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1

EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties,...

2

Microsoft Word - GrandCoulee_FONSI.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project BPA's Finding of No Significant Impact 1 Bonneville Power Administration's Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project DOE/EA-1679 SUMMARY The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Bureau of Reclamation's (Reclamation) Grand Coulee Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project. This project involves replacing the six 500-kV transmission lines of the Third Powerplant (TPP) at Grand Coulee Dam. The transmission lines are presently installed within the dam and a two-chambered tunnel that leads to a Spreader Yard about a mile west of the TPP. BPA would design and construct

3

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

4

Microsoft Word - CX-Coulee_Westside_Relay_Replacement_130205.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2013 6, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Roy Slocum Project Manager - TEP-CSB-2 Proposed Action: Coulee-Westside Transfer Trip Replacement Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic Equipment Locations: Grand Coulee, WA and Spokane, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: The BPA has entered into a three-party agreement with Bureau of Reclamation (Bureau) and Avista Corporation (Avista) to coordinate the replacement of relays and removal of transfer trip equipment at Avista's Westside Substation and the Bureau's Grand Coulee Switchyard on the Grand Coulee-Westside 230-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line. Under this agreement, BPA proposes to:

5

Microsoft Word - GrandCoulee_FinalEA_CommentResponses.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Replacement Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment Finding of No Significant Impact Mitigation Action Plan DOE/EA-1679 December 2011 Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project Revision Sheet for the Environmental Assessment 2 SUMMARY This revision sheet documents the changes to be incorporated into the Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (EA). With the addition of these changes, the Preliminary EA will not be reprinted and will serve as the Final EA. On May 2, 2011, the Preliminary EA was sent to agencies and interested parties.

6

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-Creston_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2011 5, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Robert Keudell Robert Zeller Lineman Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Lineman Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Selected wood pole replacement and minor access road maintenance along the Grand Coulee-Creston transmission line at miles 14, 15, 21 and 28. PP&A Project No: 1828 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights of way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment...routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures... in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose.

7

EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE's...

8

EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and 50: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration is preparing this EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of approximately 28 miles of transmission line between the cities of Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. The proposed project would include replacing all wood pole structures and conductor, improving existing access roads, and developing temporary access roads. Additional information is available at the project website: http://www.bpa.gov/goto/CouleeCrestonRebuild. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES Draft EA: Comment Period Ends 2/3/14.

9

EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

79: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line 79: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington Summary This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011. BPA website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Grand_Coulee/

10

Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Bio Fuels LLC Region Bio Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Coulee Region Bio-Fuels LLC Place Ettrick, Wisconsin Zip 54627 Sector Biofuels Product LLC created by PrairieFire BioFuels Coop, INOV8, and Arcade Pumping to distribute waste vegetable oil vehicle fuel in Wisconsin. Coordinates 44.16944°, -91.268549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.16944,"lon":-91.268549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-Bell3WestsideInsulatorRepAccessImprov_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mark Kjelland Mark Kjelland Project Manager - TEP-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit 230-kV transmission line insulator replacement and access improvement project Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1946 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designated purpose. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit

12

Bonneville Power Administration Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Record of Decision Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project in Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane Counties, Washington. BPA has decided to implement the proposed action identified in the Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0344, December 2002). The proposed action consists of constructing a new 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Bureau of Reclamation's (BOR) Grand Coulee 500- kV Switchyard near Grand Coulee, Washington, and BPA's Bell Substation near Spokane, a distance of 84 miles. The proposed action involves removing an existing 115-kV transmission

13

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-OkanoganWP-AR-Landing_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Jim Semrau Robert Keudell Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Todd Wehner Robert Zellar Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Line Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction and access road construction/maintenance along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-kV transmission line right-of-way (ROW). PP&A Project No: 1776 Work Order No.: 275584 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):  B1.13 Construction, acquisition, and relocation of onsite pathways and short onsite access roads and railroads.  B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such

14

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-ChiefJoseph_ARandWood Poles_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Todd Wehner Road Engineer - TELF-TPP-3 Robert Keudell Line Foreman III - TFWK-Grand Coulee Robert Zellar Line Foreman I - TFWK-Grand Coulee Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction and access road construction/maintenance along portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-kV transmission line rights-of-way. PP&A Project No: 1777 Work Order No.: 275582 and 275583 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):  B1.13 Construction, acquisition, and relocation of onsite pathways and short onsite access roads and railroads.  B1.3 Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such

15

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCouleeDistrictWoodPoleReplacementsAccessRoadsFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEPR-Bell-1 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Todd Wehner Civil Design/Access Roads - TELF-TPP-3 James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement, equipment landing construction, and access road improvements along various transmission lines in Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Grand Coulee District. PP&A Project No.: 2152 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 1), 2151 (Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph No. 2), 2121 (Grand Coulee-Foster Creek No. 1) and 1776 (Grand Coulee-Okanogan No. 2) Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Douglas and Okanogan counties, Washington. Refer to table below for project locations: Line Name Structure Township Range Section County

16

Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

Merker, Christopher

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCouleeBellNo3-WestsideAgLand_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mark Kjelland Project Manager - TEP-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Insulator replacement in agricultural lands along the Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 double circuit 230-kV transmission line Budget Information: Work Order #00255064 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1909 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance activities...for structures, rights-of-way, infrastructures such as roads, equipment... routine maintenance activities, corrective....are required to maintain... infrastructures...in a condition suitable for a facility to be used for its designed purpose. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

19

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-BellNo3ReconductoringFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Frank Weintraub Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 double circuit 230-kV transmission line reconductoring project Budget Information: Work Order #00280243 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1946 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230-kV Transmission Line Reconductoring Project is located in Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane counties, Washington, in BPA's Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project listed below (Table 1).

20

Microsoft Word - CX-GrandCoulee-BellNo5InsultatorFY13_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Stacie Hensley Project Manager - TEP-TPP-4 Proposed Action: Grand Coulee-Bell No. 5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project Budget Information: Work Order #00339638 PP&A Project No.: 2699 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: Grant and Lincoln counties, Washington, in BPA's Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project are listed below (Table 1). Table 1. Townships, Ranges, and Sections for the Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project. Township Range Sections

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Prelim EA.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kilovolt Transmission Line Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment May 2011 DOE/EA-1679 Agency Proposing Action. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is the lead NEPA agency. The Bonneville Power Administration is assisting Reclamation through project design, environmental review and construction, if the Proposed Action is taken. Action. Reclamation is proposing to replace the six, 500- kV transmission lines of the Third Powerplant (TPP) at Grand Coulee Dam. The transmission lines are presently installed within the dam and a two-chambered tunnel that leads to a Spreader Yard about a mile away. Purpose and Need. The TPP's six generators and transmission lines are critical to the regional power supply.

22

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Study of the effects of a disaster at Grand Coulee Dam upon the Hanford Works  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 23 Nov 1973. It is assumed that the Grand Coulee Dam would be destroyed by one direct hit following detonation of an atomic bomb. Major effects of the explosion include flooding and isolation of Richland, flooding of Midway Substation, and flooding of surrounding areas. Maximum water elevations following a direct hit and indirect hits are estimated. Data are presented for flow through openings and flow through dam failure. (HLW)

Kramer, H.A.

1950-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterized the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL used the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish who are pulled through the pumps and turbines at Grand Coulee Dam's pump generation station and transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the pump generating plant's new 9-bladed turbines was also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The highest pressure experienced by the Sensor Fish was estimated at 157 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of kokanne would be carried through the pump without being struck and most likely without injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish would be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without injury.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Johnson, Robert L.

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BPA is proposing to construct a 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line that would extend approximately 84 miles between the Grand Coulee 500-kV Switchyard, near Grand Coulee Dam, and the Bell Substation, in Mead just north of Spokane. The new line would cross portions of Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane counties. In addition to the transmission line, new equipment would be installed at the substations at each end of the new line and at other facilities. The proposed action would remove an existing 115-kV transmission line and replace it with the new 500-kV line on existing right-of-way for most of its length. Additional right-of-way would be needed in the first 3.5 miles out of the Grand Coulee Switchyard to connect to the existing 115-kV right-of-way. Since the mid-1990s, the transmission path west of Spokane, called the West of Hatwai transmission pathway, has grown increasingly constrained. To date, BPA has been able to manage operation of the path through available operating practices, and customer needed have been met while maintaining the reliability of the path. however, in early 2001, operations showed that the amount of electricity that needs to flow from east to west along this path creates severe transmission congestion. Under these conditions, the system is at risk of overloads and violation of industry safety and reliability standards. The problem is particularly acute in the spring and summer months because of the large amount of power generated by dams east of the path. Large amounts of water cannot be spilled during that time in order for BPA to fulfill its obligation to protect threatened and endangered fish. The amount of power that needs to move through this area during these months at times could exceed the carrying capacity of the existing transmission lines. In additional capacity is not added, BPA will run a significant risk that it will not be able to continue to meet its contractual obligations to deliver power and maintain reliability standards that minimize risks to public safety and to equipment. BPA is considering two construction alternatives, the Agency Proposed Action and the Alternative Action. The Alternative Action would include all the components of the Preferred Action except a double-circuit line would be constructed in the Spokane area between a point about 2 miles west of the Spokane River and Bell Substation, a distance of about 9 miles. BPA is also considering the No Action Alternative.

N /A

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Microsoft Word - CX-Olympia-GrandCoulee85-5RelocationFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2012 9, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amanda Williams Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project Budget Information: Work Order #00291628 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1984 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3, Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The proposed Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project is located in King County, Washington, within the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (MBS), in BPA's Covington Operations and Maintenance District. Township, Range, and Section crossed by the proposed project are listed below:

29

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project began to address some of the identified data gaps, throughout the blocked area, with a variety of newly developed sampling projects, as well as, continuing with ongoing data collection of established projects.

Crossley, Brian (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA); Lockwood, Jr., Neil W. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia ABSTRACF: Bench terracing's effect farmers views and use of bench terraces were evaluated in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra , Indonesia

Belsky, Jill M.

31

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. The project began addressing identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area in 1999. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, Spokane River below Spokane Falls, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002 and 2003. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" Washington" "1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 "2. Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USCE-North Pacific Division",2456 "3. Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1596 "4. Rocky Reach","Hydroelectric","PUD No 1 of Chelan County",1254 "5. Columbia Generating Station","Nuclear","Energy Northwest",1097 "6. Wanapum","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",1059 "7. Boundary","Hydroelectric","Seattle City of",1040 "8. Priest Rapids","Hydroelectric","PUD No 2 of Grant County",932

37

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Grand Coulee-Creston  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project Draft Environmental Assessment December 2013 DOE/EA-1950 Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project Draft Environmental Assessment December 2013 DOE/EA-1950 This page left intentionally blank. Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild Project i

38

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS -Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 8/29/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 9, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-99-Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1 Don Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1, 287 kV transmission line from structure 53/4 through structure 64/1. Corridor width is 125 feet. Location: The project area is located within King County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. Approximately 163 acres will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded

39

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project -- Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work conducted during the first year of a long-term study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Colville Confederated Tribes are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Anglea, Steven M.; Simmons, Carver S.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Lecaire, R; Francis, S

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.  

SciTech Connect

Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. Howeve

Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Responses of upland herpetofauna to the restoration of Carolina Bays and thinning of forested Bay Margins.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on the effects of wetland restoration on reptiles and amphibians is becoming more common, but almost all of these studies have observed the colonization of recently disturbed habitats that were completely dry at the time of restoration. In a similar manner, investigations herpetofaunal responses to forest management have focused on clearcuts, and less intensive stand manipulations are not as well studied. To evaluate community and population responses of reptiles and amphibians to hydrology restoration and canopy removal in the interior of previously degraded Carolina bays, I monitored herpetofauna in the uplands adjacent to six historically degraded Carolina bays at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for four years after restoration. To evaluate the effects of forest thinning on upland herpetofauna, forests were thinned in the margins of three of these bays. I used repeated measures ANOVA to compare species richness and diversity and the abundance of selected species and guilds between these bays and with those at three reference bays that were not historically drained and three control bays that remained degraded. I also used Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) to look for community-level patterns based treatments.

Ledvina, Joseph A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

EVALUATION OF ENHANCED VOC REMOVAL WITH SOIL FRACTURING IN THE SRS UPLAND UNIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Technology Section (ERTS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted pilot scale testing to evaluate the effectiveness of using hydraulic fracturing as a means to improve soil vapor extraction (SVE) system performance. Laboratory and field research has shown that significant amounts of solvents can be entrapped in low permeability zones by capillary forces and removal by SVE can be severely limited due to low flow rates, mass transfer resistance of the hydrophobic compounds by trapped interparticle water, and diffusion resistance. Introducing sand-filled fractures into these tight zones improves the performance of SVE by (1) increasing the overall permeability of the formation and thereby increasing SVE flow rates, (2) shortening diffusion pathways, and (3) increasing air permeability by improving pore water removal. The synergistic effect of the fracture well completion methods, fracture and flow geometry, and pore water removal appears to increase the rate of solvent mass removal over that of increasing flow rate alone. A field test was conducted where a conventional well in the SRS Upland Unit was tested before and after hydraulic fracturing. ERTS teamed with Clemson University through the South Carolina University and Education Foundation (SCUREF) program utilizing their expertise in fracturing and fracture modeling. The goals of the fracturing pilot testing were to evaluate the following: (1) The effect of hydraulic fractures on the performance of a conventional well. This was the most reliable way to remove the effects of spatial variations in permeability and contaminant distribution on relative well performance. It also provided data on the option of improving the performance of existing wells using hydraulic fractures. (2) The relative performance of a conventional SVE well and isolated hydraulic fractures. This was the most reliable indicator of the performance of hydraulic fractures that could be created in a full-scale implementation. The SVE well, monitoring point arrays and four fracturing wells were installed and the well testing has been completed. Four fractures were successfully created the week of July 25, 2005. The fractures were created in an open area at the bottom of steel well casing by using a water jet to create a notch in the soil and then injecting a guar-sand slurry into the formation. The sand-filled fractures increase the effective air permeability of the subsurface formation diffusion path lengths for contaminant removal. The primary metrics for evaluation were an increase in SVE flow rates in the zone of contamination and an increase in the zone of influence. Sufficient testing has been performed to show that fracturing in the Upland Unit accelerates SVE solvent remediation and fracturing can increase flow rates in the Upland Unit by at least one order of magnitude.

Riha, B

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Upland Black Spruce Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SSA-OJP Photos | SSA-YA Photos | SSA-YJP Photos | SSA-Ops Photos | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data Citation || Rate Us || Help | User...

50

"1. Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Reclamation",7079 "2. Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 "3. Martin","Gas","Florida Power & Light Co",3695 "4. W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power...

51

Hydraulic fracture orientation for miscible gas injection EOR in the Elm Coulee field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is tremendous potential for shale oil reservoirs, such as the Bakken Formation, Eagle Ford and Niobrara to have a lasting impact on the U.S (more)

Xu, Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

EA-1679: Preliminary Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grand Coulees Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

53

Landscape Characteristics Of Upland Sandpiper Habitat In Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grassland bird populations have declined across North America due to habitat loss but at a disproportionately higher rate in the midwestern United States, where extensive (more)

Korte, Jacob Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Major Nitrogen Loss Pathways in Upland Blueberry Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sawdust sewage sludge compost (1:1) with 5 g ferrous sulfategas relations, the sawdust compost amended treatment has theprecipitation (? SC-Sawdust Compost; ? PM-Peat Moss; ?SO-

Vano, Imre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

56

Sensitivity of canopy transpiration to altered precipitation in an upland oak forest: evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and seasonal rates of canopy transpiration (EC) from 2000 to 2003. With the exception of 2003, which and 841170 W), a part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Environmental Research Park near Oak in the vicinity of the heated probe. TDP were installed in late March of each year (i.e. 2000­2003) and removed

57

Upland groundwater pumping and stream flow, San Jose Creek, Monterey County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

golf course, and gas station. The suit was successful.Board-approved hotel, and gas station. The court ordered a

Ford, Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spruce forest, near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. The samplingsite near Thompson, Manitoba, showed increased contribution

Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

Whitney, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIS-0285-SA-23: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Raver No.1 and 2 from 603 to 755 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 702 to 705 Transmission Line ROW's Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Washington - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington's Columbia River is the largest hydroelectric power producer ... Washington ranked sixth in the Nation in net generation of ...

62

EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties,...

63

CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Selected Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along the Grand Coulee-Creston...

64

CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan 2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s)...

65

Washington Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Washington Quick Facts. The Grand Coulee Dam on Washington's Columbia River is the largest hydroelectric power producer in the United States, with a total generating ...

66

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine foundations (Patrick and Henderson) was commissioned to design a foundation. More detailHull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP

67

Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

Davis, Justin, Charles

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5379: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5379: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Insulator Replacement in Agricultural Lands Along the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace worn insulators on sections of the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside Number 1 double circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. This portion of the transmission line is located in Lincoln County, Washington, in BPA?s Spokane Operations and Maintenance District. Townships, Ranges, and Sections crossed by the proposed project are listed below.

69

CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Reconductoring Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

70

CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

71

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 3, 2011 March 3, 2011 CX-005410: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Bonneville-Alcoa Number 1 and 2 Transmission Line Corridor CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Clark County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 3, 2011 CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 2, 2011 CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Insulator Replacement in Agricultural Lands Along the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/02/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration

72

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 17740 of 26,764 results. 31 - 17740 of 26,764 results. Page EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011. http://energy.gov/nepa/ea-1679-grand-coulees-third-powerplant-500-kv-transmission-line-replacement-project-grant-and Download CX-001732: Categorical Exclusion Determination

73

EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement 4: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) discloses the potential impacts associated with construction and operation of the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project. Bonnewille Power Administration (BPA) would construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line that would replace a single-circuit 115-kV transmission line in an exisiting corridor that has multiple transmission lines for most of the project's length. The transmission line would extend between the Grand Coulee 600-kV Switchyard and Bell Substation near Spokane, a distance of 84 miles. Detailed information about the project and its environmental impacts

74

CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04: Categorical Exclusion Determination 04: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to replace worn insulators along the 83-mile Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 230 kilovolt (kV) double circuit transmission line. Work would be conducted on energized lines using live-line and bare-hand techniques as well as standard techniques requiring an outage. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006304.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination

75

PREDICTING AREAS OF 137 Cs LOSS AND ACCUMULATION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

catchments 1. Introduction 1.1. BACKGROUND Global atmospheric fallout of anthropogenic radioactivity from resulted in higher fallout concentrations in the upland areas of Europe. Such upland environments are often

76

RIVER+CITY+LIFE: A Guide to Renewing Toronto's Lower Don Lands by Stoss Landscape Urbanism [EDRA/Places Awards 2008 -- Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

marshes, floodway, and armored uplands. Above: Overview ofThese would comprise armored and porous surfaces, which

Burga, Hector Fernando

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

www.geog.ox.ac.uk Issue 6: Michaelmas Term 2012 eSoGE News  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Karoo uplands, South Africa: post ­European impacts. Land Degradation and Development. Foxall, A. (2012

Oxford, University of

78

These long-standing issues have been debated in various processes. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unprofitable to serve. This low-cost power helped to shape the economy and advance the growth of the region tributaries and one non-federal nuclear power plant. Bonneville provides about half the elec- tricity used draft policy, ince its creation in 1937 to market the power from the Bonneville and Grand Coulee dams

79

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Chapter 6 Hydroelectric System Development187  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIGRATION "Dam construction presents a serious threat to the continued expansion - and indeed the very River in 1967. Later (1955), Chief Joseph Dam was constructed downstream of Grand Coulee Dam 1993). The Hanford Reach, the one remaining undammed portion of the river, was debatable as a potential

80

Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

Collins, Gary S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microsoft Word - SCADA CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: Claire Bingaman KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Hall Project Manager - TPC-TPP-4 Proposed Action: SCADA Upgrades at BPA's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations Budget Information: Hungry Horse: WO# 00246171, Task 01 Bonneville: WO# 00246173, Task 01 Grand Coulee: WO# 00246244, Task 01 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility area.... Location: Grant County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the

82

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 26, 2011 July 26, 2011 Hanford Reaches Recovery Act Goal for Waste Cleanup Ahead of Schedule - Workers Shipped 1,800 Cubic Meters for Treatment and Disposal RICHLAND, Wash. - Today, the Department of Energy Hanford Site announced it reached a cleanup goal more than two months ahead of schedule at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. July 25, 2011 CX-006290: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cardwell-Cowlitz 2011 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/25/2011 Location(s): Cowlitz County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 21, 2011 CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/21/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington

83

CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5409: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5409: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Access road maintenance project near structure 38/2 of the Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to maintain one double-culvert creek crossing on an unnamed stream. Work would include removing woody debris that is the result of beaver activity, and installing a beaver deterrent structure to exclude the beaver(s) from the culverts. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005409.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008679: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008687: Categorical Exclusion Determination

84

CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5845: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5845: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Selected Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along the Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line at Miles 14, 15, 21 and 28 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms, insulators, guy anchors, etc.) along the Grand Coulee-Creston #1 115-kilovolt transmission line. The structures scheduled for replacement are identified as 14/6, 14/8, 15/1, 21/9 and 28/7. Replacement will be in-kind and will utilize the existing holes to minimize ground disturbance.

85

CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

600: Categorical Exclusion Determination 600: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to install Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) upgrades at the United States Army Corps of Engineers' Bonneville 115-kilovolt (kV) Switchyard, and the United States Bureau of Reclamation's Grand Coulee 115-kV, 230-kV, and 500-kV Switchyards and Hungry Horse 230-kV Switchyards. The SCADA upgrade at each switchyard will provide BPA the system monitoring and control necessary to

86

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22, 2011 22, 2011 CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 22, 2011 CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 18, 2011 EA-1728: Draft Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 15, 2011 EIS-0245-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the K Basins at the Hanford Site,

87

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Willpinit, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Historical record of data on flood control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Last year (1948) during the flood period the flow at Grand Coulee fluctuated widely. 2 PM, June 8, 543000 c.f.s.; 4 AM, June 9, 568000 c.f s.; 2 PM, June 9, 543000 c.f.s.; 2 AM, June 10, 573000 c.f.s. A total instantaneous fluctuations of 37,500 c.f.s. was reported. Now there is installed a new control. This control can keep downstream variation within 500 c.f.s. By lowering the lake level prior to the crest period, the drum gates could be used as flood control (1948 high water basis) the drum gate control plus the water turbine discharge (if the lake level had been reduced) could have dropped the crest at Richland three feet. a. Drop in crest at Richland one foot: Electrical loss nominal, b. Drop in crest at Richland two feet: Electrical loss 1 megawatt/foot for six generators. Loss Max possible 13,310 KW each generator, 79,860 KW total (7 days). Capacity 1,170,000 KW Max Loss 6.8% for 7 days to 10 days. c. Drop in crest at Richland three feet: Electrical loss 1 megawatt/foot for 6 generators Max possible 30,100 KW each generator 180,600 KW total 8 days. Capacity 1,170,000 KW Maximum loss 15.4% for 8 to 12 days. Actual loss, we believe is much less: For an eleven foot drop actual capacity dropped from 1,170,000 KW to 1,137,000 KW during the present winter. Contacts were re-established with Grand Coulee Control Engineers with whom we had dealt in the 1948 flood. We indicated to Grand Coulee Management, Mr. Bates, Mr. Newberry, etc., that careless control and lack of cooperation between Coulee and Hanford could be harmful and at times disastrous.

Kramer, H.A.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

Colorado State University Center for Geosciences/Atmospheric Research (CG/AR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-11, Monterey, CA (NRL). Combs, C.L. and T.H. Vonder Haar, 2003: Smart climatology: wind-stratified cloud. Rojas-Sanchez, R., 2003: GIS-based upland erosion modeling, geovisualization and grid size effects., and P.Y. Julien, 2002: Grid resolution effects on upland erosion predictions. Proceedings CD, Second

91

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

92

Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

LeCaire, Richard

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Surface Energy Balance of the Western and Central Canadian Subarctic: Variations in the Energy Balance among Five Major Terrain Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the surface energy balance of 10 sites in the western and central Canadian subarctic is examined. Each research site is classified into one of five terrain types (lake, wetland, shrub tundra, upland tundra, and coniferous forest) ...

Andrea K. Eaton; Wayne R. Rouse; Peter M. Lafleur; Philip Marsh; Peter D. Blanken

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

we'll fix it. Or maybe you meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms sites prod files Fig4 1 1 16SurficialGeologyUplandCableRte...

95

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

meant to go somewhere else? Use the search box or links below to help guide you. Enter terms sites prod files Fig4 1 1 16SurficialGeologyUplandCableRte Search Showing 41 - 50 of...

96

Plovers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America from Central Canada to central Mexico and winters as far south as Venezuela and Peru. The so-called Upland Plover, once so abundant on the original prairies, is actually a...

97

Fish Remains from Nahas Cave: Archaeological Evidence of Anadromous Fishes in Southwestern Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cave No. I, South- western Idaho. Tebiwa 10(2);63-72. (Fore-Explorations in South- western Idaho, American Antiquity 31(and 150 km. south of Boise, Idaho, in the Owyhee Uplands. A

Plew, Mark G

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Microsoft Word - PIII 092408  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gravel roads provides access to well sites. The area is hilly upland with no mapped wetlands. No significant water bodies are found in the study area. South Coles Creek provides...

99

Power, Labor, and Livelihood: Processes of Change in Rural Java: Notes and Reflections on a Village Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two upland villages in Central Java. We returned to one ofDevelopment in Rural Java: A Study of the OrganizationalKecamatan Cibadak, West Java, and Kecamatan Kendal, Central

Hart, Gillian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of Eastern Redcedar Infestations in theNorthern Kansas Flint Hills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of Eastern Redcedar Infestations in theNorthern Kansas Flint Hills CLENTON E. OWENSBY than on loamy upland. The study area was in the True Prairie of northeast Kansas Flint Hills near Man

Owensby, Clenton E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spruce Year: 2002 Site: NOBS (Manitoba, Canada) Biome: Boreal Forest Day of Year 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 LAI (m 2 m -2 ) 0 1 2 3 4 5 Upland Black Spruce Year: 2002 Site: NOBS...

102

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were large (31:1 annual mean) likely indicating phosphorus limitations to phytoplankton.

Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 27, 2010 January 27, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

104

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 30790 of 31,917 results. 81 - 30790 of 31,917 results. Download CX-010344: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alvey District Wood Poles CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/09/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010344-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010432: Categorical Exclusion Determination De-energized Wood Pole Removal Project CX(s) Applied: B4.10 Date: 06/05/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

105

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

106

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Washington Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Washington Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Washington. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration September 24, 2013 CX-011171: Categorical Exclusion Determination Longview and Tillamook Substation Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 09/24/2013

107

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Bonneville Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Bonneville Power Administration Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Bonneville Power Administration. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration August 26, 2013 CX-010720: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monroe-Custer #2 Access Roads CX(s) Applied: B1.3

108

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23)(8/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: August 17, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-23) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Schultz - Raver No.1 and 2 from 60/3 to 75/5 and the Olympia - Grand Coulee from 70/2 to 70/5 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW is located in King County, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways, around tower structures, and along access roads that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety

109

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Date Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date September 3, 2014 CX-011089: Categorical Exclusion Determination Low-cost, Highly Transparent Flexible Low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 09/03/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Golden Field Office November 22, 2013 CX-010734: Categorical Exclusion Determination Covington District Culvert Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/22/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration November 19, 2013 CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

110

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

111

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 8790 of 26,764 results. 81 - 8790 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005409-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lancaster-Noxon Number 1 Mile 46-50 Access Road Improvement and Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/16/2010 Location(s): Bonner County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001179-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting, June 5-6, 2013- Meeting Summaries and Transcripts Meeting summaries and transcripts for the June 5-6, 2013 meeting of the

112

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17)(7/24/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DATE: July 24, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-17) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along selected sections of the Schulz - Raver No.1, 2, 3 & 4, Olymplia - Grand Coulee NO. 1 Transmission Line ROW's. Location: The ROW's are located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be executed in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA

113

CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

98: Categorical Exclusion Determination 98: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective is to have public access to Biodiesel-20 and above. The project involves installing 2 new dispenser that can blend bio at the pump. A new card reader will be needed. Tanks and piping can be reused since they were installed in 1998 but some seals in the pump will need to be replaced. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000998.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

114

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2011 6, 2011 CX-007504: Categorical Exclusion Determination 300 Area Nanoscale Research and Development Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.15, A9, B3.6 Date: 12/06/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office December 1, 2011 EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington November 18, 2011 Demolition Begins on Hanford's Historic Plutonium Vaults - Plutonium Finishing Plant on track to meet regulatory milestone RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) began demolishing a vault complex that once held stores of plutonium for the U.S. nuclear weapons

115

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N Federal Transmission Expansion in the West DOE Tribal Leader Forum: Transmission and Clean Energy Development in the West February 7-8, 2012 Denver, Colorado Bill Drummond Deputy Administrator Bonneville Power Administration B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N McNary Dworshak Anderson Ranch Palisades Ice Harbor Grand Coulee Revelstroke Lower Monumental Little Goose John Day The Dalles Minidoka Lower Granite Chandler Rosa Albeni Falls Black Canyon Boise Diversion Mica Keenleyside Duncan BPA Service Area Columbia Basin Federal Dams: Canadian Dams Montana Wyoming Utah Nevada California Oregon Idaho Washington

116

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 12960 of 29,416 results. 51 - 12960 of 29,416 results. Download Audit Report: OAS-L-12-05 The Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility at the Nevada National Security Site http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-l-12-05 Download CX-010151: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brasada-Harney No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/12/2013 Location(s): Oregon, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010151-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination

117

EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis

118

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-12): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 5/15/01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2) 2) Donald F. Atkinson - TFN/Snohomish Natural Resource Specialist Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 Transmission Line ROW. Location: The ROW is located in Pierce and King Counties, WA, being in the Snohomish Region. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of- ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. Also, access road clearing will be conducted. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the

119

CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13 Date: 08/22/2011 Location(s): Douglas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Maintenance activities will take place within the existing transmission line right-of-way easement and include upgrading existing access roads, relocating or constructing short spur roads to structures, constructing equipment landings and performing maintenance on structures. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006583.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination

120

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 7170 of 28,905 results. 61 - 7170 of 28,905 results. Download Microsoft Word- CHAP02ESH_REVISED1_3.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-chap02esh-revised13doc Download National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Presentation by Ahmad Al-Daouk, Director of National Security Department NNSA Service Center http://energy.gov/em/downloads/national-transportation-stakeholders-forum Download 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Office of River Protection and Richland Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/2013-annual-planning-summary-office-river-protection-and-richland-operations-office Download CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 18890 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002155: Categorical Exclusion Determination Anaerobic Biotechnology for Renewable Energy CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/21/2010 Location(s): Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002155-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee Substations CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 01/12/2010 Location(s): Grant County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000600-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000602: Categorical Exclusion Determination

122

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 1850 of 26,777 results. 41 - 1850 of 26,777 results. Download EA-1454: Final Environmental Assessment Reactivation and Use of Three Former Borrow Sites in the 100-F,100-H, and 100-N Areas http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1454-final-environmental-assessment Download EIS-0332-SA-01: Supplement Analysis McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0332-sa-01-supplement-analysis Download EA-1950: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1950-draft-environmental-assessment Download Response to several FOIA requests- Renewable Energy. http://energy.gov/management/downloads/response-several-foia-requests-renewable-energy-33 Download 2010 Smart Grid Peer Review Day Two Morning Presentations

123

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 24540 of 31,917 results. 31 - 24540 of 31,917 results. Download CX-006818: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grant New Cingular Wireless? Request for Use of Right-Of-Way at the Salem Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 09/19/2011 Location(s): Salem, Polk County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006818-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission Line CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/03/2011 Location(s): Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005409-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001411: Categorical Exclusion Determination Idaho Falls (IF)-608 Uninterrupted Power Supply Upgrade Project

124

CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

712: Categorical Exclusion Determination 712: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000712: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory The objective is to have public access to Biodiesel-20 and above. The project involves installing 2 new dispenser that can blend bio at the pump. A new card reader will be needed. Tanks and piping can be reused since they were installed in 1998 but some seals in the pump will need to be replaced. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000712.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

125

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 5650 of 28,560 results. 41 - 5650 of 28,560 results. Download EIS-0265-SA-72: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Scatter Creek/Plum Creek Land Acquisition Phase II http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0265-sa-72-supplement-analysis Download CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Reconductoring Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008704-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EA-1441: Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of the Molecular Foundry at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

126

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

851 - 860 of 9,640 results. 851 - 860 of 9,640 results. Download CX-008689: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2012 Spacer and Insulator Replacement Program; Third and Fourth Quarter Projects CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/28/2012 Location(s): Washington, Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008689-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010424-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Technical Standards,DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk- February 2, 2002 DOE Standards and Corresponding Directives Crosswalk

127

ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of plans full-scale exercises to test security at major U.S. Bureau of Reclamation dams ORISE has served as lead exercise planner for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation's Critical Infrastructure Exercise Program since its inception in 2003. Six of the dams operated by BOR are designated as National Critical Infrastructure facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. The program helps BOR answer an important question-are these massive dams secure in the event of a terrorist attack? Exercise programs for each of these critical facilities typically extend over a 12-month period during which ORISE facilitates a series of exercise events that test emergency response plans. ORISE guides the dam's staff,

128

Data:D7964dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add 4dbe-4a06-4933-a709-e46a3d7c0add No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Electric Rate Sector: Description: General electric rate for all applications. Source or reference: http://www.eatonville-wa.gov/billing Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

129

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 27, 2010 January 27, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

130

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 2870 of 26,777 results. 61 - 2870 of 26,777 results. Download EA-98-G WESTERN SYSTEMS POWER POOL http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-98-g-western-systems-power-pool Download EA-1679: Revision Sheet for Final Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Power plant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1679-revision-sheet-final-environmental-assessment Download CX-005785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Green Lane Energy, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 05/04/2011 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005785-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Technical Standards Newsletter- January 1998

131

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 18760 of 31,917 results. 51 - 18760 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0285-SA-147: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-147-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-110: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-110-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-99-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-95: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-95-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0285-SA-103: Supplement Analysis

132

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Office of Energy Efficiency and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-000997: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (PrairieFire) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Monona, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel Infrastructure Project (Coulee) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Blair, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 27, 2010 CX-000999: Categorical Exclusion Determination Biodiesel In-line Blending Project (Innovation) CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 01/27/2010 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy

133

Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Record of Decision, Summary..  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Entity (the Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Division Engineer, North Pacific Division of the US Army Corps of Engineers) has decided to fulfill its obligation under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty) between the US and Canada by delivering Canada`s Entitlement under the Treaty to a point on the US/Canada border near Oliver, British Columbia (BC). Delivering the Entitlement at that location will require BPA to construct and operate a new single-circuit 500-kV transmission line from Grand Coulee or Chief Joseph Substation to the US/Canada border, a distance of 135 to 155 kilometers (85 to 95 miles), depending on the alignment selected. This paper describes the decision process and its environmental impacts.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 2330 of 28,560 results. 21 - 2330 of 28,560 results. Download Friedrich: ENERGY STAR Referral (US12C10 and US10C30) DOE referred the matter of Friedrich room air conditioner models US12C10 and US10C30 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the models do not meet the ENERGY STAR specification. http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/friedrich-energy-star-referral-us12c10-and-us10c30 Download EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0344-draft-envrionmental-impact-statement Download Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication- August 12, 2011 On August 9, 2011, the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute's (AHRI) Unitary Small Engineering Committee, Compressors and

138

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

139

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2011 2, 2011 EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project May 1, 2011 EA-1679: Preliminary Environmental Assessment Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington April 28, 2011 CX-005892: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbia River Inter-Tidal Fish Commission Use of White Bluffs Boat Launch and Hanford Town Boat Ramp for Salmon Tagging CX(s) Applied: B3.8 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Environmental Management, Office of River Protection-Richland Office April 26, 2011 CX-005891: Categorical Exclusion Determination 200 Area Tank Farm Interim Surface Barriers CX(s) Applied: B6.9 Date: 04/26/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington

140

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 19230 of 28,905 results. 21 - 19230 of 28,905 results. Download Comments of East Central Energy- Minnesota http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/comments-east-central-energy-minnesota Download flash2007-42attachment1.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/flash2007-42attachment1pdf Article Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at the Tokyo American Center-- As Prepared for Delivery Thank you, Jeff, for the introduction. Jeff has recently returned to Japan as the Department of Energy's attaché here. He continues the long tradition of excellent energy officers that have... http://energy.gov/articles/deputy-secretary-daniel-ponemans-remarks-tokyo-american-center-prepared-delivery Download EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement

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141

Washington | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 5, 2002 September 5, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-107: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington August 30, 2002 EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project August 29, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 August 22, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 1, 2002 EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement

142

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

Bartels, Duane G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Seasonality in the Surface Energy Balance of Tundra in the Lower Mackenzie River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study details seasonal characteristics in the annual surface energy balance of upland and lowland tundra during the 199899 water year (Y2). It contrasts the results with the 199798 water year (Y1) and relates the findings to the climatic ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Andrea K. Eaton; Richard M. Petrone; L. Dale Boudreau; Philip Marsh; Timothy J. Griffis

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependent upon maintenance of a healthy and functioning riparian system and associated uplands. AlterationsCONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ON THE U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Suite 40 USAF Academy, CO 80840-2400 October 26, 1999 #12;CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE

146

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a coevolving naturalcultural system. Suitable ecosystem attributes can be achieved by managing human maintenance that protects the riparian corridor. · Manage recreational use to protect riparian values Creek and the Warm Springs River during runoff periods. · Road systems and upland management practices

147

Mapping Floating and Emergent Aquatic Vegetation in Coastal Wetlands of Eastern Georgian Bay,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), marine systems (Wang et al. 2004), upland coastal habitats (Grenier et al. 2007; Rokitnicki- Wojcik 2009 using Ikonos imagery. Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing 34(2):143­158 Fournier RA, Grenier M, Lavoie A Creek, Michigan. U.S. Geological Survey, Scientific Investigations Report 2006­5051, 8 p Grenier M

McMaster University

148

Chair's Message NATURAL RESOURCES ALUMNI NEWSLETTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America may be ineffective because the laws preserve the amphibians' wetland, but not upland habitat; even from accelerating development pressures. By definition, vernal pools are small, depressional wetlands populations of fish. With a main predator missing, many organisms have evolved to depend on these wetlands

Pringle, James "Jamie"

149

ADVANCES ON THE USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS Jorge G. Zornberg, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change little. Water diverted from Bendora Dam (the middle dam) is supplied to Canberra via a gravity examines the ecological effects of serial impoundments (three dams) on a rocky upland stream and Sons, New York] and the Australian Rivers Assessment System (AUSRIVAS) to predict pre-dam biota. First

Zornberg, Jorge G.

150

SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change little. Water diverted from Bendora Dam (the middle dam) is supplied to Canberra via a gravity examines the ecological effects of serial impoundments (three dams) on a rocky upland stream and Sons, New York] and the Australian Rivers Assessment System (AUSRIVAS) to predict pre-dam biota. First

Perissin, Daniele - Institute of Space and Earth Information Science

151

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57 Federal Register 57 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 198 / Friday, October 10, 2008 / Notices Facilities Associated With the Caliente Rail Alignment DOE also has decided to construct and operate the Nevada Railroad Control Center and the National Transportation Operations Center, co- located with the Upland Staging Yard, along the Caliente alternative segment, rather than one mile from the southern boundary of the geologic repository operations area at the Rail Equipment Maintenance Yard. In making this selection, DOE recognizes that locating these facilities at the Upland Staging Yard would require the use of private land, but believes that locating these facilities nearer Caliente, Nevada, is responsive to public comments received on the draft Rail Alignment EIS.

155

Nesting ecology of wood thrush (Turdidae: Passeriformes) in hardwood forests of South Carolina  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nesting success of the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) in bottomland and upland forests in South Carolina. Twenty-one of 26 nests were located in bottomland sites, and 76.2% of these nests were in narrow (<150-m wide) bottomland corridors. No nests were found in upland sites enclosed by fields. The Mayfield success rate for 20 nests was 35.3%. All nest failures were attributed to predation, no nests were parasitized by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater). Nest sites were characterized by a dense overstory and a moderately developed understory. Bottomland hardwoods, especially relatively narrow corridors, appear to provide suitable nesting habitat for Wood Thrush in this region. Brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds does not appear to be a significant factor in the failure of Wood Thrush nests in these sites.

Sargent, Robert, A.; Kilgo, John, C.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Miller, Karl, V.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Rights-of-Way Stability: A 15-year Appraisal of Plant Dynamics on Electric Power Rights-of-Way in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational, selective removal of trees on rights-of-way (ROWs) can create relatively stable, compositionally constant low-density tree populations. This report presents the results of studies on 21 electric transmission line ROWs in New York State. The results show that selective vegetation management of undesirable species, an ecologically based management technique, helps promote or maintain plant species richness and diversity on upland landscapes, but appears to have no effect in wetlands. In additi...

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

METAALICUS Project Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A whole ecosystem study has been undertaken to examine the relationship between atmospheric mercury deposition and fish mercury concentrations. The project is known as the Mercury Experiment to Assess Atmospheric Loading in Canada and the United States (METAALICUS). METAALICUS is a multiyear study funded by the public and private sectors in the United States and Canada. Three stable isotopes of mercury are being added to a lake and its surrounding watershed (upland and wetland). The study site is the Lak...

2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Utilization requirements. A Southern California gas company project SAGE report: utilization requirements. [Solar Assisted Gas Energy  

SciTech Connect

Utilization requirements are given and comparisons made of two phase III SAGE (solar assisted gas energy) installations in California: (1) a retrofit installation in an existing apartment building in El Toro, and (2) an installation in a new apartment building in Upland. Such testing in the field revealed the requirements to be met if SAGE-type installations are to become commercially practical on a widespread basis in electric and gas energy usage.

Barbieri, R.; Schoen, R.; Hirshberg, A.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the Southeastern United States.  

SciTech Connect

The importance of dead wood to maintaining forest diversity is now widely recognized. However, the habitat associations and sensitivities of many species associated with dead wood remain unknown, making it difficult to develop conservation plans for managed forests. The purpose of this research, conducted on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina, was to better understand the relationships between dead wood and arthropods in the southeastern United States. In a comparison of forest types, more beetle species emerged from logs collected in upland pine-dominated stands than in bottomland hardwood forests. This difference was most pronounced for Quercus nigra L., a species of tree uncommon in upland forests. In a comparison of wood postures, more beetle species emerged from logs than from snags, but a number of species appear to be dependent on snags including several canopy specialists. In a study of saproxylic beetle succession, species richness peaked within the first year of death and declined steadily thereafter. However, a number of species appear to be dependent on highly decayed logs, underscoring the importance of protecting wood at all stages of decay. In a study comparing litter-dwelling arthropod abundance at different distances from dead wood, arthropods were more abundant near dead wood than away from it. In another study, grounddwelling arthropods and saproxylic beetles were little affected by large-scale manipulations of dead wood in upland pine-dominated forests, possibly due to the suitability of the forests surrounding the plots.

Ulyshen, Michael, Darragh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model included: quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report summarized the data collected on Lake Roosevelt for 1991 and includes limnological, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, fishery, and reservoir operation data. Discussions cover reservoir operation affect upon zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Reservoir operations brought reservoir elevations to a low of 1,221.7 in April, the result of power operations and a flood control shift from Dworshak Dam, in Idaho, to Grand Coulee Dam. Water retention times were correspondingly low reaching a minimum of 14.7 days on April 27th.

Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince George's County, Maryland; Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State; corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This report was drafted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Policy and International Affairs (DOE-PI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The coordinating lead author and a principal author was Craig Zamuda of DOE-PI; other principal authors included Bryan Mignone of DOE-PI, and Dan Bilello, KC Hallett, Courtney Lee, Jordan Macknick, Robin Newmark, and Daniel Steinberg of NREL. Vince Tidwell of Sandia National Laboratories, Tom Wilbanks of

164

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Jointly sponsored research program. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Objectives, accomplishments, procedures, and results are briefly described for each of the following 18 research projects: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation, and product market study; The impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing of heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC Coke Process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C Process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid-state NMR analysis and interpretation of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; CROW{trademark} field demonstration with bell lumber and pole; ``B`` series pilot plant tests; In situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; and Acid-mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment technology development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Providing solutions to energy and environmental problems. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries are presented for the following tasks: Development and demonstration of a practical electric downhole steam generator for thermal recovery of heavy oil and tar; Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems; Coal gasification, power generation and product market study; Impact of leachate from Clean Coal Technology waste on the stability of clay liners; Investigation of coprocessing heavy oil, automobile shredder residue, and coal; Injection into coal seams for simultaneous CO{sub 2} mitigation and enhanced recovery of coalbed methane; Optimization of carbonizer operations in the FMC coke process; Chemical sensor and field screening technology development; Demonstration of the Koppelman Series C process using a batch test unit with Powder River Basin coal as feed; Remote chemical sensor development; Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use; Solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; Contained recovery of oily wastes field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; B Series pilot plant tests; In-situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils; Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system; Solid state NMR analysis of Mowry Formation shale from different sedimentary basins; Acid mine drainage prevention, control, and treatment development for the Stockett/Sand Coulee Area; PERF dispersion modeling project, Phase 2; Field testing of the TaBoRR Process using the asphalt and dry bottoms configurations; and Validation of a new soil VOC sampler.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

Olson, Jim [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

177

Residential cattle egret colonies in Texas: geography, reproductive success and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A phenomenon of large, upland breeding colonies of cattle egrets in residential areas of Central Texas has been observed since the early 1960s. These large concentrations of breeding birds can be a nuisance to nearby residents and their management has been difficult. To help understand why cattle egrets choose upland, residential breeding sites, and predict where these might occur, the geographic extent of the phenomenon was bounded within Texas, a habitat suitability model constructed, and reproductive success compared by breeding habitat type to evaluate if residential nesting confers an adaptive advantage.. Records of upland cattle egret colonies were found only in Central Texas, not other parts of the state. The habitat suitability model was constructed using total edge of three land use classes: water, forest, and developed classes. The model classified 78.6 % of upland colonies in very high or high suitability classes and 7.1% of colonies in low or very low suitability classes. This distribution was significantly different than expected considering the overall ratio of suitability scores in the entire raster model (p = 0.036). Nineteen active colonies were found in or bordering the Post Oak Savannah and Blackland Prairie ecoregions. Colonies were in residential, urban, island, and flooded tree and shrub habitat. Nests were found in 12 different tree and shrub species. Residential colonies had more breeding pairs, greater nest survival, and were less productive than non-residential colonies on average, but these differences were not statistically significant. Colonies where nest substrate was removed were not reused and no breeding was initiated nearby the next year. Propane cannons discouraged reuse of colony after prolonged application. Herons and egrets likely use residential sites when wetland habitats are limited. Their overall breeding distribution reflects state wide rainfall and wetland availability patterns with upland nesting in Central Texas, wetland nesting in eastern and coastal regions, and little large scale nesting in western Texas. Egrets and herons may use edges of development as breeding sites to limit predation by ground predators when flooded tree and shrub or island habitats are absent, but this hypothesis needs more testing.

Parkes, Michael Lawrence

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Influence of woody plant on spring and riparian vegetation in central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increase in human population, water resources have become more and more precious. A comprehensive study of water yield characteristics is imperative, especially in water-limited semiarid regions. The objective of this study is to examine spring flow and vegetation cover in a first-order watershed and investigate the herbaceous community structure of upland riparian zones. This study consists of two major components: (1) the effects of environmental factors and vegetation cover on spring flow at Pedernales River upland catchments, and (2) the ecological responses of vegetation to altered flow regimes that result from brush management at the upland riparian zones. The study finds that an average of 3.67% of the monthly water budget of first-order catchments in central Texas is made up of spring flow. The influence of woody plant cover on streamflow was evaluated by comparing spring sites with different percentages of woody cover three times during 2003 and 2004. Our findings indicate that changes in woody plant cover had no influence on the amounts of streamflow from these catchments, and the surface catchment area had only a minor influence. This suggests that the real spring catchment area might be different from the surface watershed boundaries that have been delineated by topography. Plant species richness and diversity gradually decreased with increasing lateral distances from the stream bank. Herbaceous richness and diversity declined with increasing Ashe juniper cover in the riparian zone. Ashe juniper canopy cover had a larger effect on the understory composition than the cover of other woody species. Herbaceous diversity and production was greater in areas with sparse tree density than in areas with no trees, but was lowest at high tree densities. The complete removal of Ashe juniper in the riparian zones is not recommended because of the potential loss of grass cover. The recommended management would be to leave a sparse cover of canopy trees to maintain understory plants.

Shen, Li

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) Shore Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Shore Protection Act is the primary legal authority for protection and management of Georgia's shoreline features including sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals, collectively known as the sand-sharing system. The value of the sand-sharing system is recognized as vitally important in protecting the coastal marshes and uplands from Atlantic storm activity, as well as providing valuable recreational opportunities.

180

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 128-B-3 Burn Pit Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-058  

SciTech Connect

The 128-B-3 waste site is a former burn and disposal site for the 100-B/C Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River. The 128-B-3 waste site has been remediated to meet the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results of sampling at upland areas of the site also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Culture and Resource Management for Subsistence: An Anthropological Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

day. one rupee Is charged as Interest against 100 rupees A small stone mill powered by water through v.oooden turbine like devices Irrigated paddy land Slash and bum upland where shifting cultivation is practiced Category of communal land tenure... such as water. forests and pasture are renewable. Others. such as minerals are non-renewable and cannot be used a.gaIn once consumed. The consumptiOn of envirorunental resources such as land. solI. water. air. minerals and energy are increasing throughout...

Timseena, Bhanu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Inheritance of cotton fiber length and distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiber quality data from five upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genotypes, which were grown at College Station, TX during 2001 and 2002, were subjected to diallel and generation means analyses to determine the potential for improvement of fiber length and to determine the inheritance of length distribution data. Four near-long staple (NLS) upland cotton genotypes and one short-staple genotype were crossed in all combinations, excluding reciprocals. Estimates of general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) for fiber length based on Griffingâ??s diallel Model I, Method 4 were calculated for high volume instrumentation (HVI) upper-half mean (UHM) fiber length and advance fiber information system (AFIS) mean fiber length by weight (FLw), mean fiber length by number (FLn), upper quartile length by weight (Uqlw), fiber length distribution cross entropy (using 3 different standard or check distributions - CEA, CEB, and CEC), fiber length distribution kurtosis (FLwKurt), and fiber length distribution skewness (FLwSkew) for FLw. Across environments, GCA effects were significant for fiber length measurements of UHM, FLw, FLn, Uqlw, and SFCw and distribution measurements of CEA, CEB, FLwKurt, and FLwSkew. On the basis of GCA effects, TAM 94L-25 was the best parent to be used in a cross to improve upland fiber length, while Acala 1517-99 was the parent of choice to improve distribution among the 4 parents tested. The inheritance of AFIS fiber length measurements and distribution data was estimated using parents, F1, F2, and backcross generations. The magnitude and significance of the estimates for non-allelic effects in the parental combinations suggest that epistatic gene effects are present and important in the basic mechanism of AFIS fiber length and length distribution inheritance for the populations studied. Gene effects and variances for all AFIS fiber length and distribution data measurements were inherited differently in different environments and specific parental combination, suggesting environmentally specific mechanisms. Developing genotypes with enhanced fiber length and an optimal fiber length distribution should be a priority to improve spinning performance and product quality of U.S. upland cotton.

Braden, Chris Alan

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend parallel to ?1, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal wells are drilled perpendicular to the ?1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Frederick Sarg

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal 1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Sarg, J.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota Subtask 1.2 – Evaluation of Key Factors Affecting Successful Oil Production in the Bakken Formation, North Dakota DE-FC26-08NT43291 – 01.2 Goal The goal of this project is to quantitatively describe and understand the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin by collecting and analyzing a wide range of parameters, including seismic and geochemical data, that impact well productivity/oil recovery. Performer Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Background The Bakken Formation is rapidly emerging as an important source of oil in the Williston Basin. The formation typically consists of three members, with the upper and lower members being shales and the middle member being dolomitic siltstone and sandstone. Total organic carbon (TOC) within the shales may be as high as 40%, with estimates of total hydrocarbon generation across the entire Bakken Formation ranging from 200 to 400 billion barrels. While the formation is productive in numerous reservoirs throughout Montana and North Dakota, with the Elm Coulee Field in Montana and the Parshall area in North Dakota being the most prolific examples of Bakken success, many Bakken wells have yielded disappointing results. While variable productivity within a play is nothing unusual to the petroleum industry, the Bakken play is noteworthy because of the wide variety of approaches and technologies that have been applied with apparently inconsistent and all too often underachieving results. This project will implement a robust, systematic, scientific, and engineering research effort to overcome these challenges and unlock the vast resource potential of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin.

189

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

SciTech Connect

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Multiple factors affect pest and pathogen damage on 31 Populus clones in South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but there is a paucity of data regarding selections that perform well in the southeastern US. We compared pest susceptibility of 31 Populus clones over 3 years in South Carolina, USA. Cuttings were planted in spring 2001 on two study sites. Clones planted in the bottomland site received granular fertilizer yearly and irrigation the first two years only, while those on the sandy, upland site received irrigation and fertilization throughout each growing season. Foliar damage by the cottonwood leaf beetle (Chrysomela scripta), cottonwood leafcurl mite (Tetra lobulifera), and poplar leaf rust (Melampsora medusae) was visually monitored several times each growing season. Damage ratings differed significantly among clones, and clonal rankings changed from year to year. Irrigation increased C. scripta and M. medusae damage, but had no effect on T. lobulifera damage. Certain clones received greater pest damage at a particular study site. Temporal damage patterns were evident among individual clones and on each site. At the upland site, OP367 and 7300502 were highly resistant to all three pests; I45/51 was highly resistant to C. scripta and M. medusae; NM6 and 1529 were highly resistant to M. medusae; and 7302801 was highly resistant to T. lobulifera and M. medusae. At the bottomland site, NM6, Eridano, I45/51, and 7302801 were highly resistant to all three pests; clone 7300502 was highly resistant to M. medusae only. Based on this preliminary 3-year study of pest damage l

Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D.; Durant, Jaclin A.; Newman, Lee A.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Survival and growth of 31 Populus clones in South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but clonal performance is relatively undocumented in the southeastern United States outside of the Mississippi River alluvial floodplain. In spring 2001, 31 Populus clones were planted on two sites in South Carolina, USA. The sandy, upland site received irrigation and fertilization throughout the growing season, while the bottomland site received granular fertilizer yearly and irrigation in the first two years only. Over three growing seasons, tree survival and growth differed significantly among clones at both sites. Hybrid clones I45/51, Eridano, and NM6 had very high survival at both sites, while pure eastern cottonwood (P. deltoides) clones consistently had the lowest survival. Nearly all mortality occurred during the first year. The P. deltoides clone WV416 grew well at both sites, P. deltoides clones S13C20 and Kentucky 8 grew well at the bottomland site, and hybrids 184-411 and 52-225 grew well at the upland site. Based on both survival and growth, clones 311-93, S7C15, 184-411, and WV416 may warrant additional testing in the upper coastal plain region of the southeastern US. Kentucky 8 and S13C20 had excellent growth rates, but initial survival was low. However, this was likely due to planting stock quality. We emphasize this is preliminary information, and that clones should be followed through an entire rotation before large-scale deployment.

Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D.; Durant, Jaclin A.; Newman, Lee A.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effects of Heavy, Tracked-Vehicle Disturbance on Forest Soil Properties at Fort Benning, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the effects of heavy, tracked-vehicle disturbance on various measures of soil quality in training compartment K-11 at Fort Benning, Georgia. Predisturbance soil sampling in April and October of 2002 indicated statistically significant differences in soil properties between upland and riparian sites. Soil density was less at riparian sites, but riparian soils had significantly greater C and N concentrations and stocks than upland soils. Most of the C stock in riparian soils was associated with mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., the silt + clay fraction physically separated from whole mineral soil). Topographic differences in soil N availability were highly dependent on the time of sampling. Riparian soils had higher concentrations of extractable inorganic N than upland soils and also exhibited significantly greater soil N availability during the spring sampling. The disturbance experiment was performed in May 2003 by driving a D7 bulldozer through the mixed pine/hardwood forest. Post-disturbance sampling was limited to upland sites because training with heavy, tracked vehicles at Fort Benning is generally confined to upland soils. Soil sampling approximately one month after the experiment indicated that effects of the bulldozer were limited primarily to the forest floor (O-horizon) and the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil. O-horizon dry mass and C stocks were significantly reduced, relative to undisturbed sites, and there was an indication of reduced mineral soil C stocks in the disturbance zone. Differences in the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil also indicated a significant increase in soil density as a result of disturbance by the bulldozer. Although there was some tendency for greater soil N availability in disturbed soils, the changes were not significantly different from undisturbed controls. It is expected that repeated soil disturbance over time, which will normally occur in a military training area, would simply intensify the changes in soil properties that were measured following a one-time soil disturbance at the K-11 training compartment. The experiment was also useful for identifying soil measurements that are particularly sensitive to disturbance and therefore can be used successfully as indicators of a change in soil properties as a result of heavy, tracked-vehicle traffic at Fort Benning. Measurements related to total O-horizon mass and C concentrations or stocks exhibited changes that ranged from {approx}25 to 75% following the one-time disturbance. Changes in surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil density or measures of surface soil C and N following the disturbance were less remarkable and ranged from {approx}15 to 45% (relative to undisturbed controls). Soil N availability (measured as initial extractable soil N or N production in laboratory incubations) was the least sensitive and the least useful indicator for detecting a change in soil quality. Collectively, the results suggest that the best indicators of a change in soil quality will be found at the soil surface because there were no statistically significant effects of bulldozer disturbance at soil depths below 10 cm.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

196

Improvement of Cotton Fiber Maturity and Assessment of Intra-Plant Fiber Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temporal system of fruiting on the cotton plant lends itself to bolls at different fruiting sites developing under different environmental conditions and with varied source-sink relationships. To investigate this, intra-plant fiber quality was assessed in four upland cultivars at College Station, Texas for three years and at Lubbock, Texas for two years. It was concluded that fiber quality steadily declines from the bottom sympodial branches towards the upper branches. 'FiberMax 832' had the best fiber quality among all cultivars but it also had the highest degree of variability within the plants. 'Half and Half' and 'Acala 1517-99' appear to have the least amount of intra-plant variability of fiber quality. Bolls from the bottom region of the plant have higher trash content compared to the upper region. To test the impact of fiber quality variability on boll sampling techniques employed, ten sampling protocols were compared against each other for three years in College Station, Texas, for two upland cultivars. Results suggest that randomized boll samples containing 50 bolls worked well to estimate inherent fiber quality for most fiber traits while estimation of trash and lint percent was not predictable based on boll samples. One of the problems associated with intra-plant fiber variability was the presence of immature fibers. In order to determine the potential for improvement of fiber maturity and standard fineness, five upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) genotypes were subjected to a diallel analysis at College Station, Texas, in 2011. Four cultivars that tend to produce fine and mature fibers and one cultivar that tends to produce coarse fibers were intermated in all combinations, without reciprocals. Estimates of general (GCA) and specific combining ability (SCA) for fiber maturity ratio and standard fineness based on Griffing's diallel Model I, Method 4 were calculated for AFIS and fiber micronaire, length and strength measurements for High Volume Instrument (HVI). Four parents had significant GCA effects and Acala 1517-99 was found to be the best parent for improving standard fineness followed by FiberMax 832 and 'Tamcot HQ-95'. Tamcot HQ-95 was the best parent to improve fiber maturity ratio while 'Deltapine 90' was the best parent to reduce fiber maturity ratio. The specific cross between Acala 1517-99 and Tamcot HQ-95 had the best performance. Diallel analysis indicated that fiber maturity ratio was influenced by non-additive gene effects more than additive gene effects while fiber standard fineness was highly influenced by additive gene effects. Developing cultivars with optimal fiber standard fineness and maturity should be prioritized to address problems associated with neps and short fiber content and improve spinning performance of US cotton.

Kothari, Neha

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To improve and develop my professional skills, a wetland assessment and delineation was performed for Lakewood Heights, a proposed residential subdivision consisting of 133 hectares, more or less, located in northeast Harris County, Texas. The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site reconnaissance activities. The identified wetland areas were delineated as accurately as possible, based on available information, and were mapped on a survey plat of the property. These areas were contrasted with surrounding uplands, which were mapped as well. Broad scale mapping of soil types by the SCS appears to have been moderately accurate. Through site reconnaissance activities, I verified the scs soil mapping, identified previously unmapped hydric soils, and evaluated and documented vegetation communities that further delineated wetland/upland boundaries. By employing the methods outlined in the 1987 Corps of Engineers Delineation manual that call for evaluations of hydric soils, hydrology indicators, and hydrophytic vegetation, I concluded that approximately 14.68 hectares of the subject property were jurisdictional wetlands. The remaining 118.32 hectares were classified as upland (non-wetland). The wetland delineations made on the subject property were approached in a conservative manner, taking into account transitional or overflow areas which are sometimes hard to define. Those areas which appeared adjacent to a saturated or inundated wetland within the same hydrologic and hydrophytic vegetation regime were included in wetland boundaries. This method of delineation, in my opinion, provides the highest reliability for, even under varying seasonal circumstances, those areas that would appear as jurisdictional waters of the United states. upon completion of the field assessment, the data were assembled into a technical report and presented to the client for his use. we discussed my findings, reviewed the methodology used to determine that wetlands did, in fact, exist on the property and examined land management options, including u.s. Army Corps of Engineers permit procedures.

Siems-Alford, Susan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total mortality of limnetic fishes, depending on the contribution of littoral zone fishes. Inflow to GCD forebay showed the strongest negative relationship with entrainment whereas reservoir elevation and fish vertical distribution had no direct relationship with entrainment. Our results indicate that kokanee and rainbow trout in Lake Roosevelt were limited by top down impacts including predation and entrainment, whereas bottom up effects and abiotic conditions were not limiting.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when age 3 kokanee are expected to return to Sherman Creek.

McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Determination of dispersivities and reactionkinetics of selected basalts of columbia river plateau using an inverse analytical solution technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Columbia River Plateau consists of over 100 layers of tholemtic flood basaits, ranging in thickness from 1 m to greater than 100 m, with groundwater flow occurring predominantly along the fractured and weathered flow tops. This study focuses on the determination of transport parameters by modeling sodium transport in the Priest Rapids and Roza flow tops of the Wanapum formation, and Rocky Coulee and Umtanum flow tops of the Grande Ronde formation, within the Cold Creek Syncline of the Hanford Nuclear Waste Reservation. Regional scale lateral dispersivities and reaction rate coefficients were determined from sodium concentration distributions, using an inverse analytical solution technique developed by Domenico (1987) to model nonconservative mass transport. Deuterium, a conservative species, was also modeled using the same technique, to determine a "baseline" reaction rate coefficient. Source concentration values and source dimension sizes were also produced by the model. Model results were compared to those determined by LaVenue (1 985) for chloride, and Adamski (1 993) for boron and potassium. Results from the Wanapum formation yielded a source Y dimension ranging from 11581 m to 13583 m and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 26 m to 96 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for this formation were determined to be 10-'-10-' and 10-'-10-9, respectively for sodium and deuterium. Results from the Grande Ronde formation yield a source Y dimension ranging from 6500 m to 12360 m, and a lateral dispersivity value ranging from 70 m to 488 m. Relative reaction rate coefficients for sodium and deuterium in the Grande Ronde formation were determined to be approximately 10-' m-1 and 1 O-Il? 0-7 m-1, respectively. Larger variations in values of source Y dimension and lateral dispersivity (ay) for the Grande Ronde formation are probably due to a minimum amount of available data control points. Oxygen-18 and deuterium isotopic data for waters from the flowtops upgradient and downgradient of the Cold Creek Barrier (a hydrologic discontinuity), and from a deep formation well support the hypothesis that deeper formation waters are moving upward along the Cold Creek Barrier and then laterally along the flow tops in the downgradient direction. Fluids found in deeper flow tops have an isotopic signature closer to those of the deep formation well; and fluids of shallower flow tops have an isotopic signature suggesting mixing between local meteoric waters and deep formation waters.

Fahlquist, Lisa Armstrong

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated the project fieldwork in 1990. Phase II included only the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Spokane Tribe of Indians. Phase III is being completed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation.

Jones, Charles D.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer will be determined using radio telemetry. Changes in cougar functional (kills/unit time), aggregative (cougars/unit area), numerical (offspring/cougar), and total (predation rate) responses on deer will also be monitored using radio telemetry. The experiment will be conducted and completed over a period of 5 years. Results will be used to determine the cause and try to halt the mule deer population declines. Results will also guide deer mitigation and management in the IM and throughout the North American West.

Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CX-004075: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Categorical Exclusion Determination 75: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004075: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquire a Conservation Easement of the 1310-Acre Trappist Abbey Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 10/04/2010 Location(s): Yamhill County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to acquire a conservation easement of the 1310-acre Trappist Abbey property. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property. The Trappist Abbey tract being considered for purchase is located near Lafayette, Oregon and is currently a working forest (1,025 acres) consisting of native conifer woodlands, upland prairie, oak savanna, oak woodlands, grasslands and wet prairies, an area of agricultural use designated as ?Farmland? (247

209

Why Sequnce Crenothrix polyspora?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crenothrix polyspora? Crenothrix polyspora? Aerobic methane oxidation catalyzed by bacteria is a key step in the global carbon cycle. The process has great importance for the Earth's climate by reducing the amount of the potent greenhouse gas methane released from habitats such as wetlands and lakes to the atmosphere and by the consumption of atmospheric methane in upland soils. Given their diversity and global importance, methane oxidizing bacteria have not yet been adequately considered in genome sequencing projects. Crenothrix polyspora has many properties that are highly unusual for aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. For example, it possesses a very unusual methane monooxygenase that is significantly different from the version of this key enzyme found in all cultured methanotrophs. In

210

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reroute of Jamestown-Grand Forks 230 kV transmission line near Hannaford, North Reroute of Jamestown-Grand Forks 230 kV transmission line near Hannaford, North Dakota. Description of Proposed Action: Western is planning to reroute approximately two miles of its Jamestown-Grand Forks 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. The reroute will occur in SECI and 11 T144N R60W in Griggs County, North Dakota. The purpose of moving the transmission line is to relocate the line out of a wetland to a more upland site. Construction will occur late summer or fall of2012. Number and Title of Categorical Exclusions Being Applied: 10 CFR 1021.410 Subpart D, Appendix B, B4.13: Reconstruction (upgrading or rebuilding) and/or minor relocation of existing electric power lines approximately 20 miles in length or less to enhance environmental and land use values. Such

211

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

212

Geomorphology K  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Geomorphology Geomorphology K . R. Everett Institute of Polar Studies and Department of Agronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Amchitkn Island is composed of six distinct geomorphic regions. The major elements of each region are strongly controlled by ~ e o l o g i c structure and to n lesser degree b y rock type. The eastern three regions are characterized b y pond-dotted uplaitds of low eleuatiolt. These aresurrounded b y areas of one or more elevated ? i ~ a r i l ~ e terraces. Struc- turally controlled dminngewnys cut tlte terracesat:d extend into the uplniid. A tltick blnnket of orgonic-rich soilsforms a nearly complete mantle ouer the regions. Across region IIT farther west, elevations rise to tire moutttai~t and plateau regions. The crest upland becomes increasingly dissected,

213

El Verde Fact Sheet.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy El Verde, Puerto Rico, Site. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is responsible for maintaining records for this site. Site Description and History El Verde site is located in the Caribbean National Forest, in northeastern Puerto Rico, about 9 miles southwest of the town of Luquillo and 22 miles southeast of San Juan. The forest occupies approximately 28,000 acres of upland rainforest with elevations to 3,539 feet above sea level. El Verde site is situated in Study Area 4 of a facility known as El Verde Field Station, a research facility that occupies 173 acres at elevations of 1,100 to 1,400 feet above sea level. The University of Puerto Rico Institute of Terrestrial Ecosystem Studies administers the facility. El Verde Field Station began operations as El Verde

214

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

020: Categorical Exclusion Determination 020: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005020: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game For Purchase of the Tall Pines Property CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 01/05/2011 Location(s): Kootenai County, Idaho Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 203-acre Tall Pines property by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDF&G). BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of its outstanding wetlands and upland forest natural resource values. The acquisition will provide an opportunity to enhance, restore, and manage high quality habitat for bird species such as

216

CX-004745: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

745: Categorical Exclusion Determination 745: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004745: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acquisition of a Conservation Easement for Fish Habitat Mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington CX(s) Applied: A7 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Okanogan County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is working with the Yakama Nation to fund the riparian portion of the Methow Conservancy?s acquisition of a 40.9-acre conservation easement on the West Chewuch River in Okanogan County, Washington. The BPA would fund the acquisition of 16.83-acres of riparian habitat and the remaining 24.07-acres of upland habitat would be donated by the property owners. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004745.pdf More Documents & Publications

217

Ticks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ticks Ticks Nature Bulletin No. 25 July 28, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation TICKS Ticks seem to be unusually plentiful this year. Many persons walking through the upland woods of the forest preserves have found these insects on their clothing, on their bodies, even in their hair. In the pinewoods of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan it is not uncommon to find a hundred or more ticks crawling up your clothing, and there it is necessary to carefully search every inch of your body for ticks, every night. Never try to pull one off after it has firmly attached itself to the skin. Otherwise the head may remain. Touch the body of the tick with a lighted cigarette, or a wad of cotton soaked in alcohol or gasoline, and the insect will drop off.

218

Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released, May 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released Nine LBA-ECO Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of nine Carbon Dynamics data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). These Carbon dynamics studies involved the quantification of the carbon pools in vegetation and the rates of carbon exchange among the atmosphere, vegetation, and soils. Ecosystem carbon balance was investigated in a primary tropical forest in central Amazonia using an approach that integrated long-term eddy covariance flux measurements with comprehensive ecological characterization methods. These data are applicable for the investigation of the way in which these rates may be altered by natural and human disturbances. Studies took place in the old-growth upland forest at the Para Western

219

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laborat... Laborat... file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0157-FEIS-03-1992/05eis0157_f.html[6/27/2011 9:57:50 AM] APPENDIX F ECOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT This appendix contains two major sections. Section F.1 is a discussion of the ecological characteristics at the LLNL Livermore site, LLNL Site 300, and SNL, Livermore (referred to collectively as the study sites); and presents information and data on the flora and fauna in the upland areas (see Appendix G for a detailed analysis of wetlands at the study sites). This section focuses on the biological features of LLNL Site 300 because this 7000-acre site is largely undeveloped and represents the most biologically diverse area under study. In contrast, the LLNL Livermore site and SNL, Livermore are developed areas that provide only marginal wildlife habitat because of the high degree of human activity and the few

220

CX-003618: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

618: Categorical Exclusion Determination 618: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003618: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Nature Conservatory (TNC) Willamette Wildlife Acquisitions CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/17/2010 Location(s): Lane County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of the 1270-acreWildish property by the Conservancy. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The Wildish tract includes the confluence and lower reaches of the Coast and Middle Fork Willamette rivers and the surrounding floodplain habitat and upland oak woodlands, prairie and conifer forest habitats. By securing control to restore lowland riparian

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221

Reactor operation environmental information document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large United States Department of Energy installation on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina. The SRS contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, varied wetlands including Carolina Bays, the Savannah River swamp system, and impoundment related and riparian wetlands, and the aquatic habitats of several stream systems, two large cooling reservoirs, and the Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a large variety of plants and animals including many commercially or recreational valuable species and several rare, threatened or endangered species. This volume describes the major habitats and their biota found on the SRS, and discuss the impacts of continued operation of the K, L, and P production reactors.

Wike, L.D.; Specht, W.L.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Wilde, E.W.; Dicks, A.S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Soil carbon model Yasso07 graphical user interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present a graphical user interface software for the litter decomposition and soil carbon model Yasso07 and an overview of the principles and formulae it is based on. The software can be used to test the model and use it in simple applications. Yasso07 is applicable to upland soils of different ecosystems worldwide, because it has been developed using data covering the global climate conditions and representing various ecosystem types. As input information, Yasso07 requires data on litter input to soil, climate conditions, and land-use change if any. The model predictions are given as probability densities representing the uncertainties in the parameter values of the model and those in the input data - the user interface calculates these densities using a built-in Monte Carlo simulation.

Tuomi, Mikko; Repo, Anna; Vanhala, Pekka; Liski, Jari

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Development of a General Ecosystem Model for a Range of Scales and Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a General Ecosystem Model (GEM) that is designed to simulate a variety of ecosystem types using a fixed model structure. Driven largely by hydrologic algorithms for upland, wetland and shallow-water habitats, the model captures the response of macrophyte and algal communities to simulated levels of nutrients, water, and environmental inputs. It explicitly incorporates ecological processes that determine water levels, plant production, nutrient cycling associated with organic matter decomposition, consumer dynamics, and fire. While the model may be used to simulate ecosystem dynamics for a single homogenous habitat, our primary objective is to replicate it as a "unit" model in heterogeneous, grid-based dynamic spatial models using different parameter sets for each habitat. Thus, we constrained the process (i.e., computational) complexity, yet targeted a level of disaggregation that would effectively capture the feedbacks among important ecosystem processes. A basic ver...

H. C. Fitz; E. B. DeBellevue; R. Costanza; R. Boumans; T. Maxwell; L. Wainger; F.H. Sklar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heterotrophic respiration in disturbed forests: A review with examples from North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterotrophic respiration (RH), the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide by free-living microorganisms, is one of three major processes releasing carbon to the atmosphere, the other two being autotrophic respiration (RA) and combustion. Over long times and large spatial extents these three fluxes roughly equal the amount of carbon being fixed by photosynthesis, at least in upland ecosystems (Frey and Smith 2005). Over short period of time or within small areas changes in the strength of these fluxes can determine when and where an ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon relative to the atmosphere (reference from Hurtt disturbance paper). Thus, the understanding of the biophysical factors that regulate the strength of these fluxes is a current topic of research.

Harmon, Mark; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Tang, Jianwu; Vargas, Rodrigo

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Regional uptake and release of crop carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO(2) sinks where it is harvested and regional CO(2) sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. With respect to US Farm Resource Regions, net sources of CO(2) associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.3 to 6.1% yr(-1) during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Branstetter, Marcia L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Schuh, Andrew [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Ogle, Stephan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Regional Uptake and Release of Crop Carbon in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon fixed by agricultural crops in the US creates regional CO2 sinks where it is harvested and regional CO2 sources where it is released back to the atmosphere. The quantity and location of these fluxes differ depending on the annual supply and demand of crop commodities. Data on the harvest of crop biomass, storage, import and export, and on the use of biomass for food, feed, fiber, and fuel were compiled to estimate an annual crop carbon budget for 2000 to 2008. Net sources of CO2 associated with the consumption of crop commodities occurred in the Eastern Uplands, Southern Seaboard, and Fruitful Rim regions. Net sinks associated with the production of crop commodities occurred in the Heartland, Northern Crescent, Northern Great Plains, and Mississippi Portal regions. The national crop carbon budget was balanced to within 0.7 to 6.6% yr-1 during the period of this analysis.

West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Brandt, Craig C.; Schuh, A.E.; Ogle, S.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SA28: Supplement Analysis SA28: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA28: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Yakima County, Washington BPA proposes to purchase four parcels of private land that total approximately 125 acres located in south-central Washington along the Naches River in Yakima County. Following acquisition, title to the land will be held by The Yakama Nation. The goal of this project is to protect and enhance riparian, wetland, and upland habitats for the benefit of fish and wildlife. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and The Yakama Nation, Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS, Yakima County, Washington (July 2002) More Documents & Publications EIS-0246-SA-29: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-70

228

MAPSS Version 1.0 Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available MAPSS (Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model) Version 1.0 Available The ORNL NASA DAAC is please to announce the release of a new vegetation distribution model product, MAPSS: Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System Model, Version 1.0. The MAPSS model was developed by the Pacific Northwest Research Station USDA Forest Service and has been used extensively by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) in regional and global assessments of climate change impacts on vegetation. The MAPSS model simulates the potential natural vegetation that could exist on any upland site in the world under present, past, or future climate change. It operates on the fundamental principal that ecosystems will tend to maximize the leaf area that can be supported at a site by available soil

229

Development of In Vitro Systems for Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) - Final Report for 1992 to 2002  

SciTech Connect

Our project began on July 1, 1992, with the objective of developing systems that could be used in biotechnological approaches to switchgrass improvement. Within six months after initiation of the project, we had worked out protocols in which plants could be regenerated from callus cultures through both organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Documentation for both modes of regeneration was provided in our progress reports and in publications. One thousand regenerated plants were established in the field during the first year. We found that Alamo (lowland type) was much more amenable to in vitro culture, and plants could be regenerated much more easily than from Cave-in-Rock (upland type). During the first three years of the project, we studied the influence of genotype, culture medium components, explant type, etc., on regeneration. As mentioned, we found that the lowland cultivars Alamo and Kanlow were much easier to regenerate than upland cultivars, such as Trailblazer, Blackwell, and Cave-in-Rock. For callus induction, we initially used mature caryopses, young leaf tissue, and portions of seedlings. We were successful in inducing callus and regenerating plants from all explants. Two other systems developed during the 4th to 6th year period of the project included multiple shoot formation initiated from germinated seedlings and regenerable suspension cultures. The latter were initiated from embryogenic calluses produced from in vitro developed inflorescences. An important factor for producing multiple shoots was the presence of thidiazuron in the medium. The shoots could be easily rooted and numerous plantlets produced. The last 3 to 4 years of the project focused on anther and microspore culture experiments to produce haploid plants and on genetic transformation. Although thousands of putative haploid plants were produced from a few anthers, they were very weak and difficult to keep alive. Chromosome counts revealed the gametic number in cells where it was possible to count chromosomes. The isolated microspore culture experiments were not successful.

Conger, B.V.

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has been frequently studied in large reservoirs and coastal marshes. Large ontogenetic shifts in their diet and morphology have been linked with changes in habitat use, with adult males using deep, open water and juveniles and nesting females relying on vegetated marsh. In certain regions of the inland portion of the alligators range, these different aquatic habitats are represented by seasonal wetlands and riverine systems that are separated by a terrestrial matrix. Ontogenetic habitat shifts, therefore, would require overland movements between systems, which has important implications for conservation of the species. I tested several commonly used methods of surveying alligator populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found that seasonal wetlands provided nesting and nursery sites for these inland alligator populations, but that both juveniles undergoing an ontogenetic shift and nesting females move between the wetlands and riverine systems. Overland movements by alligators between the wetland and riverine habitats establish a level of functional connectivity between these aquatic ecosystems. I constructed a habitat suitability index of both the wetlands and the surrounding landscape to determine which patch and landscape characteristics were important to wetland use by alligators. I found that both descriptive wetland characteristics and the spatial relationships between wetlands were important predictors of alligator use. Overland movement was related to upland landuse as well as distance between aquatic habitats. Conserving a variety of wetland sizes and types within an intact upland matrix is critical to maintaining connectivity across the landscape. Furthermore, understanding how species may act as mobile links between ecosystems, particularly those with ontogenetic niche shifts, illustrates the importance of approaching conservation from a landscape perspective.

Subalusky, Amanda Lee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water Infiltration and Permeability of Selected Urban Soils as Affected by Salinity and Sodicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil sodicity is known to affect soil structural stability and permeability. However, the impact differs depending on salinity of irrigation water, soil types as well as irrigation management practices. This study examined water infiltration into two alluvial soils (Torrifluvents), and two upland soils (Paleorthid and Calciorthid, Aridisols) placed in greenhouse pots. For the first experiment, irrigation solutions simulating the Rio Grande water, city potable water, and two sources of reclaimed water (EC of 1.4 and 2.2 dS m-1 and SAR of 6 and 11) were applied twice a week at 1.7 cm per application for a total of 27 irrigation events using 46 cm of water. No significant effect of water quality was detected in Delnorte gravelly loam (Paleorthid) and a small effect on infiltration into Harkey silt loam (Torrifluvent). However, the use of distilled water curtailed infiltration mainly in Harkey soil. In the second greenhouse experiment using a carefully crafted soil packing and water application protocols, the impact of water quality on infiltration into two Torrifluvents, Harkey silt loam and Glendale silty clay loam appeared after water application of 40 to 50 cm (16" - 20"). When saline solutions were applied as deep as 10 cm per application, the infiltration time nearly doubled when SAR of the solution increased from 1 to 6 or 12 in alluvial soils, but not in Turney silty clay loam (Calciorthid, Aridisol). When the irrigation depth per application was reduced to 7.5, 5.0, and 2.5 cm per application, the difference in infiltration rate was markedly reduced. The impact of elevated sodicity (SAR of 6 to 12) on infiltration can be an issue in alluvial soils, but unlikely in upland soils at irrigation water salinity of 1 to 2 dS m-1.

Miyamoto, S.

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represents initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as initial conditions for steady-state flow runs, simulations were executed to investigate the relative effects on contaminant transport from the increased upland fluxes. Contaminant plumes were analyzed for 1) peak concentrations and arrival times at downstream points of compliance, 2) the area of the aquifer contaminated at or above the drinking water standard (DWS), and 3) the total activity remaining in the domain at the end of the simulation. In addition to this analysis, unit source release simulations from a hypothetical tracer were executed to determine relative travel times from the Central Plateau. The results of this study showed that increases in the lateral recharge had limited impact on regional flow directions but accelerated contaminant transport. Although contaminant concentrations may have initially increased for the more mobile contaminants (tritium, technetium-99, and iodine-129), the accelerated transport caused dilution and a more rapid decline in concentrations relative to the Base Case (no additional flux). For the low-mobility uranium-238, higher lateral recharge caused increases in concentration, but these concentrations never approached the DWS. In this preliminary investigation, contaminant concentrations did not exceed the DWS study metric. With the increases in upland fluxes, more mass was transported out of the aquifer, and concentrations were diluted with respect to the base case where no additional flux was considered.

Freedman, Vicky L.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Spatial variations in soil and plant delta 13 C and delta 15 N values in a subtropical savanna: implications for vegetation change and nutrient dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grass-dominated ecosystems in many regions around the world have experienced increased abundance of woody plants during the past 100 yrs. In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical woodlands, dominated by C3 trees/shrubs capable of symbiotic N2-fixation, have become significant components of landscapes that were once dominated by C4 grasslands. Upland areas in this region now consist of small discrete clusters and large groves of woody vegetation embedded in a grassy matrix, while lower-lying portions of the landscape are dominated by closed-canopy woodlands. I used soil ?13C in conjunction with aerial photography and geostatistics to quantify landscape-scale vegetation dynamics in uplands of this savanna parkland. Spatial patterns of soil ?13C in grids and transects traversing woody patches indicated larger woody groves were formed from small discrete clusters of woody plants that spread laterally and eventually coalesced. Soil ?13C contour maps revealed some clusters are currently growing rapidly towards each other and might coalesce into groves in the near future, while some clusters remained relatively stable. Kriged maps of soil ?13C provided a strong spatial context for future studies aimed at understanding the functional consequences of this change in landscape structure. The dominant invading woody plant, honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), was important in determining the spatial pattern of soil ?13C, supporting the hypothesis that they serve as recruitment foci and facilitate the establishment of subordinate woody species. Leaf ?15N values suggested that the N2-fixing mesquite influenced the N nutrition of nearby non-N2-fixing shrubs, thus, suggesting a mechanism by which mesquite could facilitate establishment of other woody species. In closed-canopy drainage woodlands, however, spatial patterns of soil ?13C were no longer controlled by the presence of mesquite, but by the amount of soil organic carbon and soil texture. The positive correlation between silt+clay and soil ?13C indicates that the formation of organomineral complexes and microaggregates may slow SOC turnover rates and favor the persistence of C4-derived SOC from the original grassland. This study enhances our understanding of potential patterns, causes and consequences of grassland to woodland conversions which are underway today in many grass-dominated ecosystems around the world.

Bai, E

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the upland areas of the PNNL site in 2011. Efforts in 2011 to control noxious weed populations (comprising plant species designated as Class B noxious weeds by the Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board) discovered in 2009 and initially treated with herbicides in 2010 are described in Appendix B.

Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Garfield County Habitat for Fall Chinook and Steelhead, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives and tasks outlined in detail in this project report were implemented during calendar year 2006 in all the watersheds of Garfield County. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). In the years since 1993, other watersheds in Garfield County have been designated as salmon bearing streams and have received numerous practices formerly just designated for the Pataha Creek Watershed. The following sections show the individual practices, quantity of practices implemented, total costs, BPA costs and tons of soil saved for all the BPA funds used to protect and enhance the natural resources in the salmon bearing watersheds of Garfield County. In the year 2006, 55% of the funding received from BPA went into cost share practices. Of all the cost share received in the county, 22% came from BPA. This is largely due to other funding programs becoming available to address livestock influenced water quality problems and riparian health improvement. Over 95% of the sediment entering the streams can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek, Deadman Creek, and Alpowa Creek have had steelhead runs in the past. The Pataha Creek has native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow, and shiners inhabit the lower portion of Pataha Creek because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat through the CREP, CCRP, and DOE grants has improved habitat for all the fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek is slowly developing into spawning and rearing habitat for Chinook salmon. With the future removal of some migration barriers on the lower portion of the Deadman and Pataha, more stream miles will become useful spawning and rearing habitat. The upland projects completed during 2006 were practices that significantly reduce the erosion and resulting sedimentation from these croplands. Runoff studies conducted by WSU have shown a direct impact on reducing soil erosion by the implementation of these practices. The tree planting projects conducted under the CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) and CRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) programs have helped reduce sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone in desired locations inside the Pataha, Deadman, and Alpowa Creek watersheds. The CREP and the CCRP programs continue with enrollment in the watersheds and are protecting the riparian areas along these three streams at an increasing level every year. Currently, over 1,100 acres of riparian habitat have been enrolled in the CREP program within these three watersheds.

Bartels, Duane

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types evaluated for this study were grasslands, shrub-steppe, rock, conifer forest and woodland, and riparian. These same cover types were evaluated for other Hellsgate Project acquisitions within the same geographic area. Mule deer habitat on the Sand Hills unit rated good overall for winter food and cover in the shrub-steppe and conifer woodland cover types. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat on the former Hinman property and special management area rated good for nesting and brood rearing in the grassland cover type. Mink habitat on the Friedlander parcel rated poor due to lack of food and cover in and along the riparian cover type. The Downy woodpecker rated poor for food and cover on the Friedlander parcel in the conifer forest cover type. This species also rated poor on the conifer woodland habitat on the Hinman parcel. Yellow warbler habitat on the Agency Butte Special Management area rated very poor due to lack of shrubs for cover and reproduction around the scattered semi/permanent ponds that occur on the area. Bobcat habitat on this same area rated poor due to lack of cover and food. Fragmentation of existing quality habitat is also a problem for both these species. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation and managed lands, and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, this information will be used to manage these lands for the benefit of wildlife.

Berger, Matthew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in 1997 because diet data revealed predation on salmonids during these years. We could not determine the absolute impact of piscivores on each salmonid species because identification of fish prey was limited to families. Our estimate of salmonid consumption by walleye in 1996 and northern pikeminnow in 1997 shows that losses of stocked kokanee and rainbow trout could be substantial (up to 73% of kokanee) if piscivores were concentrating on one salmonid species, but were most likely lower, assuming predation was spread among kokanee, rainbow trout, and whitefish. Dissolved oxygen was never limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout, but temperatures were up to 6 EC above the growth optimum for kokanee from July to September in the upper 33 meters of water. Critical data needed for a more complete analysis in the future include species composition of entrainment estimates, entrainment estimates expanded to include unmonitored turbines, seasonal growth of planktivorous salmonids, species composition of salmonid prey, piscivore diet during hatchery releases of salmonids, and collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen data throughout all depths of the reservoir during warm summer months.

Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

EIS-0268-Figures-1997.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOFJ'EIS-0268 DOFJ'EIS-0268 - PKw.2F Figure 4-L L-Lake and environs. 4-3 -- =----- 90 --m--- -m- EAST o (C.nti""ed O"figure 4.4b) AA 320 1 300 1 Fourmile Indian Grave Upland Pen Branch Brench Formation Branch 280 ~ 280 240 : E -220 ~ L 200 180 I 160 140 1 I I 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Legend: _ _ Inferredcontact Note:TO converito kilometersmultiply by 1.609 to convetito metersmultiply by0.304e Figure 4-4a. Generalized geologic cross section from Fourmile Branch to L DO~IS-0268 I t" 1 I I t 4-8 DOE/EIS-0268 I 4-60 I t t i I I DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,. 4-61 DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,,.':, .. ,.. , 4-62 I 1 I I I DOE/EIS-0268 4-63 DOEI'EIS-0268 ., . . 4-64 I I 1 B I I I m 1 I I I I 1 I I I m I DOE~IS-0268 4-65 DO~IS-0268 Radon in homes: 200 millirem per year Notes me major contributor to the annual average individual dose in the United StaIeS, [ncluti"g residents of the Central Savannah River Area, is naturally occuning radiation

247

Dispersal and disturbance as factors limiting the distribution of rare plant species at the Savannah River Site and the Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experiment was conducted to identify effective methods of creating new populations of herbaceous species in managed upland longleaf pine forest at two locations in the Fall-line Sandhills of South Carolina. We included thirteen species and a variety of site treatments. All sites were burned and lightly raked prior to planting. Sowing seeds on untreated or fertilized treatments resulted in the lowest establishment of all treatments. Digging the planting area to remove belowground plant structures and using hardware cloth cages to exclude potential mammalian seed predators and herbivores led to increased establishment of target species. Establishment was higher using seedling transplants compared to seeds. Success rate was highly variable among sites so population establishment efforts should try to incorporate many sites initially to find the sites that give the greatest chance of success, or increase efforts to carefully identify species, habitat requirements and screen potential sites accordingly. Some species showed very low rates of success despite the variety of methods used; for such species additional work is required on their basic ecology, in particular germination biology and site requirements, as part of a restoration project. The overall low rate of establishment success emphasizes the need to protect and manage existing populations of uncommon Sandhills species, and to recognize that establishing large, long-term, reproducing populations of such species will be difficult.

Primack, Richard; Walker, Joan.

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ecological Characterization Data for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site. The original Hanford Site Composite Analysis of 1998 must be revised and submitted to DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in 2004 because of revisions to waste site information in the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, updated performance assessments and environmental impact statements (EIS), changes in inventory estimates for key sites and constituents, and a change in the definition of offsite receptors. Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 to support ecological site assessment modeling for the 2004 Composite Analysis. This work was conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project (formerly the Groundwater Protection Program) managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. The purpose of this report is to provide summaries of the characterization information and available spatial data on the biological resources and ecological receptors found in the upland, riparian, aquatic, and island habitats on the Hanford Site. These data constitute the reference information used to establish parameters for the ecological risk assessment module of the System Assessment Capability and other assessment activities requiring information on the presence and distribution of biota on the Hanford Site.

Downs, Janelle L.; Simmons, Mary A.; Stegen, Jennifer A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Tiller, Brett L.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Zufelt, Rhett K.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mast Mast Nature Bulletin No. 355-A October 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MAST Mast, according to Webster, was an Anglo-Saxon word for the nuts, especially beechnuts, which littered the forest floor and served as food for hogs, deer and grouse. In addition to nuts and acorns, the term is often extended to include the winged seeds of such trees as maple, elm and ash, and even the nuts or seeds of pines -- all eaten by wildlife. Acorns, rich in starch, fat and vitamins, are now most widely available and most commonly eaten. The oily beechnuts on the uplands and pecans in the bottom lands are also important but much less so than in pioneer days. Until about 50 years ago, chestnuts -- now destroyed by a blight from Asia -- were of major importance in eastern United States. Hickory nuts, hazelnuts, walnuts and butternuts, because of their thick hard shells, are eaten principally by squirrels, chipmunks and their kin. In addition to mast, the fruits and berries of gum, cherry, persimmon, hawthorn, crabapple and other trees furnish much food for wildlife; and many shrubs and vines such as wild grape, blueberry and blackberry.

251

letter to cities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students: Students: Muscovy Mineral Spring Water is a corporation located in Moscow, Russia. Our product is pure, bottled water from the upland streams that are tributaries of the Volga River. It has met with great success in Europe, and our Board of Directors would like to expand our business into the United States of America. To achieve this goal, they have asked me to find a site in the U.S. to build a distribution center that will include a corporate office, warehouse, and shipping facility. These are the cities we are considering: Andover, Massachusetts Atlanta, Georgia Aurora, Colorado Duluth, Minnesota Ithaca, New York Little Rock, Arkansas Lubbock, Texas Milwaukee, Wisconsin Santa Fe, New Mexico Spokane, Washington My travel budget does not allow me to visit all of the cities we are considering. Therefore, I am asking for your help in choosing a location. I would like you to prepare a presentation based on research that will give MMSW a sense of the city's quality of life, especially for children. Some of our company executives will be moving to the U.S. with their families.

252

The Oaks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oaks Oaks Nature Bulletin No. 73 July 6, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE OAKS The oak is celebrated in history and fable. Great forests of oak once covered much of England and central Europe. The ancient Druids held the oak especially sacred and performed their mysterious rites in the depths of the oak forests. Our modern oaks, of which there are more than 275 species distributed over the world -- largely in temperate regions -- are descendants of prehistoric trees. Some 20 or 30 forms have been identified from fossils as existing during the Ice Age. The oaks dominate our upland woods in the Middle West. Of 54 species in the United States, Illinois has 19. Cook County has 9, of which only 6 are common: the white, the swamp white, the bur, the black, the red and Hill's black ( or northern pin oak). Less common are the true pin oak, the shingle oak and the chinquapin.

253

Umatilla River Basin, Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : Annual Report 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The channelization of Meacham Creek by the Union Pacific Railroad combined with poor riparian livestock management created extreme channel instability and bedload movement within the project area. The resulting loss of riparian vegetation caused an increase in water temperatures, evaporative losses and sediment loading from upland sites. Four leases and nine right-of-way agreements were procured for the restoration of 2 miles of stream channel on Meacham Creek and lower Boston Canyon Creek. Treatments included: sloping of gravel deposits to reduce channel braiding and develop a more stable channel configuration, placement of rock and wood structures to reduce erosion of stream banks and encourage the deposition of fines for the establishment of riparian vegetation, placement of instream boulders, weirs and large organic debris to increase holding and hiding cover and to encourage the development of a stable thalweg, and the enhancement of riparian vegetation through planting of hardwood cuttings and grass and forb seeds. Baseline data on stream flows, water temperature and suspended sediments, and channel morphology was collected.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Draft environmental impact statement for construction and operation of the proposed Bangor Hydro-Electric Company`s second 345-kV transmission tie line to New Brunswick  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was prepared by the US Department of Energy (US DOE). The proposed action is the issuance of Presidential Permit PP-89 by DOE to Bangor Hydro-Electric Company to construct and operate a new international transmission line interconnection to New Brunswick, Canada that would consist of an 83.8 mile (US portion), 345-kilovolt (kV) alternating current transmission line from the US-Canadian border at Baileyville, Maine to an existing substation at Orrington, Maine. The principal environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the transmission line would be incremental in nature and would include the conversion of forested uplands (mostly commercial timberlands) and wetlands to right-of-way (small trees, shrubs, and herbaceous vegetation). The proposed line would also result in localized minor to moderate visual impacts and would contribute a minor incremental increase in the exposure of some individuals to electromagnetic fields. This DEIS documents the purpose and need for the proposed action, describes the proposed action and alternatives considered and provides a comparison of the proposed and alternatives routes, and provides detailed information on analyses of the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, as well as mitigative measures to minimize impacts.

NONE

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

Johnson, Bradley J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Influence of coarse woody debris on the soricid community in southeastern Coastal Plain pine stands.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shrew abundance has been linked to the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD), especially downed logs, in many regions in the United States. We investigated the importance of CWD to shrew communities in managed upland pine stands in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain. Using a randomized complete block design, 1 of the following treatments was assigned to twelve 9.3-ha plots: removal (n 5 3; all downed CWD _10 cm in diameter and _60 cm long removed), downed (n 5 3; 5-fold increase in volume of downed CWD), snag (n 5 3; 10-fold increase in volume of standing dead CWD), and control (n 5 3; unmanipulated). Shrews (Blarina carolinensis, Sorex longirostris, and Cryptotis parva) were captured over 7 seasons from January 2007 to August 2008 using drift-fence pitfall trapping arrays within treatment plots. Topographic variables were measured and included as treatment covariates. More captures of B. carolinensis were made in the downed treatment compared to removal, and captures of S. longirostris were greater in downed and snag compared to removal. Captures of C. parva did not differ among treatments. Captures of S. longirostris were positively correlated with slope. Our results suggest that abundance of 2 of the 3 common shrew species of the southeastern Coastal Plain examined in our study is influenced by the presence of CWD.

Davis, Justin, C.; Castleberry, Steven, B.; Kilgo, John, C.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

258

Bioavailable organic carbon in wetland soils across a broad climogeographic area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soils from a broad climogeographic region of the U.S., ranging from Alaska to Louisiana and Texas, were obtained from the NRCS National Soils Laboratory in Lincoln, Nebraska. Soils were also collected in the summer of 1996 from upland and poorly drained areas in northern Alaska for comparison of biological properties and to determine the effects of drying on estimation of microbial biomass and activity. Air-dried soils were moistened and incubated 48 h, during which time CO? evolution was measured. Following the preincubation, microbial biomass was determined using a modification of the chloroform-fumigation-incubation method to accommodate limited sample quantity. Carbohydrates were determined using bicinchoninic acid reagent and total extractable carbon was determined by analysis of 0.5-M K?SO? extracts with a total carbon analyzer. The objectives of this study were to elucidate geographical trends and meaningful relationships between the bioavailable C parameters. Soil microbial biomass, determined by chloroform fumigation incubation, correlated best with organic C and basal respiration with subtraction of unfumigated controls. Extraction of C with hot water was a rapid, simple procedure that provided the best predictor of soil respiration. Potassium sulfate-extractable carbon was consistently lower than hot water extractable C. Soils from northern states tended to contain more organic carbon than soils in southern states, however, not necessarily more bioavailable C. Detecting geographical trends for bioavailable C proved more difficult due to numerous factors such as topographic position, surface vegetation, climate, and land use.

Baker, Andrew Dwight

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Geopressured-geothermal development and coastal subsidence in Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elevation changes at the Parcperdue geopressured-geothermal test site in southwestern Louisiana range from 0.8 to 0.16 in/y (+2 to -4 mm/y) and reflect natural base-line movements associated with salt dome growth and the compaction of thick, recent sediments. Natural variation is the primary cause of greater movement at the nearby Rockefeller Refuge geopressured-geothermal test site where base-line movement rates range from -0.43 to -0.55 in/y (-12 to -14 mm/y). Holocene sediments in the coastal marshlands at Rockefeller Refuge are more susceptible to compactional subsidence than upland Pleistocene formations at Parcperdue. Anomalous subsidence at both test sites coincided with site preparation and well drilling and may have been related to loading of surficial soils by the weight of drilling equipment. Elevation changes monitored after drilling and during formation testing were consistent with base-line subsidence rates, indicating that loading was temporary. Anomalous base-line subsidence rates coinciding with areas of historical fluid withdrawal indicate that these effects may outweigh the effects of present geopressured-geothermal development.

Trahan, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology  

SciTech Connect

This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

Pioneer Natural Resources

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

ADDENDUM: CHANGES TO REVISED COGENERATION PROJECT COMPENSATORY MITIGATION PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes requested at that meeting are discussed here under five topics and presented in the order that they are presented in the Plan. 1. East Restoration Area The wetland planned for restoration in the East Restoration Area will now be expanded to total 0.5 acre in size. As discussed in Section 4.6, the Plan had only intended to restore the 0.2 acre of existing wetland area within the East Restoration Area. Figure 3 Restoration Areas Plan Topography and Plant Community Distribution has been revised to demonstrate the change. As previously, post-mitigation topography of the East Restoration Area will direct most surface and subsurface runoff to the wetland area. A portion of this water will travel directly from the upland area to be re-created within the Restoration Area. The remaining moisture will enter the wetland as surface water diverted to the seasonally inundated wetland area from a ditch that will be installed along the south edge of the East Restoration Area. As explained in the Plan, the surface water delivery will be designed to minimize intra-seasonal water level fluctuation and prevent flooding.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Wallowa Canyonlands Weed Partnership : Completion Report November 19, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Noxious weeds threaten fish and wildlife habitat by contributing to increased sedimentation rates, diminishing riparian structure and function, and reducing forage quality and quantity. Wallowa Resources Wallowa Canyonlands Partnership (WCP) protects the unique ecological and economic values of the Hells Canyon grasslands along lower Joseph Creek, the lower Grande Ronde and Imnaha Rivers from invasion and degradation by noxious weeds using Integrated Weed Management techniques. Objectives of this grant were to inventory and map high priority weeds, coordinate treatment of those weeds, release and monitor bio-control agents, educate the public as to the dangers of noxious weeds and how to deal with them, and restore lands to productive plant communities after treatment. With collaborative help from partners, WCP inventoried {approx} 215,000 upland acres and 52.2 miles of riparian habitat, released bio-controls at 23 sites, and educated the public through posters, weed profiles, newspaper articles, and radio advertisements. Additionally, WCP used other sources of funding to finance the treatment of 1,802 acres during the course of this grant.

Porter, Mark C.; Ketchum, Sarah

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Resource Management, Environmental Protection Division (EPD),  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPD Home EPD Home Site Details Home Page Management Amphibians Birds Fish Invertebrates Mammals Plants Pictures Reptiles Research/Internships Other Information BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Natural Resource Management at Brookhaven National Laboratory Welcome to BNL's Natural Resources web site! Within this web site you will find interesting information concerning the Natural Resources program (what we are doing and plan to do), plant and animal species found onsite, great photos of our habitat and wildlife, management issues we are dealing with, and links to other sites of interest. Introduction The Laboratory is located in a section of the Oak/Chestnut forest region of the coastal Plain of Long Island, New York. Forest types are typically oak-pine or pine-oak. BNL property constitutes roughly five percent of the 404.7 sq-km (100,000 acre) Pine Barrens on Long Island. Because of the general topography and porous soil, there is little surface runoff or open water. Upland soils tend to be very well drained, while depressions form ephemeral coastal plain ponds. Hence, a mosaic of wet and dry areas on site are correlated with variations in topography and depth to the water table. Without fires or other disturbances, vegetation would follow the normal moisture gradient closely. In actuality, vegetation onsite is in various stages of succession, reflecting the history of disturbances to the area, the most important of which are land clearing, fire, local flooding, and draining.

266

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Exploring Potential U.S. Switchgrass Production for Lignocellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to concerns about oil dependency and the contributions of fossil fuel use to climatic change, the U.S. Department of Energy has begun a research initiative to make 20% of motor fuels biofuel based in 10 years, and make 30% of fuels bio-based by 2030. Fundamental to this objective is developing an understanding of feedstock dynamics of crops suitable for cellulosic ethanol production. This report focuses on switchgrass, reviewing the existing literature from field trials across the United States, and compiling it for the first time into a single database. Data available from the literature included cultivar and crop management information, and location of the field trial. For each location we determined latitude and longitude, and used this information to add temperature and precipitation records from the nearest weather station. Within this broad database we were able to identify the major sources of variation in biomass yield, and to characterize yield as a function of some of the more influential factors, e.g., stand age, ecotype, precipitation and temperature in the year of harvest, site latitude, and fertilization regime. We then used a modeling approach, based chiefly on climatic factors and ecotype, to predict potential yields for a given temperature and weather pattern (based on 95th percentile response curves), assuming the choice of optimal cultivars and harvest schedules. For upland ecotype varieties, potential yields were as high as 18 to 20 Mg/ha, given ideal growing conditions, whereas yields in lowland ecotype varieties could reach 23 to 27 Mg/ha. The predictive equations were used to produce maps of potential yield across the continental United States, based on precipitation and temperature in the long term climate record, using the Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) in a Geographic Information System (GIS). Potential yields calculated via this characterization were subsequently compared to the Oak Ridge Energy Crop County Level data base (ORECCL), which was created at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Graham et al. 1996) to predict biofuel crop yields at the county level within a limited geographic area. Mapped output using the model was relatively consistent with known switchgrass distribution. It correctly showed higher yields for lowland switchgrass when compared with upland varieties at most locations. Projections for the most northern parts of the range suggest comparable yields for the two ecotypes, but inadequate data for lowland ecotypes grown at high latitudes make it difficult to fully assess this projection. The final model is a predictor of optimal yields for a given climate scenario, but does not attempt to identify or account for other limiting or interacting factors. The statistical model is nevertheless an improvement over historical efforts, in that it is based on quantifiable climatic differences, and it can be used to extrapolate beyond the historic range of switchgrass. Additional refinement of the current statistical model, or the use of different empirical or process-based models, might improve the prediction of switchgrass yields with respect to climate and interactions with cultivar and management practices, assisting growers in choosing high-yielding cultivars within the context of local environmental growing conditions.

Gunderson, Carla A [ORNL; Davis, Ethan [ORNL; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Probing the deep critical zone beneath the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work has suggested that weathering processes occurring in the subsurface produce the majority of silicate weathering products discharged to the world s oceans, thereby exerting a primary control on global temperature via the well-known positive feedback between silicate weathering and CO2. In addition, chemical and physical weathering processes deep within the critical zone create aquifers and control groundwater chemistry, watershed geometry and regolith formation rates. Despite this, most weathering studies are restricted to the shallow critical zone (e.g., soils, outcrops). Here we investigate the chemical weathering, fracturing and geomorphology of the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico, from two boreholes drilled to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth, from which continuous core samples were taken. Corestones exposed aboveground were also sampled. Weathered rinds developed on exposed corestones and along fracture surfaces on subsurface rocks slough off of exposed corestones once rinds attain a thickness up to ~1 cm, preventing the corestones from rounding due to diffusion limitation. Such corestones at the land surface are assumed to be what remains after exhumation of similar, fractured bedrock pieces that were observed in the drilled cores between thick layers of regolith. Some of these subsurface corestones are massive and others are highly fractured, whereas aboveground corestones are generally massive with little to no apparent fracturing. Subsurface corestones are larger and less fractured in the borehole drilled on a road where it crosses a ridge compared to the borehole drilled where the road crosses the stream channel. Both borehole profiles indicate that the weathering zone extends to well below the stream channel in this upland catchment; hence weathering depth is not controlled by the stream level within the catchment and not all of the water in the watershed is discharged to the stream.

Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Scatena, Fred [University of Pennsylvania; Bazilevskaya, Ekaterina [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Blum, Alex [U. S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO; Schulz, M [University of Pennsylvania; Jimenez, M [University of Pennsylvania; White, Art [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Cole, David [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ecological baseline study of the Yakima Firing Center proposed land acquisition: A Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A baseline census was conducted from October 1987 to Janurary 1988 on the property identified for possible expansion of the Yakima Firing Center. These studies provide general descriptions of the major plant communities presentand animal inhabitants during the late fall and winter study period. A vegetation map derived from a combination of onsite surveillance and remotely sensed imagery is also provided as part of this report. Through January 1988, 13 wildlife species of special interest to state and federal agencies, in addition to ducks and geese, were observed on the proposed expansion area. Then raptorial bird species were observed in the area, including bald eagles, golden eagles, and prairie falcons. Upland game bird species, such as sage grouse, California quail, chuckars, and gray (Hungarian) partridge were present. Loggerhead shrikes, a species of special interest, were also observed on the site. Estimates of waterfowl abundance are included for the Priest Rapids Pool of the Columbia River, which includes the proposed river crossing sites. The number of waterfowl on the proposed crossing areas were comparatively low during the winter of 1986 to 1987 and high in 1987 to 1988. Bald eagles ad common loons were observed on the crossing areas. Six small mammal species were captured during this study period;one, the sagebrush vole, is a species of special interest. Two large animal species, mule deer and elk, were noted on the site. Beaver were the only furbearig animals noted to date. Rainbow trout were the only fish species collected within the proposed northern expansion area. The distribution of fall chinook salmon spawning areas was documented within the proposed river crossing areas. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Rogers, L.E.; Beedlow, P.A.; Eberhardt, L.E.; Dauble, D.D.; Fitzner, R.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon Carbon-14 with Mass Loss for an Oak Forest  

SciTech Connect

First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies (~35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the 14C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the 14C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures reflect C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily replicate results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent 14C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Low dissolved organic carbon input from fresh litter to deep mineral soils  

SciTech Connect

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leached from recent litter in the forest floor has been suggested to be an important source of C to the mineral soil of forest ecosystems. In order to determine the rate at which this flux of C occurs we have taken advantage of a local release of 14C at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Reservation, USA (latitude N 35 58'; longitude W 84 16'). Eight replicate 7x7 m plots were estab lished at four field sites on the reservation in an upland oak forest setting. Half of the plots were provided with 14C-enriched litter (?14C ?1000 ), and the other half with near-background litter (?14C ?220 ) over multiple years. Differences in the labeled leaf litter were used to quantify the movement of litter derived DOC through the soil profile. Soil solutions were collected over several years with tension lysimeters at 15 and 70 cm depth and measured for DOC concentration and 14C abundance. The net amount of DOC retained between 15 and 70 cm was 1.5-6 g m-2 y-1. There were significant effects of the litter additions on the 14C abundance in the DOC, but the net transport of 14C from the added litter was small. The difference in ?14C between the treatments with enriched and near-background litter was only about 130 at both depths, which is small compared with the difference in ?14C in the added litter. The primary source of DOC within the mineral soil must therefore have been either the Oe/Oa horizon or the organic matter in the mineral soil. Over a 2-year time frame, leaching of DOC from recent litter did not have a major impact on the C stock in the mineral soil below 15 cm in this ecosystem.

Froeberg, Mats J [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon 14C With Mass Loss for an Oak Forest  

SciTech Connect

First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies ({approx}35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the {sup 14}C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the {sup 14}C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures are subject to C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily reflect results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent {sup 14}C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

Hanson, P J; Swanston, C W; Garten, Jr., C T; Todd, D E; Trumbore, S E

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Patterns of Plant Invasions: A Case Example in Native Species Hotspots and Rare Habitats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land managers require landscape-scale information on where exotic plant species have successfully established, to better guide research, control, and restoration efforts. We evaluated the vulnerability of various habitats to invasion by exotic plant species in a 100,000 ha area in the southeast corner of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. For the 97 0.1-ha plots in 11 vegetation types, exotic species richness (log 10 ) was strongly negatively correlated to the cover of cryptobiotic soil crusts (r =-0.47, P<0.001), and positively correlated to native species richness (r = 0.22, P<0.03), native species cover (r = 0.23, P<0.05), and total nitrogen in the soil (r = 0.40, P<0.001). Exotic species cover was strongly positively correlated to exotic species richness (r = 0.68, P<0.001). Only 6 of 97 plots did not contain at least one exotic species. Exotic species richness was particularly high in locally rare, mesic vegetation types and nitrogen rich soils. Dry, upland plots (n = 51) had less than half of the exotic species richness and cover compared to plots (n = 45) in washes and lowland depressions that collect water intermittently. Plots dominated by trees had significantly greater native and exotic species richness compared to plots dominated by shrubs. For the 97 plots combined, 33% of the variance in exotic species richness could be explained by a positive relationship with total plant cover, and negative relationships with the cover of cryptobiotic crusts and bare ground. There are several reasons for concern: (1) Exotic plant species are invading hot spots of native plant diversity and rare/unique habitats. (2) The foliar cover of exotic species was greatest in habitats that had been invaded by several exotic species. (3) Continued distu...

Thomas J. Stohlgren; Yuka Otsuki; Cynthia A. Villa; Michelle Lee; Jayne Belnap

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

Uchida, S.; Tagami, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996 and 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build, install, and operate a Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LMA) in Technical Area 53 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LEDA will demonstrate the accelerator technology necessary to produce tritium, but is not designed to produce tritium at LANL. USFWS reviewers of the Biological Assessment prepared for LEDA insisted that the main drainage be monitored to measure and document changes to vegetation, soils, wildlife, and habitats due to LEDA effluent discharges. The Biology Team of ESH-20 (LANL`s Ecology Group) has performed these monitoring activities during 1996 and 1997 to document baseline conditions before LEDA released significant effluent discharges. Quarterly monitoring of the outfall which will discharge LEDA blowdown effluent had one exceedance of permitted parameters, a high chlorine discharge that was quickly remedied. Samples from 12 soil pits in the drainage area contained no hydric indicators, such as organic matter in the upper layers, streaking, organic pans, and oxidized rhizospheres. Vegetation transacts in the meadows that LEDA discharges will flow through contained 44 species of herbaceous plants, all upland taxa. Surveys of resident birds, reptiles, and amphibians documented a fauna typical of local dry canyons. No threatened or endangered species inhabit the project area, but increased effluent releases may make the area more attractive to many wildlife species, an endangered raptor, and several other species of concern. Biological best management practices especially designed for LEDA are discussed, including protection of floodplains, erosion control measures, hazards posed by increased usage of the area by deer and elk and revegetation of disturbed areas.

Cross, S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Economics of modifying harvesting systems to recover energy wood  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in the recovery of previously underutilized logging residues for energy has stimulated the development of a variety of technologies for bringing this resource to market. The most promising approach for the independent contractor working the south eastern United States is to incorporate residue recovery equipment into his existing harvesting system. Computer simulation was used to assess the potential impact of adding small chippers or residue balers to three common harvesting systems. The systems are used in pine plantations, and mixed pine hardwood and upland hardwood stands. Changes in both operating costs and capital used were used to measure the effect of moving from conventional products to total energy wood harvests and capturing residues for energy in conjunction with conventional products. Incremental analysis was used to assess the operating cost per ton and capitalization per ton of annual production associated with the addition of the residue recovery capability. In nearly every case the incremental cost per ton and the incremental capitalization per ton associated with adding capability (for recovering wood residues for energy) to conventional harvesting systems were considerably less than for establishing systems of the same configuration (to produce energy wood only). The flow of conventional products must not be interrupted by the residue recovery process. Clearcutting or thinning operations conducted primarily for the production of enery wood did not appear to be economical on any stand, given 1979 residue values, unless a proportion of the large diameter trees are merchandized as conventional products. This statement, of course, must take into account that the cost used for both conventional products and the full tree chips were based upon 1979 pulp chip prices. If the alternative value of this material as fuel rises above its current value for fiber, this situation may change.

Stuart, W.B.; Porter, C.D.; Walbridge, T.A.; Oderwald, R.G.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of Albeni Falls Dam was completed in 1955. Prior to construction, the dam was expected to alter approximately 6,300 acres. However, the loss assessment addressed the losses in terms of Habitat Units (HUs) (Martin et al. 1988). HUs are derived by multiplying the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) by the number of acres in question. The HSI, in turn, is an index to the habitat carrying capacity for a specific species or guild of species based on a set of habitat performance measures and can be used to assess changes, both positive and negative, in habitat quantity and quality (USFWS 1980, 1980a). The HSI is derived though a HEP that is completed according to species or guild specific models. Variables defined in the models are measured on the landscape; and those measured values are rated according to the model to produce an index to the habitat's suitability. The HSI index ranges from 0.0 to 1.0. An HSI of 0.3 indicates that habitat quality/carrying capacity is marginal while an HSI of 0.7 suggests that habitat quality/carrying capacity is relatively good. Thus an acre of optimum habitat (HSI = 1.0) results in 1 HU. The construction and inundation of Albeni Falls Dam resulted in a loss of 28,587 HUs. This HU ledger was the sum of the losses for each of the chosen target species, which were 5,985 mallard HUs, 4,699 Canada goose HUs, 3,379 redhead HUs, 4,508 breeding bald eagle HUs, 4,365 wintering bald eagle HUs, 2,286 black-capped chickadee HUs, 1,680 white tailed deer HUs, and 1,756 muskrat HUs. The PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND CONSERVATION ACT (1980) made mitigating against the HU ledger associated with the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), of which Albeni Falls is a part, the responsibility of BPA. The Act also established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), which is responsible for, among other things, establishing the Fish and Wildlife Program to direct the mitigation process. The Bonneville Power Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The Bonneville Power Administration was guaranteed a minimum of 364 protection HUs for th

Green, Gerald I.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence in the face of anthropogenic influences and prospective climate change. This included recovering the lacustrine-adfluvial life history form that was historically prevalent and had served to provide both resilience and resistance to the structure of cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin. To this end, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe closed Lake Creek and Benewah Creek to fishing in 1993 to initiate recovery of westslope cutthroat trout to historical levels. However, achieving sustainable cutthroat trout populations also required addressing biotic factors and habitat features in the basin that were limiting recovery. Early in the 1990s, BPA-funded surveys and inventories identified limiting factors in Tribal watersheds that would need to be remedied to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations. The limiting factors included: low-quality, low-complexity mainstem stream habitat and riparian zones; high stream temperatures in mainstem habitats; negative interactions with nonnative brook trout in tributaries; and potential survival bottlenecks in Coeur d'Alene Lake. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery (NWPPC Program Measures 10.8B.20). These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. These activities provide partial mitigation for the extirpation of anadromous fish resources from usual and

Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A. [Coeur d'Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Program

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River and Coeur d'Alene Lake. Effluents from tailings and mining waste have contributed vast quantities of trace heavy metals to the system. Poor agricultural and forest practices have also contributed to the degradation of water quality and habitat suitability for resident salmonids. Increased sediment loads from agricultural runoff and recent and recovering clearcuts, and increases in water temperature due to riparian canopy removal may be two of the most important problems currently affecting westslope cutthroat trout. Increases in water temperature have reduced the range of resident salmonids to a fraction of its historic extent. Within this new range, sediment has reduced the quality of both spawning and rearing habitats. Historically, municipal waste contributed large quantities of phosphates and nitrogen that accelerated the eutrophication process in Coeur d'Alene Lake. However, over the last 25 years work has been completed to reduce the annual load of these materials. Wastewater treatment facilities have been established near all major municipalities in and around the basin. Species interactions with introduced exotics as well as native species are also acting to limit cutthroat trout populations. Two mechanisms are at work: interspecific competition, and species replacement. Competition occurs when two species utilize common resources, the supply of which is short; or if the resources are not in short supply, they harm each other in the process of seeking these resources. Replacement occurs when some environmental or anthropogenic change (e.g., habitat degradation, fishing pressure, etc.) causes the decline or elimination of one species and another species, either native or introduced, fills the void left by the other. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery. These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strong argument can be made that there is a greater need to study the effect of warming on boreal forests more than on any other terrestrial biome. Boreal forests, the second largest forest biome, are predicted to experience the greatest warming of any forest biome in the world, but a process-based understanding of how warming will affect the structure and function of this economically and ecologically important forest biome is lacking. The effects of warming on species composition, canopy structure and biogeochemical cycles are likely to be complex; elucidating the underlying mechanisms will require long-term whole-ecosystem manipulation to capture all the complex feedbacks (Shaver et al. 2000, Rustad et al. 2001, Stromgren 2001). The DOE Program for Ecosystem Research funded a three year project (2002-2005) to use replicated heated chambers on soil warming plots in northern Manitoba to examine the direct effects of whole-ecosystem warming. We are nearing completion of our first growing season of measurements (fall 2004). In spite of the unforeseen difficulty of installing the heating cable, our heating and irrigation systems worked extremely well, maintaining environmental conditions within 5-10% of the specified design 99% of the time. Preliminary data from these systems, all designed and built by our laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, support our overall hypothesis that warming will increase the carbon sink strength of upland boreal black spruce forests. I request an additional three years of funding to continue addressing the original objectives: (1) Examine the effect of warming on phenology of overstory, understory and bryophyte strata. Sap flux systems and dendrometer bands, monitored by data loggers, will be used to quantify changes in phenology and water use. (2) Quantify the effects of warming on nitrogen and water use by overstory, understory and bryophytes. (3) Compare effects of warming on autotrophic respiration and above- and belowground net primary production (NPP) budgets. Autotrophic respiration budgets will be constructed using chamber measurements for each tissue and NPP and standard allometry techniques (Gower et al. 1999). (4) Compare microbial and root dynamics, and net soil surface CO2 flux, of control and warmed soils to identify causes that may explain the hypothesized minimal effect of soil warming on soil surface CO2 flux. Fine root production and turnover will be quantified using minirhizotrons, and microbial dynamics will be determined using laboratory mineralization incubations. Soil surface CO2 flux will be measured using automated soil surface CO2 flux systems and portable CO2 analyzers. The proposed study builds on the existing research programs Gower has in northern Manitoba and would not be possible without in-kind services and financial support from Manitoba Hydro and University of Wisconsin.

Stith T.Gower

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a result of severe cattle grazing along riparian areas and deltas. Groundwater and springs also feed the lake, and are likely critical for oxygen supply during winter stratification. During the winter of 1991, Henrys Lake experienced low dissolved oxygen levels resulting in large fish kills. It is thought that thick ice cover combined with an increase in nutrient loads created conditions resulting in poor water quality. The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, DEQ is currently conducting a study to determine the water quality of Henrys Lake, the sources contributing to its deterioration, and potential remedial actions to correct problem areas.

John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Spatial Trends and Factors of Pimple Mound Formation in East-Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pimple mounds are circular to elliptical domes with basal diameters ranging from 3 to more than 30 m, and heights of 30 cm to more than 2 m above intermound levels. For almost two centuries, the origin of these features has been speculated upon by scientists without general consensus as to one of over 30 different mechanisms suggested for their origin. These soil microfeatures can be observed throughout portions of East Texas as well as Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri. Pimple mounds have been extensively mapped throughout East Texas as complexes covering over 1.0 million ha in 47 soil survey areas. About 600,000 ha are on Pleistocene-age geological formations. This study focused on 5,500 ha in Leon County, Texas, mapped as Rader-Derly complex and Derly-Rader complex. Rader (Aquic Paleustalfs) is on mounds and Derly (Typic Glossaqualfs) in the low intermounds. These soils are mapped primarily on terraces of the Trinity River system within the survey area. Using elevation levels published for the various fluviatile terrace deposits of the Trinity River, six groups (five terrace level groups and an upland group) were identified for analysis of mounds within the study area. Processes and factors of soil formation during the life of these features were considered using two methods ? remotely sensed elevation data and sampling data collected in the field. Size, shape, and relief of mounds were analyzed using airborne-based, remotely sensed LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation data. Particle size distributions and pedon descriptions of mounds formed on materials of various ages were compared across the study area with special emphasis given to spatial trends. Analyses indicate a fluvial origin with pimple mound orientation corresponding to surrounding ridge and swale features of the paleoriver. Pimple mounds within the study area formed in the presence of sandy to loamy alluvial sediments and require the presence of accretionary ridge microtopography over point bar deposits. This alluvial parent material and topography were further developed by fluctuations in climate and vegetation over time. The erosional influence of bioturbation by animals and the intense rainfall and flood events which frequent the study area provided an environment in which these soil microfeatures have developed and over time exhibit increased levels of pedogenesis.

Robinson, Chance

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Oak Ridge Reservation Physical Characteristics and Natural Resources  

SciTech Connect

The topography, geology, hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide a complex and intricate array of resources that directly impact land stewardship and use decisions (Fig. 1). The purpose of this document is to consolidate general information regarding the natural resources and physical characteristics of the ORR. The ORR, encompassing 33,114 acres (13,401 ha) of federally owned land and three Department of Energy (DOE) installations, is located in Roane and Anderson Counties in east Tennessee, mostly within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge and southwest of the population center of Oak Ridge. The ORR is bordered on the north and east by the population center of the city of Oak Ridge and on the south and west by the Clinch River/Melton Hill Lake impoundment. All areas of the ORR are relatively pristine when compared with the surrounding region, especially in the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province (Fig. 2). From the air, the ORR is clearly a large and nearly continuous island of forest within a landscape that is fragmented by urban development and agriculture. Satellite imagery from 2006 was used to develop a land-use/land-cover cover map of the ORR and surrounding lands (Fig. 3). Following the acquisition of the land comprising the ORR in the early 1940s, much of the Reservation served as a buffer for the three primary facilities: the X-10 nuclear research facility (now known as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL]), the first uranium enrichment facility or Y-12 (now known as the Y-12 National Security Complex [Y-12 Complex]), and a gaseous diffusion enrichment facility (now known as the East Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP]). Over the past 60 years, this relatively undisturbed area has evolved into a rich and diverse eastern deciduous forest ecosystem of streams and reservoirs, hardwood forests, and extensive upland mixed forests. The combination of a large land area with complex physical characteristics and diverse natural resources has provided a critical foundation for supporting DOE's environmental research mission, as well as the area in which to build leading-edge facilities.

Parr, P.D.; Hughes, J.F.

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

Okanogan Subbasin Water Quality and Quantity Report for Anadromous Fish in 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fish need water of sufficient quality and quantity in order to survive and reproduce. The list of primary water quality indicators appropriate for monitoring of anadromous fish, as identified by the Upper Columbia Monitoring Strategy, includes: discharge, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, conductivity, nitrogen, phosphorus and ammonia. The Colville Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department began evaluating these water quality indicators in 2005 and this report represents data collected from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006. We collected empirical status and trend data from various sources to evaluate each water quality indicator along the main stem Okanogan and Similkameen Rivers along with several tributary streams. Each water quality indicator was evaluated based upon potential impacts to salmonid survival or productivity. Specific conductance levels and all nutrient indicators remained at levels acceptable for growth, survival, and reproduction of salmon and steelhead. These indicators were also considered of marginal value for monitoring environmental conditions related to salmonids within the Okanogan subbasin. However, discharge, temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen and pH in that order represent the water quality indicators that are most useful for monitoring watershed health and habitat changes and will help to evaluate threats or changes related to salmon and steelhead restoration and recovery. On the Okanogan River minimum flows have decreased over the last 12 years at a rate of -28.3CFS/year as measured near the town of Malott, WA. This trend is not beneficial for salmonid production and efforts to reverse this trend should be strongly encouraged. Turbidity levels in Bonaparte and Omak Creek were a concern because they had the highest monthly average readings. Major upland disturbance in the Bonaparte Creek watershed has occurred for decades and agricultural practices within the riparian areas along this creek have lead to major channel incision and bank instability. High sediment loads continue to threaten Omak and Bonaparte sub-watersheds. Major rehabilitation efforts are needed within these sub-watersheds to improve salmonid habitats. We found that for the past 12 years dissolved oxygen levels have been on a slightly downward trend during summer/fall Chinook egg incubation. Dissolved oxygen readings in early October, for summer/fall Chinook and from June through early July for summer steelhead can occasionally drop to the range from 8 to 10 mg/L and therefore warrant continued monitoring. Levels of pH represent an indicator that has little monitoring value throughout most of the subbasin. The Similkameen River drainage showed dramatic annual changes in the mean pH values and a declining trend for pH thus warranting continued monitoring. Average daily temperatures, in 2006, exceeded 25 C for eight days in July in the Okanogan River at Malott. Due to increased warm water temperatures, delays in migration have increased at a rate of 1.82 days per year over the last 10 years. Increases in water temperature can be linked to many anthropogenic activities. Increasing water temperatures within the Okanogan River watershed represent the single most limiting factor facing salmonids in main-stem habitats.

Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during Pleistocene and Holocene times; these paleoseismic studies form the basis for evaluating the potential for future earthquakes and fault displacements. Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed underground storage facility, was studied by using rock varnish cation-ratio and {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl cosmogenic dating methods to determine the length of time bedrock outcrops and hillslope boulder deposits were exposed to cosmic rays, which then served as a basis for calculating long-term erosion rates. The results indicate rates ranging from 0.04 to 0.27 cm/k.y., which represent the maximum downcutting along the summit of Yucca Mountain under all climatic conditions that existed there during most of Quaternary time. Associated studies include the stratigraphy of surficial deposits in Fortymile Wash, the major drainage course in the area, which record a complex history of four to five cut-and-fill cycles within the channel during middle to late Quaternary time. The last 2 to 4 m of incision probably occurred during the last pluvial climatic period, 22 to 18 ka, followed by aggradation to the present time.

W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

Conley, Will

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Bioenergy Crop Breeding and Production Research in the Southeast, Final Report for 1996 to 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a native grass species to much of the US. It has shown great potential for use in production of fuel ethanol from cellulosic biomass (Lynd et al., 1991). Work in Alabama demonstrated very high dry matter yields can be achieved with switchgrass (Maposse et al. 1995) in the southeastern US. Therefore, this region is thought to be an excellent choice for development of a switchgrass cropping system where farmers can produce the grass for either biomass or forage. Another report has shown success with selection and breeding to develop high yielding germplasm from adapted cultivars and ecotypes of switchgrass (Moser and Vogel 1995). In the mid 1990s, however, there was little plant breeding effort for switchgrass with a potential for developing a cultivar for the southeast region. The main goal of the project was to develop adaptive, high-yielding switchgrass cultivars for use in cropping systems for bioenergy production in the southeastern US. A secondary objective was to assess the potential of alternate herbaceous species such as bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.), bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge.), and napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach.) that may compete with switchgrass for herbaceous bioenergy production in the southeast. During the conduct of the project, another goal of developing molecular markers useful for genetic mapping was added. The ''lowland'' cultivars, Alamo and Kanlow, were found to be the highest yielding switchgrass cultivars. Although most summers during the project period were hot and dry, their annual dry matter yield continue to outperform the best ''upland'' cultivars such as Cave-in-Rock, Shawnee, NE Late, and Trailblazer. The use of a breeding procedure based on the ''honeycomb design'' and multi-location progeny testing, coupled with the solid heritability and genetic gain estimates for dry matter yield in lowland type switchgrass germplasm, indicated excellent potential to isolate parental genotypes for producing higher yielding synthetic cultivars. The four experimental synthetics produced thus far, and now in performance tests, could provide this cultivar. Initial performance results of these experimentals have been very promising demonstrating a 30% yield enhancement over Alamo and Kanlow. Future testing, including testing in other states, will be critical before a determination can be made to release one or more of these into the commercial seed trade. In the genetic mapping project, 42 genotypes of switchgrass were surveyed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) probes from different grass species. The different genotypes included 24 from Alamo, 15 from Kanlow, and 3 from ''Summer.'' A majority of the probes (87%) hybridized to the switchgrass DNA and 81% were polymorphic. Most of the polymorphism observed was between the cultivars. A mapping population consisting of 100 progeny from a cross between the most dissimilar Kanlow and Summer genotypes was produced during 2001. The parents and progeny population are now maintained at the University of Georgia and will be used to construct a map based on the polymorphic RFLP probes. When compared to ''Tifton 85'' bermudagrass, ''Tifton 9'' bahiagrass, and ''Merkron'' napier-grass, Alamo switchgrass was found to show poorer yields than Merkron and Tifton 85, but better yields than Tifton 9 in the coastal plain region. The exceptional performance of Tifton 85 bermudagrass is extremely noteworthy because this hybrid bermudagrass is also a variety of choice for many commercial hay producers in the lower south and would give any producers a very good option to produce either biomass for a biofuels initiative or sell as hay on the open market. Merkron has consistently showed the highest dry matter yields. However, there continues to be some winter damage each year on this species at the Athens location indicating its real potential lies mainly in the Gulf Coast region of the southeastern United States. The excellent characteristic of Tifton 85 and Merkron should therefore be enough to initi

Bouton, J.H.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bullsnake upland coulee" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ecosystem and Wildlife Implications of Brush: Management System Designed to Improve Water Runoff and Percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the settlement of Texas and establishment of ranchers to produce cattle, there was an effort to maximize beef production. This caused serious overgrazing. In addition, there was a reduced incidence of fires across the landscape to clear out brush. These factors led to deterioration of the grazing lands and provided an opportunity for invasive intrusion by brush and other species onto the land and riparian zones. There has been a large-scale conversion from grasslands and savannahs to wildlands over the last 150 years (Scholes and Archer, 1997). The overall impacts are significantly impaired uplands and reduced percolation and surface flow of water from rainfall which caused changes and loss in basic aquatic and terrestrial habitat. The State of Texas adopted a program to study and implement brush management systems across the state to improve the water availability in streams, rivers, reservoirs and aquifers, as well as to improve the rangelands. The feasibility studies have shown great promise for improving ranchland and improving the water situation. However, there is less known about the aquatic and wildlife species response implications of brush management. Certainly, there are opportunities for improving the viability of an ecosystem through brush management strategies and continuing management practices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in hydrology and biological diversity associated with brush management in two watersheds where significant data was already available. This study focused on assessing the aquatic and terrestrial species implications related to specified brush management strategies over time. This involved an integrated analysis including modeling of the landscape, assessing biological diversity and developing economic implications for the two watersheds (Twin Buttes and Edwards regions). Thus, this study is comprised of three parts: modeling of brush management strategies temporally, assessing biological diversity (aquatic and terrestrial) and estimating economic implications. This represents a complex analysis involving variable units and multiple disciplines. Previous feasibility studies of brush removal have been targeted at maximizing water runoff. This analysis is an extension that is designed to examine the implications of brush management under a more restrictive set of brush removal criteria that were chosen based upon wildlife considerations. To achieve the integration of hydrologic modeling, range ecology, and economic implications, there were three team meetings bringing together all components to review status and set priorities for the remainder of the work. In addition, scientists in the three basic groups of specialization interacted daily along with representatives of the Corps of Engineers to assure that each decision was reflected in other parts of the analyses. The major addition of this analysis to brush management feasibility studies being conducted as part of the Texas brush management plan is the consideration of wildlife and aquatic biota and assessing changes in biological diversity likely to result from alternative brush management scenarios.

Arrington, D. Albrey; Conner, Richard; Dugas, William; Hejl, Sallie; Magness, Dawn; Muttiah, Ranjan; Olenick, Keith; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Winemiller, Kirk O.; Zinn, Michele; Wilkins, Neal; Amonett, Carl; Bednarz, Steve; Dybala, Tim; Griffith, Rebecca; Jarboe, Hank

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site  

SciTech Connect

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z