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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grand-Coulee-Transmission-Line-Replacement-Project Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand...

2

Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Line Projects Big Eddy-Knight Central Ferry Lower Monumental Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Hooper Springs McNary-John Day Montana-to-Washington Transmission...

3

EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties,...

4

Microsoft Word - GrandCoulee_FONSI.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project BPA's Finding of No Significant Impact 1 Bonneville Power Administration's Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project DOE/EA-1679 SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Bureau of Reclamation's (Reclamation) Grand Coulee Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project. This project involves replacing the six 500-kV transmission lines of the Third Powerplant (TPP) at Grand Coulee Dam. The transmission lines are presently installed within the dam and a two-chambered tunnel that leads to a Spreader Yard about a mile west of the TPP. BPA would design and construct

5

Microsoft Word - CX-Coulee_Westside_Relay_Replacement_130205.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2013 6, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Roy Slocum Project Manager - TEP-CSB-2 Proposed Action: Coulee-Westside Transfer Trip Replacement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic Equipment Locations: Grand Coulee, WA and Spokane, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The BPA has entered into a three-party agreement with Bureau of Reclamation (Bureau) and Avista Corporation (Avista) to coordinate the replacement of relays and removal of transfer trip equipment at Avista's Westside Substation and the Bureau's Grand Coulee Switchyard on the Grand Coulee-Westside 230-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line. Under this agreement, BPA proposes to:

6

Microsoft Word - GrandCoulee_FinalEA_CommentResponses.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Replacement Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment Finding of No Significant Impact Mitigation Action Plan DOE/EA-1679 December 2011 Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment 2 SUMMARY This revision sheet documents the changes to be incorporated into the Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA). With the addition of these changes, the Preliminary EA will not be reprinted and will serve as the Final EA. On May 2, 2011, the Preliminary EA was sent to agencies and interested parties.

7

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

8

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-Creston_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Robert Keudell Robert Zeller Lineman Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Lineman Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Selected wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along the Grand Coulee-Creston transmission line at miles 14, 15, 21 and 28. PP&A Project No: 1828 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures... in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

9

EIS-0344: Grand Coulee-Bell 500 kV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action for the construction and operation of the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project.

10

EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

50: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and 50: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of approximately 28 miles of transmission line between the cities of Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. The proposed project would include replacing all wood pole structures and conductor, improving existing access roads, and developing temporary access roads. Additional information is available at the project website: http://www.bpa.gov/goto/CouleeCrestonRebuild. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES Draft EA: Comment Period Ends 2/3/14.

11

EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

79: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line 79: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington Summary This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011. BPA website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Grand_Coulee/

12

Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Bio Fuels LLC Region Bio Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Coulee Region Bio-Fuels LLC Place Ettrick, Wisconsin Zip 54627 Sector Biofuels Product LLC created by PrairieFire BioFuels Coop, INOV8, and Arcade Pumping to distribute waste vegetable oil vehicle fuel in Wisconsin. Coordinates 44.16944°, -91.268549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.16944,"lon":-91.268549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-Bell3WestsideInsulatorRepAccessImprov_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mark Kjelland Mark Kjelland Project Manager - TEP-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit 230-kV transmission line insulator replacement and access improvement project Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1946 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit

14

Bonneville Power Administration Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Record of Decision  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Record of Decision Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project in Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane Counties, Washington. BPA has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0344, December 2002). The proposed action consists of constructing a new 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Bureau of Reclamation's (BOR) Grand Coulee 500- kV Switchyard near Grand Coulee, Washington, and BPA's Bell Substation near Spokane, a distance of 84 miles. The proposed action involves removing an existing 115-kV transmission

15

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-ChiefJoseph_ARandWood Poles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Todd Wehner Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Robert Keudell Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Robert Zellar Line Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction and access road construction/maintenance along portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No: 1777 Work Order No.: 275582 and 275583 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):  B1.13 Construction, acquisition, and relocation of onsite pathways and short onsite access roads and railroads.  B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such

16

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-OkanoganWP-AR-Landing_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Jim Semrau Robert Keudell Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Todd Wehner Robert Zellar Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Line Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction and access road construction/maintenance along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-kV transmission line right-of-way (ROW). PP&A Project No: 1776 Work Order No.: 275584 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):  B1.13 Construction, acquisition, and relocation of onsite pathways and short onsite access roads and railroads.  B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such

17

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCouleeDistrictWoodPoleReplacementsAccessRoadsFY13_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Todd Wehner Civil Design/Access Roads - TELF-TPP-3 James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction, and access road improvements along various transmission lines in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Grand Coulee District. PP&A Project No.: 2152 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 1), 2151 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 2), 2121 (Grand Coulee-Foster Creek No. 1) and 1776 (Grand Coulee-Okanogan No. 2) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Douglas and Okanogan counties, Washington. Refer to table below for project locations: Line Name Structure Township Range Section County

18

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCouleeBellNo3-WestsideAgLand_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, 2011 , 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Kjelland Project Manager - TEP-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Insulator replacement in agricultural lands along the Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit 230-kV transmission line Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1909 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

19

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-BellNo3ReconductoringFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Frank Weintraub Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 double circuit 230-kV transmission line reconductoring project Budget Information: Work Order #00280243 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1946 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductoring Project is located in Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane counties, Washington, in BPA's Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project listed below (Table 1).

20

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-BellNo5InsultatorFY13_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacie Hensley Project Manager - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project Budget Information: Work Order #00339638 PP&A Project No.: 2699 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: Grant and Lincoln counties, Washington, in BPA's Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project are listed below (Table 1). Table 1. Townships, Ranges, and Sections for the Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project. Township Range Sections

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Prelim EA.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment May 2011 DOE/EA-1679 Agency Proposing Action. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is the lead NEPA agency. The Bonneville Power Administration is assisting Reclamation through project design, environmental review and construction, if the Proposed Action is taken. Action. Reclamation is proposing to replace the six, 500- kV transmission lines of the Third Powerplant (TPP) at Grand Coulee Dam. The transmission lines are presently installed within the dam and a two-chambered tunnel that leads to a Spreader Yard about a mile away. Purpose and Need. The TPP's six generators and transmission lines are critical to the regional power supply.

22

Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA is proposing to construct a 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line that would extend approximately 84 miles between the Grand Coulee 500-kV Switchyard, near Grand Coulee Dam, and the Bell Substation, in Mead just north of Spokane. The new line would cross portions of Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane counties. In addition to the transmission line, new equipment would be installed at the substations at each end of the new line and at other facilities. The proposed action would remove an existing 115-kV transmission line and replace it with the new 500-kV line on existing right-of-way for most of its length. Additional right-of-way would be needed in the first 3.5 miles out of the Grand Coulee Switchyard to connect to the existing 115-kV right-of-way. Since the mid-1990s, the transmission path west of Spokane, called the West of Hatwai transmission pathway, has grown increasingly constrained. To date, BPA has been able to manage operation of the path through available operating practices, and customer needed have been met while maintaining the reliability of the path. however, in early 2001, operations showed that the amount of electricity that needs to flow from east to west along this path creates severe transmission congestion. Under these conditions, the system is at risk of overloads and violation of industry safety and reliability standards. The problem is particularly acute in the spring and summer months because of the large amount of power generated by dams east of the path. Large amounts of water cannot be spilled during that time in order for BPA to fulfill its obligation to protect threatened and endangered fish. The amount of power that needs to move through this area during these months at times could exceed the carrying capacity of the existing transmission lines. In additional capacity is not added, BPA will run a significant risk that it will not be able to continue to meet its contractual obligations to deliver power and maintain reliability standards that minimize risks to public safety and to equipment. BPA is considering two construction alternatives, the Agency Proposed Action and the Alternative Action. The Alternative Action would include all the components of the Preferred Action except a double-circuit line would be constructed in the Spokane area between a point about 2 miles west of the Spokane River and Bell Substation, a distance of about 9 miles. BPA is also considering the No Action Alternative.

N /A

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Microsoft Word - CX-Olympia-GrandCoulee85-5RelocationFY12_WEB.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amanda Williams Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project Budget Information: Work Order #00291628 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1984 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project is located in King County, Washington, within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (MBS), in BPA's Covington Operations and Maintenance District. Township, Range, and Section crossed by the proposed project are listed below:

24

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 "2. Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",2456 "3. Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1596 "4. Rocky Reach","Hydroelectric","PUD No 1 of Chelan County",1254 "5. Columbia Generating Station","Nuclear","Energy Northwest",1097 "6. Wanapum","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",1059 "7. Boundary","Hydroelectric","Seattle City of",1040 "8. Priest Rapids","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",932

30

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Grand Coulee-Creston  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project Draft Environmental Assessment December 2013 DOE/EA-1950 Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project Draft Environmental Assessment December 2013 DOE/EA-1950 This page left intentionally blank. Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project i

31

Grass Upland Water Quality Wednesday November 21st 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grass Upland Water Quality Workshop Wednesday November 21st 2007 Water Quality in the Uplands financial support to farming could protect rural economies while reducing this damage to water. Help farmers · Unnatural spates ­ potential downstream flooding little water retention on land uneven flows lack

Quinton, John

32

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS -Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 8/29/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99-Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1, 287 kV transmission line from structure 53/4 through structure 64/1. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 163 acres will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded

33

Acid mine drainage prevention, control and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee area. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was initiated to assist the State of Montana to develop a methodology to ameliorate acid mine drainage problems associated with the abandoned mines located in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area near Great Falls, Montana. Extremely acidic water is continuously discharging from abandoned coal mines in the Stockett/Sand Coulee area at an estimated rate of greater than 600 acre-feet per year (about 350 to 400 gallons per minute). Due to its extreme acidity, the water is unusable and is contaminating other water supplies. Most of the local alluvial aquifers have been contaminated, and nearly 5% of the private wells that were tested in the area during the mid-1980`s showed some degree of contamination. Significant government money has been spent replacing water supplies due to the magnitude of this problem. In addition, millions of dollars have been spent trying to remediate acid mine drainage occurring in this coal field. To date, the techniques used have focused on the management and containment of mine waters, rather than designing technologies that would prevent the formation of acid mine drainage.

Brown, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Growth and fruiting responses of diverse genotypes of American Upland cotton grown in different environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH AND FRUITING RESPONSES OF DIVERSE GENOTYPES OF AMERICAN UPLAND COTTON GROWN IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS A Thesis JOHN ROBERT GANNAWAY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1971 Major Subject: Plant Breeding GROWTH AND FRUITING RESPONSES OF DIVERSE GENOTYPES OF AMERICAN UPLAND COTTON GROWN IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS A Thesis by JOHN ROBERT GANNAWAY Approved as to style and content by...

Gannaway, J. R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

39

crop science, vol. 51, septemberoctober 2011 Along-term challenge faced by upland cotton (Gossypium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crop science, vol. 51, september­october 2011 ReseaRch Along-term challenge faced by upland cotton by a fundamental shift in the cotton fiber market from a primarily domestically con- sumed product to one in which nearly two-thirds of the U.S. cot- ton is now exported. Since the international cotton fiber market

Chee, Peng W.

40

Effects of upland disturbance and instream restoration on hydrodynamics and ammonium uptake in headwater streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delivery of water, sediments, nutrients, and organic matter to stream ecosystems is strongly influenced by the catchment of the stream and can be altered greatly by upland soil and vegetation disturbance. At the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia), spatial variability in intensity of military training results in a wide range of intensities of upland disturbance in stream catchments. A set of 8 streams in catchments spanning this upland disturbance gradient was selected for investigation of the impact of disturbance intensity on hydrodynamics and nutrient uptake. The size of transient storage zones and rates of NH4+ uptake in all study streams were among the lowest reported in the literature. Upland disturbance did not appear to influence stream hydrodynamics strongly, but it caused significant decreases in instream nutrient uptake. In October 2003, coarse woody debris (CWD) was added to of the study streams (spanning the disturbance gradient) in an attempt to increase hydrodynamic and structural complexity with the goals of enhancing biotic habitat and increasing nutrient uptake rates. CWD additions had positive short-term (within 1 mo) effects on hydrodynamic complexity (water velocity decreased and transient storage zone cross-sectional area, relative size of the transient storage zone, fraction of the median travel time attributable to transient storage over a standardized length of 200 m, and the hydraulic retention factor increased) and nutrient uptake (NH4+ uptake rates increased). Our results suggest that water quality in streams with intense upland disturbances can be improved by enhancing instream biotic nutrient uptake capacity through measures such as restoring stream CWD.

Roberts, Brian J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Houser, Jeffrey N [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fate of 14C-labeled dissolved organic matter in paddy and upland soils in responding to moisture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil organic matter (SOM) content in paddy soils is higher than that in upland soils in tropical and subtropical China. The dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration, however, is lower in paddy soils. We hypothesize that soil moisture strongly controls the fate of DOM, and thereby leads to differences between the two agricultural soils under contrasting management regimens. A 100-day incubation experiment was conducted to trace the fate and biodegradability of DOM in paddy and upland soils under three moisture levels: 45%, 75%, and 105% of the water holding capacity (WHC). 14C labeled DOM, extracted from the 14C labeled rice plant material, was incubated in paddy and upland soils, and the mineralization to 14CO2 and incorporation into microbial biomass were analyzed. Labile and refractory components of the initial 14C labeled DOM and their respective half-lives were calculated by a double exponential model. During incubation, the mineralization of the initial 14C labeled DOM in the paddy soils was more affected by moisture than in the upland soils. The amount of 14C incorporated into the microbial biomass (2.411.0% of the initial DOM-14C activity) was less affected by moisture in the paddy soils than in the upland soils. At any of the moisture levels, 1) the mineralization of DOM to 14CO2 within 100days was 1.22.1-fold higher in the paddy soils (41.960.0% of the initial DOM-14C activity) than in the upland soils (28.735.7%), 2) 14C activity remaining in solution was significantly lower in the paddy soils than in the upland soils, and 3) 14C activity remaining in the same agricultural soil solution was not significantly different among the three moisture levels after 20days. Therefore, moisture strongly controls DOM fate, but moisture was not the key factor in determining the lower DOM in the paddy soils than in the upland soils. The UV absorbance of DOM at 280nm indicates less aromaticity of DOM from the paddy soils than from the upland soils. At any of the moisture levels, much more labile DOM was found in paddy soils (34.349.2% of the initial 14C labeled DOM) compared with that in upland soils (19.423.9%). This demonstrates that the lower DOM content in the paddy soil compared with that in the upland soil is probably determined by the less complex components and structure of the DOM.

Xiangbi Chen; Aihua Wang; Yang Li; Lening Hu; Hua Zheng; Xunyang He; Tida Ge; Jinshui Wu; Yakov Kuzyakov; Yirong Su

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Influence of row spacing, population density and irrigation on phenology, yield and fiber properties of three upland cotton varieties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF ROW SPACING, POPULATION DENSITY AND IRRIGATION ON PHENOLOGY, YIELD AND FIBER PROPERTIES OF THREE UPLAND COTTON VARIETIES A Thesis by WILLIAM DAVID HAMILTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Agronomy INFLUENCE OF ROW SPACING, POPULATION DENSITY AND IRRIGATION ON PHENOLOGY, YIELD AND FIBER PROPERTIES OF THREE UPLAND COTTON VARIETIES A Thesis...

Hamilton, William David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Catchment-scale deposition and redistribution of Chernobyl radiocaesium in upland Britain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident in April 1986 resulted in a significant increase in the inventory of radiocaesium in many areas of upland Britain. Caesium-137 derived from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has been widely used as a sediment tracer to monitor soil erosion. The presence of Chernobyl fallout provides an opportunity to examine the short-term, post-input behavior of radiocaesium in upland soils and assess its potential for investigating sediment transfer in upland systems. Sampling undertaken in the catchment of Lake Vyrnwy, North Wales considered the vertical distribution of radiocaesium in different soil types, the catchment-wide variation in Chernobyl fallout deposition, and the radiocaesium content of sediment from a variety of slope and fluvial environments. Whilst uncertainty surrounding the estimation of baseline inventories limits the detailed interpretation of short-term sediment dynamics, it is apparent that the sediment-associated redistribution of Chernobyl radioactivity may result in its accumulation in certain parts of the catchment over longer timescales. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Higgitt, D.L.; Rowan, J.S. (Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom)); Walling, D.E. (Univ. of Exeter (United Kingdom))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The effects of topping on yield and other agronomic characters in two varieties of Upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fulfillment of the requirements for ths degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1957 Ma/or Subjects Plant Breeding THE EFFECTS OF TOPPING ON YIELD AND OTHER AGRONOMIC CHARACTERS IN TM3 VARIETIES OF UPLAND COTTON Gary Dee Beaten Approve4 as to style..., espsoially when a heavy arop of bells is set near the tep, Even if lodging does net occur, tho dense foliage may shade the lower bells and fester boll rote and damage to tho green bogle and to the seed cotton in the mature bells as well, Hand pioking...

Bearden, Gary Dee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

Riha, B

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

THE RESILIENCE OF UPLAND-OAK FOREST CANOPY TREES TO CHRONIC AND ACUTE PRECIPITATION MANIPULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implications of chronic ( 33 percent) and acute (-100 percent) precipitation change were evaluated for trees of upland-oak forests of the eastern United States. Chronic manipulations have been conducted since 1993, and acute manipulations of dominant canopy trees (Quercus prinus; Liriodendron tulipifera) were initiated in 2003. Through 12 years of chronic manipulations tree growth remained unaffected by natural or induced rainfall deficits even though severe drought conditions dramatically reduced canopy function in some years. The resilience of canopy trees to chronic-change was the result of a disconnect between tree growth phenology and late-season drought occurrence. Acute precipitation exclusion from the largest canopy trees also produced limited growth reductions from 2003 through 2005. Elimination of lateral root water sources for the acute treatment trees, via trenching midway through the 2004 growing-season, forced the conclusion that deep rooting was a key mechanism for large-tree resilience to severe drought.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Auge, Robert M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

BPA and partners surmount unique obstacles on Grand Coulee project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

credits the project's success to relying on the expert support of the team, including BPA substation engineer James Kelly, transmission designer Len Custer, tower designers...

48

A Study of Decline Curve Analysis in the Elm Coulee Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last two years, due in part to the collapse of natural gas prices, the oil industry has turned its focus from shale gas exploration to shale oil/tight oil. Some of the important plays under development include the Bakken, Eagle Ford...

Harris, Seth C

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

49

EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grand Coulees Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

50

EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1

51

The recovery of the recurrent parent in upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and incorporation of variability into modern breeding strains. The primary or initial breeding method used for the introgression of exotic traits from the CRS should be the backcross. Twenty-three populations, each containing a CRS donor parent, TAM 94L-25...

Rosenbaum, Ross Corbet

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Boll and fiber development in long staple upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pattern, boll maturation period, and average fiber length were studied under dryland and irrigated conditions in 1998 and 1999. The ANOVA indicated that UHM length varied across years and genotypes, but not irrigation. TAM 94L-25 and TAM 94M-14 had...

Braden, Chris Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dynamic Conservation Management of Nontillable East Mediterranean Upland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prepared for the Symposium on Dynamics and Management of Mediterranean-type Ecosystems, June 22-26, 1981 are undergoing a rapid transformation into more intensive, irrigated agriculture, these non- tillable, marginal Koeppen Cs "olive climate" -- dry, hot summers with wet, mild winters. This largely subhumid zone can

Standiford, Richard B.

54

The magnesium nutrition of American upland and Egyptian cottons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Magnesium n1trate, sulfate, and chloxide ax'e highly soluble in water and are read1ly leached from the soil ~ Albert and Armstrong (l) grew cotton plants in nutrient solutions containing two levels of magnesium and found that greater top and root gx... on maturity of cotton X the rate of growth was not afflicted by magnesium supply but symptoms of magnesium deficien)y were present in the foliage of the low magnesium plants ~ Schappelle, Armstrong and Hollis (52) studied the effect of high magnesium...

Helmy, Hussein

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Upland Log Volumes and Conifer Establishment Patterns in Two Northern,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conifer recruit densities on these logs and on the surrounding forest floor. We report significantly greater conifer recruit densities on log substrates as compared to the forest floor. Log substrate, height class and substrate for each established individual. Conifer recruit densities on the forest floor

Standiford, Richard B.

56

ORIGIN OF THE UPLAND SILT NEAR FAIRBANKS, ALASKA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...level. The wide crest of Chena Ridge (PI. 1), extending...near Chatanika, Circle Hot Springs, and Chena Springs (Fig. 2...Tanana River at Manley Hot Springs, about 90 miles west...the flood plain of the Chena-Tanana River system...

57

EA-1950: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington....

58

EA-1679: Preliminary Environmental Assessment | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Preliminary Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington...

59

A comparison of F2 distributions of certain economic characters in crosses of six "foreign" upland cotton stocks with an American upland tester stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

means for flowering date in Fj_ and F2 generations from crosses of C/50/20, 51-368, MU-8b and BP-52 with Deltapine 14,.,.,......... ..3^ 3. Observed and calculated arithmetic and geometric means for lint percentage in F-, and F2 generations from... arithmetic and geometric means for fiber fineness in F|j_ and F2 generations from crosses of C/50/20, 51?368, MU-8b and BP-52 with Deltapine 1^............. . . .3 8 7 . Observed and calculated arithmetic and geometric means for fiber strength in F^ and F...

Niles, George Alva

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

Distribution and Differentiation of Wild, Feral, and Cultivated Populations of Perennial Upland Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Mesoamerica and the Caribbean Geo Coppens d'Eeckenbrugge1 *, Jean, feral and wild populations of perennial cottons. Out of 954 records of occurrence in Mesoamerica), wild/feral (protected habitats), and truly wild cotton (TWC) populations. The widely distributed three

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Row spacing effects on the canopy light extinction coefficient of upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 at the Stiles Farm, Thrall, Texas and the Blackland Research Center, Temple, Texas, respectively, to characterize the influence of row spacing, plant density and time of day on the extinction...

Steglich, Evelyn Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Molecular Analysis of a Bacterial Chitinolytic Community in an Upland Pasture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...either sludge alone, lime and sludge, or lime alone. In a prior study...stained by using SYBR Green I (Molecular Probes...consisted of a base layer of mineral salts agar and an upper...each for control (C), lime (L), lime and sludge...

A. C. Metcalfe; M. Krsek; G. W. Gooday; J. I. Prosser; E. M. H. Wellington

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparative studies of growth and fruiting habits in selected varieties of American upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently Van Schatk (32) haS imvesti~ted varietal differences in. flowering and shedding under irrigated conditions in California. Boll set efficiency xanged from 88It in Acala 442 to 51$ in Deitapine Smooth Leaf. Boll matuzation period in cotton is inf... Valleyf generally fndet~te fruiting habit with abundant vegetst1ve growth and dispersed fruitfngi medium or average in maturity. Reals 4-42 - developed at the U. S. Cotton Field Station, Shafter, Calffornfa for primary adaptation to irrigated...

Shamsuddin, Abul Khayer Muhammad

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Introgression from Gossypium mustelinum and G. tomentosum into upland cotton, G. hirusutum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These generations were tested with microsatellite markers from chromosome 11 in order to measure the effects of selection and recombination. Later generations (BC2F1, BC2rm1, BC2F2, BC3F1, BC3rm1 and BC3F2) and composite generations were evaluated in a randomized...

Gardunia, Brian Wayne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

A cytogenetic analysis of a sterile type in American Upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orto each sterile, and ie) flowers were allowed to open- poi linate. The Fl seed obtained by crossing Deltapine-14 with pollen from the 25 pl arts designated as LS-1 thru LS-25, were ttsed as the basis of an expanded genetic analysis of sterility...

Newman, James Shelby

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

An economic study of the experimental response of fertilizer to East Texas Upland native pasture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

total aeter' (aegatiro mrgiaal retaras) ~ Xtq ~ asseaey a ?oastesA reMe ef oae aarghaLX yredr& te tbe eeseseding asrgiaal yre dost sad diadaiahiag elasticity + g %ho gshb4saglas faaetiea& has bees saylegred as a Nodal ih earioas geaeral seem... total aeter' (aegatiro mrgiaal retaras) ~ Xtq ~ asseaey a ?oastesA reMe ef oae aarghaLX yredr& te tbe eeseseding asrgiaal yre dost sad diadaiahiag elasticity + g %ho gshb4saglas faaetiea& has bees saylegred as a Nodal ih earioas geaeral seem...

Grant, Warren Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

Introgression of resistance to Rotylenchulus reniformis into Meloidogyne incognita resistant upland cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5774 14634 15250 16888 13413 19195 6665 467 15112 1938 22856 11216 22837 10340 3040 2519 6174 8226 13 Table 1. Continued Geno e M6xTq-2 Iv4xTq-4 Average Generation Fi Fi S ecies ISH** ISH~* R remformis E s/500 cm soil... 5774 14634 15250 16888 13413 19195 6665 467 15112 1938 22856 11216 22837 10340 3040 2519 6174 8226 13 Table 1. Continued Geno e M6xTq-2 Iv4xTq-4 Average Generation Fi Fi S ecies ISH** ISH~* R remformis E s/500 cm soil...

Ripple, Kevin William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

The ecology of furbearers in the Upland Post Oak Region of Eastern Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prime and unprime pelts . . . 165 38. Ringtail pelts, prime and unprime. 166 39. Ringtail fur mounts showing frayed hair, . . . . . . . . 167 Illustrations (continued) 40. Unprime gray fox hide. ................. . 167 41. Gray fox fur mounts... prime and unprime pelts . . . 165 38. Ringtail pelts, prime and unprime. 166 39. Ringtail fur mounts showing frayed hair, . . . . . . . . 167 Illustrations (continued) 40. Unprime gray fox hide. ................. . 167 41. Gray fox fur mounts...

Wood, John Eugene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

History of late Pleistocene glaciations in the central Sayan-Tuva Upland (southern Siberia)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Sugorakova et al., 2003; Komatsu et al., 2007). Using the size, structure, morphology and age of the tuya

70

Changes in hydrological extremes and climate variability in the Severn Uplands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrological extremes within the UK have increased in intensity, frequency and persistence over recent years and are predicted to increase in variability throughout the 21st (more)

Biggs, Eloise M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Lava Dome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"coulees." Volcanic domes commonly occur within the craters or on the flanks of large composite volcanoes. The nearly circular Novarupta Dome that formed during the 1912 eruption...

72

EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington Bonneville Power...

73

Microsoft Word - Woody.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and power lines, Woody opined that maybe "the whole damn country ought to be run by electricity." Grand Coulee and Bonneville Dams, and The Bonneville Power Administration...

74

Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

links Line Projects Big Eddy-Knight Central Ferry Lower Monumental Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Hooper Springs McNary-John Day Montana-to-Washington...

75

EA-1950: Final Environmental Assessement | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessement EA-1950: Final Environmental Assessement Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington Bonneville Power...

76

EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington...

77

EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action Plan EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington This MAP is for...

78

CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan 2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s)...

79

CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Exclusion Determination CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Selected Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along the Grand Coulee-Creston...

80

CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Determination CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06072013 Location(s): Washington, Washington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

THE AMERICAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF WAR STANDARDS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electrical energy from Bonneville and Grand Coulee Dams...of the two government power plants to provide a...of 200 miles of the Bonneville and Grand Coulee Dams...the Office of Price Administration will supervise the work...and to conserve man-power. As outlined in the...

1942-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

Getting the biggest birch for the bang: restoring and expanding upland birchwoods in the Scottish Highlands by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highlands by managing red deer Andrew J. Tanentzap1 , James Zou2 & David A. Coomes1 1 Forest Ecology: +44-1223-333593; E-mail: ajt65@cantab.net Funding Information Funding was provided by the Gates a spatially explicit model to predict the responses of Betula spp. to red deer (Cervus elaphus) and land

Chen, Yiling

83

Using Size Fractionation and Pb Isotopes to Study Pb Transport in the Waters of an Organic-Rich Upland Catchment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The two streams, Cairn Burn and Birnie Burn, converge just below the southern boundary (?225 m amsl). ... Rainwater (250 mL samples) was collected over 2 week periods at two of the throughflow pit sites, pits 1 (365904E, 780238N; altitude 337 m) and 2 (366126E, 780074N; altitude 288 m) (Figure 1). ... 206Pb/207Pb ratio of ?1.17 probably resulted from a combination of emissions from the smelting of indigenous Pb ore (1.170) and coal burning (1.181) in Scotland, and industrial activity to the south in England, where Australian Pb of characteristically low 206Pb/207Pb ratio (1.04) was already in use. ...

Margaret C. Graham; Susan I. Vinogradoff; Alastair J. Chipchase; Sarah M. Dunn; Jeffrey R. Bacon; John G. Farmer

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Terrestrial Ecosystems extend from uplands to wetlands, which form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field of study provides students with an understanding of ecological restoration, particularly as it relates to restoring and managing the kinds of ecosystems found, restoration, consulting and education pertaining to a wide range of forest ecosystems in the governmental

Edwards, Paul N.

85

Abstract In northern Laos, upland rice is grown as a subsistence crop under rainfed conditions with no  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restore soil fertility and reduce insect and weed pres- sure. However, increasing population density Present Address: K. Saito Africa Rice Center (WARDA), 01 BP 2031 Cotonou, Benin Plant Soil (2006) 284-and- burn systems are sustainable when population den- sities are low enough to allow for long fallow

van Kessel, Chris

86

CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5379: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5379: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Insulator Replacement in Agricultural Lands Along the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace worn insulators on sections of the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside Number 1 double circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. This portion of the transmission line is located in Lincoln County, Washington, in BPA?s Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project are listed below.

87

Reach Survival Estimates, 2008 Bill Muir, Steve Smith, Doug Marsh,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reach Survival Estimates, 2008 Bill Muir, Steve Smith, Doug Marsh, John Williams, and Jim Faulkner Grand Coulee McNary IceHarbor LittleGoose LowerGranite LowerMonumental Juvenile detectors Snake R. trap

88

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Fact...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

all of the kilowatts saved through BPA's energy efficiency program, the capacity of the "generator" would be second only to Grand Coulee Dam - the largest power plant in the...

89

EP Exploration Place Lot FW Far West Lot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARKING EP Exploration Place Lot W West Lot FW Far West Lot N North Lot NW North West Lot E East FOR THE ARTS (W) University Drive to City Centre Valley Road Coulee Trail Aperture Drive LIBRARY (L) N TURCOTTE

Morris, Joy

90

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service...

91

Probabilistic Performance Forecasting for Unconventional Reservoirs With Stretched-Exponential Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Montana's Elm Coulee field producing from the Bakken oil shale (400 wells). This section aims to present the utility of proposed methodology for assessing reserves in tight gas and oil reservoirs. The overall results are presented in Table 4...

Can, Bunyamin

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

92

EIS-0344: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Record of Decision EIS-0344: Record of Decision Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed...

93

2003 Records of Decision  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Line Project and Wallula Power Project - March 10th, 2003 Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project - January 10, 2003 Wallula-McNary Transmission Line Project and...

94

CX-008679: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

95

Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of December 1, 2014  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of December 1, 2014 Moody's: Aa1Stable S&P: AA-Stable Fitch: AAStable Grand Coulee Dam High Voltage Transmission Columbia Generating...

96

Through Voluntary Conservation Regional Step-Down Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II. Regional Overview..................................................................................................................... 3 Wetland Habitat Types............................................................................................................... 3 Coastal Upland Habitat Types................................................................................................... 4

unknown authors

97

Edaphic and microclimatic controls over permafrost response to fire in interior Alaska This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties between recently burned and unburned sites across three soil landscapes (rocky uplands, silty uplands, and sandy lowlands) situated within the Yukon Flats and Yukon-Tanana Uplands in interior Alaska, whereas a talik of unknown depth developed in the rocky uplands and a thin talik developed in the sandy

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

98

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 2110 at China Camp with 52 cm/century, 100 cm/century,Camp and Rush Ranch) exhibited little response to SLR under the 52 cm/century

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A comparative socio-economic study of farm-owner and farm non-owner groups residing in a section of the Brazos bottom and neighboring upland area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-e fairly "ell a. reed Chat from a business aiul social ?oint og vic'. c, otM-. ~~ one's form is lircferable ic iiot orninS ono's fatti, Xust about three out oi every four, llorth and Houthi Yi'ltito and LloSro sa~ Chcg ~ntnli t. e '"nta o'. :c r. iv nb...

Adams, Irby Ray

1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and patterns across a salinity gradient using high spatialacross the estuarine salinity gradient. Four tidal marshesconcentrations across a salinity gradient would more

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The effects of fire on the thermal stability of permafrost in lowland and upland black spruce forests of interior Alaska in a changing climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA 2 Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks and climate warming. Keywords: permafrost, wildfires, active layer, carbon cycle, climate change, GIPL

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

102

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of carbon sequestration potential in coastalMilan CS (2012) Carbon sequestration and sediment accretion29] and links to carbon sequestration potential [30]. Some

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Modeling Tidal Marsh Distribution with Sea-Level Rise: Evaluating the Role of Vegetation, Sediment, and Upland Habitat in Marsh Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and 180 cm/century sea-level rise at mid suspended sedimentCouncil (2012) Sea-level rise for the coasts of California,to projecting future sea-level rise. Science 315: 368370.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Diallel analysis of within-boll seed yield components and fiber properties in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and breeding potential for heat tolerance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled growth chamber conditions, suggesting their potential for use in screening genotypes for heat tolerance. These traits were not found to interact with temperature, which indicates that selection for improvements in these traits could be conducted...

Ragsdale, Paul Irwin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

An ecological and range vegetation analysis of the upland sites of the southern extension of the oak-hickory forest region in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the northern , southern, eastern and w estern s e c to r s o f the study area . 2. To develop a range condition guide fr om e co lo g ica l and grazing data obtained in wooded and open pastures and r e l ic t a reas through ? out the area . 3... C o llege Station, T ex - as , were cultivated about 1866 o r near the c lo se o f the C iv il War. B ie se ls (1930) found that F red e r ick E rnst, when writing to a fr iend about the new settlement of Industry, T exas , in 1829 p...

McCaleb, John Earl

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 17740 of 26,764 results. 31 - 17740 of 26,764 results. Page EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011. http://energy.gov/nepa/ea-1679-grand-coulees-third-powerplant-500-kv-transmission-line-replacement-project-grant-and Download CX-001732: Categorical Exclusion Determination

107

EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement 4: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) discloses the potential impacts associated with construction and operation of the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project. Bonnewille Power Administration (BPA) would construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line that would replace a single-circuit 115-kV transmission line in an exisiting corridor that has multiple transmission lines for most of the project's length. The transmission line would extend between the Grand Coulee 600-kV Switchyard and Bell Substation near Spokane, a distance of 84 miles. Detailed information about the project and its environmental impacts

108

CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

04: Categorical Exclusion Determination 04: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to replace worn insulators along the 83-mile Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 230 kilovolt (kV) double circuit transmission line. Work would be conducted on energized lines using live-line and bare-hand techniques as well as standard techniques requiring an outage. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006304.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination

109

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 3, 2011 March 3, 2011 CX-005410: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Bonneville-Alcoa Number 1 and 2 Transmission Line Corridor CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 3, 2011 CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 2, 2011 CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Insulator Replacement in Agricultural Lands Along the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

110

Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wallula Gap Row Sand Hallow Flows Sliver Fans Flo Ginkgo Flows Palause Falls Flow Vantage Intarbad Undifferent a e 0 s Rocky Coulee Flow Levering Flow Cohaeeet Row Unnamed Flow Birkett Flow Undifferentiated Flows McCoy Canyon Flow Unnamed... penetrate and have provided water samples for the flow systems in the Frenchman Springs and Rocky Coulee flows are: Ford, McGee, Enyeart, DB-11, RRL-2, DC-16, DC-19, DC-2, DB-15, DC-7, and DC-15. Based on the hydraulic data obtained from these wells...

Adamski, Mark Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Environmental impact from agrochemicals in Bali (Indonesia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Irrigation of paddy has been practised for centuries in Bali, based on the use of upland weirs for diverting river waters to irrigate downstreams lands ranging from upland terraces to flat coastal plains. Whil...

Badruddin Machbub; Harvey F. Ludwig

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Exploring global changes in nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in agriculture induced by livestock production over the 19002050 period  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...what you are planning to do with the...geographical distribution of the fate...upland crops, and energy crops. Areas...upland crops, and energy crops...upland crops, and energy...of the manure distribution and...cyanamide, and electric-arc calcium...

Lex Bouwman; Kees Klein Goldewijk; Klaas W. Van Der Hoek; Arthur H. W. Beusen; Detlef P. Van Vuuren; Jaap Willems; Mariana C. Rufino; Elke Stehfest

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Northwest Geological Society Society Field Trips in Pacific Northwest Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through the Western Channeled Scablands June 21-22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad #12;This field trip guide has been - 22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad Dry Falls and the Lower Grand Coulee #12;Introduction Ice Age floods were Age flood features is repro- duced from a previous field trips (Bjornstad 2004; Kiver and Bjornstad

114

ENGINEERING IN AN AMERICAN PROGRAM FOR SOCIAL PROGRESS. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...this end the Federal Administration has maintained a National...waterways and even man-power. There can be nothing...Grand Coulee and Bonneville Dams, oil production...agri-culture, and the administration of the latter is in...increase productive power. The ideal community...

KARL T. COMPTON

1937-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

115

Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste...

Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

Collins, Gary S.

117

by Patrick M. Barkey RecoveryWhat's on Track and What's Not  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activity in the Elm Coulee oil fields in the Bakken, have continued at full pace throughout the year Domestic Product to less than 2 percent in the second quarter of 2012. Many countries in Europe by this measure (Figure 1). · Healing housing markets. After experiencing cumulative price declines of as much

Vonessen, Nikolaus

118

Irrigation Management Improvements for San Joaquin Valley Pima Cotton Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing pima and upland cotton growth, development andProceedings of Fourth World Cotton Research Conference, 2007Scheduling Final Irrigations. Cotton Management Guidelines,

Munk, Daniel S; Hutmacher, Robert B.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Use of remote sensing to link watershed land use change and wetland vegetation response in a California coastal watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

place. In August, the salinity gradient along the sedimentmuch more driven by a salinity gradient, with pickleweed andsalinity decreased greatly along the wetland-upland gradient.

Kelly, N. Maggi; Byrd, Kristin B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Fish and Wildlife. The types of habitat on the property include native conifer woodlands, upland prairie, oak savanna, oak woodlands, grasslands and wet...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

protect floodplains, adjacent wetlands, upland oak woodlands, native prairie and hardwood-conifer forest. This habitat supports many fish and wildlife species including beaver,...

122

Two new species for the flora of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two new species from upland Panama,Licania chiriquiensis Prance (Chrysobalanaceae), andDichapetalum gentryi Prance. (Dichapetalaceae), are described and illustrated, and their relationships within their respectiv...

Ghillean T. Prance

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-dependent skeletal retention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Riparian Forest Soil Jodi B. Lyons... of nutrients movingfrom the upland areas to aquatic eco- systems (Lowrance, 1991). Nutrient retention varies... is considered to be generally...

124

(Revision : 1.10) A REPORT TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5.5 Hill forest Vegetation Types 9 5.1 Submontane forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 5.2 Upland forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 5

Webb, Campbell O.

125

2007 Nationwide Permits, Conditions, Further Information, and Definitions (with corrections)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Mining Activities 45. Repair of Uplands Damaged by Discrete Events 46. Discharges in Ditches 47. Pipeline Safety Program Designated Time Sensitive Inspections and Repairs 48. Existing Commercial Shellfish

US Army Corps of Engineers

126

Coso Rock Art Within Its Archaeological Context  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1984 The Sugarloaf Obsidian Quarry. Naval Weapons CenterPinyon Uplands, Obsidian Quarries, and Coso Hot Springs.hunter-gatherers. Behemoth quarries of high-quaUty obsidian

Gilreath, Amy J.; Hildebrandt, William R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5845: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Selected Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along the Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line at Miles 14, 15, 21 and 28 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the Grand Coulee-Creston #1 115-kilovolt transmission line. The structures scheduled for replacement are identified as 14/6, 14/8, 15/1, 21/9 and 28/7. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance.

128

CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

600: Categorical Exclusion Determination 600: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the United States Army Corps of Engineers' Bonneville 115-kilovolt (kV) Switchyard, and the United States Bureau of Reclamation's Grand Coulee 115-kV, 230-kV, and 500-kV Switchyards and Hungry Horse 230-kV Switchyards. The SCADA upgrade at each switchyard will provide BPA the system monitoring and control necessary to

129

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 22, 2011 CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 18, 2011 EA-1728: Draft Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

130

Microsoft Word - SCADA CX.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: Claire Bingaman KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: SCADA Upgrades at BPA's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations Budget Information: Hungry Horse: WO# 00246171, Task 01 Bonneville: WO# 00246173, Task 01 Grand Coulee: WO# 00246244, Task 01 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area.... Location: Grant County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the

131

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 26, 2011 July 26, 2011 Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. July 25, 2011 CX-006290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cardwell-Cowlitz 2011 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/25/2011 Location(s): Cowlitz County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2011 CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington

132

CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5409: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5409: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Access road maintenance project near structure 38/2 of the Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to maintain one double-culvert creek crossing on an unnamed stream. Work would include removing woody debris that is the result of beaver activity, and installing a beaver deterrent structure to exclude the beaver(s) from the culverts. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005409.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008679: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008687: Categorical Exclusion Determination

133

Preliminary assessment of regional dispersivity of the Hanford basalts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A HANFORD SITE Yakima ) BOUNDARY REFERENCE m I REPOSITORY LOCATION. . . . COLD CREEK . 4 SYNCLINE "+-. . """. . . ~ . Richland Pasco Prosser f Kennewick WALLULA GAP Figure 1. Hanford Site location. tiirahluke Syncline 1FDRD McGEE ~ ~ Ehi... MEMBER & SADDLE MOUNTA IN 5 BASALT PRIEST RAPIDS MEMBER ROCKY COULEE FLO -2000 -3000 -4000 -750 -1000 -1250 GRANDE RONDE BASALT COHASSETT FLOW McCQY ~ CANYON UMTANUM FLOW TD = 1053 m (3396 ff) TO =1034 m (3335 N) VE =25X FRENCHMAN...

LaVenue, Arthur Marsh

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University R. Daren Harmel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that reflects the transition from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems. With careful management, riparian areas can in conjunction with sound upland management. It cannot compensate for poor nutrient management or erosion in upland areas. Rather, the RBS complements nutrient management and sediment control practices. Although

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

136

Table S1. Cotton extent and Mexican free-tailed bat population size per county. County State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

File S1 Table S1. Cotton extent and Mexican free-tailed bat population size per county. County State Bat population size Mean cotton hectares* County State Bat population size Mean cotton hectares 28,255 4,127 *From 1990 to 2008 Table S2. Upland and Pima cotton price over time. Year Upland Cotton

Russell, Amy L.

137

SECTION 32 Table of Contents 32 Upper Columbia Subbasin Assessment Terrestrial...................................... 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by interior mixed conifer forest, ponderosa pine forests, eastside interior grasslands, and shrub-steppe habitats. Montane mixed conifer forest, upland aspen forest, and lodgepole pine forests are present-Steppe 140,874 5.4% Upland Forest (Focal Habitat) Montane Mixed Conifer Forest 28,696 1.1% Eastside (Interior

138

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 10031014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1003 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 1003­1014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists WETLAND AND UPLAND USE PATTERNS IN SEMI-AQUATIC SNAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND CONSERVATION John H. Roe1) in northwestern Ohio and southern Michigan, USA, to investigate differences in the use of wetland and upland

Canberra, University of

139

Responses of native grasses to soil applications of fenuron (3-phenyl-1, 1-dimethylurea) and T B A (2,3,6-trichlorobenzoic acid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1957 to June 1, 1958 in 1nches at Rmterwood Airport, College Station, Texas Mean total density of pe~ herbaceous vegetation in var1ous fenurcm and TBA. treatment plots as of June 1, 1958 on the prairie upland site. . . . . . . . . . . ~ . 14... Analysis of variance for total density on the prairie upland site and a sepsamtion of significant amans. ~ ~. . . . ~ 1, 5 5 ~ Tuitial an4 termLnsl densities aud percentage change in three 4omtnmts of the prairie upland site for the period, December 15...

Hughes, Eugene Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION recreational pressures on these ecotones between water and surrounding uplands are forcing management agencies and Recreational History ............................................... 4 Impacts to Riparian Ecosystems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Close Out Report for the Meadow Marsh Operable Unit I Area of Concern 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, designated as Area of Concern (AOC) 8, also known as the Upland Recharge/Meadow Marsh Area, was the site Treatment Plant (STP) were applied to various study areas within this AOC. Prior to remediation, the area

142

Fungi in the diets of northern flying squirrels and lodgepole chipmunks in the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diet in a mixed-conifer forest. For. Sci. 51: Johnson, C.N.and upland mixed-conifer forest of Californias southernspores in mixed- conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada.

Meyer, M D; North, M P; Kelt, D A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian spruce-fir forest Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HardwoodsSpruce-Fir Open Upland Brush Lowland Brush UrbanBare Rock CedarMixed Conifer 12;... Ford Forestry Center and Research Forest Historical Stand Cover (c. 1956)...

144

Identification of DNA marker for root-knot nematode resistance gene and characterization of disease resistance gene candidates in cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of root-knot nematode resistance (RNR) in Auburn 623 - one of the most desirable sources for RNR in Upland cottons, identification of DNA markers for the RNR genes and characterization of disease resistance gene candidates in cotton. Genetic analysis...

He, Limei

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Title  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Geologic map of the Nevada Test Site, Southern Nevada. Geographic Features of NTS and upland Areas. Author Frizzell, Jr. V.A. and J. Shulters 101056 Document Date 1190 Document...

146

Brush Busters: How To Take Out Tallowtrees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chinese tallowtrees have invaded many upland and wetland sites on the Texas Coastal Prairie. Two control methods--the leaf spray method and the stem spray method--are effective. Both are explained in this publication....

Hanselka, C. Wayne

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Reforestation as a novel abatement and compliance measure for ground-level ozone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...disturbance events like drought, wildfire, pests and diseases, or hurricanes...Coast inland along the Brazos, Colorado, and St. Bernard Rivers...susceptible to drought and wildfire than upland forests (49...M Forest Service ( 2014 ) Wildfire risk assessment portal. Available...

Timm Kroeger; Francisco J. Escobedo; Jos L. Hernandez; Sebastin Varela; Sonia Delphin; Jonathan R. B. Fisher; Janice Waldron

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Spatial variations in soil and plant delta 13 C and delta 15 N values in a subtropical savanna: implications for vegetation change and nutrient dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower-lying portions of the landscape are dominated by closed-canopy woodlands. I used soil ?13C in conjunction with aerial photography and geostatistics to quantify landscape-scale vegetation dynamics in uplands of this savanna parkland. Spatial...

Bai, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Alameda Song Sparrow Abundance Related to Salt Marsh Vegetation Patch Size and Shape Metrics Quantified from Remote Sensing Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone, water, or upland patches number, density, size, shapevariation and repetition of patch type, and the vari- anceGE, Niemi GJ. 2003. Using patch and landscape variables to

Moffett, Kevan B.; Law, Jaslyn; Gorelick, Steven M.; Nur, Nadav; Wood, Julian K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

WESTERN GREAT PLAINS SHORTGRASS PRAIRIE extent exaggerated for display  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Western Great Plains, east of the Rocky Mountains and ranges from the Nebraska Panhandle south into Texas primarily on flat to rolling uplands with loamy, ustic soils ranging from sandy to clayey. WESTERN GREAT

151

Postgraduate Study Physics at Swansea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the popular student area of Uplands (single and family flats) and Hendrefoelan Student Village (flats sharing's first `Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty' with super sandy and rocky beaches offering a wide range

Harman, Neal.A.

152

Postgraduate Study Geography at Swansea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the popular student area of Uplands (single and family flats) and Hendrefoelan Student Village (flats sharing's first `Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty' with super sandy and rocky beaches offering a wide range

Harman, Neal.A.

153

Postgraduate Study Biosciences at Swansea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the popular student area of Uplands (single and family flats) and Hendrefoelan Student Village (flats sharing's first `Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty' with super sandy and rocky beaches offering a wide range

Harman, Neal.A.

154

Postgraduate Study Mathematics at Swansea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the popular student area of Uplands (single and family flats) and Hendrefoelan Student Village (flats sharing's first `Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty' with super sandy and rocky beaches offering a wide range

Harman, Neal.A.

155

Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spring flow and vegetation cover in a first-order watershed and investigate the herbaceous community structure of upland riparian zones. This study consists of two major components: (1) the effects of environmental factors and vegetation cover on spring...

Shen, Li

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Review of the internship with Soil Conservation Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for most crops in the area (Soil Survey of Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, unpublished soil survey). Land Resource Areas The main topographic distinctions are the uplands, Gulf Coast Prairies, flood plains and backswamps along streams, and the marshes.... 32 34 37 Water Management Grazing Plans. Upland Native Pasture. Gulf Coast Prairie/Fresh Marsh. Brackish Marsh. Conclusion Literature Cited. Appendix A Appendix B. . Appendix C 40 41 44 . 48 50 51 52 53 54 55 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

Mattox, Matthew W

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

The Soils of Brazos, Camp, Ellis, and Washington Counties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loam 11 per cent. and the Tabor fine sandy loam 8 per cent. These three are upland soils. The Miller clay, which is a very productive and durable alluvial soil, occupies 7.9 per cent. of the county. The average composition of the upland soils... fine sandy loam-subsoil.. low Bastrop sand- surface. ........................................ fair Rastrop sand-subsoil. ......................................... fair Rell clay-surface ............................................. good Bell cla y...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were large (31:1 annual mean) likely indicating phosphorus limitations to phytoplankton.

Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Landscape Measures of Rangeland Condition in the BLM Owyhee Pilot Project: Shrub Canopy Mapping, Vegetation Classification, and Detection of Anomalous Land Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, the BLM tasked PNNL to collaborate in research being conducted under the Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project to assess rangeland condition. The objective of this effort was to provide Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project with a sophisticated suite of data and tools to assist in evaluating the health and condition of the Owyhee Uplands study area. We focused on three technical areas. The first involved enhancing existing algorithms to estimate shrub canopy cover in the Lower Reynolds Creek Watershed. The second task involved developing and applying a strategy to assess and compare three vegetation map products for the Idaho portion of the Owyhee study area. The third task developed techniques and data that can be used to identify areas exhibiting anomalous rangeland conditions (for example exotic plants or excessive bare soil exposure). This report documents the methods used, results obtained, and conclusions drawn.

Tagestad, Jerry D.; Downs, Janelle L.

2007-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

98: Categorical Exclusion Determination 98: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective is to have public access to Biodiesel-20 and above. The project involves installing 2 new dispenser that can blend bio at the pump. A new card reader will be needed. Tanks and piping can be reused since they were installed in 1998 but some seals in the pump will need to be replaced. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000998.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2011 6, 2011 CX-007504: Categorical Exclusion Determination 300 Area Nanoscale Research and Development Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.15, A9, B3.6 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 1, 2011 EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington November 18, 2011 Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) began demolishing a vault complex that once held stores of plutonium for the U.S. nuclear weapons

162

Slide 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

N N Federal Transmission Expansion in the West DOE Tribal Leader Forum: Transmission and Clean Energy Development in the West February 7-8, 2012 Denver, Colorado Bill Drummond Deputy Administrator Bonneville Power Administration B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N McNary Dworshak Anderson Ranch Palisades Ice Harbor Grand Coulee Revelstroke Lower Monumental Little Goose John Day The Dalles Minidoka Lower Granite Chandler Rosa Albeni Falls Black Canyon Boise Diversion Mica Keenleyside Duncan BPA Service Area Columbia Basin Federal Dams: Canadian Dams Montana Wyoming Utah Nevada California Oregon Idaho Washington

163

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 12960 of 29,416 results. 51 - 12960 of 29,416 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-L-12-05 The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-l-12-05 Download CX-010151: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brasada-Harney No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010151-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination

164

EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis

165

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2) 2) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 Transmission Line ROW. Location: The ROW is located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the

166

CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Maintenance activities will take place within the existing transmission line right-of-way easement and include upgrading existing access roads, relocating or constructing short spur roads to structures, constructing equipment landings and performing maintenance on structures. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006583.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination

167

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 - 7170 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7170 of 28,905 results. Download Microsoft Word- CHAP02ESH_REVISED1_3.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-chap02esh-revised13doc Download National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Presentation by Ahmad Al-Daouk, Director of National Security Department NNSA Service Center http://energy.gov/em/downloads/national-transportation-stakeholders-forum Download 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/2013-annual-planning-summary-office-river-protection-and-richland-operations-office Download CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt

168

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002155: Categorical Exclusion Determination Anaerobic Biotechnology for Renewable Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002155-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000600-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

169

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 1850 of 26,777 results. 41 - 1850 of 26,777 results. Download EA-1454: Final Environmental Assessment Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and 100-N Areas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1454-final-environmental-assessment Download EIS-0332-SA-01: Supplement Analysis McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0332-sa-01-supplement-analysis Download EA-1950: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1950-draft-environmental-assessment Download Response to several FOIA requests- Renewable Energy. http://energy.gov/management/downloads/response-several-foia-requests-renewable-energy-33 Download 2010 Smart Grid Peer Review Day Two Morning Presentations

170

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 24540 of 31,917 results. 31 - 24540 of 31,917 results. Download CX-006818: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grant New Cingular Wireless? Request for Use of Right-Of-Way at the Salem Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Salem, Polk County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006818-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005409-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001411: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idaho Falls (IF)-608 Uninterrupted Power Supply Upgrade Project

171

CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

712: Categorical Exclusion Determination 712: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective is to have public access to Biodiesel-20 and above. The project involves installing 2 new dispenser that can blend bio at the pump. A new card reader will be needed. Tanks and piping can be reused since they were installed in 1998 but some seals in the pump will need to be replaced. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000712.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

172

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 5650 of 28,560 results. 41 - 5650 of 28,560 results. Download EIS-0265-SA-72: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0265-sa-72-supplement-analysis Download CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Reconductoring Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008704-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EA-1441: Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of the Molecular Foundry at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

173

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

851 - 860 of 9,640 results. 851 - 860 of 9,640 results. Download CX-008689: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2012 Spacer and Insulator Replacement Program; Third and Fourth Quarter Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/28/2012 Location(s): Washington, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008689-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk- February 2, 2002 DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk

174

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of Reclamation dams ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation's Critical Infrastructure Exercise Program since its inception in 2003. Six of the dams operated by BOR are designated as National Critical Infrastructure facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. The program helps BOR answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? Exercise programs for each of these critical facilities typically extend over a 12-month period during which ORISE facilitates a series of exercise events that test emergency response plans. ORISE guides the dam's staff,

175

Data:D7964dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add 4dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Electric Rate Sector: Description: General electric rate for all applications. Source or reference: http://www.eatonville-wa.gov/billing Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

176

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 27, 2010 January 27, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

177

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

61 - 2870 of 26,777 results. 61 - 2870 of 26,777 results. Download EA-98-G WESTERN SYSTEMS POWER POOL http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-98-g-western-systems-power-pool Download EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1679-revision-sheet-final-environmental-assessment Download CX-005785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Lane Energy, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/04/2011 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005785-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Technical Standards Newsletter- January 1998

178

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 18760 of 31,917 results. 51 - 18760 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0285-SA-147: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-147-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-110: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-110-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-99-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-95: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-95-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-103: Supplement Analysis

179

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

180

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 27, 2010 January 27, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

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181

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 30790 of 31,917 results. 81 - 30790 of 31,917 results. Download CX-010344: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alvey District Wood Poles CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/09/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010344-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010432: Categorical Exclusion Determination De-energized Wood Pole Removal Project CX(s) Applied: B4.10 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

182

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

183

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Washington Washington Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Washington. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 24, 2013 CX-011171: Categorical Exclusion Determination Longview and Tillamook Substation Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 09/24/2013

184

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bonneville Power Bonneville Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Bonneville Power Administration. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 26, 2013 CX-010720: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monroe-Custer #2 Access Roads CX(s) Applied: B1.3

185

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23)(8/17/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Schultz - Raver No.1 and 2 from 60/3 to 75/5 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 70/2 to 70/5 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and along access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety

186

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Date Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date September 3, 2014 CX-011089: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-cost, Highly Transparent Flexible Low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

187

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

188

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 8790 of 26,764 results. 81 - 8790 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005409-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lancaster-Noxon Number 1 Mile 46-50 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/16/2010 Location(s): Bonner County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001179-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting, June 5-6, 2013- Meeting Summaries and Transcripts Meeting summaries and transcripts for the June 5-6, 2013 meeting of the

189

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17)(7/24/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: July 24, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected sections of the Schulz - Raver No.1, 2, 3 & 4, Olymplia - Grand Coulee NO. 1 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW's are located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

190

Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Record of Decision, Summary..  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Entity (the Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Division Engineer, North Pacific Division of the US Army Corps of Engineers) has decided to fulfill its obligation under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty) between the US and Canada by delivering Canada`s Entitlement under the Treaty to a point on the US/Canada border near Oliver, British Columbia (BC). Delivering the Entitlement at that location will require BPA to construct and operate a new single-circuit 500-kV transmission line from Grand Coulee or Chief Joseph Substation to the US/Canada border, a distance of 135 to 155 kilometers (85 to 95 miles), depending on the alignment selected. This paper describes the decision process and its environmental impacts.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 2330 of 28,560 results. 21 - 2330 of 28,560 results. Download Friedrich: ENERGY STAR Referral (US12C10 and US10C30) DOE referred the matter of Friedrich room air conditioner models US12C10 and US10C30 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the models do not meet the ENERGY STAR specification. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/friedrich-energy-star-referral-us12c10-and-us10c30 Download EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0344-draft-envrionmental-impact-statement Download Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication- August 12, 2011 On August 9, 2011, the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute's (AHRI) Unitary Small Engineering Committee, Compressors and

193

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

194

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2011 2, 2011 EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project May 1, 2011 EA-1679: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington April 28, 2011 CX-005892: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbia River Inter-Tidal Fish Commission Use of White Bluffs Boat Launch and Hanford Town Boat Ramp for Salmon Tagging CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office April 26, 2011 CX-005891: Categorical Exclusion Determination 200 Area Tank Farm Interim Surface Barriers CX(s) Applied: B6.9 Date: 04/26/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington

195

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

21 - 19230 of 28,905 results. 21 - 19230 of 28,905 results. Download Comments of East Central Energy- Minnesota http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/comments-east-central-energy-minnesota Download flash2007-42attachment1.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/flash2007-42attachment1pdf Article Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at the Tokyo American Center-- As Prepared for Delivery Thank you, Jeff, for the introduction. Jeff has recently returned to Japan as the Department of Energy's attaché here. He continues the long tradition of excellent energy officers that have... http://energy.gov/articles/deputy-secretary-daniel-ponemans-remarks-tokyo-american-center-prepared-delivery Download EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement

196

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 5, 2002 September 5, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-107: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington August 30, 2002 EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project August 29, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 August 22, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 1, 2002 EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement

197

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities. Learn about "Ingestion of Spent Lead

198

Diatom succession trends in recent sediments from Lake Baikal and their relation to atmospheric pollution and to climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to the Baikalsk paper and pulp mill, we do provide evidence of localized...to the Baikalsk paper and pulp mill but, as far as the authors are...diatom assemblages in an upland, wind-stressed lake (Loch Fleet...bottom of Baikal near a pulp mill. Chemosphere 21, 1381^1334...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September 05 Throughfall Displacement and biogeochemical cycling processes. #12;Oak Ridge National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy September 05) manipulation of precipitation inputs to an upland oak forest has been conducted. This Throughfall Displacement

200

CONVENTIONAL COTTON RESPONSE TO LOW RATES OF GLYPHOSATE J.W. Keeling and L.L. Lyon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONVENTIONAL COTTON RESPONSE TO LOW RATES OF GLYPHOSATE J.W. Keeling and L.L. Lyon Texas acres of upland cotton planted in the United States were Roundup Ready varieties. Because non-Roundup Ready cotton is often planted adjacent to Roundup Ready cotton, the potential for herbicide drift

Mukhtar, Saqib

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Use of the Chlorophyll Meter to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cotton Following water, nitrogen (N) is the most important constraint to upland cotton production. Most of the cotton in the semiarid western U.S.A. is irrigated, and in areas like the Southern High Plains, center recommendations for cotton in the semiarid western USA (Zhang et al., 1998). Soil nitrate-N measured in early

Mukhtar, Saqib

202

ReproducedfromCropScience.PublishedbyCropScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Pedigree-vs. DNA Marker-Based Genetic Similarity Estimates in Cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- vs. DNA Marker-Based Genetic Similarity Estimates in Cotton Guillermo Van Becelaere, Edward L and detailed pedi- mates for a set of 36 Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars. gree records similarity measures the degree ofof true genetic resemblance among cotton cultivars. Nevertheless

Chee, Peng W.

203

PUBLICATION 460-123 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUBLICATION 460-123 Introduction Most coal-bearing lands in the Appalachian region were forested prior to mining. The region's forests are predominantly upland oak-hickory and Appalachian mixed pleasing environment. Surface mining completely removes the forest. Public law 95-87, the Surface Mining

Liskiewicz, Maciej

204

Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Use of Spectroradiometers to Guide In-season Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Irrigated Cotton in West Texas Following water, nitrogen (N) is the most important constraint to upland cotton production. Most of the cotton in the semiarid western U.S.A. is irrigated, and in areas like the Southern High

Behmer, Spencer T.

205

Journal of Environmental Management (1998) 53, 309321 Article No. ev980217  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in temperature variability from the stream to the upland, measured by coefficient of variation (CV), were watersheds 1998). It is generally believed that water of the Pacific North-west, there exists more quality oftemperature, filtering surface erosional in- of steam and riparian ecosystems in both Washington, Seattle, WA

Chen, Jiquan

206

Final Independent External Peer Review Report Brazos Island Harbor, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Additionally, Section 6009, "Offshore Oil and Gas Fabrication Ports," of the Emergency Supplemental-13) provides that in determining the economic justification for navigation projects involving offshore oil of Brownsville and upland placement areas, as well as offshore placement areas and a nearshore feeder berm

US Army Corps of Engineers

207

The fluvial record of climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in mountain and upland areas, high-energy flood deposits comprising boulders and...longer-term climate variations, are low-energy flood basins particularly in former or...Cave in the Guadalupe Mountains, New Mexico-[89]. Episodes of regional river...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Restoration of lowland conifer PAWS Ralph Harmer and Andrea Kiewitt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 Restoration of lowland conifer PAWS Ralph Harmer and Andrea Kiewitt Introduction During much predominantly on plantation forestry using fast growing, non-native conifer species. As a consequence there was a large expansion in forest cover due mainly to the afforestation of unwooded land in upland areas

209

Fuels Treatment for Mixed Conifer Forests Alexander M. Evans The Forest Guild, New Mexico zander@forestguild.org  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Fuels Treatment for Mixed Conifer Forests Authors Alexander M. Evans ­ The Forest Guild, New.forestguild.org i #12;Fuels Treatment for Mixed Conifer Forests ii Executive Summary The goal of this guide is to provide a resource for managers of mixed conifer forests of the Southwestern plateaus and uplands

Stephens, Scott L.

210

SECTION 16 Table of Contents 16 Pend Oreille Subbasin Assessment Terrestrial ............................................ 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixed conifer forest, with montane mixed conifer and lodgepole forests in the high elevations and small,442 0.1% Upland Forest (Focal Habitat) Westside Lowland Conifer-Hardwood Forest 23,210 1.1% Montane Mixed Conifer Forest 143,240 6.9% Eastside (Interior) Mixed Conifer

211

SECTION 8 Table of Contents 8 Coeur d' Alene Subbasin Assessment Terrestrial.....................................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by interior mixed conifer forest, with small amounts of montane mixed conifer and lodgepole forests) Grasslands 86,352 3.7% Shrub-Steppe 78 0.0% Upland Forest (Focal Habitat) Westside Lowland Conifer-Hardwood Forest 79,369 3.4% Montane Mixed Conifer Forest 153,208 6.5% Eastside (Interior) Mixed Conifer Forest 1

212

Central and South Florida Project, Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-related resource needs of the region, including water supply and flood protection. The recommended project. Scientists have established that a mosaic of uplands, freshwater marsh, deep water sloughs, and estuarine significantly declined in remaining natural system areas due to water management projects and practices

US Army Corps of Engineers

213

Fate of 2 year-old, hatchery-reared trout cod Maccullochella macquariensis (Percichthyidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a range of habitats including pools, riffles and runs but is usually associated with deeper water into two upland rivers B. C. EBNER*, J. D. THIEM* AND M. LINTERMANS* *Parks, Conservation & Lands water rat Hydromys chrysogaster were the probable causes of mortality. Predator-assisted movement

Cooke, Steven J.

214

Ecology, 89(10), 2008, pp. 29002910 2008 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and photosynthetic gas exchange were closely linked to the onset of the North American monsoon in the upland). The sudden presence of water may trigger a complex cascade of physical, chemical, and biological processes between rainfall- event characteristics, such as magnitude and seasonal timing, and organismal natural

Williams, David G.

215

Suspended sediment sources and tributary effects in the lower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suspended sediment sources and tributary effects in the lower reaches of a coastal plain stream Abstract Characterizing the dynamics of fluvial sediment sources over space and time is often critical in identifying human impacts on fluvial systems. Upland interfluve and subsoil sources of suspended sediment

Yeager, Kevin M.

216

NAME: McAllis Point Estuarine Habitat Restoration LOCATION: City of Galveston/Galveston County/Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: McAllis Point Estuarine Habitat Restoration LOCATION: City of Galveston/Galveston County/Texas ACRES: 75 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSOR: Texas General Land Office PROJECT DESCRIPTION: This project Galveston Island. Estuarine habitat to be restored includes salt marsh, soft bottom/sand flat, uplands

US Army Corps of Engineers

217

Impact of prescribed burning on Gulf Coast tick populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

included upland prairies consisting of lush and moderately tall little bluestem (~ski* h 1 ~i (Mt h . ] M h . ~f f. t. M bb bkbhbl kby(~sh(b(1t MhdRbp h btt t fth 1 h b; (Rh s ~)li L. ) h bft t fth d t1yd d t y; p ( (~oi y ~ii 1 L. ) habitat which...

Oldham, Thomas Walter

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/TN APCRP-CC-19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formulations registered by the U.S. EPA and the state of New York can be applied. There is little information and upland) and is utilized by more than 200 species of resident and migratory birds (Andrle 1986, Simmers vulgaris L.). The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in collaboration with the U.S. Army

US Army Corps of Engineers

219

Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by plants instead of traveling into the water system #12;Water Storage on Conservation Lands · Upland areas.9 billion · In terms of water quality and groundwater purification, returns of $13.2 billion estimated #12Economic Benefit of Land Conservation in Protecting Water Resources November 2, 2011 Presented by

Demers, Nora Egan

220

14 2010 Proceedings Symposium on Ash in North America GTR-NRS-P-72 SILVICS AND SILVICULTURE OF ASH IN MIXED HARDWOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN MIXED HARDWOOD FORESTS OF THE SOUTHERN BOTTOMLANDS AND LOESSIAL HILLS Steve Meadows U.S. Forest Service wet bottomland sites. White ash is the primary ash species in the loessial hills and on other upland sites across the South. The natural range, distribution across site types, and associated forest cover

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SCALE 1:1 500 000 Albers Equal Area Projection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 51015 102030 1 Coast Range 1a Coastal Lowlands 1b Coastal Uplands 1d Volcanics 1f Willapa Hills 1g Portland/Vancouver Basin 3b Willamette River and Tributaries Gallery Forest 3c Prairie Terraces 3d Valley Cascade Crest Montane Forest 4d Cascade Subalpine/Alpine 4e High Southern Cascades Montane Forest 4f

Muir, Patricia

222

Interrelationship Between Watershed Condition and Health of Riparian Areas in Southwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes operating on upland slopes ofa watershed and the channel processes affecting downstream riparian to different rehabilitation treatments. Riparian areas are closely interrelated with the sur rounding watershed not only destroyed plant cover and increased soil erosion but also, in the process, reduced valuable

223

The Tobacco-specific Carcinogen 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone Is a ?-Adrenergic Agonist and Stimulates DNA Synthesis in Lung Adenocarcinoma via ?-Adrenergic Receptor-mediated Release of Arachidonic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Upland, CA) GDS 7500 or an Ultra Lum (Paramount, CA) TUI-5000...5-lipoxygenase-inhibitor MK-886 was added immediately prior...the lipoxygenase-inhibitor MK-886 (10 mum; P 0.001 Fig...the lipoxygenase-inhibitor MK-886 and was completely blocked...

Hildegard M. Schuller; Patricia K. Tithof; Michelle Williams; and Howard Plummer III

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrological SciencesJournaldes Sciences Hydrologiques, 47(5) October 2002 Open for discussion until 1 April 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manganese (Mn) in upland catchments is required for water quality management. Stream water Mn and other concentrations in stream water. This approach was more successful for HS4 than HS7, probably because of different. Factor analysis of the stream water chemistry data set for each catchment was more useful in identifying

Heal, Kate

225

Formation of the Great LakesFormation of the Great Lakes Part 2Part 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to present eraera era eon Precambrian Eon Hadean Era Geology Birth of solar system - 4.55 bya Escaping" of the North American continent. Canadian Shield Canadian Shield Craton made up of three geological provinces Superior Uplands Province Southern Province Grenville Province The Central Lowlands Province contains

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

226

Inheritance of certain economic characters in a cross between a cultivated upland variety of cotton, G?o?s?s?y?p?i?u?m? h?i?r?s?u?t?u?m?, and a strain derived from a three-species hybrid of G?o?s?s?y?p?i?u?m? a?r?b?o?r?e?u?m?, G?. t?h?u?r?b?e?r?i?, and G?. h?i?r?s?u?t?u?m?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apart. Seeds for 1953 planting were obtained by making the appropriate self and cross pollinations in the field during the sunnier of 1952. The 1953 planting contained the parents, Fj, F2, F3, and backcrosses to each parent. The seeds were planted.... The means, mean squares, and coefficients of variability for lint strength (Pressley Index) of the parents, F-j_, F2, F3, and the backcross populations are given in table 2. Figure 1 shows frequency distributions of Pressley Index for the parents, Fi...

Nakornthap, Arth

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Soil and variety effects on energy use and carbon emissions associated with switchgrass-based ethanol production in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High biomass production potential, wide adaptability, low input requirement, and low environmental risk make switchgrass an economically and ecologically viable energy crop.The inherent variablity in switchgrass productivity due to variations in soil and variety could affect the sustainability and eco-friendliness of switchgrass-based ethanol production. This study examined the soil and variety effects on these variables. Three locations in Mississippi were selected based on latitude and potential acreage. Using ALMANAC, switchgrass biomass yields were simulated for several scenarios of soils and varities. The simulated yields were fed to IBSAL to compute energy use and CO2 emissions in various operations in the biomass supply From the energy and emissions values, the sustainability and eco-friendliness of ethanol production were determined using net energy value (NEV) and carbon credit balance (CCB) as indicators, respectively. Soil and variety effects on NEV and CCB were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results showed significant differences in NEV and CCB across soils and varieties. Both NEV and CCB increased in the direction of heavier to lighter soils and on the order of north-upland , south-upland, north-lowland, and south-lowland varieties. Only north-upland and south-lowland varieties were significantly significantly different because they were different in both cytotype and ecotype. Gaps between lowland and upland varieties were smaller in a dry year than in a wet year. The NEV and CCB increased in the direction of dry to wet year. From south to north, they decreased for lowland cytotypes but increased for upland cytotypes. Thus, the differences among varieties decreased northwards.

Woli, Prem; Paz, Joel O.; Baldwin, Brian S.; Lang, David J.; Kiniry, James R.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

57 Federal Register 57 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 198 / Friday, October 10, 2008 / Notices Facilities Associated With the Caliente Rail Alignment DOE also has decided to construct and operate the Nevada Railroad Control Center and the National Transportation Operations Center, co- located with the Upland Staging Yard, along the Caliente alternative segment, rather than one mile from the southern boundary of the geologic repository operations area at the Rail Equipment Maintenance Yard. In making this selection, DOE recognizes that locating these facilities at the Upland Staging Yard would require the use of private land, but believes that locating these facilities nearer Caliente, Nevada, is responsive to public comments received on the draft Rail Alignment EIS.

231

Use of a 2-inch, dual screen well to conduct aquifer tests in the upper and lower Lost lake aquifer zones: Western sector, A/M area, SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Sector, A/M Area is located just west of the M-Area Settling Basin on an upland area. The area is adjacent to the gently inclined area where the upland drops off to the Savannah River floodplain. Water in the parts of the uppermost aquifers contains dissolved contaminants which originated at the land surface and have leached downward into the groundwater. Subsurface contamination originated in the locality of the M-Area Settling Basin and Lost Lake, which is a Carolina Bay. These locations functioned as disposal sites for industrial solvents during the early years of operation of the Savannah River Site. The primary groundwater contaminants are trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and groundwater concentrations of TCE are significantly greater than the PCE.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Novick, J.S.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Raster based coastal marsh classification within the Galveston Bay ecosystem, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shoreline (E2USP), estuarine low marsh (E2EM1N), irregularly flooded intertidal high marsh (E2EM1P), irregularly flooded scrub shrub composed of high tide bush (Iva frutescens) (E2SSP), uplands, composed primarily of coastal prairie (Ur), and urban areas... roemerianus), saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), and seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum) compose the high marsh, high tide bush (Iva frutescens) compose the scrub shrub habitat, and eastern baccharis (Baccharis halimifolia) and gulf cordgrass (Spartina...

Edwards, Aron Shaun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

The influence of land use on gully erosion in Brazos County, Texas: an historical perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their width, whereas the opposite is true in rivers and streams (Heede 1974). Finally, gullies can rapidly adjust their length upslope through head cutting and downslope through extension of the toe of the channel in discontinuous gullies. For the purpose.... It was found that the underlying geology, soil characteristics, climate, and local topography were not dominant factors influencing the initiation and development of gully erosion. The rapid expansion of intensive agriculture in the Post Oak Savannah Uplands...

Clark, Jeffrey Battle

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Explaining the relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5000 feet and reaches elevations up to 11, 000 feet. The physical landscape consists of steepwalled sandstone mesa, deep canyons with many drainage resources, volcanic mountains, sand desert, and shale desert (Hunt 1974:6, 426) Most..., in the early A. D. 1200s the Chacoan culture collapsed altogather and the canyon was abandoned. Chaco Chronology and Regional System The San Juan Basin can be divide into three subareas: the Interior Lowland, the Encircling Upland, and Puerco-Red Mesa...

Gang, G-Young

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Impact of an Export Subsidy on the Domestic Cotton Industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for upland cotton' were about $1.4 billion, which amoun~ed to about one-half of the gross value of production (USDA, 1984). In light of these considerations, attention has focused on ways to expand export demand, including export subsidies. This report... deflated polyester price (LDPPRL), the logarithm of deflated prices of imported textiles (LDPM), and the logarithm of deflated income per capita (LPDY). This is a partially reduced form specification of derived demand as described in Foote (1958...

Wohlgenant, Michael K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Resource Areas of Texas: Land.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

days. Trans-Pecos I s.ooo.ooo Acres Vegetation: Uplands - at higher elevations, short grasses, some oak, pinon and ponder- osa pine; at lower elevations, short grasses, desert shrubs including salt-tolerant plants. Bottomlands - bunch grasses..., often covered with sea water in places. Elevation: Sea level to a few feet above sea level. Annual rainfall: 40 - 55 inches. Annual frost-free period: 270 - 300 days. Vegetation: Sedges, rushes, salt grasses. Coast Marsh 500,000 Acres Soils Dark...

Godfrey, Curtis L.; Carter, Clarence R.; McKee, Gordon S.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Geomorphological records of extreme floods and their relationship to decadal-scale climate change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extreme rainfall and flood events in steep upland catchments leave geomorphological traces of their occurrence in the form of boulder berms, debris cones, and alluvial fans. Constraining the age of these features is critical to understanding (i) landscape evolution in response to past, present, and future climate changes; and (ii) the magnitudefrequency of extreme, ungauged floods in small upland catchments. This research focuses on the Cambrian Mountains of Wales, UK, where lichenometric dating of geomorphological features and palaeohydrological reconstructions is combined with climatological data and documentary flood records. Our new data from Wales highlight a distinct flood-rich period between 1900 and 1960, similar to many other UK lichen-dated records. However, this study sheds new light on the underlying climatic controls on upland flooding in small catchments. Although floods can occur in any season, their timing is best explained by the Summer North Atlantic Oscillation (SNAO) and shifts between negative (wetter than average conditions with regular cyclonic flow and flooding) and positive phases (drier than average conditions with less frequent cyclonic flow and flooding), which vary from individual summers to decadal and multidecadal periods. Recent wet summer weather, flooding, and boulder-berm deposition in the UK (20072012) are related to a pronounced negative phase shift of the SNAO. There is also increasing evidence that recent summer weather extremes in the mid-latitudes may be related to Arctic amplification and rapid sea ice loss. If this is the case, continuing and future climate change is likely to mean that (i) unusual weather patterns become more frequent; and (ii) upland UK catchments will experience heightened flood risk and significant geomorphological changes.

S.A. Foulds; H.M. Griffiths; M.G. Macklin; P.A. Brewer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Soils of Henderson, Hidalgo, Milam, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Wichita, Willacy and Victoria Counties.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION - - A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS 3ULLETIN NO. 482 OCTOBER, 1933 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY soils of Henderson, Hidalgo, Milarn, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Wichita, Willacy... for representative samples of typical soils of Henderson, Hidalgo, Milam, Nacgdoches, Navarro, Victoria, Wichita, and Willacy coun- ties. The bottom, or alluvial, soils are better supplied with plant food than the upland soils. Many of the soils are deficient...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince George's County, Maryland; Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State; corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This report was drafted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Policy and International Affairs (DOE-PI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The coordinating lead author and a principal author was Craig Zamuda of DOE-PI; other principal authors included Bryan Mignone of DOE-PI, and Dan Bilello, KC Hallett, Courtney Lee, Jordan Macknick, Robin Newmark, and Daniel Steinberg of NREL. Vince Tidwell of Sandia National Laboratories, Tom Wilbanks of

240

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

BPA Committed to Northwest Values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Columbia River has been called the crown jewel of the Pacific Northwest. There is no question it is among the regions greatest assets supplying low-cost clean hydropower, making deserts bloom thanks to irrigation and providing navigation, recreation and a home for many species of fish and wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration is proud to be a steward of this great resource. Our mission is to serve the people and environment of the Pacific Northwest. We sell wholesale power from Grand Coulee Dam and 30 other Northwest federal dams to Northwest utilities, including public utility districts, rural electric cooperatives and municipal utility departments, as well as investor-owned utilities. We operate three-fourths of the regions high voltage transmission system that delivers that power. But, as a federal agency, we are not just a power marketer. We have public responsibilities that include, among many, promoting energy efficiency, facilitating development of renewable power, protecting fish and wildlife affected by hydro development, honoring treaty obligations to tribes and promoting a reliable energy future through collaboration and partnerships. This document describes our responsibilities to citizens in the Pacific Northwest.

none,

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the sand-sharing system. The value of the sand-sharing system is recognized as vitally important in protecting the coastal marshes and uplands from Atlantic storm activity, as well as providing valuable recreational opportunities.

249

Development of a wildlife monitoring system on the proposed Woodlands city site, Montgomery County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PANTHER CREEK 13 Figure 3. Average monthly temperature for the Conroe area. J F M A M J J A S 0 N 0 100 100 F 90 90 80 70 +ox 80 70 60 50 50 40 40 30 30 20 20 10 10 0 5 K C & IU ~ )- (g O. t ) Q lal g a. 4 z -I ~ ul g Q u. p g g ' ? q u... ~Car a sp. ). From these data the study area was divided into three )large habitat types on the basis of floral species frequency: 'upland (pines), flatwoods (pine-hardwood), and bottomland (hardwood- pine) (Fig. 10). The zone adjacent to Spring...

Poche, Richard Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Texas Soils: A Study of Chemical Composition.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is about one half as mnch as in creek bottom. \\Ve have also an upland hainmock here that is a good soil." The next two divisions are hased on the classification given by Mr. ILobt.,T. Hill in the first report of the State Geological surrey....v be present sodium corbonate, and ill one inrtancc I have found cnlcium chloride-chloride of lime. The folloaiilg analysis reported for the- f3t:~tc geological surrey will illustrate t,!~ conlposition of Texas "alknli" spots: Black ,liZKali fronz X~2e2a...

Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill)

1892-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as willow oak ( uercus hellos), chinese tallow (sa ium sebiferum), red Pl (II b )~, d~l dt ' dt d ' t the plant community. Examination of the upland areas, revealed a mix of loblolly p' (P' t d ), t k (~), 'll k (~bt( ) d tb d b P (~b... ~ 4 'OO EII L ~ Ooo +(IOM ~ 4 ~ Nhtatro! ~ Po ~ &tik 44 F 4 ' \\ )4?~ ~ ~ 4 OPE roo . ft Et)c 'I I ? I ~ I j I tao ~ EPKII Ot I NO TK Ml I!ETO ooerrot oor 4 EIE Od) " 444 -"I ata 1 Ic 'ata ~ 44 IEM ?)Sa ] a' ? +4...

Siems-Alford, Susan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Use and productivity of resources in the corn producing area of Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, soxeti. . . s called "topsoil. ". The B horizon referees to There is a nitroger an. 3 phosphorus shortage, ho!. e:er, calciun and pot-ssiu. . . :re sufficient x'or . rop require. -. ;eats. The 8 hor'zon starts bet!seen 30 and +g ce!xtizet rs; under th... considerable loss. Uplands, the . '. ost i. !portan. . " . om the agricultural !so" nt of v lee i. :do's's ax' because of 3. ex~ cover 80 per ce t of t3". e area. Low e good for grazlx!g especiai. ly ir su, . ?er th ir great hueidity , y 1'7 7. A g' roup...

Andruchowicz, Eugenio Waldemar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Intraspecific variability for dinitrogen fixation in southernpea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the entire growing season, All southernpea plants used in these studies were grown by the Department of Horticultural Sciences, Texas A8M Uni- versityy on the upland farm or 1n a Department greenhouse. Initial Screen Exper1ment (1) was greenhouse grown... Company, Milwaukee, wisconsin). Plants were watered as needed us1ng a modif1ed nitrogen-free solution (Table 2). Light was suppl1ed by available sunlight. Temperatures in the greenhouse were kept above 20' C during the night and below 30' C during...

Zary, Keith Wilfred

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Habitat selection in shorebirds on Bolivar Peninsula, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the combined study sites. 24 Seasonal changes in zone selection by shorebird groups on the reference and experimental sites. . . . . . . 30 INTRODUCTION The disposal of dredged material and its effects on the environ- ment is a subject of considerable... of the site. The site chosen was a disposal mound deposited in August 1974. The upland area was graded so as to remain aobve tidal inundation. The marsh and intertidal areas were graded from the mean high tide line to -0. 2 m mean sea level (USACE unpub...

Leavens, Wendy Rae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

A method of analysing fox squirrel stomach contents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not trained in plant anatomy and histological techniques, any person with a basic knowledge of the flora of East Texas and of the habits of fox squirrels should be able to use it. THE STUDY ABEA This manual is designed for use in the Post Oak Savannah... colored to dark grey sands or sandy loams, The soil usually gives an acid reaction. Bottomland soils in the Post Oak Savannah are light brown to grey, acidic, and range from sandy loam. ", to clays. Upland soils are light, colored, ac1d, sandy loams...

Smith, Hanley Kerfoot

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Performance of Cotton Varieties in Texas, 1957-59.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of varieties comprise this ; 1) I)c', in( lutling Lockett Stormproof No. 1, Blight- I In,:$tcr. Picymaster 101, Lockett 88, Gregg, Western 3 SIOI nlprool, Qualla 10, Watson's Stormproof and : sc~ rl-nl otliers. Type 5. Trans-Pecos Irrigated. This type in... of this general type. Principal cur- rent varieties included in the Texas-Delta group are Deltapine TPSA, Watson's Empire, Deltapine STPSA, Texacala X, Austin, Brazos and Tideland. Type 7. American-Egyptian. In addition to the upland types grown most...

Niles, G. A.; Richmond, T. R.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 – 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to quantitatively describe and understand the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin by collecting and analyzing a wide range of parameters, including seismic and geochemical data, that impact well productivity/oil recovery. Performer Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Background The Bakken Formation is rapidly emerging as an important source of oil in the Williston Basin. The formation typically consists of three members, with the upper and lower members being shales and the middle member being dolomitic siltstone and sandstone. Total organic carbon (TOC) within the shales may be as high as 40%, with estimates of total hydrocarbon generation across the entire Bakken Formation ranging from 200 to 400 billion barrels. While the formation is productive in numerous reservoirs throughout Montana and North Dakota, with the Elm Coulee Field in Montana and the Parshall area in North Dakota being the most prolific examples of Bakken success, many Bakken wells have yielded disappointing results. While variable productivity within a play is nothing unusual to the petroleum industry, the Bakken play is noteworthy because of the wide variety of approaches and technologies that have been applied with apparently inconsistent and all too often underachieving results. This project will implement a robust, systematic, scientific, and engineering research effort to overcome these challenges and unlock the vast resource potential of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Long-term patterns of fruit production in five forest types of the South Carolina upper coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Fleshy fruit is a key food resource for many vertebrates and may be particularly important energy source to birds during fall migration and winter. Hence, land managers should know how fruit availability varies among forest types, seasons, and years. We quantified fleshy fruit abundance monthly for 9 years (1995-2003) in 56 0.1-ha plots in 5 forest types of South Carolina's upper Coastal Plain, USA. Forest types were mature upland hardwood and bottomland hardwood forest, mature closed-canopy loblolly (Pinus taeda) and longleaf pine (P. palustris) plantation, and recent clearcut regeneration harvests planted with longleaf pine seedlings. Mean annual number of fruits and dry fruit pulp mass were highest in regeneration harvests (264,592 _ 37,444 fruits; 12,009 _ 2,392 g/ha), upland hardwoods (60,769 _ 7,667 fruits; 5,079 _ 529 g/ha), and bottomland hardwoods (65,614 _ 8,351 fruits; 4,621 _ 677 g/ha), and lowest in longleaf pine (44,104 _ 8,301 fruits; 4,102 _ 877 g/ha) and loblolly (39,532 _ 5,034 fruits; 3,261 _ 492 g/ha) plantations. Fruit production was initially high in regeneration harvests and declined with stand development and canopy closure (1995-2003). Fruit availability was highest June-September and lowest in April. More species of fruit-producing plants occurred in upland hardwoods, bottomland hardwoods, and regeneration harvests than in loblolly and longleaf pine plantations. Several species produced fruit only in 1 or 2 forest types. In sum, fruit availability varied temporally and spatially because of differences in species composition among forest types and age classes, patchy distributions of fruiting plants both within and among forest types, fruiting phenology, high inter-annual variation in fruit crop size by some dominant fruit-producing species, and the dynamic process of disturbance-adapted species colonization and decline, or recovery in recently harvested stands. Land managers could enhance fruit availability for wildlife by creating and maintaining diverse forest types and age classes. .

Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Levey, Douglas J.; Kwit, Charles; McCarty, John P.; Pearson, Scott F.; Sargent, Sarah; Kilgo, John

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total mortality of limnetic fishes, depending on the contribution of littoral zone fishes. Inflow to GCD forebay showed the strongest negative relationship with entrainment whereas reservoir elevation and fish vertical distribution had no direct relationship with entrainment. Our results indicate that kokanee and rainbow trout in Lake Roosevelt were limited by top down impacts including predation and entrainment, whereas bottom up effects and abiotic conditions were not limiting.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

020: Categorical Exclusion Determination 020: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game For Purchase of the Tall Pines Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): Kootenai County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 203-acre Tall Pines property by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDF&G). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of its outstanding wetlands and upland forest natural resource values. The acquisition will provide an opportunity to enhance, restore, and manage high quality habitat for bird species such as

270

CX-004745: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

745: Categorical Exclusion Determination 745: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquisition of a Conservation Easement for Fish Habitat Mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Okanogan County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is working with the Yakama Nation to fund the riparian portion of the Methow Conservancy?s acquisition of a 40.9-acre conservation easement on the West Chewuch River in Okanogan County, Washington. The BPA would fund the acquisition of 16.83-acres of riparian habitat and the remaining 24.07-acres of upland habitat would be donated by the property owners. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004745.pdf More Documents & Publications

271

Ticks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ticks Ticks Nature Bulletin No. 25 July 28, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation TICKS Ticks seem to be unusually plentiful this year. Many persons walking through the upland woods of the forest preserves have found these insects on their clothing, on their bodies, even in their hair. In the pinewoods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan it is not uncommon to find a hundred or more ticks crawling up your clothing, and there it is necessary to carefully search every inch of your body for ticks, every night. Never try to pull one off after it has firmly attached itself to the skin. Otherwise the head may remain. Touch the body of the tick with a lighted cigarette, or a wad of cotton soaked in alcohol or gasoline, and the insect will drop off.

272

Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released, May 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of nine Carbon Dynamics data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). These Carbon dynamics studies involved the quantification of the carbon pools in vegetation and the rates of carbon exchange among the atmosphere, vegetation, and soils. Ecosystem carbon balance was investigated in a primary tropical forest in central Amazonia using an approach that integrated long-term eddy covariance flux measurements with comprehensive ecological characterization methods. These data are applicable for the investigation of the way in which these rates may be altered by natural and human disturbances. Studies took place in the old-growth upland forest at the Para Western

273

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laborat... Laborat... file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0157-FEIS-03-1992/05eis0157_f.html[6/27/2011 9:57:50 AM] APPENDIX F ECOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This appendix contains two major sections. Section F.1 is a discussion of the ecological characteristics at the LLNL Livermore site, LLNL Site 300, and SNL, Livermore (referred to collectively as the study sites); and presents information and data on the flora and fauna in the upland areas (see Appendix G for a detailed analysis of wetlands at the study sites). This section focuses on the biological features of LLNL Site 300 because this 7000-acre site is largely undeveloped and represents the most biologically diverse area under study. In contrast, the LLNL Livermore site and SNL, Livermore are developed areas that provide only marginal wildlife habitat because of the high degree of human activity and the few

274

CX-003618: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

618: Categorical Exclusion Determination 618: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003618: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Nature Conservatory (TNC) Willamette Wildlife Acquisitions CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 1270-acreWildish property by the Conservancy. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The Wildish tract includes the confluence and lower reaches of the Coast and Middle Fork Willamette rivers and the surrounding floodplain habitat and upland oak woodlands, prairie and conifer forest habitats. By securing control to restore lowland riparian

275

CX-004075: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

75: Categorical Exclusion Determination 75: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004075: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquire a Conservation Easement of the 1310-Acre Trappist Abbey Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 10/04/2010 Location(s): Yamhill County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to acquire a conservation easement of the 1310-acre Trappist Abbey property. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property. The Trappist Abbey tract being considered for purchase is located near Lafayette, Oregon and is currently a working forest (1,025 acres) consisting of native conifer woodlands, upland prairie, oak savanna, oak woodlands, grasslands and wet prairies, an area of agricultural use designated as ?Farmland? (247

276

Why Sequnce Crenothrix polyspora?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crenothrix polyspora? Crenothrix polyspora? Aerobic methane oxidation catalyzed by bacteria is a key step in the global carbon cycle. The process has great importance for the Earth's climate by reducing the amount of the potent greenhouse gas methane released from habitats such as wetlands and lakes to the atmosphere and by the consumption of atmospheric methane in upland soils. Given their diversity and global importance, methane oxidizing bacteria have not yet been adequately considered in genome sequencing projects. Crenothrix polyspora has many properties that are highly unusual for aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. For example, it possesses a very unusual methane monooxygenase that is significantly different from the version of this key enzyme found in all cultured methanotrophs. In

277

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reroute of Jamestown-Grand Forks 230 kV transmission line near Hannaford, North Reroute of Jamestown-Grand Forks 230 kV transmission line near Hannaford, North Dakota. Description of Proposed Action: Western is planning to reroute approximately two miles of its Jamestown-Grand Forks 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The reroute will occur in SECI and 11 T144N R60W in Griggs County, North Dakota. The purpose of moving the transmission line is to relocate the line out of a wetland to a more upland site. Construction will occur late summer or fall of2012. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.13: Reconstruction (upgrading or rebuilding) and/or minor relocation of existing electric power lines approximately 20 miles in length or less to enhance environmental and land use values. Such

278

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

279

Geomorphology K  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geomorphology Geomorphology K . R. Everett Institute of Polar Studies and Department of Agronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Amchitkn Island is composed of six distinct geomorphic regions. The major elements of each region are strongly controlled by ~ e o l o g i c structure and to n lesser degree b y rock type. The eastern three regions are characterized b y pond-dotted uplaitds of low eleuatiolt. These aresurrounded b y areas of one or more elevated ? i ~ a r i l ~ e terraces. Struc- turally controlled dminngewnys cut tlte terracesat:d extend into the uplniid. A tltick blnnket of orgonic-rich soilsforms a nearly complete mantle ouer the regions. Across region IIT farther west, elevations rise to tire moutttai~t and plateau regions. The crest upland becomes increasingly dissected,

280

El Verde Fact Sheet.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is responsible for maintaining records for this site. Site Description and History El Verde site is located in the Caribbean National Forest, in northeastern Puerto Rico, about 9 miles southwest of the town of Luquillo and 22 miles southeast of San Juan. The forest occupies approximately 28,000 acres of upland rainforest with elevations to 3,539 feet above sea level. El Verde site is situated in Study Area 4 of a facility known as El Verde Field Station, a research facility that occupies 173 acres at elevations of 1,100 to 1,400 feet above sea level. The University of Puerto Rico Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystem Studies administers the facility. El Verde Field Station began operations as El Verde

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281

Little Ice Age glaciers in Britain: Glacierclimate modelling in the Cairngorm Mountains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely believed that the last glaciers in the British Isles disappeared at the end of the Younger Dryas stadial (12.911.7 cal. kyr BP). Here, we use a glacierclimate model driven by data from local weather stations to show for the first time that glaciers developed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the Cairngorm Mountains. Our model is forced from contemporary conditions by a realistic difference in mean annual air temperature of -1.5 degrees C and an increase in annual precipitation of 10%, and confirmed by sensitivity analyses. These results are supported by the presence of small boulder moraines well within Younger Dryas ice limits, and by a dating programme on a moraine in one cirque. As a result, we argue that the last glaciers in the Cairngorm Mountains (and perhaps elsewhere in upland Britain) existed in the LIA within the last few hundred years, rather than during the Younger Dryas.

Stephan Harrison; Ann V. Rowan; Neil F. Glasser; Jasper Knight; Mitchell A. Plummer; Stephanie C. Mills

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

Paul Bolstad

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Applications of Quaternary stratigraphic, soil-geomorphic, and quantitative geomorphic analyses to the evaluation of tectonic activity and landscape evolution in the Upper Coastal Plain, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geomorphic analyses combined with mapping of fluvial terraces and upland geomorphic surfaces provide new approaches and data for evaluating the Quaternary activity of post-Cretaceous faults that are recognized in subsurface data at the Savannah River Site in the Upper Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Analyses of longitudinal stream and terrace profiles, regional slope maps, and drainage basin morphometry indicate long-term uplift and southeast tilt of the site region. Preliminary results of drainage basin characterization suggests an apparent rejuvenation of drainages along the trace of the Pen Branch fault (a Tertiary reactivated reverse fault that initiated as a basin-margin normal fault along the northern boundary of the Triassic Dunbarton Basin). This apparent rejuvenation of drainages may be the result of nontectonic geomorphic processes or local tectonic uplift and tilting within a framework of regional uplift.

Hanson, K.L.; Bullard, T.F.; de Wit, M.W. [Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Stieve, A.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Health assessment for Nearshore/Tideflats, Tacoma, Washington, Region 10. CERCLIS No. WAD980726368. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Commencement Bay Nearshore/Tideflats project site is located in Pierce County, Washington and includes approximately 12 square miles of shallow water, shorelines, tideflats, and upland industrial/commercial sections in and around the City of Tacoma. Since the late 1800s, industrialization of the Commencement Bay area has resulted in many metals, such as lead and arsenic, and organic compounds, such as polychlorinated bipheny (PCBs) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs), being released into the marine environment. The waterways and the shoreline are impacted by over 400 potential pollutant sources, including storm drains, pulp mills, chemical plants, and oil refineries. Levels of contaminants in bottom fish and shell fish pose a potential public health concern for those consuming local seafood. Levels of contaminants in sediment, surface water, soil, and air may also pose potential public health concerns for remedial workers and those individuals involved in recreational and commercial activities at the site.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Response of Wetland Soils to Flow Alterations in the Sabine River below Toledo Bend Dam for the Texas Instream Flows Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Figure 4. Average pH recorded at elevation of Lowland (L), Midland (M), and Upland (U) of each plot using a total of 272 soil samples Average pH of Elevation 12 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 3.8 4.1 4.3 4.5 4.7 4.9 5.1 5.3 5.5 5.7 5.9 6.1 6.3 6.5.... All of the soils sampled at Sabine Island were classified as Guyton and Bienville which typically have a pH of 4.8 compared with my observed average of 5.1. Due to the dynamic nature of this ecosystem, it is necessary to observe many properties...

Nally, Deseri 1975-

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Microfluidic Validation of Diagnostic Protein Markers for Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photolithography was performed using a film transparency mask containing a 500 ?m 4 mm opening (Fineline Imaging, Colorado Springs, CO) which was aligned with the desired channel containing 12%T precursor solution then exposed to UV power (?5.8 mW/cm2) for 4 to 5 min from a collimated UV illumination sourcea 4 UV objective on a Nikon microscope in conjunction with an adjustable power mercury arc lamp (Hamamatsu, Bridgewater NJ). ... The entire unmasked chip was then exposed to UV flood illumination for 10 min at approximately 18 cm from a 100W UV lamp (UVP B100-AP, Upland, CA) at ?10 mW/cm2. ...

Akwasi A. Apori; Martina N. Brozynski; Ivan H. El-Sayed; Amy E. Herr

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SA28: Supplement Analysis SA28: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Yakima County, Washington BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project is to protect and enhance riparian, wetland, and upland habitats for the benefit of fish and wildlife. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and The Yakama Nation, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, Yakima County, Washington (July 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-70

291

MAPSS Version 1.0 Available  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available The ORNL NASA DAAC is please to announce the release of a new vegetation distribution model product, MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0. The MAPSS model was developed by the Pacific Northwest Research Station USDA Forest Service and has been used extensively by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in regional and global assessments of climate change impacts on vegetation. The MAPSS model simulates the potential natural vegetation that could exist on any upland site in the world under present, past, or future climate change. It operates on the fundamental principal that ecosystems will tend to maximize the leaf area that can be supported at a site by available soil

292

Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

Freedman, Vicky L.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mast  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mast Mast Nature Bulletin No. 355-A October 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MAST Mast, according to Webster, was an Anglo-Saxon word for the nuts, especially beechnuts, which littered the forest floor and served as food for hogs, deer and grouse. In addition to nuts and acorns, the term is often extended to include the winged seeds of such trees as maple, elm and ash, and even the nuts or seeds of pines -- all eaten by wildlife. Acorns, rich in starch, fat and vitamins, are now most widely available and most commonly eaten. The oily beechnuts on the uplands and pecans in the bottom lands are also important but much less so than in pioneer days. Until about 50 years ago, chestnuts -- now destroyed by a blight from Asia -- were of major importance in eastern United States. Hickory nuts, hazelnuts, walnuts and butternuts, because of their thick hard shells, are eaten principally by squirrels, chipmunks and their kin. In addition to mast, the fruits and berries of gum, cherry, persimmon, hawthorn, crabapple and other trees furnish much food for wildlife; and many shrubs and vines such as wild grape, blueberry and blackberry.

302

letter to cities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Students: Students: Muscovy Mineral Spring Water is a corporation located in Moscow, Russia. Our product is pure, bottled water from the upland streams that are tributaries of the Volga River. It has met with great success in Europe, and our Board of Directors would like to expand our business into the United States of America. To achieve this goal, they have asked me to find a site in the U.S. to build a distribution center that will include a corporate office, warehouse, and shipping facility. These are the cities we are considering: Andover, Massachusetts Atlanta, Georgia Aurora, Colorado Duluth, Minnesota Ithaca, New York Little Rock, Arkansas Lubbock, Texas Milwaukee, Wisconsin Santa Fe, New Mexico Spokane, Washington My travel budget does not allow me to visit all of the cities we are considering. Therefore, I am asking for your help in choosing a location. I would like you to prepare a presentation based on research that will give MMSW a sense of the city's quality of life, especially for children. Some of our company executives will be moving to the U.S. with their families.

303

The Oaks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oaks Oaks Nature Bulletin No. 73 July 6, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE OAKS The oak is celebrated in history and fable. Great forests of oak once covered much of England and central Europe. The ancient Druids held the oak especially sacred and performed their mysterious rites in the depths of the oak forests. Our modern oaks, of which there are more than 275 species distributed over the world -- largely in temperate regions -- are descendants of prehistoric trees. Some 20 or 30 forms have been identified from fossils as existing during the Ice Age. The oaks dominate our upland woods in the Middle West. Of 54 species in the United States, Illinois has 19. Cook County has 9, of which only 6 are common: the white, the swamp white, the bur, the black, the red and Hill's black ( or northern pin oak). Less common are the true pin oak, the shingle oak and the chinquapin.

304

EIS-0268-Figures-1997.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOFJ'EIS-0268 DOFJ'EIS-0268 - PKw.2F Figure 4-L L-Lake and environs. 4-3 -- =----- 90 --m--- -m- EAST o (C.nti""ed O"figure 4.4b) AA 320 1 300 1 Fourmile Indian Grave Upland Pen Branch Brench Formation Branch 280 ~ 280 240 : E -220 ~ L 200 180 I 160 140 1 I I 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Legend: _ _ Inferredcontact Note:TO converito kilometersmultiply by 1.609 to convetito metersmultiply by0.304e Figure 4-4a. Generalized geologic cross section from Fourmile Branch to L DO~IS-0268 I t" 1 I I t 4-8 DOE/EIS-0268 I 4-60 I t t i I I DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,. 4-61 DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,,.':, .. ,.. , 4-62 I 1 I I I DOE/EIS-0268 4-63 DOEI'EIS-0268 ., . . 4-64 I I 1 B I I I m 1 I I I I 1 I I I m I DOE~IS-0268 4-65 DO~IS-0268 Radon in homes: 200 millirem per year Notes me major contributor to the annual average individual dose in the United StaIeS, [ncluti"g residents of the Central Savannah River Area, is naturally occuning radiation

305

Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.

Porter, Mark C.; Ketchum, Sarah

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sequence stratigraphy of middle and upper Jurassic strata of Southwestern Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama differ from those of the western Gulf rim, showing: (1) profound influence of antecedent topography; (2) low early subsidence rates; and (3) greater clastic influx from adjacent uplands. Werner Anhydrite and Louann Salt represent the earliest marine incursion onto the Gulf rim following initial rifting; they onlap upper Paleozoic basement and garben-filling Eagle Mills red beds. Because basin-wide evaporative drawdowns overprint even higher order eustatic sea level changes, transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) are indistinguishable. Anhydrite and shale caps accumulated via interstratal halite dissolution. Oxfordian Norphlet siliciclastics form a continental lowstand systems tract as illustrated by abrupt contact with underlying marine evaporites without intervening progradational marginal marine facies. Marine-reworked uppermost Norphlet sandstone marks the base of a subsequent TST, which includes overstepping lower Smackover lithofacies (laminated mudstone, algal-laminated mudstone, and pellet wackestone). The upper Smackover HST is characterized by formation of rimmed shelves upon which algal mounds and aggrading ooid grainstone parasequences accumulated. Shallow lagoonal carbonate and evaporite saltern deposition occurred behind ooid shoals; fine-grained siliciclastics accumulated in updip areas. Equivalents of Smackover A, Smackover B, Bossier, and Gilmer sequences are largely masked by influx of Haynesville and Cotton Valley continental clastics. Lack of biostratigraphic data, a consequence of restricted fauna, precludes useful age assignments for these sequences in Alabama. Middle and Upper Jurassic systems tracts of southwestern Alabama are regionally atypical and cannot serve as a model for Gulf-wide sequences.

Wade, W.J.; Moore, C.H. Jr. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cost-Effective Mapping of Benthic Habitats in Inland Reservoirs through Split-Beam Sonar, Indicator Kriging, and Historical Geologic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because bottom substrate composition is an important control on the temporal and spatial location of the aquatic community, accurate maps of benthic habitats of inland lakes and reservoirs provide valuable information to managers, recreational users, and scientists. Therefore, we collected vertical, split-beam sonar data (roughness [E1], hardness [E2], and bathymetry) and sediment samples to make such maps. Statistical calibration between sonar parameters and sediment classes was problematic because the E1:E2 ratios for soft (muck and clay) sediments overlapped a lower and narrower range for hard (gravel) substrates. Thus, we used indicator kriging (IK) to map the probability that unsampled locations did not contain coarse sediments. To overcome the calibration issue we tested proxies for the natural processes and anthropogenic history of the reservoir as potential predictive variables. Of these, a geologic map proved to be the most useful. The central alluvial valley and mudflats contained mainly muck and organic-rich clays. The surrounding glacial till and shale bedrock uplands contained mainly poorly sorted gravels. Anomalies in the sonar data suggested that the organic-rich sediments also contained trapped gases, presenting additional interpretive issues for the mapping. We extended the capability of inexpensive split-beam sonar units through the incorporation of historic geologic maps and other records as well as validation with dredge samples. Through the integration of information from multiple data sets, were able to objectively identify bottom substrate and provide reservoir users with an accurate map of available benthic habitat.

Venteris, Erik R.; May, Cassandra

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Level II Cultural Resource investigation for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Level II Cultural Resource Survey was completed for the Texoma Distribution Enhancements project, located in Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana. The 13-mile pipeline extends from Strategic Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to a terminus near Vincent Landing. Located in Louisiana's southwest coastal zone, the pipeline will traverse extensive marsh lands as well as upland prairie terrace areas. Present land use within the project area consists primarily of undeveloped marsh land and cattle range. The study methods included background research, intensive pedestrian survey with systematic shovel testing, a boat survey, and laboratory analysis of recovered artifact collections. One historic site, 16CU205, was identified during the field survey, and it was tested for National Register eligibility. The site is assignable to the Industrialization and Modernization (1890-1940) Cultural Unit. Archaeological testing indicates that it is a rural residence or farmstead, with a house and one outbuilding within the proposed right-of-way. The site lacks significant historical association and sufficient archaeological integrity to merit inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. Four standing structures were also identified during the field survey. The structures are agricultural outbuildings, less than 40 years in age, that possess no architectural distinction or historical association. They have been documented photographically and by scaled plan drawings, but do not merit additional study prior to their destruction. 24 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

LeeDecker, C. H.; Holland, C. C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Draft environmental impact statement for construction and operation of the proposed Bangor Hydro-Electric Company`s second 345-kV transmission tie line to New Brunswick  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was prepared by the US Department of Energy (US DOE). The proposed action is the issuance of Presidential Permit PP-89 by DOE to Bangor Hydro-Electric Company to construct and operate a new international transmission line interconnection to New Brunswick, Canada that would consist of an 83.8 mile (US portion), 345-kilovolt (kV) alternating current transmission line from the US-Canadian border at Baileyville, Maine to an existing substation at Orrington, Maine. The principal environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the transmission line would be incremental in nature and would include the conversion of forested uplands (mostly commercial timberlands) and wetlands to right-of-way (small trees, shrubs, and herbaceous vegetation). The proposed line would also result in localized minor to moderate visual impacts and would contribute a minor incremental increase in the exposure of some individuals to electromagnetic fields. This DEIS documents the purpose and need for the proposed action, describes the proposed action and alternatives considered and provides a comparison of the proposed and alternatives routes, and provides detailed information on analyses of the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, as well as mitigative measures to minimize impacts.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Influence of coarse woody debris on the soricid community in southeastern Coastal Plain pine stands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shrew abundance has been linked to the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD), especially downed logs, in many regions in the United States. We investigated the importance of CWD to shrew communities in managed upland pine stands in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain. Using a randomized complete block design, 1 of the following treatments was assigned to twelve 9.3-ha plots: removal (n 5 3; all downed CWD _10 cm in diameter and _60 cm long removed), downed (n 5 3; 5-fold increase in volume of downed CWD), snag (n 5 3; 10-fold increase in volume of standing dead CWD), and control (n 5 3; unmanipulated). Shrews (Blarina carolinensis, Sorex longirostris, and Cryptotis parva) were captured over 7 seasons from January 2007 to August 2008 using drift-fence pitfall trapping arrays within treatment plots. Topographic variables were measured and included as treatment covariates. More captures of B. carolinensis were made in the downed treatment compared to removal, and captures of S. longirostris were greater in downed and snag compared to removal. Captures of C. parva did not differ among treatments. Captures of S. longirostris were positively correlated with slope. Our results suggest that abundance of 2 of the 3 common shrew species of the southeastern Coastal Plain examined in our study is influenced by the presence of CWD.

Davis, Justin, C.; Castleberry, Steven, B.; Kilgo, John, C.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The remedial investigation of marine sediment at the United Heckathorn Superfund site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The former United Heckathom site in Richmond, California, was used to process and package chlorinated pesticides from the 1940s to the mid-1960s. These activities resulted in the contamination of upland soils and marine sediment in the adjacent waterways. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was requested by USEPA to conduct a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS). of the marine portion of the site. The objectives of this RI are to determine the extent of pesticide contamination in inner Richmond Harbor, estimate the total volume of contaminated sediment, characterize the subsurface geology; characterize the biological effects of contaminated sediment; and characterize the quality of effluent derived from dewatered sediment through treatability testing. Sediment cores were collected from 53 stations. Vertical subsamples from each sediment core were analyzed for chlorinated pesticides. Sediment from selected cores was also analyzed for other contaminants. Younger Bay Mud (YBM) sediment from multiple stations was mixed to form composite samples representing various segments of the study area. These composites were used for solid-phase toxicity and bioaccumulation tests, and the preparation of liquid-phase samples for treatability testing. The probable quality of effluent produced by dewatering sediment was evaluated by chemical and toxicological testing of suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) and elutriate samples.

White, P.J.; Kohn, N.P.; Gardiner, W.W.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Mitigation Projects, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pend Oreille Wetlands project consists of two adjacent parcels totaling about 600 acres. The parcels make up the northern boundary of the Kalispel Indian Reservation, and is also adjacent to the Pend Oreille River about 25 miles north of Newport and Albeni Falls Dam (Figure 1). Located in the Selkirk Mountains in Pend Oreille County Washington, the project is situated on an active floodplain, increasing its effectiveness as mitigation for Albeni Falls Dam. The combination of the River, wetlands and the north-south alignment of the valley have resulted in an important migratory waterfowl flyway. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Kalispel Natural Resource Department have designated both project sites as priority habitats. Seven habitat types exist on the project properties and include four wetland habitats (open water, emergent, and scrub-shrub and forested), riparian deciduous forest, upland mixed coniferous forest and floodplain meadow. Importance of the project to wildlife is further documented by the occurrence of an active Bald Eagle nest aerie.

Entz, Ray D. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA)

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A warm and wet Little Climatic Optimum and a cold and dry Little Ice Age in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next century, increases in atmospheric trace gas concentration could warm the global average temperature beyond what it has ranged during the past century. Examination of larger-than-historic climatic changes that have occurred in the past in specific regions provides realistic context for evaluating such potential future changes. This paper has contrasted the climatic manifestation of the Little Climatic Optimum or Medieval Warm Period (AD 900--1300) with that of the Little Ice Age (AD 1300--1850) in the northern Colorado Plateau region of the southwestern USA. The zenith of the Anasazi occupation coincides with the former and their demise coincides with the latter, when conditions became too cold and especially dry (in the summer) to support upland dry farming. During the height of the Little Climatic Optimum the region was characterized by a relatively long growing season and greater winter and summer precipitation than that of today. This resulted in a relatively rapid development of a potential dry-farming belt that was twice as wide as the present and areas that cannot be dry farmed today were routinely farmed by the Anasazi. Such conditions would be beneficial to dry farmers in the Four Corners region if those conditions were repeated in the near future.

Petersen, K.L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Oakland Harbor intensive study, IC-1 and OC4-B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oakland Harbor is located on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay in Alameda County, between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California. Oakland Harbor and its access channels are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modern deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels to {minus}44 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) ({minus}42 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdraft) in Oakland Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE. Those options include disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean sites, or at upland disposal sites. Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, specifies that all proposed disposal of dredged material into open water be evaluated to determine the potential environmental impacts to those activities. To comply with those requirements, the potential environmental impacts of the dredged material must be evaluated by chemical characterization, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation testing prior to dredging and disposal. Test results are described.

Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Loss and damage from the double blow of flood and drought in Mozambique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Loss and damage associated with the adverse effects of climate variability and climate change is currently an important topic being discussed under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This study investigated loss and damage from floods and droughts among rural households living near the Limpopo, Zambezi and Save rivers in Mozambique. We used a questionnaire survey (n = 303) and qualitative research tools. The study showed that farmers in the research areas were caught between two evils. In the uplands, conditions for agriculture are extremely poor and crop yields are low; moreover, farmers face considerable risk of crop failure when drought hits. In the lowlands, close to the river, soil and water conditions are more favourable, but these areas experience frequent floods. Evidence from this study shows that farmers in the research areas are severely affected by both floods and droughts, and their capacity to cope and adapt is limited. With very little livelihood diversification and poor access to markets, crop failures translate almost directly into severe food insecurity among the population.

Ange-Benjamin Brida; Tom Owiyo; Youba Sokona

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Natural Resource Management, Environmental Protection Division (EPD),  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EPD Home EPD Home Site Details Home Page Management Amphibians Birds Fish Invertebrates Mammals Plants Pictures Reptiles Research/Internships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Natural Resource Management at Brookhaven National Laboratory Welcome to BNL's Natural Resources web site! Within this web site you will find interesting information concerning the Natural Resources program (what we are doing and plan to do), plant and animal species found onsite, great photos of our habitat and wildlife, management issues we are dealing with, and links to other sites of interest. Introduction The Laboratory is located in a section of the Oak/Chestnut forest region of the coastal Plain of Long Island, New York. Forest types are typically oak-pine or pine-oak. BNL property constitutes roughly five percent of the 404.7 sq-km (100,000 acre) Pine Barrens on Long Island. Because of the general topography and porous soil, there is little surface runoff or open water. Upland soils tend to be very well drained, while depressions form ephemeral coastal plain ponds. Hence, a mosaic of wet and dry areas on site are correlated with variations in topography and depth to the water table. Without fires or other disturbances, vegetation would follow the normal moisture gradient closely. In actuality, vegetation onsite is in various stages of succession, reflecting the history of disturbances to the area, the most important of which are land clearing, fire, local flooding, and draining.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Distribution, properties and origin of viscous-flow features in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Satellite images and high resolution air photos, coupled with field examinations, were used to examine 24 rock glaciers/debris-covered glaciers and 25 gelifluction sheets, collectively referred to as viscous-flow features, in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Debris-covered glaciers are the dominant form and are longer (mean length=2.5km), wider (mean width=0.8km), and less steep (mean slope=12) than similar features reported in most arctic and alpine environments. The catchment areas tend to be large, averaging over 9km2. Most of the debris-covered glaciers are tongue-shaped, and where excavation was possible, the ice core was readily observable. Gelifluction sheets primarily occur at the base of valley sidewalls below talus on slopes ranging from 5 to 30 (average=13) and contain a very thin active layer (normal range 20 to 40cm). Both viscous-flow forms occur on the north- and south-facing slopes of the eastwest trending valleys and are concentrated in the inland mixed zone and stable upland microclimatic zone; these lobes were not found in the coastal thaw zone. Gelifluction sheets result from the melting of snow high on the valley walls, subsurface flow of meltwater on top of the permafrost, and slow movement downslope. They are readily observable from nonsorted polygons that are stretched into rectangles that are perpendicular to the slope and contain raised polygon rims upslope. The movement of gelifluction sheets can be detected from upturned stones containing carbonate coatings. Rates of horizontal surface flow of the viscous-flow features are comparable to those reported elsewhere in Antarctica and in the alpine and arctic regions of the world. Some of the viscous-flow features appear to be inactive, possibly reflecting the recession of alpine glaciers in high elevation cirques.

James G. Bockheim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Climate change and Ecotone boundaries: Insights from a cellular automata ecohydrology model in a Mediterranean catchment with topography controlled vegetation patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regions of vegetation transitions (ecotones) are known to be highly sensitive to climate fluctuations. In this study, the Cellular-Automata Tree Grass Shrub Simulator (CATGraSS) has been modified, calibrated and used with downscaled future climate scenarios to examine the role of climate change on vegetation patterns in a steep mountainous catchment (1.3km2) located in Sicily, Italy. In the catchment, north-facing slopes are mostly covered by trees and grass, and south-facing slopes by Indian Fig opuntia and grass, with grasses dominating as elevation grows. \\{CATGraSS\\} simulates solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture in space and time. Each model cell can hold a single plant type or can be bare soil. Plant competition is modeled explicitly through mortality and the establishment of individual plants in open spaces. In this study, \\{CATGraSS\\} is modified to account for heterogeneity in soil thickness and tested in the study catchment using the historical climate of the region. Predicted vegetation patterns are compared with those obtained from satellite images. Results of model under current climate underscore the importance of solar irradiance and soil thickness, especially in the uplands where soil is shallow, in determining vegetation composition over complex terrain. A stochastic weather generator is used to generate future climate change scenarios for the catchment by downscaling GCM realizations in space and time. Future increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration was considered through modifying the vegetation water use efficiency and stomatal resistance for our study site. Model results suggest that vegetation pattern is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall variations provided by climate scenarios (30% reduction of the annual precipitation and a 2.8C increase of the mean annual temperature). Future climate change is predicted to bring a considerable reorganization of the plant composition following topographic patterns, leading to a decrease of trees cover at the expenses of a grass expansion, which will cause loss of landscape vegetation diversity.

Domenico Caracciolo; Leonardo Valerio Noto; Erkan Istanbulluoglu; Simone Fatichi; Xiaochi Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Paleohydrologic investigations in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain: Late Quaternary paleobotanical and polynological records  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research in the vicinity of the proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository is the detection of episodes of increased runoff and groundwater discharge in this presently arid area. Ancient, inactive spring deposits in nearby valley bottoms (Haynes, 1967; Quade, 1986; Quade and Pratt, 1989), evidence for perennial water in presently dry canyons (Spaulding, 1992), and recent claims for extraordinary increases in precipitation during the last glacial age (Forester, 1994), provide good reason to further investigate both lowland spring-discharge habitats, and upland drainages. The ultimate purpose is to assess the long-term variability of the hydrologic system in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain in response to naturally occurring climatic changes. The data generated in the course of this study are derived from radiocarbon dated packrat (Neotoma) middens. This report presents the results of an initial assessment of the hydrologic stability of the candidate area based on a limited suite of middens from localities that, on geomorphic and hydrologic grounds, could have been close to ancient stream-side or spring environments. Paleoclimatic reconstructions are another means of studying the long-term climatic hydrologic stability of the Candidate Area include, and are also generated from packrat midden data. A different flora characterized the Candidate Area during the last glacial age in response to a cooler and wetter climate, and the plant species that comprised this flora can be used to reconstruct specific components of past climatic regimes. Thus, a secondary objective of this study is to compare the plant macrofossil data generated in this study to other records from the Candidate Area (Spaulding, 1985; Wigand, 1990) to determine if these new data are consistent with prior reconstructions. 66 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

Spaulding, W.G.

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

326

2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory Riparian Inventory Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total length of 36.7 kilometers of riparian habitat were inventoried within LANL boundaries between 2007 and 2011. The following canyons and lengths of riparian habitat were surveyed and inventoried between 2007 and 2011. Water Canyon (9,669 m), Los Alamos Canyon (7,131 m), Pajarito Canyon (6,009 m), Mortandad Canyon (3,110 m), Two-Mile Canyon (2,680 m), Sandia Canyon (2,181 m), Three-Mile Canyon (1,883 m), Canyon de Valle (1,835 m), Ancho Canyon (1,143 m), Canada del Buey (700 m), Sandia Canyon (221 m), DP Canyon (159 m) and Chaquehui Canyon (50 m). Effluent Canyon, Fence Canyon and Potrillo Canyon were surveyed but no areas of riparian habitat were found. Stretches of inventoried riparian habitat were classified for prioritization of treatment, if any was recommended. High priority sites included stretches of Mortandad Canyon, LA Canyon, Pajarito Canyon, Two-Mile Canyon, Sandia Canyon and Water Canyon. Recommended treatment for high priority sites includes placement of objects into the stream channel to encourage sediment deposition, elimination of channel incision, and to expand and slow water flow across the floodplain. Additional stretches were classified as lower priority, and, for other sites it was recommended that feral cattle and exotic plants be removed to aid in riparian habitat recovery. In June 2011 the Las Conchas Wildfire burned over 150,000 acres of land in the Jemez Mountains and surrounding areas. The watersheds above LA Canyon, Water Canyon and Pajarito Canyon were burned in the Las Conchas Wildfire and flooding and habitat alteration were observed in these canyon bottoms (Wright 2011). Post fire status of lower priority areas may change to higher priority for some of the sites surveyed prior to the Las Conchas Wildfire, due to changes in vegetation cover in the adjacent upland watershed.

Norris, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Leslie A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keller, David C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zemlick, Catherine M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Integration of Pipeline Operations Sourced with CO2 Captured at a Coal-fired Power Plant and Injected for Geologic Storage: SECARB Phase III CCS Demonstration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a case study of the design and operation of a fit-for-purpose pipeline sourced with anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) associated with a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) Research & Demonstration Program located in Alabama, USA. A 10.2 centimeter diameter pipeline stretches approximately 19 kilometers from the outlet of the CO2 capture facility, located at Alabama Power Company's James M. Barry 2,657 - megawatt coal-fired electric generating plant, to the point of injection into a saline reservoir within Citronelle Dome. The CO2 pipeline has a 6.5 meter wide easement that primarily parallels an existing high-voltage electric transmission line in undulating terrain with upland timber, stream crossings, and approximately 61,000 square meters of various wetland types. In addition to wetlands, the route transects protected habitat of the Gopher Tortoise. Construction methods included horizontal drilling under utilities, wetlands, and tortoise habitat and open cutting trenching where vegetation is removed and silt/storm-water management structures are employed to limit impacts to water quality and ecosystems. A total of 18 horizontal directional borings, approximately 8 kilometers, were used to avoid sensitive ecosystems, roads, and utilities. The project represents one of the first and the largest fully-integrated pulverized coal-fired CCS demonstration projects in the USA and provides a test bed of the operational reliability and risk management for future pipelines sourced with utility CO2 capture and compression operations sole-sourced to injection operations. An update on status of the project is presented, covering the permitting of the pipeline, risk analysis, design, construction, commissioning, and integration with compression at the capture plant and underground injection at the storage site.

R. Esposito; C. Harvick; R. Shaw; D. Mooneyhan; R. Trautz; G. Hill

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Geophysical exploration in the Lautertal at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geophysical exploration was conducted in the Lautertal at the Combat Maneuver Training Center, Hohenfels, Germany, to determine the shallow geological framework of a typical dry valley in this karstic environment. The complementary methods of electromagnetic surveying, vertical electrical soundings, and seismic refraction profiling were successful in determining the depth and configuration of the bedrock surface, the character of the unconsolidated deposits resting on the bedrock surface, and the nature of the bedrock surface. Channels and other depressions in the bedrock surface are aligned with structurally induced fractures in the bedrock. The unconsolidated deposits consist of coarse alluvium and colluvium, which are confined to these channels and other depressions, and fine-grained loam and loess, which cover most of the Lautertal. Wide ranges in the electrical and elastic parameters of the bedrock surface are indicative of carbonate rock that is highly fractured and dissolved at some locations and competent at others. Most local groundwater recharge occurs in the uplands where the Middle Kimmeridge (Delta) Member of the Maim Formation (Jurassic) is widely exposed. These carbonate rocks are known to be susceptible to dissolution along the fractures and joints; thus, they offer meteoric waters ready access to the main shallow aquifers lower in the Malm Formation. These same rocks also form the bedrock surface below many of the dry valleys, but in the Lautertal, the infiltration of meteoric waters into the subsurface is generally impeded by the surficial layer of fine-grained loam and loess, which have low hydraulic conductivity. Further, the rocks of the Middle Kimmeridge Member appear to be closely associated with the localized occurrence of turbidity in such perennial streams as the Lauterach.

Heigold, P.C.; Thompson, M.D.; Borden, H.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Importance of Carolina Bays to the Avifauna of Pinelands in the Southeastern United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract - Past anthropogenic activity has led to the destruction or alteration of Carolina bay wetlands throughout the southeastern United States. Presently, urban development, combined with a 2001 ruling by the US Supreme Court relaxing protection of isolated wetlands, poses an increasing threat to these and other isolated wetland systems; however, little information exists on the importance of these wetland systems to birds. We compared breeding and wintering bird communities of upland pine (Pinus spp.) forests with and without Carolina bays. Estimated species richness was greater in pine forests with Carolina bays than without during the winter (31.7 ?± 1.3 [mean ?± SE] vs. 26.9 ?± 1.2; P = 0.027), but not in the breeding season (27.9 ?± 2.2 vs. 26.3 ?± 2.2; P = 0.644). Total relative abundance did not differ between pine forests with Carolina bays and those without in either the breeding (148.0 ?± 16.0 vs. 129.4 ?± 10.4 birds/40 ha; P = 0.675) or winter (253.0 ?± 36.4 vs. 148.8 ?± 15.1 birds/40 ha; P = 0.100) seasons. However, 23 species, 43% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in pine forests with bays during the breeding season, and 20 species, 30% of which were wetland-dependent, were observed only in such sites during winter. In contrast, only 6 and 1 species were observed only in pine forests without bays during the breeding and winter seasons, respectively, indicating that few species were negatively affected by the presence of bays. Thus, Carolina bays appear to enrich the avifauna of pine forests in the southeastern United States.

Czapka, Stephen, J.; Kilgo, John, C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Phase of Target Scattering for Wetland Characterization using Polarimetric C-Band SAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wetlands continue to be under threat, and there is a major need for mapping and monitoring wetlands for better management and protection of these sensitive areas. Only a few studies have been published on wetland characterization using polarimetric synthetic aperture radars (SARs). The most successful results have been obtained using the phase difference between HH and VV polarizations, phi{sub HH} - phi{sub VV}, which has shown promise for separating flooded wetland classes. Recently, we have introduced a new decomposition, the Touzi decomposition, which describes target scattering type in terms of a complex entity, the symmetric scattering type. Huynen's target helicity is used to assess the symmetric nature of target scattering. In this paper, the new complex-scattering-type parameters, the magnitude alphas and phase Phi{sub alpha} s, are investigated for wetland characterization. The use of the dominant-scattering-type phase Phi{sub alpha} s makes it possible to discriminate shrub bogs from poor (sedge or shrub) fens. These two classes cannot be separated using phi{sub HH} - phi{sub VV}, or the radiometric scattering information provided by alphas, the Cloude alpha, the entropy H, and the multipolarization HH-HV-VV channels. phi{sub alpha} s, which cannot detect deep (45 cm below the peat surface) water flow in a bog, is more sensitive to the shallower (10-20-cm) fen beneath water, and this makes possible the separation of poor fens from shrub bogs. Phi{sub alpha} s also permits the discrimination of conifer-dominated treed bog from upland deciduous forest under leafy conditions. Target helicity information is exploited to introduce a new parameter, the target asymmetry. The latter is shown very promising for detection of forest changes between leafy and no-leaf conditions. The analysis of low-entropy marsh scattering showed that both the scattering-type magnitude and phas- - e alphas and Phi{sub alpha} s, respectively, as well as the maximum polarization intensity of the dominant scattering m, are needed for a better understanding of marsh complex scattering mechanisms. The unique information provided by the new roll-invariant decomposition parameters are demonstrated using repeat-pass Convair-580 polarimetric C-band SAR data collected in June and October 1995 over the RAMSAR Mer Bleue wetland site near Ottawa (Canada).

Touzi, R [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Deschamps, Mireille C [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Pre-industrial charcoal production in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, Germany): Detection and evaluation of a large charcoal-burning field by combining archaeological studies, GIS-based analyses of shaded-relief maps and dendrochronological age determination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In pre-industrial times, charcoal burning was a common source of energy across Europe. Charcoal production and its related consequences for the upland environment are well known due to historical and palaeoenvironmental research. In recent years, awareness has grown regarding the use of woods in the lowlands for charcoal production. In the last 20 years, a large charcoal-burning field in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, North German Lowlands) was discovered by systematic archaeological excavations of the opencast mine of Jnschwalde. However, the excavations are limited to the mine, which only covers a portion of the Jnschwalder Heide and the surrounding forests. In this paper, we present the results of our study regarding the spatial extension and timing of charcoal production in the Jnschwalder Heide and its surrounding areas. We applied a combined approach using archaeological research results, GIS-analyses of shaded-relief maps (SRMs) and tree-ring dating of selected charcoal kiln remains. Approximately 900 excavated charcoal kiln ground plans were analysed, which provided a solid data basis for our GIS analyses. For an extensive evaluation, we enlarged our study area beyond the limits of the lignite mine. We identified and digitised the remains of the charcoal kilns by creating \\{SRMs\\} from digital elevation models (DEMs) that were based on high-resolution airborne laser scanning data (ALS). The data from the excavated and digitised charcoal kiln remains were analysed in terms of their sizes and spatial distributions. In addition, the dendrochronological ages of 16 selected charcoal kiln remains were determined. This study shows that charcoal production was more extensive than initially proven by archaeological excavations. The remains of more than 5000 charcoal kilns were detected on the \\{SRMs\\} across an area that was twice as large as the excavated charcoal-burning field. In the Jnschwalder Heide, considerably more charcoal kiln relicts exist compared with the surrounding communal areas. Furthermore, the charcoal kiln remains in the Jnschwalder Heide have larger diameters, suggesting large-scale charcoal production for supplying energy to the nearby ironworks at Peitz. However, the charcoal production on the communal land was most likely for local crafts. The ages of the charcoal kiln remains indicated that charcoal production occurred between the 17th and 19th centuries, corresponding with the main period of charcoal burning. Overall, our study suggested that charcoal production sites are underestimated in the modern landscapes of the North German Lowlands.

A. Raab; M. Takla; T. Raab; A. Nicolay; A. Schneider; H. Rsler; K.-U. Heuner; E. Bnisch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Remedial Investigation of Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River - 13603  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In south-central Washington State, the Columbia River flows through the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. A primary objective of the Hanford Site cleanup mission is protection of the Columbia River, through remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater that resulted from its weapons production mission. Within the Columbia River system, surface water, sediment, and biota samples related to potential Hanford Site hazardous substance releases have been collected since the start of Hanford operations. The impacts from release of Hanford Site radioactive substances to the Columbia River in areas upstream, within, and downstream of the Hanford Site boundary have been previously investigated as mandated by the U.S. Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act. The Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Hanford Site Releases to the Columbia River [1] was issued in 2008 to initiate assessment of the impacts under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 [2]. The work plan established a phased approach to characterize contaminants, assess current risks, and determine whether or not there is a need for any cleanup actions. Field investigation activities over a 120-mile stretch of the Columbia River began in October 2008 and were completed in 2010. Sampled media included surface water, pore water, surface and core sediment, island soil, and fish (carp, walleye, whitefish, sucker, small-mouth bass, and sturgeon). Information and sample results from the field investigation were used to characterize current conditions within the Columbia River and assess whether current conditions posed a risk to ecological or human receptors that would merit additional study or response actions under CERCLA. The human health and ecological risk assessments are documented in reports that were published in 2012 [3, 4]. Conclusions from the risk assessment reports are being summarized and integrated with remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) reports developed for upland areas, riparian areas, and groundwater in the Hanford Site River Corridor. The RI/FS reports will evaluate the impacts to soil, groundwater, and river sediments and lead to proposed cleanup actions and records of decision to address releases from the Hanford Site reactor operations. (authors)

Lerch, J.A.; Hulstrom, L.C. [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Sands, J.P. [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2003-September 2004. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2003 and 2004 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Sixty-nine turtles were over-wintered at the Woodland Park Zoo and 69 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 136 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2004. Two were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Thirty-four were released at the Klickitat ponds, 19 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 62 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 246 for the Klickitat ponds, 114 for the Klickitat lake, 167 for the Skamania pond complex, and 250 at Pierce NWR. In 2004, 32 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-one of the females nested and produced 85 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and October and transported to the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos for rearing in the head-start program. Data collection for a four-year telemetry study of survival and habitat use by juvenile western pond turtles at Pierce NWR concluded in 2004. Radio transmitters on study animals were replaced as needed until all replacements were in service; afterward, the turtles were monitored until their transmitters failed. The corps of study turtles ranged from 39 in August 2003 to 2 turtles at the end of August 2004. These turtles showed the same seasonal pattern of movements between summer water and upland winter habitats observed in previous years. During the 2004 field season trapping effort, 345 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 297 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 224 individual painted turtles captured in 2004 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native population. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded approximately 60% of program activities in the Columbia River Gorge from October 2003 through September 2004.

Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hangman Restoration Project : Annual Report, August 1, 2001 - July 31, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia Basin resulted in the extirpation of anadromous fish stocks in Hangman Creek and its tributaries within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. Thus, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss garideini), westslope cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) as well as local wildlife populations. Additionally, the Tribe was forced to convert prime riparian habitat into agricultural lands to supply sustenance for their changed needs. Wildlife habitats within the portion of the Hangman Creek Watershed that lies within the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation have been degraded from a century of land management practices that include widespread conversion of native habitats to agricultural production and intensive silvicultural practices. Currently, wildlife and fish populations have been marginalized and water quality is significantly impaired. In the fall of 2000 the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Wildlife Program, in coordination with the Tribal Fisheries Program, submitted a proposal to begin addressing the degradations to functioning habitats within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation in the Hangman Watershed. That proposal led to the implementation of this project during BPA's FY2001 through FY2003 funding cycle. The project is intended to protect, restore and/or enhance priority riparian, wetland and upland areas within the headwaters of Hangman Creek and its tributaries in order to promote healthy self-sustaining fish and wildlife populations. A key goal of this project is the implementation of wildlife habitat protection efforts in a manner that also secures areas with the potential to provide stream and wetland habitats essential to native salmonid populations. This goal is critical in our efforts to address both resident fish and wildlife habitat needs in the Hangman Watershed. All proposed implementation activities are conducted in the headwaters of the system and are expected to prove beneficial to the natural functions of the entire Hangman Watershed. The following is the FY2001 annual report of Project activities and is submitted as partial fulfillment of Operation and Maintenance Task 2.a. The Objectives and Tasks for this first year were designed to position this Project for a long-term habitat restoration effort. As such, efforts were largely directed at information gathering and project orientation. The major task for this first year was development of a Habitat Prioritization Plan (attached) to guide implementation efforts by selecting areas that will be of greatest benefit to the native ecology. Completion of the first year tasks has positioned the project to move forward with implementing restoration activities using the latest information to accomplish the greatest possible results. The Project will be looking to implement on-the-ground protection and restoration efforts in the coming fiscal year using the data and information gathered in the last fiscal year. Continually refining our understanding of the natural watershed functions and fish and wildlife habitats within the Project Area will result in an increase in the efficiency of project implementation. Research and data gathering efforts will remain a strong emphasis in the coming fiscal year, as it will throughout the life of this Project.

Green, Gerald I.; Coeur D'Alene Tribe.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z