla Hatchery. This is a unique feature of the Umatilla Hatchery evaluation project.

Keefe, MaryLouise; Carmichael, Richard W.; French, Rod A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives wer

Hitchcock, David

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Application Layer Definition and Analyses of Controller Area Network Bus for Wire Harness Assembly Machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the feature of multi-master bus access, nondestructive contention-based arbitration and flexible configuration, Controller Area Network (CAN) bus is applied into the control system of Wire Harness Assembly Machine (WHAM). To accomplish desired goal, ...

Hui Guo; Ying Jiang

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL98-0521 : Development of an Electric Bus Inverter Based on ORNL Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART) Soft-Switching Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has for many years been developing technologies for power converters for motor drives and many other applications. Some of the research goals are to improve efficiency and reduce audible and electromagnetic interference noise generation for inverters and the driven loads. The converters are being required to produce more power with reduced weight and volume, which requires improvements in heat removal from the electronics, as well as improved circuit designs that have fewer electrical losses. PEEMRC has recently developed and patented a soft-switching inverter topology called an Auxiliary Resonant Tank (ART), and this design has been tested and proven at ORNL using a 10-kW laboratory prototype. The objective of this project was to develop, test, and install the ART inverter technology in an electric transit bus with the final goal of evaluating performance of the ORNL inverter under field conditions in a vehicle. A scaled-up inverter with the capacity to drive a 22-e bus was built based on the 10-kW ORNL laboratory prototype ART soft-switching inverter. Most (if not all) commercially available inverters for traction drive and other applications use hard-switching inverters. A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was established with the Chattanooga Area Regional Transit Authority (CARTA), the Electric Transit Vehicle Institute (ETVI), and Advanced Vehicle Systems (AVS), all of Chattanooga, along with ORNL. CARTA, which maintains and operates the public transit system in Chattanooga, provided an area for testing the vehicle alongside other similar vehicles in the normal operating environment. ETVI offers capabilities in standardized testing and reporting and also provides exposure in the electric transit vehicle arena for ORNL's technologies. The third Chattanooga partner, (AVS) manufactures all-electric and hybrid electric transit buses using inverter drive systems from several manufacturers. AVS provided help in field installation, and parts for laboratory testing. A 100-kW field-ready unit was developed, tested in an ORNL laboratory, and installed and successfully operated in a CARTA bus in Chattanooga. The tests on the vehicle were performed at a CARTA maintenance facility and at a l-mile test track in Chattanooga managed by CARTA.

Ayers, C.W.

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

SunLine Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid Fuel Cell Bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing the fuel cell hybrid bus demonstration being managed by SunLIne Transit Agency.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections March 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | AEO Retrospective Review: Evaluation of 2011 and Prior Reference Case Projections i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

212

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Klickitat Only Monitoring and Evaluation, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The monitoring and evaluation activities described in this report were determined by consensus of the scientists from the Yakama Nation (YN). Klickitat Subbasin Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of YKFP's Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP project biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - Accurately characterize baseline available habitat and salmonid populations pre-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) EDT Modeling - Identify and evaluate habitat and artificial production enhancement options. (3) Genetics - Characterize the genetic profile of wild steelhead in the Klickitat Basin. (4) Ecological Interactions - Determine the presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information.

Sampson, Melvin; Evenson, Rolf

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

BWRVIP-277: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Nondestructive Evaluation Development 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) activities conducted in the previous year within the NDE development task of the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Inspection Focus Group. The scope of the ongoing task includes the reactor vessel and its internal components. This task attempts to develop solutions for the more difficult inspections recommended by the BWRVIP, to determine limitations to inspection capability, and sometimes to demonstrate ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

BUSpec: A framework for generation of verification aids for standard bus protocol specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A typical verification intellectual property (VIP) of a bus protocol such as ARM advanced micro-controller bus architecture (AMBA) or PCI consists of a set of assertions and associated verification aids such as test-benches, design-ware models and coverage ... Keywords: Assertion-based verification, Bus functional models, Protocol validation, Verification intellectual property

Bhaskar Pal; Ansuman Banerjee; Pallab Dasgupta; P. P. Chakrabarti

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Bus Demonstration: Long Island, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initiated in 2003, this plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) bus program has three major phases: Odyne/EPRI Design and Build Phases coupled with Odyne/Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) Demonstration Phase. This interim report describes completion of an initial demonstration with Long Island Bus (LI Bus) Mass Transit Authority (MTA).

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

Microsoft Word - CX-MalinBusFY13_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Bob Trismen Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Malin Substation relay equipment replacements PP&A Project No.: 2504 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic equipment Location: Klamath County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA plans to replace bus differential relays and associated electronic equipment inside an existing building at the BPA Malin Substation. The replacements are scheduled to be completed in January 2013. Findings: BPA has determined that the proposed action complies with Section 1021.410 and

217

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of grid connected wind energy conver- sion systems employing induction generators, one1 Steady State Analysis of an induction generator infinite bus system Rajesh G Kavasseri Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105 - 5285, USA (email: rajesh

Kavasseri, Rajesh

219

New York Power Authority Sodium Sulfur Battery Storage Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Battery Storage Project Yan Kishinevsky New York Power Authority LI Bus Issues LIPA Tariff Time Energy (kWh) Demand (kWmonth) I, off peak Mid-7am 0.0440 - II, peak...

220

Bus Lanes with Intermittent Priority: Screening Formulae and an Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of H, and the maximum possible demand in the inter-bandTSP doubles the maximum excess demand where intermittenceas traffic demand does not exceed by much the maximum flow

Eichler, Michael; Daganzo, Carlos F.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations - DOE Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of FCEB design. Using fuel cells in a transit application can help accelerate the learning curve for the technology because of the high mileage accumulated in short periods...

222

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the second annual report of a six-year project to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration projects in the Columbia River Estuary, conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Marine Sciences Laboratory, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Pt. Adams Biological Field Station, and the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce for the US Army Corps of Engineers. In 2005, baseline data were collected on two restoration sites and two associated reference sites in the Columbia River estuary. The sites represent two habitat types of the estuary--brackish marsh and freshwater swamp--that have sustained substantial losses in area and that may play important roles for salmonids. Baseline data collected included vegetation and elevation surveys, above and below-ground biomass, water depth and temperature, nutrient flux, fish species composition, and channel geometry. Following baseline data collection, three kinds of restoration actions for hydrological reconnection were implemented in several locations on the sites: tidegate replacements (2) at Vera Slough, near the city of Astoria in Oregon State, and culvert replacements (2) and dike breaches (3) at Kandoll Farm in the Grays River watershed in Washington State. Limited post-restoration data were collected: photo points, nutrient flux, water depth and temperature, and channel cross-sections. In subsequent work, this and additional post-restoration data will be used in conjunction with data from other sites to estimate net effects of hydrological reconnection restoration projects throughout the estuary. This project is establishing methods for evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects and a framework for assessing estuary-wide cumulative effects including a protocol manual for monitoring restoration and reference sites.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Roegner, G. C.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Dawley, Earl; Skalski, John R.; Vavrinec, John; Ebberts, Blaine D.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint project between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP - a project aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.

Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

226

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL] [ORNL; Irick, David Kim [ORNL] [ORNL; Kenney, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluating reservoir production strategies in miscible and immiscible gas-injection projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miscible gas injection processes could be among the most widely used enhanced oil recovery processes. Successful design and implementation of a miscible gas injection project depends upon the accurate determination of the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) and other factors such as reservoir and fluid characterization. The MMP indicates the lowest pressure at which the displacement process becomes multicontact miscible. The experimental methods available for determining MMP are both costly and time consuming. Therefore, the use of correlations that prove to be reliable for a wide range of fluid types would likely be considered acceptable for preliminary screening studies. This work includes a comparative and critical evaluation of MMP correlations and thermodynamic models using an equation of state by PVTsim software. Application of gas injection usually entails substantial risk because of the technological sophistication and financial requirements to initiate the project. More detailed, comprehensive reservoir engineering and project monitoring are necessary for typical miscible flood projects than for other recovery methods. This project evaluated effects of important factors such as injection pressure, vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratio, well completion, relative permeability, and permeability stratification on the recovery efficiency from the reservoir for both miscible and immiscible displacements. A three-dimensional, three-phase, Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) compositional simulator based on the implicit-pressure explicit-saturation (IMPES) technique was used to determine the sensitivity of miscible or immiscible oil recovery to suitable ranges of these reservoir parameters. Most of the MMP correlations evaluated in this study have proven not to consider the effect of fluid composition properly. In most cases, EOS-based models are more conservative in predicting MMP values. If screening methods identify a reservoir as a candidate for a miscible injection project, experimental MMP measurements should be conducted for specific gas-injection purposes. Simulation results indicated that injection pressure was a key parameter that influences oil recovery to a high degree. MMP appears to be the optimum injection pressure since the incremental oil recovery at pressures above the MMP is negligible and at pressures below the MMP recovery is substantially lower. Stratification, injection-well completion pattern, and vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratios could also affect the recovery efficiency of the reservoir in a variety of ways discussed in this work.

Farzad, Iman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Laboratory Shuttle Bus Routes: Potter St./JBEI Shuttle Bus Routes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St./JBEI Route Combined Routes & Schedules Blue Route Orange Route Rockridge Route Potter St./JBEI Route Potter St./JBEI Map Scroll down or click here for schedule ↓ Printable Map | Printable Schedule Potter St/JBEI Route Potter St./JBEI Schedule Bus Service @ lbl.gov email link LBNL - POTTER ST/JBEI START - LBL STOP 65 CORY HALL SHATTUCK BART JCAP POTTER CFO JBEI SHATTUCK BART CORY HALL Depart on the 08's and 38's Depart on the 10's and 40's Depart on the 15's and 45's Depart on the 28's and 58's Depart on the 00's and 30's Depart on the 05's and 35's Depart on the 08's and 35's Depart on the 20's and 50's Depart on the 25's and 55's 1 8:08 AM 8:10 AM 8:15 AM 8:28 AM 8:30 AM 8:35 AM 8:38 AM 8:50 AM 8:55 AM 2 8:38 AM 8:40 AM 8:45 AM 8:58 AM 9:00 AM 9:05 AM 9:08 AM 9:20 AM 9:25 AM

231

Engineering evaluation of neutralization and precipitation processes applicable to sludge treatment project  

SciTech Connect

Engineering evaluations have been performed to determine likely unit operations and methods required to support the removal, storage, treatment and disposal of solids/sludges present in the K Basins at the Hanford Site. This evaluation was initiated to select a neutralization process for dissolver product solution resulting from nitric acid treatment of about 50 m{sup 3} of Hanford Site K Basins sludge. Neutralization is required to meet Tank Waste Remediation Waste System acceptance criteria for storage of the waste in the double shell tanks after neutralization, the supernate and precipitate will be transferred to the high level waste storage tanks in 200E Area. Non transuranic (TRU) solids residue will be transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This report presents an overview of neutralization and precipitation methods previously used and tested. This report also recommends a neutralization process to be used as part of the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project and identifies additional operations requiring further evaluation.

Klem, M.J.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Activities of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)  

SciTech Connect

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) – Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments”. The 2001 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 2642 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data.

Briggs, Joseph Blair

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam`s Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam`s projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project`s expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid and Zero Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com...

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel School Bus Grant and Loan Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

237

Calculational evaluation of plasma flow switches for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project  

SciTech Connect

The next system design under consideration for the Los Alamos Foil Implosion Project (Trailmaster) is projected to deliver in excess of 15 MA of electrical current produced by high-explosive driven flux compression generators to a foil load. A plasma flow switch is being investigated as the final pulse shaping step in this system. The performance of these switches is being evaluated using a wide variety of computational tools including zero-, one- and two-dimensional MHD codes and a 3-D view-factor radiation transport code. We are concerned with the effects of radiation from the switch plasma prior to switching current to the load, and the interaction of the switch plasma on existing perturbations and as a source of perturbation on the imploding load. 4 refs. 6 figs.

Greene, A.E.; Bowers, R.L.; Oliphant, T.A.; Peterson, D.L.; Weiss, D.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Application of Multi-objects Fuzzy Comprehension Evaluation in Selecting Location of Coal-Fired Plant Construction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper introduces the method of multi-objects fuzzy comprehension evaluation briefly, and applies it to select location of coal-fired plants construction project. Multi-objective fuzzy comprehensive evaluation in plant site application has strong ... Keywords: Fuzzy comprehension evaluation, Multi-objects decision, Selecting location of coal-fired plant

Li Wei; Zhang Zhen-gang; Wen Xinpu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Holnam Incorporated  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of four energy conservation measures (ECMs) that were recently installed at Holnam Incorporated (Holnam) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Holnam as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECMs was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, site visit and interview, and review of previous program submittals (Holnam's Proposals and Completion Reports). The four ECMs were all electronic power control devices that replaced less efficient technologies for controlling power to the kiln drive motors, cooler grate drive motors, cooler fan motors, and kiln stack gas precipitators. Energy savings from this project are expected to be 1,782,000 kWh/yr or 0.20 average megawatts. On a unit production basis, this project will save 3.4 kWh/ton of cement, based on Holnam's projected average annual future production rate. The four ECMs cost a total of $248,232 to install, and Holnam received payment of $115,615 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. Program administrative costs incurred by Bonneville, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Seattle City Light (SCL) were estimated to be $29,362. The real levelized cost (1992 $) of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 6.2 mills/kWh over the project's expected 15-year life, and the real levelized cost (1992 $) to the region will be 14.1 mills/kWh. Based on expected ECM installation costs and energy savings benefits alone, none of the four ECMs would have been implemented by Holnam without the E$P acquisition payment.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

BWRVIP-239: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Updated Evaluation of the Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) Capsule Withdrawal Sch edule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates updated reactor pressure vessel and surveillance capsule fluence data for potential impacts on the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project Integrated Surveillance Program (BWRVIP ISP) capsule withdrawal schedule.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Project identification and evaluation techniques for transportation infrastructure : assessing their role in metropolitan areas of developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project identification and evaluation of transportation infrastructure play a vital role in shaping and sustaining the forms of cities all over the world. These cities differ substantially in character and urban form and ...

Kumar, Vimal, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Incorporating livability benefits into the Federal Transit Administration New Starts project evaluation process through accessibility-based modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Transportation's announcement of the "Livability initiative" for major transit projects in January 2010 has prompted the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to reassess the criteria used in the evaluation ...

Ducas, Caroline R. (Caroline Rose)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Device Evaluation Center TIDEC Device Evaluation Center TIDEC < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.3879,"lon":-68.7998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance for Geothermal Resource Evaluation Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to report on the evaluation of geothermal resource potential on and around three different United States (U. S.) Air Force Bases (AFBs): Nellis AFB and Air Force Range (AFR) in the State of Nevada (see maps 1 and 5), Holloman AFB in the State of New Mexico (see map 2), and Mountain Home AFB in the State of Idaho (see map 3). All three sites are located in semi-arid parts of the western U. S. The U. S. Air Force, through its Air Combat Command (ACC) located at Langley AFB in the State of Virginia, asked the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) for technical assistance to conduct technical and feasibility evaluations for the potential to identify viable geothermal resources on or around three different AFBs. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is supporting FEMP in providing technical assistance to a number of different Federal Agencies. For this report, the three different AFBs are considered one project because they all deal with potential geothermal resource evaluations. The three AFBs will be evaluated primarily for their opportunity to develop a geothermal resource of high enough quality grade (i.e., temperature, productivity, depth, etc.) to consider the possibility for generation of electricity through a power plant. Secondarily, if the resource for the three AFBs is found to be not sufficient enough for electricity generation, then they will be described in enough detail to allow the base energy managers to evaluate if the resource is suitable for direct heating or cooling. Site visits and meetings by INL personnel with the staff at each AFB were held in late FY-2009 and FY-2010. This report provides a technical evaluation of the opportunities and challenges for developing geothermal resources on and around the AFBs. An extensive amount of literature and geographic information was evaluated as a part of this assessment. Resource potential maps were developed for each of the AFBs.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Thomas R. Wood; Joel Renner

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of the Missouri Division of Energy's project conserve class B energy audit project  

SciTech Connect

A posttest control group telephone survey was used to document the results of the Division's Project Conserve Energy Audit Project. The survey found no attributable energy savings. Several contributing factors as to why not were hypothetized. Most likely cause was seen as the shotgun audit distribution method used by the Division of Energy which did not address those homeowners most in need of an energy audit.

Barnett, D.R.

1984-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

NREL Energy DataBus/Contact | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contact Contact < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search View the Databus Partners NREL's Energy Databus NREL's Energy DataBus is used for tracking and analyzing energy use on its own campus. The system is applicable to other facilities-including anything from a single building to a large military base or college campus-or for other energy data management needs. Managing and minimizing energy consumption on a large campus is usually a difficult task for facility managers: There may be hundreds of energy meters spread across a campus, and the meter data are often recorded by hand. Even when data are captured electronically, there may be measurement issues or time periods that may not coincide. Making sense of this limited and often confusing data can be a challenge that makes the assessment of

256

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12012: Fuel Cell Bus Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Record #: 12012 Date: March 2, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell Bus Targets Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Sunita Satyapal * Date: September 12, 2012 Item: Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses are presented in Table 1. These market-driven targets represent technical requirements needed to compete with alternative technologies. They do not represent expectations for the status of the technology in future years. Table 1. Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses. Units 2012 Status 2016 Target Ultimate Target Bus Lifetime years/miles 5/100,000 1 12/500,000 12/500,000 Power Plant Lifetime 2,3 hours 12,000 18,000 25,000

257

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Designing New Transit Bus Garages to be Fuel Flexible Prepared By: Marathon Technical Services Six Venus Crescent P.O. Box 318 Heidelberg, Ontario, Canada N0B1Y0 Telephone: 519-699-9250 May 12, 2006 ______________________________________________________________________________ DESIGNING NEW TRANSIT BUS GARAGES TO BE FUEL FLEXIBLE Background Information Before discussing the building design features that are recommended for CNG and GH2 buses, it is important to understand what makes these fuels different from gasoline or diesel. The items below summarize the basic differences between the properties of gaseous and liquid fuels that influence the building design changes: 1. Natural Gas and Hydrogen are both lighter-than-air and in gaseous form at atmospheric

258

Hanford spent nuclear fuel project recommended path forward, volume III: Alternatives and path forward evaluation supporting documentation  

SciTech Connect

Volume I of the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project - Recommended Path Forward constitutes an aggressive series of projects to construct and operate systems and facilities to safely retrieve, package, transport, process, and store K Basins fuel and sludge. Volume II provided a comparative evaluation of four Alternatives for the Path Forward and an evaluation for the Recommended Path Forward. Although Volume II contained extensive appendices, six supporting documents have been compiled in Volume III to provide additional background for Volume II.

Fulton, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The systems edge of the Parameterized Linear Array with a Reconfigurable Pipelined Bus System (LARPBS(p)) optical bus parallel computing model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is about exploring the various systems related aspects pertinent in the recent Parameterized Linear Array with a Reconfigurable Pipelined Bus System (LARPBS(p)) model. The two principal features of the LARPBS(p) model is, firstly, its bridging ... Keywords: Optical bus, Parallel computing model

Brian J. D'Auriol

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Intercomparison and analyses of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in the West African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (WAMME) first model intercomparison experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the climatology of the West African Monsoon in theWest African Monsoon Modeling and Evaluation project (the West African Monsoon (WAM) Modeling and Evaluation

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Distribution Operations Guide to Enterprise Service Bus Suites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprise integration is often the last crosscutting issue considered when a firm implements a large information system. Organizations frequently find that after a period of time they are in possession of what can be described as Accidental Architecture, often the result of the evolution of systems and point-to-point integration. These ramshackle systems become increasingly unwieldy and expensive to maintain. To avoid these problems, the implementation and use of an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) is a cri...

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A conceptual framework for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of projects to reduce GHG emissions and sequester carbon  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a conceptual framework for evaluating the cost of projects to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). The evaluation of cost-effectiveness should account for both the timing of carbon emissions and the damage caused by the atmospheric stock of carbon. We develop a conceptual basis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of projects in terms of the cost of reducing atmospheric carbon (CRAC) and other GHGs. CRAC accounts for the economic discount rate, alternative functional forms of the shadow price, the residence period of carbon in the atmosphere, and the multiple monetary benefits of projects. The last item is of particular importance to the developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Norgaard, R.; Makundi, W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, November--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

268

Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) - Year 5 : Annual Report for FY 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP) is a coordinated effort to improve the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key monitoring and evaluation questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP was initiated by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) in October 2003. The project is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program (NPCC). CSMEP is a major effort of the federal state and Tribal fish and wildlife managers to develop regionally integrated monitoring and evaluation (M&E) across the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP has focused its work on five monitoring domains: status and trends monitoring of populations and action effectiveness monitoring of habitat, harvest, hatcheries, and the hydrosystem. CSMEP's specific goals are to: (1) interact with federal, state and tribal programmatic and technical entities responsible for M&E of fish and wildlife, to ensure that work plans developed and executed under this project are well integrated with ongoing work by these entities; (2) document, integrate, and make available existing monitoring data on listed salmon, steelhead, bull trout and other fish species of concern; (3) critically assess strengths and weaknesses of these data for answering key monitoring questions; and (4) collaboratively design, implement and evaluate improved M&E methods with other programmatic entities in the Pacific Northwest. During FY2008 CSMEP biologists continued their reviews of the strengths and weaknesses (S&W) of existing subbasin inventory data for addressing monitoring questions about population status and trends at different spatial and temporal scales. Work was focused on Lower Columbia Chinook and steelhead, Snake River fall Chinook, Upper Columbia Spring Chinook and steelhead, and Middle Columbia River Chinook and steelhead. These FY2008 data assessments and others assembled over the years of the CSMEP project can be accessed on the CBFWA public website. The CSMEP web database (http://csmep.streamnet.org/) houses metadata inventories from S&W assessments of Columbia River Basin watersheds that were completed prior to FY2008. These older S&W assessments are maintained by StreamNet, but budget cutbacks prevented us from adding the new FY2008 assessments into the database. Progress was made in FY2008 on CSMEP's goals of collaborative design of improved M&E methods. CSMEP convened two monitoring design workshops in Portland (December 5 and 6, 2007 and February 11 and 12, 2008) to continue exploration of how best to integrate the most robust features of existing M&E programs with new approaches. CSMEP continued to build on this information to develop improved designs and analytical tools for monitoring the status and trends of fish populations and the effectiveness of hatchery and hydrosystem recovery actions within the Columbia River Basin. CSMEP did not do any new work on habitat or harvest effectiveness monitoring designs in FY2008 due to budget cutbacks. CSMEP presented the results of the Snake Basin Pilot Study to the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) in Portland on December 7, 2008. This study is the finalization of CSMEP's pilot exercise of developing design alternatives across different M&E domains within the Snake River Basin spring/summer Chinook ESU. This work has been summarized in two linked reports (CSMEP 2007a and CSMEP 2007b). CSMEP participants presented many of the analyses developed for the Snake Basin Pilot work at the Western Division American Fisheries Society (AFS) conference in Portland on May 4 to 7, 2008. For the AFS conference CSMEP organized a symposium on regional monitoring and evaluation approaches. A presentation on CSMEP's Cost Integration Database Tool and Salmon Viability Monitoring Simulation Model developed for the Snake Basin Pilot Study was also given to the Pacific Northwest Aquatic monitoring Partnership (PNAMP) stee

Marmorek, David R.; Porter, Marc; Pickard, Darcy; Wieckowski, Katherine

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Agency/Company /Organization: Federal Transit Administration, United States Department of Transportation Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Other Website: www.nbrti.org/docs/pdf/Characteristics_BRT_Decision-Making.pdf Cost: Free Language: English FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making Screenshot References: FTA-Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making[1] "The Characteristics of Bus Rapid Transit for Decision-Making (CBRT) report was prepared to provide transportation planners and decision makers with

270

Global Grid-Connected Hybrid-Electric Vehicle Project: Year-End Summary Report, November 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes research conducted under the auspices of the Global Grid-Connected Hybrid Electric Vehicle Project, an EPRI initiative to promote the use of grid-connected electric technologies in heavy-duty applications. One study in the program evaluated the potential of converting a Ford E-350 or E-450 Super Duty chassis into a grid-connected hybrid electric vehicle airport shuttle bus and a Ford Explorer chassis into a dedicated electric vehicle delivery van. A second study analyzed ad...

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Environmental restoration program pollution prevention checklist guide for the evaluation of alternatives project phase  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of alternative studies determine what decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) alternatives are presented to regulators for facility and site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best clean-up option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all Evaluation of Alternatives (EV) phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will assist users with documenting PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to help users implement and evaluate waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves, eliminating expensive process waste assessments and audit teams.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on the evaluation of compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel hybrid electric bus propulsion systems in New York City Transit's transit buses.

Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Environmental and Economical Evaluation of Integrating NGL Extraction and LNG Liquefaction Technology in Iran LNG Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of changing global markets for natural gas liquids (NGL) with the simultaneous increase in global demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has stimulated an interest in the integration of NGL recovery technology with LNG liquefaction technologies. Historically, the removal of “heavy” or high-freezing-point hydrocarbons from the feed to LNG plants has been characterized as “gas conditioning” and achieved using one or more distillation columns. While some attempts to provide reflux to the distillation columns marginally enhanced NGL recovery, little emphasis was placed on maximizing NGL recovery as a product from the LNG process. As such, the integration of the two processes was not a priority. Integrating state-of-the art NGL recovery technology within the CoP LNGSM Process1, formerly the Phillips Optimized Cascade LNG Process, results in a significant reduction in the specific power required to produce LNG, while maximizing NGL recovery. This corresponds to a production increase in both LNG and NGL for comparable compression schemes as compared to stand-alone LNG liquefaction and NGL extraction facilities. In addition, there are potential enhancements to the overall facility availability and project economics and environmental impacts using the integrated concept. This integrated concept has been applied to three ongoing international NGL/LNG projects using the CoP LNG Process in Iran LNG project. In this respect, simulation has been performed in THERMOFLEX software. Moreover, thermo economic analysis has been applied for economic and thermodynamic analysis of base and integrated cases through computer code has been provided here. Finally, the base and integrated case have been evaluated and comprised in view of thermodynamics, economics and environmental impacts.

Manesh, M. H. K.; Mazhari, V.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evaluation of the Benefits Attributable to Automotive Lightweight Materials Program Research and Development Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-237 -237 Evaluation of the Benefits Attributable to Automotive Lightweight Materials Program Research and Development Projects November 2001 Prepared by Sujit Das Oak Ridge National Laboratory Jean H. Peretz The University of Tennessee Bruce Tonn Oak Ridge National Laboratory DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

275

Evaluating the use of Social Impact Assessment in the context of agricultural development projects in Iran  

SciTech Connect

The utilisation of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) in Iran is analysed in terms of its policy context and its application in practice. Five case studies where SIA was employed in conjunction with Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) for agricultural development projects are evaluated. In addition, the performance of the policy context is assessed. This research revealed that there are legal and institutional constraints to the effective functioning of SIA in Iran, and that there are deficiencies in the operating guidelines. There were serious problems associated with the way SIA was undertaken in all five case studies. Recommendations to improve the policy framework for the conduct of SIA are made. The recommendations advocate for a higher profile of SIA within legislation, for social issues to have greater emphasis in official guidelines for the conduct of EIA and SIA, and for a range of measures to increase the professionalism of SIA practice.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Faculty of Agriculture, Yasuj University, Yasuj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Gholam Hossein, E-mail: zamani@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: Frank.Vanclay@utas.edu.a [Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Harmonization and Sharing of Data from International Fuel Cell Bus Demonstrations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation, which was given by NREL's Leslie Eudy at the 2006 Fuel Cell Seminar, provides information on international fuel cell bus demonstrations.

Eudy, L.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Field evaluation of recycled plastic lumber (RPL) pallets. Final project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One significant component of the waste stream, discarded plastic products and packaging, continues to be a growing portion of the municipal solid waste (MSW). There has been considerable work done in characterizing the quantity and types of plastics in different waste streams, collection methods, separation, sorting as well as technologies for processing post-consumer mixed plastics. The focus in recent years has been the development of markets for recycled plastic products, which constitutes the second half of the material flow diagram cycle shown in Figure 1. One key product that holds significant promise for plastics recycling to be both technically feasible and economically viable is Recycled Plastic Lumber (RPL). The contents of this report forms the second phase of a two-phase pilot project on developing specifications and standards for a product fabricated from RPL. Such standards and specifications are needed to prepare procurement guidelines for state and federal agencies interested in purchasing products made from recycled materials. The first phase focused on establishing a procedure to evaluate RPL product,s such as pallets, in a laboratory setting while this phase focuses on field evaluation of RPL pallets in service. This effort is critical in the development of new markets for RPL products. A brief summary of the findings from Phase 1 of this effort is presented next.

Krishnaswamy, P.; Miele, C.R.; Francini, R.B. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Yuracko, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yerace, P. [Dept. of Energy, Fernald, OH (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Program Evaluation - Automotive Lightweighting Materials Program Research and Development Projects Assessment of Benefits - Case Studies No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This report is the second of a series of studies to evaluate research and development (R&D) projects funded by the Automotive Lightweighting Materials (ALM) Program of the Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies (OAAT) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objectives of the program evaluation are to assess short-run outputs and long-run outcomes that may be attributable to the ALM R&D projects. The ALM program focuses on the development and validation of advanced technologies that significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost. Funded projects range from fundamental materials science research to applied research in production environments. Collaborators on these projects include national laboratories, universities, and private sector firms, such as leading automobile manufacturers and their suppliers. Three ALM R&D projects were chosen for this evaluation: Design and Product Optimization for Cast Light Metals, Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures, and Rapid Tooling for Functional Prototyping of Metal Mold Processes. These projects were chosen because they have already been completed. The first project resulted in development of a comprehensive cast light metal property database, an automotive application design guide, computerized predictive models, process monitoring sensors, and quality assurance methods. The second project, the durability of lightweight composite structures, produced durability-based design criteria documents, predictive models for creep deformation, and minimum test requirements and suggested test methods for establishing durability properties and characteristics of random glass-fiber composites for automotive structural composites. The durability project supported Focal Project II, a validation activity that demonstrates ALM program goals and reduces the lead time for bringing new technology into the marketplace. Focal projects concentrate on specific classes of materials and nonproprietary components and are done jointly by DOE and the Automotive Composites Consortium of U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR). The third project developed a rapid tooling process that reduces tooling time, originally some 48-52 weeks, to less than 12 weeks by means of rapid generation of die-casting die inserts and development of generic holding blocks, suitable for use with large casting applications. This project was conducted by the United States Automotive Materials Partnership, another USCAR consortium.

Das, S.

2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Baker-Barry Tunnel Lighting: Evaluation of a Potential GATEWAY Demonstrations Project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating the Baker-Barry Tunnel as a potential GATEWAY Demonstrations project for deployment of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The National Park Service views this project as a possible proving ground and template for implementation of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires in other tunnels, thereby expanding the estimated 40% energy savings from 132 MWh/yr to a much larger figure nationally. Most of the energy savings in this application is attributable to the instant-restrike capability of LED products and to their high tolerance for frequent on/off switching, used here to separately control either end of the tunnel during daytime hours. Some LED luminaires rival or outperform their high-intensity discharge (HID) counterparts in terms of efficacy, but options are limited, and smaller lumen packages preclude true one-for-one equivalence. However, LED products continue to improve in efficacy and affordability at a rate unmatched by other light source technologies; the estimated simple payback period of eight years (excluding installation costs and maintenance savings) can be expected to improve with time. The proposed revisions to the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting system would require slightly increased controls complexity and significantly increased luminaire types and quantities. In exchange, substantial annual savings (from reduced maintenance and energy use) would be complemented by improved quantity and quality of illumination. Although advanced lighting controls could offer additional savings, it is unclear whether such a system would prove cost-effective; this topic may be explored in future work.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of Possible Surrogates for Validation of the Oxidation Furnace for the Plutonium Disposition Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Disposition project (PuD) is considering an alternative furnace design for direct metal oxidation (DMO) of plutonium metal to use as a feed for potential disposition routes. The proposed design will use a retort to oxidize the feed at temperatures up to 500 C. The atmosphere will be controlled using a metered mixture of oxygen, helium and argon to control the oxidation at approximately 400 torr. Since plutonium melts at 664 C, and may potentially react with retort material to form a lower melting point eutectic, the oxidation process will be controlled by metering the flow of oxygen to ensure that the bulk temperature of the material does not exceed this temperature. A batch processing time of <24 hours is desirable to meet anticipated furnace throughput requirements. The design project includes demonstration of concept in a small-scale demonstration test (i.e., small scale) and validation of design in a full-scale test. These tests are recommended to be performed using Pu surrogates due to challenges in consideration of the nature of plutonium and operational constraints required when handling large quantities of accountable material. The potential for spreading contamination and exposing workers to harmful levels of cumulative radioactive dose are motivation to utilize non-radioactive surrogates. Once the design is demonstrated and optimized, implementation would take place in a facility designed to accommodate these constraints. Until then, the use of surrogates would be a safer, less expensive option for the validation phase of the project. This report examines the potential for use of surrogates in the demonstration and validation of the DMO furnace for PuD. This report provides a compilation of the technical information and process requirements for the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide by burning in dry environments. Several potential surrogates were evaluated by various criteria in order to select a suitable candidate for large scale demonstration. First, the structure of the plutonium metal/oxide interface was compared to potential surrogates. Second the data for plutonium oxidation kinetics were reviewed and rates for oxidation were compared with surrogates. The criteria used as a basis for recommendation was selected in order to provide a reasonable oxidation rate during the validation phase. Several reference documents were reviewed and used to compile the information in this report. Since oxidation of large monolithic pieces of plutonium in 75% oxygen is the preferable oxidizing atmosphere for the intended process, this report does not focus on the oxidation of powders, but focuses instead on larger samples in flowing gas.

Duncan, A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation of Aeroelastically Tailored Small Wind Turbine Blades Final Report Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) has performed a conceptual design study concerning aeroelastic tailoring of small wind turbine blades. The primary objectives were to evaluate ways that blade/rotor geometry could be used to enable cost-of-energy reductions by enhancing energy capture while constraining or mitigating blade costs, system loads, and related component costs. This work builds on insights developed in ongoing adaptive-blade programs but with a focus on application to small turbine systems with isotropic blade material properties and with combined blade sweep and pre-bending/pre-curving to achieve the desired twist coupling. Specific goals of this project are to: (A) Evaluate and quantify the extent to which rotor geometry can be used to realize load-mitigating small wind turbine rotors. Primary aspects of the load mitigation are: (1) Improved overspeed safety affected by blades twisting toward stall in response to speed increases. (2) Reduced fatigue loading affected by blade twisting toward feather in response to turbulent gusts. (B) Illustrate trade-offs and design sensitivities for this concept. (C) Provide the technical basis for small wind turbine manufacturers to evaluate this concept and commercialize if the technology appears favorable. The SolidWorks code was used to rapidly develop solid models of blade with varying shapes and material properties. Finite element analyses (FEA) were performed using the COSMOS code modeling with tip-loads and centripetal accelerations. This tool set was used to investigate the potential for aeroelastic tailoring with combined planform sweep and pre-curve. An extensive matrix of design variables was investigated, including aerodynamic design, magnitude and shape of planform sweep, magnitude and shape of blade pre-curve, material stiffness, and rotor diameter. The FEA simulations resulted in substantial insights into the structural response of these blades. The trends were used to identify geometries and rotor configurations that showed the greatest promise for achieving beneficial aeroelastic response. The ADAMS code was used to perform complete aeroelastic simulations of selected rotor configurations; however, the results of these simulations were not satisfactory. This report documents the challenges encountered with the ADAMS simulations and presents recommendations for further development of this concept for aeroelastically tailored small wind turbine blades.

Griffin, Dayton A.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

284

NREL Energy DataBus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL Energy DataBus NREL Energy DataBus (Redirected from Databus) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL's Energy Databus Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Country: United States Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

285

NREL Energy DataBus | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL Energy DataBus NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL's Energy Databus Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Country: United States Web Application Link: www.nrel.gov/analysis/databus/index.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

286

Development of an ultra-safe, ultra-low emissions natural gas fueled school bus: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents work conducted under Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Project 03-6871, ``Development of an Ultra-Safe and Low-Emission Dedicated Alternative Fuel School Bus.`` The project was sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Subcontract No. ZCF-5-13519-01. This report documents Phase 3 -- Integration and Phase 4 -- Demonstration and serves as the final report for this project. Phase 1 -- Systems Design and Phase 2 -- Prototype Hardware Development were documented in NREL publications TP-425-7609 and TP-425-2 1081, respectively. Several significant areas of work are summarized in this report. Integration of the engine technologies developed under Phase 2 into a production Deere 8.1-L, spark-ignition compressed natural gas engine is detailed, including information on the engine and control system modifications that were made. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions results verifying the ultra-low emissions output of this engine are also included. The informal project goal of producing oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions less than or equal to 1.0 g/bhp-hr over the FTP heavy-duty engine cycle was attained. In addition, a test run that resulted in less than one half of the Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle limit for NO{sub x} plus non-methane hydrocarbons was obtained. These results were for engine-out (no catalyst) emissions. Results using a catalyst produced very low formaldehyde emissions and virtually zero carbon monoxide and particulate matter emissions. Following these excellent results, a duplicate engine was assembled and integrated into the prototype ultra-safe school bus, the Envirobus 2000. Many of the new and modified subsystems developed during this project for the engine are considered strong candidates for inclusion into the production Deere 8.1-L gas engine in the near future.

Kubesh, J.T. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Design of Micro-Satellite AOCS Software Architecture Based on Software Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) software architecture is presented in this paper by using the concept of software bus. According to the analysis of the function flow and data flow of AOCS, its software components are partitioned clearly ... Keywords: AOCS software architecture, software bus, software components

Chen Jian; Yan Ruidong; Sun Zhaowei; Xu Guodong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Study on Energy-Saving Control Strategy of Idling Stop System for City Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel economy of city bus is poor, because the urban traffic is congested, the city bus is constantly in the idle condition resulting in fuel consumption is increasing. In order to improve the vehicle fuel economy and protect environment, the energy consumption ... Keywords: idling stop, energy-saving, control strategy, regenerative braking

Daxing Huang; Ren He

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Modeling shared cache and bus in multi-cores for timing analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Timing analysis of concurrent programs running on multi-core platforms is currently an important problem. The key to solving this problem is to accurately model the timing effects of shared resources in multi-cores, namely shared cache and bus. In this ... Keywords: WCET, multi-core, shared bus, shared cache

Sudipta Chattopadhyay; Abhik Roychoudhury; Tulika Mitra

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Analysis of the impact of bus implemented EDCs on on-chip SSN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the impact of error detecting codes, implemented on an on-chip bus, on the on-chip simultaneous switching noise (SSN). First, we analyze in detail how SSN is impacted by different bus transitions, pointing out its dependency ...

Daniele Rossi; Carlo Steiner; Cecilia Metra

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioner Monitoring Control System Design Based on CAN Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on CAN bus technology, chooses ST's ARM Cortex-M3 core, new generation STM32 embedded enhanced processor STM32F103 as main control chip, designs the overall structure of system, CAN functional block diagram, CAN communication software and so on. ... Keywords: CAN bus embedded STM32F103

Tong Gang; Li Ping

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y Y I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Las V e g a s , Nevada J u n e 1 5 , ,1972 C o n t r a c t No. AT(26-1) -.429 b e t w e e n t h e U . S . Atomic Energy Commission, t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e I n t e r i o r , A u s t r a l O i l Company, I n c o r p o r a t e d , a n d CER G e o n u c l e a r C o r p o r a t i o n . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. C O N T E N T S . . ....... . . 1 INTRODUCTION . . . - 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . P U R P O S E OF EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R E G R E S S I O N EQUATION D E R I V A T I O N S 4 S E I S M I C PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FREQUENCY P R E D I C T I O N 7 6 . DAMAGE PREDICTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A P P E N D I X A . E S C A L A T I O N E Q U A T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 S c a l

295

UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: UNDP-GEF Fuel Cell Bus Programme: Update Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, Global Environment Facility Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/documents/GEF.C.28.Inf_.12.p The Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the United Nations Development Programme launched a fuel cell bus deployment program to support commercial demonstrations of buses and fueling infrastructure in large bus markets in developing countries. The program's objective was to reduce the long-term greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector in GEF program countries. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

296

Final Report K I N E SAFETY EVALUATION PROJECT RULIS ON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

K K I N E SAFETY EVALUATION PROJECT RULIS ON By ,R. L . Bolmer U . S . Bureau of Mines Denver ,Mining Research Center ' Denver, Colorado January 1 0 , 1970 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. CONTENTS ! P a g e Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I n t r o d u c t i o n H i s t o r i c a l d e s c r i p t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - Mine S a f e t y E v a l u a t i o n Program . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 G e n e r a l s e t t i n g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mines i n p r o j e c t a r e a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mine e f f e c t s s a f e t y e v a l u a t i o n Mine e v a c u a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 P r e - and p o s t - s h o t mine i n s p e c t i o n s . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mine s t r u c t u r a l damage 8 Cameo mine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Red Canon mine. 10

297

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur.

MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

The reliability of the government cost estimate as an evaluator of the low bid in US Air Force Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study proposes to scientifically assess the reliability of previous government cost estimates in evaluating construction project bids and to examine the usefulness of discordancy testing methods as an alternative to the government estimate in evaluating the low bid. A random sample of US Air Force Military Construction (MILCON) projects bid between I Oct 92 and 30 Jun 95 are divided into four subgroups for examination. Sampling distributions are generated in order to determine the mean of the ratio difference between the low bid or median bid and the government cost estimate. A null hypothesis is tested for each comparison. Conclusions are drawn about government cost estimate accuracy, consistency, and reliability. Two discordancy testing methods are examined for their usefulness in evaluating a low bid. A null hypothesis is tested for the significance of detection rates. Conclusions are drawn about the performance of each discordancy test.

Strucely, Timothy David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

NREL Energy DataBus/Nonprofit Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nonprofit Partners Nonprofit Partners < NREL Energy DataBus Jump to: navigation, search Energy Databus Non-Profit Partners Nrellogo.jpg The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the founder of the Energy Databus. NREL is located in Golden, Colorado. Become a Databus partner If you would like to register as a Databus partner, please send email to with the following information: Organization Name Organization Website Phone Contact Email Contact Name of Contact Description of what you support To be approved as a Databus partner, you must fill in a description that tells the community about what you are in the stages of developing that will work with Databus or what services/support you offer on or around Databus including products that might work with Databus through the Databus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TL5002 Provides DDR Bus Termination Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Double data rate (DDR) bus termination power requirements bring new challenges to the power supply by requiring voltage tracking of a reference supply, requiring both sourcing and sinking current, and maintaining a high efficiency over a wide current range. This paper address these issues while presenting an example DDR design of 12 A of output current with voltage outputs between 0.9 V and 1.25 V. Issues and their solutions are provided for the power supply operating as a tradition buck power stage in the sourcing mode as well as for operating as a synchronous boost regulator in the sinking mode. Regulation and control loop characteristics of the examples are presented for both current sinking and sourcing modes of operation. Transient load response is also presented showing output voltage variation, as the current is transitioned from sourcing to sinking.

Robert Kollman; John Betten; Bang S. Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluation Use and Influence among Project Directors of State GEAR UP Grants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Evaluation use is a major goal of program evaluators, because it can lead to program improvement and sustainability. This dissertation adds to the literature on… (more)

Burr, Erin Mehalic

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Heisenberg Spin Bus as a Robust Transmission Line for Perfect State Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the protocol known as quantum state transfer for a strongly coupled antiferromagnetic spin chain or ring (acting as a spin bus), with weakly coupled external qubits. By treating the weak coupling as a perturbation, we find that perfect state transfer (PST) is possible when second order terms are included in the expansion. We also show that PST is robust against variations in the couplings along the spin bus and between the bus and the qubits. As evidence of the quantum interference which mediates PST, we show that the optimal time for PST can be smaller with larger qubit separations, for an even-size chain or ring.

Sangchul Oh; Lian-Ao Wu; Yun-Pil Shim; Mark Friesen; Xuedong Hu

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using hydrogen as an alternative fuel. Final report, September 1997--May 1998  

SciTech Connect

Alternative fuels such as Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG), and alcohol fuels (methanol and ethanol) are already being used in commercial vehicles and transit buses in revenue service. Hydrogen, which has better air quality characteristics as a vehicle fuel, is being used in research demonstration projects in fuel cell powered buses, as well as in internal combustion engines in automobiles and small trucks. At present, there are no facility guidelines to assist transit agencies (and others) contemplating the use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel. This document addresses the various issues involved. Hydrogen fuel properties, potential hazards, fuel requirements for specified levels of bus service, applicable codes and standards, ventilation, and electrical classification are indicated in this document. These guidelines also present various facility and bus design issues that need to be considered by a transit agency to ensure safe operations when using hydrogen as an alternative fuel. Fueling facility, garaging facility, maintenance facility requirements and safety practices are discussed. Critical fuel-related safety issues in the design of the related system on the bus are also identified. A system safety assessment and hazard resolution process is also presented. This approach may be used to select design strategies which are economical, yet ensure a specified level of safety.

Raj, P.K.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.A.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluating the Uncertainty Induced by the Virtual Salt Flux Assumption in Climate Simulations and Future Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unphysical virtual salt flux (VSF) formulation widely used in the ocean component of climate models has the potential to cause systematic and significant biases in modeling the climate system and projecting its future evolution. Here a ...

Jianjun Yin; Ronald J. Stouffer; Michael J. Spelman; Stephen M. Griffies

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of Tropospheric Water Vapor Simulations from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of humidity from 28 general circulation models for the period 1979–88 from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project are compared with observations from radiosondes over North America and the globe and with satellite microwave ...

Dian J. Gaffen; Richard D. Rosen; David A. Salstein; James S. Boyle

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for October and November 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress on 3 projects: Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling and experiments for solar thermal storage; Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems; and Incident angle modifiers (IAMs) by the Monte Carlo method for cylindrical solar collectors. IAMs are used to correct for effects such as shading, back plane reflectance, inter-reflection, etc. Summaries are given for the first two projects; however, a full draft report is given for the third.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. The AEO is based on only then current Federal and State laws and regulations. Thus, the AEO provides a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. The analyses in the AEO primarily focuses on a reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher energy price cases. However, more than 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

310

Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This article evaluates the first year of the Section 1603 Treasury cash grant program, which enables renewable power projects in the U.S. to elect cash grants in lieu of the federal tax credits that are otherwise available. To date, the program has been heavily subscribed, particularly by wind power projects, which had received 86% of the nearly $2.6 billion in grants that had been disbursed as of March 1, 2010. As of that date, 6.2 GW of the 10 GW of new wind capacity installed in the U.S. in 2009 had applied for grants in lieu of production tax credits. Roughly 2.4 GW of this wind capacity may not have otherwise been built in 2009 absent the grant program; this 2.4 GW may have supported approximately 51,600 short-term full-time-equivalent (FTE) gross job-years in the U.S. during the construction phase of these wind projects, and 3,860 longterm FTE gross jobs during the operational phase. The program’s popularity stems from the significant economic value that it provides to renewable power projects, relative to the otherwise available tax credits. Although grants reward investment rather than efficient performance, this evaluation finds no evidence at this time of either widespread “gold-plating” or performance problems.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Darghouth, Naim

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, October 1995--November 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the October/November 1995 project status report of the Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling is discussed, as well as advanced residential solar hot water systems. A paper to be presented at the 1996 International Solar Energy Conference is included. The subject of this paper is rating and certification of domestic water heating systems.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Chapter 7, Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Refrigerator 7: Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs and Josh Keeling, The Cadmus Group, Inc. Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 7 - 1 Chapter 7 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol ....................................................................................... 3 3 Savings Calculations .............................................................................................................. 4 4 Gross Savings......................................................................................................................... 5

314

BWRVIP-18, Revision 1-A: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Core Spray Internals Inspection and Flaw Evaluation Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel and internals issues. This BWRVIP report contains generic guidelines that describe locations on the core spray piping and spargers for which inspection is needed, categories of plants for which inspection needs would differ, extent of inspection and reinspection for each location, and flaw evaluation procedures to determine ...

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

BWRVIP-275NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project: Testing and Evaluation of the Susquehanna Unit 1 120° Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U.S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Susquehanna Unit 1 120° capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.BackgroundThe BWRVIP ISP represents a major enhancement to the process of monitoring embrittlement for the U.S. ...

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Chapter 6, Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Residential Lighting 6: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol Scott Dimetrosky, Apex Analytics, LLC Subcontract Report NREL/SR-7A30-53827 April 2013 The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures 6 - 1 Chapter 6 - Table of Contents 1 Measure Description .............................................................................................................. 2 2 Application Conditions of Protocol ....................................................................................... 3 3 Savings Calculations .............................................................................................................. 4 4 Measurement and Verification Plan ....................................................................................... 5

317

BWRVIP-271NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Testing and Evaluation of the Browns Ferry Unit 2 120° Capsule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, a Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) was developed to improve the surveillance of the U.S. BWR fleet. This report describes testing and evaluation of the Browns Ferry Unit 2 120° capsule. These results will be used to monitor embrittlement as part of the BWRVIP ISP.BackgroundThe BWRVIP ISP represents a major enhancement to the process of monitoring embrittlement for the U.S. ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

New concept for coal wettability evaluation and modulation. Technical progress report for the project, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the new concept for coal surface wettability and floatability evaluation and modulation. the objective of the work is the fundamental surface chemistry features about the evaluation of the surface wettability and floatability of coal and pyrite, and establish a new separation strategy which could contribute to advanced coal-cleaning for premium fuel application. In this quarter, the mini-cell flotation tests are conducted to study kinetic floatability and kinetic collectability of coal and pyrite. The kinetic floatability of the five samples have been tested with methanol, butanol, and hexanol as collector.

Hu, W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product, which is one of the objectives of this current study, is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage but is not necessary for performance. FBSR testing of a Hanford LAW simulant and a WTP-SW simulant at the pilot scale was performed by THOR Treatment Technologies, LLC at Hazen Research Inc. in April/May 2008. The Hanford LAW simulant was the Rassat 68 tank blend and the target concentrations for the LAW was increased by a factor of 10 for Sb, As, Ag, Cd, and Tl; 100 for Ba and Re (Tc surrogate); 1,000 for I; and 254,902 for Cs based on discussions with the DOE field office and the environmental regulators and an evaluation of the Hanford Tank Waste Envelopes A, B, and C. It was determined through the evaluation of the actual tank waste metals concentrations that some metal levels were not sufficient to achieve reliable detection in the off-gas sampling. Therefore, the identified metals concentrations were increased in the Rassat simulant processed by TTT at HRI to ensure detection and enable calculation of system removal efficiencies, product retention efficiencies, and mass balance closure without regard to potential results of those determinations or impacts on product durability response such as Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP). A WTP-SW simulant based on melter off-gas analyses from Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was also tested at HRI in the 15-inch diameter Engineering Scale Test Demonstration (ESTD) dual reformer at HRI in 2008. The target concentrations for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were increased by 16X for Se, 29X for Tl, 42X for Ba, 48X for Sb, by 100X for Pb and Ni, 1000X for Ag, and 1297X for Cd to ensure detection by the an

Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Secretary Bodman Tours LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul Secretary Bodman Tours LNG Powered City Bus in Seoul December 13, 2006 - 9:46am Addthis Joins Secretary Gutierrez to Highlight Cooperation in Developing and Deploying Clean Energy Technologies SEOUL, KOREA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today joined U.S. Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez in Seoul, Korea to view a city bus and industrial equipment powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) built with U.S. technology. Secretaries Bodman and Gutierrez and senior Korean government officials highlighted the importance of diversifying to clean and efficient energy sources to increase global energy security. "South Korea and the United States are allies in advancing the use of cleaner, safer, and healthier clean energy technologies," Secretary Bodman

322

TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Agency/Company /Organization: Transportation Research Board Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.trb.org/Main/Public/Blurbs/152921.aspx Country: United States, Australia, United Kingdom, France, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador Cost: Free Northern America, Australia and New Zealand, Northern Europe, Western Europe, South America, South America, South America Language: English TRB-Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP): Case Studies in Bus Rapid Transit Screenshot

323

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) accomplishments in showcasing a Ford hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) bus at The Taste of Colorado festival in Denver. NREL started using its U.S. Department of Energy-funded H2ICE bus in May 2010 as the primary shuttle vehicle for VIP visitors, members of the media, and new employees. In September 2010, NREL featured the bus at The Taste of Colorado. This was the first major outreach event for the bus. NREL's educational brochure, vehicle wrap designs, and outreach efforts serve as a model for other organizations with DOE-funded H2ICE buses. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Education Group and Market Transformation Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The Energy DataBus (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for particular sites and applications. Free Software for Open-Source Development The Energy DataBus uses open-source software, which not only saves the high cost of licensed...

325

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... The Wheels on the Bus Go Round and Round... March 9, 2010 - 5:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program I have a love/hate relationship with buses. I love that they save me gasoline, are more efficient than driving a car, and reduce my greenhouse gas emissions. However, I hate them when they're running late! But there is one category of buses that I'm particularly fond of - those that run on alternative fuels. In fact, alternative fuel and advanced technology transit buses offer a number of health, environmental, and social benefits. As anyone who has walked behind a traditional diesel bus knows, the plume of black smoke from its tailpipe is both unpleasant and unhealthy. That

326

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State...

327

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Evaluating Potential Groundwater Impacts and Natural Geochemical...

328

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mechanistic insights 5 Project Overview: Scope of work * Task 1 - Pipeline and Casing Steel Corrosion Studies * Evaluate corrosion behavior of pipeline steels in CO 2 mixtures...

329

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook Retrospective Review-Evaluation of Projections in  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) The Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies. The Reference case projection assumes trends that are consistent with historical and current market behavior, technological and demographic changes, and current laws and regulations. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards-or of sections of legislation that have been enacted but that require implementing regulations or appropriation of funds that are not provided or specified in the legislation itself-are not reflected in the projections. Thus, the AEO Reference case provides an impartial baseline that can be used to analyze potential new policies or legislative initiatives. The analysis in the AEO primarily focuses on a Reference case, lower and higher economic growth cases, and lower and higher oil price cases. However, approximately 30 alternative cases are generally included in the AEO. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases, which address many of the uncertainties inherent in long-term projections.

331

Data collection plan for Phase 2 Alternative Fuels Bus Data Collection Program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document constitutes the plan for collecting and reporting data associated with a special set of transit bus demonstrations to be conducted under the Urban Bus Program of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. This program, called the Phase 2 Bus Data Collection Program, serves as an adjunct to the Phase I Bus Data Collection Program, collecting detailed data on just a few buses to augment and enhance the Phase 1 data in fulfilling the urban bus requirements of AMFA. Demonstrations will be conducted at a few transit system locations throughout the US and will use alternative fuels and associated technologies to reduce undesirable transit bus exhaust emissions. Several organizations will be involved in the data collection; NREL will manage the program, analyze and store vehicle data, and make these data available through the Alternative Fuels Data Center. This information will enable transit agencies, equipment manufacturers, fuel suppliers, and government policy makers to make informed decisions about buying and using alternative fuels.

Krenelka, T. [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

BWRVIP-189: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Evaluation of RAMA Fluence Methodology Calculational Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the overall calculational uncertainty associated with the application of the Radiation Application Modeling Application (RAMA) Fluence Methodology to BWR reactor pressure vessel fluence evaluations.

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

Guidelines for the Monitoring, Evaluation, Reporting, Verification, and Certification of Forestry Projects for Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993. “Future Biomass-Based Electricity Supply in in. thesupply sector. Thus, the monitoring and evaluation of the impacts of biomass

Vine, Edward; Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

Steve Bergin

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) Project: Tractive Energy Analysis Methodology and Results from Long-Haul Truck Drive Cycle Evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the approach that will be used in the Large Scale Duty Cycle (LSDC) project to evaluate the fuel savings potential of various truck efficiency technologies. The methods and equations used for performing the tractive energy evaluations are presented and the calculation approach is described. Several representative results for individual duty cycle segments are presented to demonstrate the approach and the significance of this analysis for the project. The report is divided into four sections, including an initial brief overview of the LSDC project and its current status. In the second section of the report, the concepts that form the basis of the analysis are presented through a discussion of basic principles pertaining to tractive energy and the role of tractive energy in relation to other losses on the vehicle. In the third section, the approach used for the analysis is formalized and the equations used in the analysis are presented. In the fourth section, results from the analysis for a set of individual duty cycle measurements are presented and different types of drive cycles are discussed relative to the fuel savings potential that specific technologies could bring if these drive cycles were representative of the use of a given vehicle or trucking application. Additionally, the calculation of vehicle mass from measured torque and speed data is presented and the accuracy of the approach is demonstrated.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

Not Available

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

An evaluation of the Big Muddy Field low-tension flood demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

A commercial scale low-tension flood (micellar-polymer) demonstration project was conducted in the Second Wall Creek Reservoir in the Big Muddy Field in east central Wyoming. The cost-shared, low-tension flood used a 0.1 pore volume preflush and a 0.1 pore volume low-tension slug followed by a polymer drive bank. The sulfonate used in the low-tension slug was a blend of both low and high molecular weight synthetic sulfonates. Dow Pusher 500, a dry polyacrylamide polymer, was used in both the low-tension slug and polymer drive bank for mobility control. Although project oil recovery was or will be significantly less than originally predicted, the low-tension process successfully mobilized waterflood residual oil. The primary factor contributing to lower than anticipated recovery was lack of containment of the injected fluids in the reservoir. Behind-pipe communication in abandoned or reconditioned wellbores in the project area represented the most probable source of fluid migration from the reservoir. Fluid entry from other reservoirs occurred concurrently with migration of the fluids from the reservoir. Fluid containment deteriorated significantly when injection pressures during the polymer injection period were allowed to exceed the formation parting pressure. Injectivity in the relatively low permeability reservoir was a continuing operational problem. 6 refs., 78 figs., 19 tabs.

Cole, E.L.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rules pertaining to what project costs should and should notless than total installed project costs, with the differenceof total installed project costs). Capacity factor is simply

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Cost Escalation of Rail Projects: Using Previous Experience to Re-Evaluate the CalSpeed Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r RA/L ! TRACKWORK RAIL RELOCATION SUBTOTAL CONTINGENCYobtain federal support for rail projects, at the expense ofProjects-. -- - Light Rail Transit Projects" . Wash- :

Leavitt, Dan; Ennis, Sean; McGovern, Pat

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

The necessities for building a model to evaluate Business Intelligence projects- Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years Business Intelligence (BI) systems have consistently been rated as one of the highest priorities of Information Systems (IS) and business leaders. BI allows firms to apply information for supporting their processes and decisions by combining its capabilities in both of organizational and technical issues. Many of companies are being spent a significant portion of its IT budgets on business intelligence and related technology. Evaluation of BI readiness is vital because it serves two important goals. First, it shows gaps areas where company is not ready to proceed with its BI efforts. By identifying BI readiness gaps, we can avoid wasting time and resources. Second, the evaluation guides us what we need to close the gaps and implement BI with a high probability of success. This paper proposes to present an overview of BI and necessities for evaluation of readiness. Key words: Business intelligence, Evaluation, Success, Readiness

Farrokhi, Vahid

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

NONE

1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the first three years of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. Because the hatchery and the evaluation study and the fish health monitoring investigations are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The majority of the data that is crucial for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Onjukka, Sam T.; Focher, Shannon M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The ADVANCE project: Formal evaluation of the targeted deployment. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

ADVANCE [Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation ConcEpt] was a public/private partnership conceived and developed by four founding parties. The founding parties include the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), the University of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern University operating together under the auspices of the Illinois Universities Transportation Research Consortium (IUTRC), and Motorola, Inc. The major responsibilities of each party are fully described in the Project agreement. Subsequently, these four were joined on the Steering Committee by the American Automobile Association (AAA). This unique blending of public sector, private sector and university interests, augmented by more than two dozen other private sector participants, provided a strong set of resources for ADVANCE. The ADVANCE test area covered over 300 square miles including portions of the City of Chicago and 40 northwest suburban communities. The Project encompasses the high growth areas adjacent to O`Hare International Airport, the Schaumbura/Hoffman Estates office and retail complexes, and the Lake-Cook Road development corridor. It also includes major sports and entertainment complexes such as the Arlington International Racecourse and the Rosemont Horizon. The population in the area is more than 750,000. This volume provides a summary of the insights and achievements made as a result of this field test, and selected appendices containing more detailed information.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Framework for Evaluating Model Credibility for Warm Season Precipitation in the Northeast: A Case Study of CMIP5 Simulations and Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future projections of Northeast warm season precipitation (JJA) indicate substantial uncertainty. Atmospheric processes important to Northeast JJA precipitation are identified and a first evaluation of five CMIP5 models’ ability to simulate these ...

Jeanne M. Thibeault; Anji Seth

349

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of June and July 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for the months of June and July 1995, is given on the Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fuel Cell Transit Bus Coordination and Evaluation Plan California Fuel Cell Transit Evaluation Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About This Document..................................................................................................................... 3

For The

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comprehensive Evaluation of Coal Ploy-Generation Projects by Improved AHP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In allusion to the shortcoming of the traditional AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) method which requires consistency checking and judgment matrix rectifying frequently, an improved AHP that does not need consistency checking is proposed. Based on 4 main ... Keywords: improved AHP, poly-generation, comprehensive evaluation, decision making, rough set

Xian Huang; Lu Fang; Min Yang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of the Umatilla Hatchery in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan type of rearing using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus nzykiss). The hatchery was completed in the fall of 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to develop considerable knowledge and understanding of new production and supplementation techniques. The use of the Michigan raceways in rearing at Umatilla Hatchery was selected because it could increase smolt production given the limited hatchery well water supply and allow comparison of Michigan raceways with the standard Oregon raceways. Results of testing the Michigan raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia Basin. The Umatilla Hatchery is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council`s goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan . The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. This report covers the first four years of the monitoring of the hatchery.

Hayes, Michael C.; Waln, Karen; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Impact evaluation of an energy savings plan project at Bellingham Cold Storage  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Bellingham Cold Storage (BCS) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program awards cash incentives to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at BCS as a result of the ESP and to determine how much savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, submittal reviews (BCS's Completion Report, Proposal, and Abstract), and process evaluation reviews. The ECM itself consists of an energy management and control system that is used to manage energy consumption by a large refrigeration system at BCS's Orchard Drive facility in Bellingham, Washington. At this facility, BCS freezes and stores fruits, berries, and fish products, while two tenants process frozen fish products. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be at least 1,094, 402 kWh during the first year (a savings of 23%) with greater savings in subsequent years. The ECM cost BCS $169,300 to install, Bonneville paid an incentive to BCS of $65,100, and the local utility paid an additional incentive of $21,700. The levelized cost of these savings to Bonneville will be no greater than 5.0 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the cost to the region will be no greater than 12.5 mills/kWh. It is expected that this ECM would have been installed within 3 years even without the incentive from Bonneville, and the levelized cost to Bonneville for just the first three years' savings is 21.03 mills/kWh or less. 3 tabs.

Spanner, G.E.; Dixon, D.R.; Fishbaugher, M.J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The RACER (risk analysis, communication, evaluation, and reduction) stakeholder environmental data transparency project for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The RACER (Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction) project was created in 2003, as an effort to enhance the Los Alamos National Laboratory's ability to effectively communicate the data and processes used to evaluate environmental risks to the public and the environment. The RACER project staff consists of members of Risk Assessment Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). RACER staff worked closely with members of the community, tribal governments, and others within NMED and LANL to create innovative tools and a process that could provide information to regulators, LANL and the community about the sources of public health risk and ecological impact from LAN L operations. The RACER Data Analysis Tool (DA T) provides the public with webbased access to environmental measurement data collected in and around the LANL site. Its purpose is to provide a 'transparent' view to the public of all data collected by LANL and NMED regarding the LANL site. The DAT is available to the public at 'www.racernm.com'.

Echohawk, John Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dorries, Alison M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhart, Craig F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Werdel, Nancy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - Curry Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 1 mile of 72" pipeline to replace a segment of the Curry Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,258 ac-ft of water per year and 1,092,823,269 BTUs (320,288 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.68 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000598 per BTU ($0.204 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $27.49 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000568 per BTU ($0.194 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -2.84.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 (Edinburg) - North Branch / East Main - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 1 to the Bureau of Reclamation and North American Development Bank. The proposed project involves installing 4.83 miles of multi-size pipeline to replace a segment of the North Branch / East Main canal. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 48-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 5,838 ac-ft of water per year and 3,293,049,926 BTUs (965,138 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $15.58 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0000392 per BTU ($0.134 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $30.68 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0000544 per BTU ($0.186 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.58.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Popp, Michael; Robinson, John; Sturdivant, Allen; Lacewell, Ronald; Rister, Edward

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 54" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 54" pipeline to replace 2.29 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,844 ac-ft of water per year and 313,797,977 BTUs (91,969 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $24.70 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001740 per BTU ($0.594 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $56.74 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003335 per BTU ($1.138 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.46.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Project: Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Juan) - Relining Lateral A – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Hidalgo County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Juan) to the North American Development Bank (NADBank) and Bureau of Reclamation. The proposed project involves relining “Lateral A” with a geomembrane and shotcrete cover. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 2,542 ac-ft of water per year and 551,738,646 BTUs (161,705 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $74.49 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated to be $0.0003698 per BTU ($1.262 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $57.76 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0002661 per BTU ($0.908 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -14.29.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a single-component capital renovation project proposed by Brownsville Irrigation District to the North American Development Bank (NADB) and Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves constructing a 72" and 48" pipeline to replace 2.31 miles of the “Main Canal.” Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated 49-year useful life for the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 1,872 ac-ft of water per year and 318,479,103 BTUs (93,341 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $27.98 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0001933 per BTU ($0.660 per kwh). In addition, expected real (rather than nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $58.60 per ac-ft of water savings. The initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0003444 per BTU ($1.175 per kwh). The ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -1.53.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) – Infrastructure Rehabilitation – Preliminary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2 (San Benito) - Infrastructure Rehabilitation - Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Initial construction costs and net annual changes in operating and maintenance expenses are identified for a five-component capital renovation project proposed by Cameron County Irrigation District No. 2, (a.k.a. San Benito) to the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). The proposed project involves rehabilitating 42+ miles of canals, laterals, and pipelines. Both nominal and real estimates of water and energy savings and expected economic and financial costs of those savings are identified throughout the anticipated useful lives for all five components of the proposed project. Sensitivity results for both the cost of water savings and cost of energy savings are presented for several important parameters. Annual water and energy savings forthcoming from the total project are estimated, using amortization procedures, to be 19,580 ac-ft of water per year and 2,151,277,209 BTUs (630,503 kwh) of energy per year. The calculated economic and financial cost of water savings is estimated to be $45.60 per ac-ft. The calculated economic and financial cost of energy savings is estimated at $0.0004399 per BTU ($1.501 per kwh). In addition, expected real (vs nominal) values are indicated for the Bureau of Reclamation’s three principal evaluation measures specified in the United States Public Law 106-576 legislation. The aggregate initial construction cost per ac-ft of water savings measure is $46.98 per ac-ft of water savings. The aggregate initial construction cost per BTU (kwh) of energy savings measure is $0.0004275 per BTU ($1.459 per kwh). The aggregate ratio of initial construction costs per dollar of total annual economic savings is estimated to be -9.04.

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.; Popp, Michael C.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems: project status report for June and July 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This status report details activities during the months of June and July 1996. Work continues on the development of an improved wrap- around heat exchanger/tank model. The focus of the effort during June and July has been on evaluating various `local` methods of evaluating the natural convection boundary layer for use in a two layer model of the natural convection in the tank. The advantage of a local method is that the solution of the boundary layer equations depends on one or more parameters, but not on the upstream solutions. As a result, the solutions of the boundary layer equations can be calculated in advance and tabulated for use in the tank model.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

G-Tunnel Welded Tuff Mining Experiment instrumentation evaluations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratory has conducted a mine-by experiment in welded tuff so that information could be obtained regarding the response of the rock to a drill and blast excavation process, where smooth-blasting techniques were used. This report describes the results of the evaluations of nine different instrument or measurement systems used in conjunction with these mining activities.

Zimmerman, R.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Mann, K.L.; Thompson, T.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

BWRVIP-276: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Evaluation to Justify Core Plate Bolt Inspection Elimination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a comprehensive evaluation to provide justification for the elimination of periodic core plate bolt inspections for 26 boiling water reactors (BWRs) that do not have core plate wedges installed.BackgroundA core plate bolt is threaded at its upper and lower ends and is unthreaded over the remainder of its length. Anywhere from 30 to 72 bolts (dependent on plant design) are used to secure the core plate to the core plate support ...

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

BWRVIP-139: Vessel and Internals Project, Steam Dryer Inspection and Flaw Evaluation Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides steam dryer inspection and flaw evaluation guidelines consistent with those developed for other boiling water reactor (BWR) internal components. It includes (1) documentation of the steam dryer configurations for the different plants, (2) a summary of dryer cracking incidents based on field experience, (3) documentation of the regions of susceptibility for fatigue cracking and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), (4) a review of the failure modes and effects of cracking...

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company (Columbia Harbor Lumber), Chehalis, Washington, was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Columbia Harbor Lumber as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Columbia Harbor Lumber's Completion Report and Proposal). The ECM itself consists of an adjustable speed drive for controlling the speed of nine fans on a lumber drying kiln. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 286,500 kWh/yr. On a per unit of output basis, this ECM will save 0.053 kWh/board foot, a 48% reduction. The ECM cost $24,086 to install, and Columbia Harbor Lumber received payment of $19,269 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. In all likelihood, this ECM would have been installed even without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 5.6 mills/kWh over the ECM's expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 7.4 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Impact evaluation of an Energy $avings Plan project at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of an energy conservation measure (ECM) that was recently installed at Columbia Harbor Lumber Company (Columbia Harbor Lumber), Chehalis, Washington, was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy Savings Plan (ESP) Program. The Program makes acquisition payments to firms that install energy conservation measures in their industrial processes. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electrical energy is being saved at Columbia Harbor Lumber as a result of the ESP and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the ECM was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Columbia Harbor Lumber`s Completion Report and Proposal). The ECM itself consists of an adjustable speed drive for controlling the speed of nine fans on a lumber drying kiln. Energy savings resulting from this ECM are expected to be 286,500 kWh/yr. On a per unit of output basis, this ECM will save 0.053 kWh/board foot, a 48% reduction. The ECM cost $24,086 to install, and Columbia Harbor Lumber received payment of $19,269 from Bonneville for the acquisition of energy savings. In all likelihood, this ECM would have been installed even without the acquisition payment from Bonneville. The levelized cost of these energy savings to Bonneville will be 5.6 mills/kWh over the ECM`s expected 15-year life, and the levelized cost to the region will be 7.4 mills/kWh.

Spanner, G.E.; Sullivan, G.P.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Project Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

372

Malm Hydrogen and CNG/Hydrogen filling station and Hythane bus project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Vandenborre Hydrogen Systems in Belgium, a subsidiary of Stuart Energy, Canada now owned by Hydrogenics ltd % Fig 1. Hydrogen storage pressure tanks Fig 2. Hydrogen storage The above pictures show the compressed hydrogen storage at the site. The hydrogen storage is placed closed to the electrolyser unit. The pressure

373

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Agency/Company /Organization: US DOT Focus Area: Vehicles Topics: Analysis Tools Website: www.fuelcells.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/busreport.pdf From 2002-2007 > 20 cities in the US, Europe, China, Japan & Australia demonstrated buses powered by fuel cells or hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines. The resulting report analyzes lessons learned from the demonstrations, identifies key remaining challenges for introduction of the technology, & suggests potential roles for government in supporting commercialization of fuel cell buses. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

376

Evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test conducted at the project Gnome Underground Nuclear Test Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide tracer test was conducted in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Project Gnome underground nuclear test site, approximately 40 km southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The tracer study was carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to study the transport behavior of radionuclides in fractured rock aquifers. The Culebra Dolomite was chosen for the test because it was considered to be a reasonable analogue of the fractured carbonate aquifer at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the principal location of U.S. underground nuclear tests. Project Gnome was one of a small number of underground nuclear tests conducted by the AEC at sites distant from the NTS. The Gnome device was detonated on December 10, 1961 in an evaporate unit at a depth of 360 m below ground surface. Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close these offsite nuclear test areas. An early step in this process is performance of a preliminary risk analysis of the hazard posed by each site. The Desert Research Institute has performed preliminary hydrologic risk evaluations for the groundwater transport pathway at Gnome. That evaluation included the radioactive tracer test as a possible source because the test introduced radionuclides directly into the Culebra Dolomite, which is the only aquifer at the site. This report presents a preliminary evaluation of the radionuclide tracer test as a source for radionuclide migration in the Culebra Dolomite. The results of this study will assist in planning site characterization activities and refining estimates of the radionuclide source for comprehensive models of groundwater transport st the Gnome site.

Pohll, G.; Pohlmann, K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, January--February 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of several recently published methods for quantifying the uncertainty in economic evaluations due to uncertainty in future oil prices. Conventional price forecasting methods used in the industry typically underestimate the range of uncertainty in oil and gas price forecasts. These forecasts traditionally consider pessimistic, most-likely, and optimistic cases in an attempt to quantify economic uncertainty. The recently developed alternative methods have their unique strengths as well as weaknesses that may affect their applicability in particular situations. While stochastic methods can improve the assessment of price uncertainty they can also be tedious to implement. The inverted hockey stick method is found to be an easily applied alternative to the stochastic methods. However, the primary basis for validating this method has been found to be unreliable. In this study, a consistent and reliable validation of uncertainty estimates predicted by the inverted hockey stick method is presented. Verifying the reliability of this model will ensure reliable quantification of economic uncertainty. Although we cannot eliminate uncertainty from investment evaluations, we can better quantify the uncertainty by accurately predicting the volatility in future oil and gas prices. Reliably quantifying economic uncertainty will enable operators to make better decisions and allocate their capital with increased efficiency.

Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Residential on site solar heating systems: a project evaluation using the capital asset pricing model  

SciTech Connect

An energy source ready for immediate use on a commercial scale is solar energy in the form of On Site Solar Heating (OSSH) systems. These systems collect solar energy with rooftop panels, store excess energy in water storage tanks and can, in certain circumstances, provide 100% of the space heating and hot water required by the occupants of the residential or commercial structure on which the system is located. Such systems would take advantage of a free and inexhaustible energy source--sunlight. The principal drawback of such systems is the high initial capital cost. The solution would normally be a carefully worked out corporate financing plan. However, at the moment it is individual homeowners and not corporations who are attempting to finance these systems. As a result, the terms of finance are excessively stringent and constitute the main obstacle to the large scale market penetration of OSSH. This study analyzes the feasibility of OSSH as a private utility investment. Such systems would be installed and owned by private utilities and would displace other investment projects, principally electric generating plants. The return on OSSH is calculated on the basis of the cost to the consumer of the equivalent amount of electrical energy that is displaced by the OSSH system. The hurdle rate for investment in OSSH is calculated using the Sharpe--Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model. The results of this study indicate that OSSH is a low risk investment having an appropriate hurdle rate of 7.9%. At this rate, OSSH investment appears marginally acceptable in northern California and unambiguously acceptable in southern California. The results also suggest that utility investment in OSSH should lead to a higher degree of financial leverage for utility companies without a concurrent deterioration in the risk class of utility equity.

Schutz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Techno-economic and risk evaluation of a thermal recovery project  

SciTech Connect

Field production data were studied, to derive an overall energy balance for the steamflood, to calculate the steamflood capture efficiency and predict future steamflood performance. Heat-losses due to produced fluids were also calculated. Predicted production schedules from the model were history-matched with field production data The reservoir parameters (porosity, {phi}, net thickness, h{sub n}, initial oil saturation, S{sub oi}, and residual oil saturation, S{sub or}) were evaluated statistically using both Gaussian and triangular distributions. These resulted in distributed recovery predictions. The Gaussian distributions behaved as predicted; but of great importance, the skewed triangular distributions also behaved in much the same manner. The results fit closely with predictions using logical formulas to predict expected values, peak values and standard variations of recoveries. This result is important, for it indicates that complete Monte-Carlo simulations may not be necessary. All steamflood calculations were carried out using a PC-based spreadsheet program. The major results were as follows: The capture efficiency of the Wilmington steamflood was calculated at 60%. This is an acceptable value, taking into account the reservoir geometry and history. The calculated heat balance showed high heat-loss to adjacent formations and through produced fluids. Of the cumulative heat injected at the time of the study, 21% had been lost to vertical conduction and 21% through produced fluids. Predicted production schedules indicated that up to 43% of the oil in place (at steamflood initiation) could be recovered by the steamflood.

Joshi, S.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project  

SciTech Connect

TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

Laul, Jadish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimal partitioned fault-tolerant bus layout for reducing power in nanometer designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As technology scales down to nanometer dimensions, coupling capacitances between adjacent bus wires grow rapidly, and have a significant impact on power consumption and signal integrity of an integrated circuit. As buses are major components of a design, ... Keywords: coupling capacitance, fault-tolerant, low power, reliability

Shanq-Jang Ruan; Edwin Naroska; Chun-Chih Chen

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Orbital disc insulator for SF.sub.6 gas-insulated bus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An insulator for supporting a high voltage conductor within a gas-filled grounded housing consists of radially spaced insulation rings fitted to the exterior of the bus and the interior of the grounded housing respectively, and the spaced rings are connected by trefoil type rings which are integrally formed with the spaced insulation rings.

Bacvarov, Dosio C. (Greensburg, PA); Gomarac, Nicholas G. (West Newton, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

IAC-09.C3.2.8 A REDUNDANT POWER BUS FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The idea behind the proposed Power Bus is to have power conversion (from solar panels) and power storage") which contain, each: a solar panel; energy storage batteries with the corresponding power converters in a distributed way. For instance: i) accumulating the power from all solar panels towards the load(s); ii

387

High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Optimized Parameter Matching Method of Plug-in Series Hybrid Electric Bus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research attempts to deal with the coupling-influence among different powertrain parameters in the parameter matching process of Plug-in Series Hybrid Electric Bus(PSHEB), the research target is a PSHEB (with no gearbox) which is currently under ... Keywords: Plug-in, hybrid electric vehicle, parameter matching, Matlab simulation

Kai Xu, Bin Qiu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

390

Investigating the electric power distribution system (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of distributed generation (DG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the Electric Power Distribution System (EPDS) bus voltage in the presence of Distributed Generation (DG). Distribution Company's (Discos) planner endeavor to develop new planning strategies for their network in order to serve ... Keywords: PSCAD, distributed generation, electric power distribution system, islanding, power quality, voltage stability

Hasham Khan; Mohammad Ahmad Choudhry; Tahir Mahmood; Aamir Hanif

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Extensions to wireless M-Bus protocol for smart metering and smart grid application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smart metering and smart grid applications are rapidly finding their place in the market in order to improve the provisioning process efficiency of electricity, gas, water and heat. The usage of communication technologies is a major stepping stone for ... Keywords: optimization, smart grid, smart metering, wireless M-Bus

Axel Sikora; Pancraç Villalonga; Klaus Landwehr

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

393

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-09-2011 NNSA-B-11-0229 6-09-2011 NNSA-B-11-0229 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to install 7 new storm-water monitoring stations at various sites east of Technical Areas II and IV. Five of the 7 new monitoring points would be "in-ground samplers." These locations would be manually dug using hand tools (shovels, posthole digger, bars, etc.) to install the samplers. Each monitoring point would be 24 inches (in). deep by 18 in. in diameter. A 12-inch diameter PVC pipe would be placed in the ground to house the storm water collection device. The remaining two samplers would be portable and would not require any excavation. ✖ Sandia Site Office Installation of 7 New Storm Water Monitoring Stations TA 4 Escarpment/Tijeras Arroyo LACY,SUSAN DOYLENE

395

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or equipment, environmental quality maintained B1.25 - Transfer, disposition, or acquisition of uncontaminated land for habitat preservation/wildlife management B1.26 - Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of small water B1.27 - Disconnection of utilities B1.28 - Placement of unused facilities in environmentally safe condition B1.29 - Small on-site const/demolition waste disposal facility const/oper/decom B1.30 - Transfer/transportation actions, quantities incidental to amounts at receiving site B1.31 - Relocation/operation of machinery or equipment, similar use B1.32 - Traffic flow adjustments, existing roads. B2.1 - Modifications to enhance workplace habitability B2.2 - Installation/improvement of building/equipment instrumentation

396

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or equipment, environmental quality maintained B1.25 - Transfer, disposition, or acquisition of uncontaminated land for habitat preservation/wildlife management B1.26 - Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of small water B1.27 - Disconnection of utilities B1.28 - Placement of unused facilities in environmentally safe condition B1.29 - Small on-site const/demolition waste disposal facility const/oper/decom B1.30 - Transfer/transportation actions, quantities incidental to amounts at receiving site B1.31 - Relocation/operation of machinery or equipment, similar use B1.32 - Traffic flow adjustments, existing roads. B2.1 - Modifications to enhance workplace habitability B2.2 - Installation/improvement of building/equipment instrumentation

397

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or equipment, environmental quality maintained B1.25 - Transfer, disposition, or acquisition of uncontaminated land for habitat preservation/wildlife management B1.26 - Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of small water B1.27 - Disconnection of utilities B1.28 - Placement of unused facilities in environmentally safe condition B1.29 - Small on-site const/demolition waste disposal facility const/oper/decom B1.30 - Transfer/transportation actions, quantities incidental to amounts at receiving site B1.31 - Relocation/operation of machinery or equipment, similar use B1.32 - Traffic flow adjustments, existing roads. B2.1 - Modifications to enhance workplace habitability

398

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or equipment, environmental quality maintained B1.25 - Transfer, disposition, or acquisition of uncontaminated land for habitat preservation/wildlife management B1.26 - Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of small water B1.27 - Disconnection of utilities B1.28 - Placement of unused facilities in environmentally safe condition B1.29 - Small on-site const/demolition waste disposal facility const/oper/decom B1.30 - Transfer/transportation actions, quantities incidental to amounts at receiving site B1.31 - Relocation/operation of machinery or equipment, similar use B1.32 - Traffic flow adjustments, existing roads. B2.1 - Modifications to enhance workplace habitability B2.2 - Installation/improvement of building/equipment instrumentation

399

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-16-2011 NNSA-B-11-0247 8-16-2011 NNSA-B-11-0247 Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to operate an Atomic-Precision Fabrication Tool in the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT). Installation and hydrogen-gas operation of the Atomic-Precision Fabrication Tool, to be located in the CINT Integration Lab Class 1,000 Cleanroom, Room 1512 (Flex Bay Lab), was analyzed previously. The current proposal involves use of the tool for a process using phosphine gas. Phosphine would be delivered via a Safe Delivery Source (SDS) subatmospheric lecture-sized bottle/cylinder (commonly used at universities throughout the U.S.), housed in a built-in and exhausted hazardous gas cabinet within the tool. ✖ Sandia Site Office CINT Integration Laboratories: PH3 Operations

400

Evaluation Project 4492  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

decomm of facilities for R&D, B3.7 - New infill exploratory, experimental oilgasgeothermal constructionoperation B3.8 - Outdoor ecologicalenvironmental research in small...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bus evaluation project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation Project 4492  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

24-2011 NNSA-B-11-0282 Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to investigate the performance of a self-detoxifying material. Tasks would include the use of...

402

Evaluation Project 4492  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

65 Sandia National LaboratoriesCalifornia (SNLCA) proposes to conduct microfluidics laboratory activities in support of a collaboration with the University of Texas Medical...

403

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to transfer sources from the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF), to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), for disposal. ...

404

Evaluation of local content strategies to plan large engineering projects in the oil & gas industry in high risk country areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Local content of a complex project is an important variable to create value and increase the overall sustainability of large engineering projects in the Oil & Gas industry, especially in the developing countries. The paper proposes a method to ... Keywords: causal knowledge map, large engineering projects, local content, scenario analysis

Troncone Enzo Piermichele; De Falco Massimo; Gallo Mosè; Santillo Liberatina Carmela; Pier Alberto Viecelli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

This project is to evaluate the benefits of the System-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM) system implemented in the Portland Metropolitan area as  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This project is to evaluate the benefits of the System-Wide Adaptive Ramp Metering (SWARM-timed ramp metering to manage traffic congestion during the morning and afternoon peak periods. The SWARM implemented in stages since May 2005 and is operating on six of the seven metered freeway corridors. Results

Bertini, Robert L.

406

The potential for bus rapid transit to promote transit oriented development : an analysis of BRTOD in Ottawa, Brisbane, and Pittsburgh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the conditions under which bus rapid transit (BRT) can promote transit oriented development (TOD). At a time when cities throughout the U.S. are searching for methods to reduce road congestion and limit ...

Judy, Meredith H. (Meredith Hampton)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. Department of Energy Shuttle Bus Passenger List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

511.1 511.1 (02-94) All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. Department of Energy Shuttle Bus Passenger List Date: Time: Bus Number: Driver's Signature: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Shuttle operates Express between the Germantown Building and the Washington Office (Forrestal Building). ICC regulations prohibits en-route stops. The information being collected below is for the purpose of identifying individuals utilizing DOE Shuttle service. It is not retrievable by a personal identifier and is, therefore, not being kept in a Privacy Act system of records. Official Government Travelers I certify that travel on this trip is for Official Government business. (Please print all information) Name: (First/Last) Office Symbol or Agency Duty Station 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

408

Multilevel-Dc-Bus Inverter For Providing Sinusoidal And Pwm Electrical Machine Voltages  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A circuit for controlling an ac machine comprises a full bridge network of commutation switches which are connected to supply current for a corresponding voltage phase to the stator windings, a plurality of diodes, each in parallel connection to a respective one of the commutation switches, a plurality of dc source connections providing a multi-level dc bus for the full bridge network of commutation switches to produce sinusoidal voltages or PWM signals, and a controller connected for control of said dc source connections and said full bridge network of commutation switches to output substantially sinusoidal voltages to the stator windings. With the invention, the number of semiconductor switches is reduced to m+3 for a multi-level dc bus having m levels. A method of machine control is also disclosed.

Su, Gui-Jia (Knoxville, TN)

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

409

{open_quotes}Secure Bus{close_quotes} disturbance-free power at the utility substation level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last 18 months Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), El Camino Real Engineering, Inc. (CRE), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have worked on the development of disturbance-free power at the medium voltage substation level. The work resulted in the Secure Bus concept, a system in which a medium voltage bus in a substation is immune to power outages and voltage sags on the utility source. The Secure Bus voltage is also immune to voltage sags resulting from faults on any distribution feeder connected to the bus. The Secure Bus concept originated from work conducted to improve power quality for large high-tech manufacturing facilities, in particular for large semiconductor manufacturing plants. For the demands on quality power of a modern facility conventional equipment is not adequate for protecting the end user. For example, the operation of conventional vacuum breakers during short circuit conditions on a feeder circuit, requiring 3 to 5 cycles for breaker opening, does not allow for fast enough current interruption to avoid a voltage dip on the main bus. A sever voltage sag could result in a shut down of sensitive equipment being supplied by the other feeder circuits, which are connected to the main bus. The circumvent the problem, a fast breaker was introduced which interrupts the short circuit before the current causes a significant voltage disturbance. To make the bus immune also to power disturbances caused by power outages, energy storage is introduced to provide the necessary energy back-up in case the primary source is not available.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jones, W.H. [El Camino Real Engineering, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

PinBus Interface for Interoperable, Grid-Responsive Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very simple appliance interface was suggested by this author and his co-authors during Grid-Interop 2007. The approach was based on a successful collaboration between utilities, a major appliance manufacture, and the manufacturer of a load control module during the U.S. Department of Energy’s Grid Friendly Appliance project. The suggested approach was based on the assumption that demand-response objectives could be effectively communicated to and from many small electrical loads like appliances by simply agreeing on the meaning of the binary states of several shared connector pins. It was argued that this approach could pave the way for a wave of demand-response-ready appliances and greatly reduced expenses for utilities’ future demand-response programs. The approach could be supported by any of the many competing serial communication protocols and would be generally applicable to most end-use devices.

Hammerstrom, Donald J.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

411

Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in Tax Equity for Renewable Energy. ” Project Financefirms/ _________. 2010b. “Renewable Energy Money Still GoingTreasury Grant Program on Renewable Energy Deployment in

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, April--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for April and May 1995 is given on the Colorado State University program on development of solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

High voltage bus and auxiliary heater control system for an electric or hybrid vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for an electric or hybrid electric vehicle includes a vehicle system controller and a control circuit having an electric immersion heater. The heater is electrically connected to the vehicle's high voltage bus and is thermally coupled to a coolant loop containing a heater core for the vehicle's climate control system. The system controller responds to cabin heat requests from the climate control system by generating a pulse width modulated signal that is used by the control circuit to operate the heater at a duty cycle appropriate for the amount of cabin heating requested. The control system also uses the heater to dissipate excess energy produced by an auxiliary power unit and to provide electric braking when regenerative braking is not desirable and manual braking is not necessary. The control system further utilizes the heater to provide a safe discharge of a bank of energy storage capacitors following disconnection of the battery or one of the high voltage connectors used to transmit high voltage operating power to the various vehicle systems. The control circuit includes a high voltage clamping circuit that monitors the voltage on the bus and operates the heater to clamp down the bus voltage when it exceeds a pre-selected maximum voltage. The control system can also be used to phase in operation of the heater when the bus voltage exceeds a lower threshold voltage and can be used to phase out the auxiliary power unit charging and regenerative braking when the battery becomes fully charged.

Murty, Balarama Vempaty (West Bloomfield, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Set up DataBus as a system service? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Set up DataBus as a system service? Set up DataBus as a system service? Home > Groups > Databus What is the recommended way to configure a system service for DataBus? My old-skool approach would be to write a script in /etc/init.d/ . Are there specific recommendations or requirements for the start & stop commmands? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 6 August, 2013 - 14:33 1 answer Points: 0 The start command would be just like the runProduction.sh script found in databus/webapp directory though you probably want to log the pid. echo $! > pid.file and the stop script can use the pid to kill {pid} using the pid from that file. The webservers are stateless so killing them is is not a big deal...there is nothing they need to cleanup. Deanhiller on 7 August, 2013 - 06:14 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

415

Set up DataBus as a system service? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Set up DataBus as a system service? Set up DataBus as a system service? Home > Groups > Databus What is the recommended way to configure a system service for DataBus? My old-skool approach would be to write a script in /etc/init.d/ . Are there specific recommendations or requirements for the start & stop commmands? thanks, Submitted by Hopcroft on 6 August, 2013 - 14:33 1 answer Points: 0 The start command would be just like the runProduction.sh script found in databus/webapp directory though you probably want to log the pid. echo $! > pid.file and the stop script can use the pid to kill {pid} using the pid from that file. The webservers are stateless so killing them is is not a big deal...there is nothing they need to cleanup. Deanhiller on 7 August, 2013 - 06:14 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

416

The effect of magnetic field on optimal design of a rigid-bus substation  

SciTech Connect

Substation rigid-bus design involves electrical, mechanical, and structural considerations. In order to integrate these considerations into one document, IEEE in cooperation with ANSI has issued a comprehensive guide for design of substation rigid-bus systems. The design process based on this guide involves substantial manual effort to integrate all types of calculations. This is particularly evident when the computations have to be repeated several times in order to arrive at a more economic design. In an earlier paper the authors presented a mathematical model and computer program which automates the design process. Recently there has been concern expressed about the possible biological effects of low level magnetic fields. In view of this, a new design constraint taking into account the limits imposed on the magnitude of the magnetic field can be added to the design guidelines. In this paper the authors introduce such a constraint and they show how the magnitude of allowable magnetic field at a specified distance from the station buses affects the optimal design of a rigid bus substation.

Anders, G.J.; Ford, G.L.; Horrocks, D.J. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive anchor bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the concrete anchor bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive anchor bolt failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2001 (September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002).  

SciTech Connect

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Baldwin, Casey; Woller, Heather

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for transfer line SN-633 (241-AX-B to 241-AY-02A)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-633 transfer line by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the addition of transfer line SN-633. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

An Externally Replicated Experiment for Evaluating the Learning Effectiveness of Using Simulations in Software Project Management Education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for software project managers in industry requires strategies for the development of the management-related knowledge and skills of the current and future software workforce. Although several approaches help teach the required skills ... Keywords: COCOMO, learning effectiveness, replicated experiment, software project management education, system dynamics simulation

Dietmar Pfahl; Oliver Laitenberger; Jörg Dorsch; Günther Ruhe

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Philippines-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Climate Projects World Bank Climate Projects Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Geothermal Topics Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References World Bank project database[1] Contents 1 World Bank Active Climate Projects in the Philippines 1.1 PH - Chiller Energy Efficiency Project (2.6M) Global Environment Project 1.2 Additional Financing for Rural Power (40M) IBRD/IDA 1.3 Northern Negros Geothermal Power Project (6.76M) Carbon Offset 1.4 20 MW Palinpinon II Geothermal Optimization Project, Carbon Offset 1.5 Laguna de Bay Community Watershed Rehab, Carbon Offset 1.6 Philippines: Northwind Bangui Bay Project (1.4M) Carbon Offset 1.7 EDSA Bus Reduction Project (6M) Carbon Offset

422

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems: Project status report for the months of October and November, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a project to develop tools for evaluating solar heating and cooling systems. Current work on this project has been to validate the Florida Solar Energy Center`s (FSEC) models of the Solahart 302K and 302K-AS systems to prepare a rating for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s rebate program for solar domestic hot water heaters. A preliminary rating has been issued by FSEC and updated ratings will be released as necessary. Two of the problems that were mentioned in the August/September report are addressed and a tank heat loss test is discussed. Work continues on improving and validating the models.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Evaluation of Orion/BAE Hybrid Buses and Orion CNG Buses at New York City Transit: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses the NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric transit buses operated by New York City Transit.

Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WVDP-2011-11-07 WVDP-2011-11-07 Site: West Valley Demonstration Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the West Valley Demonstration Project Dates of Activity : 11/07/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Office and the nuclear facility at West Valley, NY, on November 7, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and

425

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the West Valley Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WVDP-2011-11-07 WVDP-2011-11-07 Site: West Valley Demonstration Project Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Orientation Visit to the West Valley Demonstration Project Dates of Activity : 11/07/2011 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the DOE West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Office and the nuclear facility at West Valley, NY, on November 7, 2011. The purpose of the visit was to discuss the nuclear safety oversight strategy, describe the site lead program, increase HSS personnel's operational awareness of the site's activities, and

426

NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

557 * November 2010 557 * November 2010 NREL Showcases Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Bus, Helps DOE Set Standards for Outreach National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Teams: Hydroge