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1

Marla Ingram-Bailey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accounting Marla Ingram-Bailey Contact Information contact contact us Marla Ingram-Bailey Accounting Manager ...

2

Alton E. Bailey Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizes outstanding research and exceptional service in the field of lipids and associated products Alton E. Bailey Award USA Section Alton E.Bailey award aocs awards fats global Hans Kaunitz award inform job listings member membership network oils Pr

3

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils (Volume 5) First published in 1945, Bailey's has become the standard reference on the food chemistry and processing technology related to edible oils and the nonedible byproducts derived from oils. Bailey's Industrial O

4

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils (Volume 4) First published in 1945, Bailey's has become the standard reference on the food chemistry and processing technology related to edible oils and the nonedible byproducts derived from oils. Bailey's Industrial O

5

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils (Volume 3) First published in 1945, Bailey's has become the standard reference on the food chemistry and processing technology related to edible oils and the nonedible byproducts derived from oils. Bailey's Industrial O

6

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils (Volume 6) First published in 1945, Bailey's has become the standard reference on the food chemistry and processing technology related to edible oils and the nonedible byproducts derived from oils. Bailey's Industrial O

7

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volumes 1-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complete set, volumes 1-6. First published in 1945, Bailey's has become the standard reference on the food chemistry and processing technology related to edible oils and the nonedible byproducts derived from oils....

8

Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Edible Oils Bailey's Industrial Oil and Fat Products, Volume 2 Processing Hardback Books Processing John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Edible Oil and Fat Products: Edible Oils 978-0-471-38551-6 Fereidoon Shahidi John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

9

Bailey's Crossroads, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bailey's Crossroads, Virginia: Energy Resources Bailey's Crossroads, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.848033°, -77.12916° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.848033,"lon":-77.12916,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.982,"lon":-131.6622,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Bailey County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Elec Coop Assn County Elec Coop Assn Jump to: navigation, search Name Bailey County Elec Coop Assn Place Texas Utility Id 1169 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Cotton GINS 3O Industrial Cotton GINS 3O Ginning Season Farm & Home service 1O Residential Farm & Home service 3O Residential Industrial 3O Industrial Irrigation Mar to Sep Industrial Irrigation Sep to Mar Industrial Large Commercial 3O Commercial Medium Commercial 3O Commercial Outdoor Lighting 100 W HPS Lighting

12

Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Baileys Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Death Valley Nat'l Monument, Nevada Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

13

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The CERTS Microgrid and the Future of the Chris Marnay and Owen C. Bailey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-55281 The CERTS Microgrid and the Future of the Macrogrid Chris Marnay and Owen C. Bailey contract DE-AC03-76SF00098, and by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

15

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Bull Hill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hill Hill Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Hill Facility Bull Hill Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner First Wind Developer First Wind Energy Purchaser NSTAR Location Hancock County ME Coordinates 44.723076°, -68.170852° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.723076,"lon":-68.170852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

17

CMS Runs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Runs Runs Web Based Monitoring Run Summary DQM Run Registry Commissioning & Run Coordination Online WorkBook Global Run Data Analysis FNAL ROC Process Summary [May-Dec 2007] Text output of Run Summary Global File List in dCache Directory Index DBS Discovery Aug 2008: ROOT Jul 2008: ROOT Jun 2008: ROOT May 2008: ROOT Mar 2008: ROOT Nov/Dec 2007: Streamer ROOT Sep 2007: Streamer ROOT Aug 2007: Streamer ROOT Jul 2007: Streamer ROOT Jun 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM May 2007: Streamer ROOT DQM PhEDEx Transfer State Cruzet4 Files Transferred Cruzet3 Files Transferred Cruzet2 Files Transferred GlobalCruzet1 Files Transferred GlobalMar08 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalNov07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalSep07 Files Transferred to FNAL GlobalAug07 Files Transferred to FNAL

18

Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a model of financial institutions that borrow shortterm and invest into long-term marketable assets. Because these financial intermediaries perform maturity transformation, they are subject to runs. We endogenize the profits of the intermediary and derive distinct liquidity and solvency conditions that determine whether a run can be prevented. We first characterize these conditions for an isolated intermediary and then generalize them to the case where the intermediary can sell assets to prevent runs. The sale of assets can eliminate runs if the intermediary is solvent but illiquid. However, because of cash-in-the-market pricing, this becomes less likely the more intermediaries are facing problems. In the limit, in case of a general market run, no intermediary can sell assets to forestall a run, and our original solvency and liquidity constraints are again relevant for the stability of financial institutions.

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all four streams. Juvenile bull trout utilized scour pool and run habitat the most in all four streams. YOY bull trout preferred plunge pool and scour pool habitat, as did juvenile bull trout in all four streams. These data show that while in the presence of the putative competitors, bull trout prefer the same habitat as in the absence of the putative competitors. Juvenile bull trout preferred mayflies and stoneflies in Mill Creek, while in the presence of the competitor species they preferred caddisflies, stoneflies, and Oligochaeta. It is felt that this difference is due to the differences in food items available and not species interactions, bull trout consume what is present. Adult bull trout were difficult to capture, and therefore it was difficult to determine the migratory habits in the Tucannon River. It is recommended that future studies use radio telemetry to determine the migratory habitat of these fish. The age, condition, and growth rates of bull trout differed only minimally between streams, indicating that if competitive interactions are occurring between these species it is not reflected by: (1) the length at age of bull trout; (2) the length-weight relationship of bull trout; or (3) the rate of growth of bull trout. The spawning habits of bull trout and spring chinook salmon are similar in the Tucannon River, however it was found that they spawn in different river locations. The salmon spawn below river kilometer 83, while 82% of bull trout spawn above that point. The peak of spawning for salmon occurred 10 days before the peak of bull trout spawning, indicating that very little competition for spawning locations occurs between these species in the Tucannon River. Future species interactions study recommendations include the use of electrofishing to enumerate bull trout populations, snorkeling to identify micro-habitat utilization, seasonal diet analysis, and radio transmitters to identify seasonal migration patterns of bull trout.

Martin, Steven W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Stephany Bailey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (steam fitters and plumbers); computer sales at Anderson Jacobson, Inc.; Montgomery County Board of Realtors; Dept. ...

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Place San Diego, California Sector Biomass Product Focused on development of biomass waste energy projects. References Bull Moose Energy LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

22

Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Creek Wind Farm Bull Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Creek Wind Farm Facility Bull Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Market Location Near Gail TX Coordinates 32.933099°, -101.584425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.933099,"lon":-101.584425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Moose Energy Bull Moose Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Moose Energy Address P.O. Box 231501 Place Encinitas, California Zip 92023 Sector Biomass Product Developing a 23 MW power plant fueled by biomass waste Website http://bullmooseenergy.com/ Coordinates 33.0368°, -117.2914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0368,"lon":-117.2914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs Running jobs For Edison Phase 1 users You can run jobs in the same way as you did on the phase 1 system, but keep in mind that the number of cores per node is 24 instead of...

25

User_RunReports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Standard Reports Running Standard Reports © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Running Standard Reports Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of running standard reports in SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. Run Standard Report From the Home page, click the Reports easy link. In the Report Name table, locate the report you want to generate. Click the expand icon ( ) to expand the report group. Click the title link. For this example, select the User Curriculum Status Group by Item Details report. Note: Click Help ( ) for additional information on reports. 1 1 2 2 3 3 Run Standard Report 13 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid

26

COMMENTS ON THE COUNTING AND SIZING OF BULL SPERMATOZOA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining volumes with this apparatus which have not been mentioned in earlier publications. It is these difficulties which induced us to write this report. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fresh bull ejaculates were diluted I spermatozoa (BEDFORD, i965). Formaldehyde (0.1 per cent w/v) was added to prevent growth of bacteria and algae

Recanati, Catherine

27

Running Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Job Launch Overview Parallel applications can not run on the login nodes. They must be launched onto the compute nodes via the aprun command. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Franklin by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Submitting Batch Jobs Basic batch scripts, torque keywords. Sample scripts for advanced work flows: running multiple jobs, MPMD jobs, job dependencies. Read More » Queues and Policies Queue configuration and limits, policies and tips for getting your job through the queue faster. Read More » Monitoring Jobs Once a job is submitted it can be monitored, held, deleted and in some

28

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jobs jobs Running jobs Quick Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option is available on Edison. Read More » Overview A brief overview of how to run jobs on Edison. Read More » Interactive Jobs Interactive jobs may be run on Edison by requesting resources from the batch system. "qsub -I -V -q interactive -lmppwidth=[num_cores]" is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More » Batch Jobs Batch script options. Read More » Example Batch Scripts Sample batch scripts for MPI, OpenMP, hybrid applications and various workflows. Read More » Job Launch Command: aprun Aprun is the job launcher for Cray XC30. There are many options that are

29

Running Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instructions for Hopper users Major differences between running jobs on Hopper and Edison are: the number of cores per node are different, and the Intel Hyper-threading option...

30

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations. Similar data for the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek populations illustrate there is considerable overlap and mixing among these three local populations within their over-wintering and feeding habitat. The upper Kootenay River, Lake Koocanusa and the lower Bull River provide overwintering and feeding habitat for the White River, Skookumchuck Creek and Wigwam River bull trout. Recommendations to improve escapement estimates and spawning distribution are provided. An accurate population estimate is especially important to provide baseline for any potential impacts due to wildfire and subsequent salvage logging that is currently underway immediately adjacent to and upstream of important spawning and rearing habitat in the Middlefork of the White River. Identification of important spawning habitat is important to meet management objectives for the White River.

Cope, R.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

32

Running jobs on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running jobs Running jobs Running jobs Overview and Basic Description Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI job, type in this at the shell prompt: % mpirun -np numprocs executable_name where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data analysis, NERSC will attempt to provide equitable access to Euclid's resources through the enforcement of certain usage guidelines. The most crucial resources are the processor cores (48) and memory (512 GB). Processor Core Usage Policy No single interactive job should use more than 12 processor cores. A single

33

Fermilab DART run control  

SciTech Connect

DART is the high speed, Unix based data acquisition system being developed by Fermilab in collaboration with seven High Energy Physics Experiments. This paper describes DART run control, which has been developed over the past year and is a flexible, distributed, extensible system for the, control and monitoring of the data acquisition systems. We discuss the unique and interesting concepts of the run control and some of our experiences in developing it. We also give a brief update and status of the whole DART system.

Oleynik, G.; Engelfried, J.; Mengel, L. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Running Jobs.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting and Running Jobs on Submitting and Running Jobs on the Cray XT5 Richard Gerber NERSC User Services RAGerber@lbl.gov Joint Cray XT5 Workshop UC-Berkeley February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Outline * XT5 Overview * Creating and Submitting a Batch Job * How a Job Is Launched * Monitoring Your Job * Queues and Policies Hopper in blue; Jaguar in Orange; Kraken in Green February 1, 2010 Joint Cray XT5 Workshop, UC Berkeley Cray XT5 Overview Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node Compute Node etc.... No local disk Login Node Login Node Login Node etc.... home Login Node Login Node $SCRATCH[1|2] /tmp/work/$USER /lustre/scratch/$USER

36

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Final Addendum Appendix AD4: Bull Trout Species Report Walla Walla Subbasin Plan AD4-1 November 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and other bull trout, depending on availability (Delacy and Morton 1943; Jeppson 1963; Pratt 1992; Roos 1959

38

Polarization Issues in Run 2008  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC proton beam polarization has a strong dependence on intensity in Run 2008, whereas the dependence is almost absent in Run 2006. Meanwhile, the RHIC beam transverse emittance also has a dependence on intensity in Run 2008, but little in Run 2006. Using the emittance measurement at the AGS IPM and the BtA multiwires, the source of this difference between 2006 and 2008 runs is traced to the Booster. It is found that at least the degree of the vertical scraping in the Booster is different in 2006 and 2008. The effect of this scraping for the RHIC beam emittance and polarization is studied.

Zhang,S.Y.; Ahrens, L.; Huang, H.; Zeno, K.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frog Green Energy LLC Frog Green Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Frog Green Energy LLC Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92009 Product A company, probably an individual, which has filed to develop large-scale PV projects on California Desert District land. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Running Interactive Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the compute nodes. The service nodes are shared by many users, so. please do not run your compute- or memory-intensive jobs on these nodes. NERSC may kill running processes that severely degrade service node performance. If your job will run for more than 5 minutes, or use more than 1 GB of memory it should not

42

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning Maintenance AP SPEAR Down Injector Startup University Holidays Spear Down SPEAR Startup MA Sep Oct 2011 2012 MA Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

43

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Switchyard Feeder Repair Mark Dixson Little Rock District US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Original Equipment - 52 years old. * Unit 1 Oil filled cable pothead failed and exploded on Sept 6 2006. * Resulting fire and fire suppression damaged oil insulated cable system * Minor damage to power plant. Background Background Background US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Transformer Unit 2 damaged and removed from service. * Cause of fire - Failure of Pothead stress cone assembly and build up of combustible gas * Power Plant lost all power and went in the

44

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Oil shale project run summary: small retort run S-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Retort run S-14 was a combustion run in the small retort conducted on Nov. 15-16, 1977. The charge of Anvil Points shale operated under a 50% steam - 50% air mixture. Results indicate that the broad particle size range in the packed bed increases nonuniformities in gas flow and bed retorting characteristics. Oil yield was 87%, hydrogen production amounted to 0.25 wt % of the raw shale. (DLC)

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Tripp, L.J.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be stable in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings from the third year (2000) of the multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, genetics, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek by night snorkeling. In the Warm Springs R. juvenile bull trout were slightly more numerous than brook trout, however, both were found in low densities. Relative densities of both species declined from 1999 observations. Juvenile bull trout vastly out numbered brook trout in Shitike Cr. Relative densities of juvenile bull trout increased while brook trout abundance was similar to 1999 observations in eight index reaches. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs R. for the second year. Mean relative densities of both species, within the index reaches was slightly higher than what was observed in a 2.4 km control reach. Mill Creek was surveyed for the presence of juvenile bull trout. The American Fisheries Society ''Interim protocol for determining bull trout presence'' methodology was field tested. No bull trout were found in the 2 km survey area.

Brun, Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Running Interactive Jobs on Dirac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requests 8 cores on one node using the interactive queue (and you will run on either Tesla or Fermi nodes): % qsub -I -V -q diracint -l nodes1:ppn8 If you want to request...

48

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually runs the program in parallel on the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

49

Running Interactive Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are typically pre- and post-processing jobs, data management programs, or some other type of "tool". Note that it is not possible to run any MPI application on Carver login nodes. The second type of interactive job runs on one or more Carver compute nodes. Because the only way to gain access to the compute nodes is through the batch system, these types of jobs may more accurately be called "interactive batch" jobs. The remainder of this section focuses on these types of jobs. Usage Basic usage: carver% qsub -I The above command creates an interactive shell on a compute node, in the user's home directory. As a batch job, it has default values for batch

50

Tevatron Run II Physics Projections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Run II Physics Projections (Spring 2006) Document for the P5 Committee (version 8, September 30, 2005) Electroweak Precision Measurements and Standard Model Higgs Searches W Mass Measurement: 20 - 30 MeV Projections versus Integrated Luminosity (made by CDF): eps, gif, gif (log) Extrapolated from Run Ib measurement Uncertainties assumed to scale with luminosity: Statiscal uncertainties Systematic uncertainties such as Energy and momentum scale, Hadron Recoil against W Uncertainties assumed not to scale with luminosity: W production and decay: PDFs, d(sigma_W)/d(Pt), higher order QCD/QED effects Assumed to be beween 20 MeV (dashed lines) and 30 MeV (solid lines) Top Mass Measurement: ~1.5 GeV Assumptions Channel: only lepton+jets channle considered. Uncertainties that scale with luminosity - 1 / sqrt(lum)

51

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT 1993EDL RUN 2 UTILITY-RATEs GAS-RATE RESOURCE, NATURAL-ES-E SUMMARY OF UTILITY-RATE: ELI_CTRGCHRONIC GLAZING ININP RUN 3 1993EDL RUN UTILITY-RATE: ELk'C-COST RESOURCE:

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Edison batch system is up and running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batch system is up and running Edison batch system is up and running July 25, 2013 (0 Comments) Edison batch system is up and running. Cray benchmark team and NERSC staff have...

54

NPP Database Sites (Bailey Map)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Konza Prairie (U.S.A.) Kursk (Russia) Kurukshetra (India) Lamto (Ivory Coast) Matador (Canada) Media Luna (Argentina) Montecillo (Mexico) Nairobi (Kenya) Nylsvley (South Africa)...

55

Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facebook Find us "in the news" Home News & Publications News Center News Green Flash Project Runs First Prototype Successfully Green Flash Project Runs First...

56

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Running Jobs Overview for Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview Overview and Basic Description Jobs on Edison execute on one or more "compute" nodes dedicated to that job. These nodes are distinct from the shared "login" nodes that host interactive sessions and the shared "MOM" nodes that execute commands from a "batch script" that controls how the job runs. Typically, users write the batch script with a text editor and submit it to the system using the "qsub" command. The batch script contains a number of job control directives and also the "aprun" command that actually launches the program on to the compute nodes. It is possible to run small, short parallel jobs interactively as described in the pages in this section. Pages in this section explain the process in more detail.

58

Diet Overlap of Top-Level Predators in Recent Sympatry: Bull Trout and Nonnative Lake Trout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley:1160­1171. Jeppson PW, Platts WS. 1959. Ecology and control of the Columbia River squawfish in northern Idaho lakes

McMahon, Thomas E.

59

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run a Program Run a Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Run a Program on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Workforce Development Run a Program Energy efficiency upgrade programs provide communities with many benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money

60

Oil shale project: large retort run summary, run L-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the retort run L-3, a high yield (83 to 84% of FA) was achieved using a broad particle size distribution (-30.5 cm, + 0.001 cm) with 15 to 20% of the shale larger than 15 cm. The nonuniform flow in the retort was closely predicted by the changing shape of the steam front. Steam front measurements after the run indicated that the flow distribution through the bed was little affected by the retorting and combustion processes. The technique of ignition by hot-gas-preheating worked satisfactorily; no oxygen was observed in the exit gas during the entire retort operation. The temperature of the retort front was controlled by the air flux; no runaway temperatures were encountered when making the step grade change from 18 to 36 gal/ton. The hydrogen concentration in the exit gas reached approximately 18% in the rich (36 gal/ton) shale at the bottom of the bed; this is the highest concentration seen in any of the retorting experiments. A factor-of-three change in the CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio was observed as the combustion front moved from the 18 gal/ton to 36 gal/ton shale; also, about a factor-of-two change occurred in the rate of production of CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/ and CO.

Ackerman, F.J.; Sandholtz, W.A.; Raley, J.H.; Carley, J.F.; Tripp, L.J.; Rothman, A.J.; Campbell, J.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Influence of Bull Traits and Bull to Female Ratio on Reproductive Perfromance in Beef Females and of Nutrition During Gestation on Calving Difficulty in Primiparous Beef Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments that were conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde, TX (semi-arid environment) from 2006 to 2008. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls ( n = 39; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous Bonsmara and Bonsmara-influenced females (n = 1013) during a 90-day breeding season in 2006, 2007, and 2008 to quantify the effects of a reduction in bull to female ratio on reproductive performance. Bulls were also placed with primiparous beef females ( n = 142). Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, social rank, serving capacity, and seminal traits to one of two bull to female (BFR) treatments: Low (1:30-1:45; n = 10 pastures) or Conventional (1:16-1:26; n = 12 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.36), calving date (P = 0.24), and calving rate (P = 0.25) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. The current experiment demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without negatively affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, Bonsmara heifers (3/4, 7/8, and full bloods) were exposed to Bonsmara bulls from April 15 to July 15 during each of the two years. Heifers were weighed, rectally palpated for pregnancy, and scored for BCS (1 thin - 9 fat) and frame score (1 short - 9 tall) in December (end of second trimester) during years 1 and 2. Heifers were stratified on expected calving date and randomly allotted to one of two levels of nutrition for the remainder of gestation. In year 1, heifers were allotted to range forage (n=31, low nutrition, LN) or to non-irrigated oat pasture (n=31, high nutrition, HN). In year 2, heifers were placed onto the same range environment as in year 1 (n=31, LN) or onto irrigated ryegrass pasture (n=31,HN). Heifers in the LN groups were supplemented with 20% CP cubes at the rate of 0.9 kg/heifer/day from January 2 until calving while HN heifers were not supplemented. Within 4 hr of birth, calves were weighed, and calf vigor and calving difficulty scores were recorded. Heifers were weighed within 72 hours of parturition. From treatment initiation through calving, HN heifers gained 48.6 kg whereas the LN females lost 15 kg. Twice as many HN heifers required major assistance at calving as compared to LN heifers. Calves born to the HN females weighed 3.7 kg more at birth than those born to LN females. These differences resulted in HN heifers having (P = 0.005) more calving difficulty than LN heifers (mean calving difficutly of 2.3 for HN and 1.6 for LN). The calves of the HN females were also less vigorous (P = 0.005) after birth than the calves from LN females (calf vigor score of 2.2 for HN and 3.3 for LN). Consequently, the level of nutrition during the third trimester of gestation can affect calving difficulty, calf vigor, and female weight.

Bloomberg, Blake David

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one

63

Running Interactive Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -V -q interactive -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the umber of cores per node. On Hopper, with 24 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/24 plus one more if

64

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Edison's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth=32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V flag passes your current environment variable settings to the compute environment. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The number of nodes given to your job (remember, the system allocates nodes, not cores), is the value of mppwidth divided by the number of cores per node. On Edison, with 16 cores per node, the number of nodes is mppwidth/16 plus one

65

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Caloric expenditure and substrate utilization in underwater treadmill running versus land-based treadmill running.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this study is to compare the caloric expenditure and oxidative sources of underwater treadmill running and land-based treadmill running at maximal and (more)

Schaal, Courtney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Using Bulls-Eye Commissioning to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building system commissioning comes highly recommended by energy efficiency experts; however, it is rarely undertaken due to the cost and care needed to do a comprehensive job. Many existing utility meters provide whole-building 15-minute interval data that can be used to pinpoint fan control and HVAC schedule problems. Bulls-eye commissioning uses interval metering to focus detailed commissioning efforts. This paper concentrates on a single customer and how bulls-eye commissioning can be applied to focus the commissioning process. Significant energy savings were found by using interval data in conjunction with outside air temperature to isolate problems with schedules and in the economizer controls. Evaluation of main meter profiles allows detailed commissioning work to be better focused and more effective without the wait and expense of full commissioning services. Bulls-eye commissioning can be applied on its own or can be coordinated with traditional commissioning. In either case, the main meter profile shows what will directly impact total energy use and the customer's bill.

Price, W.; Hart, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Running Jobs with the UGE Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Jobs Running Jobs Submitting Jobs How to submit your job to the UGE. Read More » Running with Java Solutions to some of the common problems users have with running on Genepool when the JVM is part of their workflow. Read More » Batch Script Examples Sample batch scripts for Genepool/Phoebe highlighting queue selection, setting the run time and requesting large amounts of memory. Read More » Interactive Jobs How to run your workflow on the interactive nodes. Read More » Job Arrays Job arrays are a way to efficiently submit large numbers of jobs. Read More » Parallel Batch Scripts This page has examples of how to run parallel jobs on Genepool. Read More » Best Practices - and Practices to Avoid Things users should do to run jobs efficiently using UGE. Read More »

69

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an approach to comparing computer run time of buildingthe purpose of comparing computer run time. Modelers shouldATIONAL L ABORATORY Comparing Computer Run Time of Building

Hong, Tianzhen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities SNS SNS Operating Status FY 2012 Run Schedule SNS Run Schedule for FY 2012 (Oct. 2011-Sep. 2012) Printable version Excel version SNS Run Schedule...

73

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

SciTech Connect

EnergyPlus is a new generation building performance simulation program offering many new modeling capabilities and more accurate performance calculations integrating building components in sub-hourly time steps. However, EnergyPlus runs much slower than the current generation simulation programs. This has become a major barrier to its widespread adoption by the industry. This paper analyzed EnergyPlus run time from comprehensive perspectives to identify key issues and challenges of speeding up EnergyPlus: studying the historical trends of EnergyPlus run time based on the advancement of computers and code improvements to EnergyPlus, comparing EnergyPlus with DOE-2 to understand and quantify the run time differences, identifying key simulation settings and model features that have significant impacts on run time, and performing code profiling to identify which EnergyPlus subroutines consume the most amount of run time. This paper provides recommendations to improve EnergyPlus run time from the modeler?s perspective and adequate computing platforms. Suggestions of software code and architecture changes to improve EnergyPlus run time based on the code profiling results are also discussed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

74

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Running against hunger Running against hunger Posted By Office of Public Affairs Pantex Security Police Officers Byron Logan and Randy Stokes completed their annual Run Against Hunger last week. The two officers ran and biked

75

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

Underwood, Keith D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Running Jobs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Cobalt Job Control How to Queue a Job Running Jobs FAQs Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Intrepid/Challenger/Surveyor Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Running Jobs Contents Job Submission Submitting a Script Job Sub-block Script Jobs Multiple Consecutive Runs within a Script Job Settings Environment Variables Script Environment Program and Argument Length Limit Job Dependencies Thread Stack Size Verbose Setting for Runjob How do I get each line of the output labeled with the MPI rank that it came from? Mapping of MPI Tasks to Cores

77

Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

Klann, Jeffrey G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

OPTIMIZATION OF RUNNING STRATEGIES BASED ON ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

determine his speed in order to run a given distance in the shortest time. ... based on the equation of motion and aerobic energy, to include a balance of ..... associated cost converges to the one associated with ? . The conclusion follows.

79

RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8  

SciTech Connect

During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

80

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Mohamed M. Anber; John F. Donoghue

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

On the running of the gravitational constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that there is no useful and universal definition of a running gravitational constant, G(E), in the perturbative regime below the Planck scale. By consideration of the loop corrections to several physical processes, we show that the quantum corrections vary greatly, in both magnitude and sign, and do not exhibit the required properties of a running coupling constant. We comment on the potential challenges of these results for the Asymptotic Safety program.

Anber, Mohamed M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Compare 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010 with Run 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the very successful commissioning of the vertical stochastic cooling in 100 GeV/n Au Run 2010, the IBS (intra-beam scattering) is no longer the dominant factor in terms of the integrated luminosity. A new luminosity model is needed, where the beam intensity lifetime is more important and the burn-off needs to be accounted for. Toward this goal, a brief review of the Run 2010, compared with Run 2007, is presented.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ASSOCIATION AMONG FLUID, GRAIN INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN IN HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine water intake. Forty-four Holstein bull calves were evaluated to investigate the effects of starter intake, body weight, temperature and time to predict water intake. A model was developed using PROC GLM in SAS. Least square means separation were used to identify significant effects. Starter intake was a significant variable (P water intake of a calf, especially after day 21 when starter intake and water intake were both increasing. Water intake was increased by calves with fecal scores of 1 and 2. However, water intake was significantly different for calves with fecal scores of 3 or 4 with a (P water intake. The interaction between scours and fecal score were not significant. Water intakes significantly differ in calves that had scour and in calves not experimented scours.

Gonzalez Ferreira, Marcelo A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

SunRun Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunRun Inc SunRun Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name SunRun Inc Address 717 Market Street Place San Francisco, California Zip 94103 Sector Solar Product Solar installer Website http://www.sunrunhome.com/ Coordinates 37.7871306°, -122.4041075° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7871306,"lon":-122.4041075,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

85

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort: MPICH2 ERROR [Rank 7436] [job id 14638087] [Sat Jan 12 04:56:54 2013] [c11-2c1s3n1] [nid04487] - MPIU_nem_gni_get_hugepages(): Unable to mmap 4194304 bytes for file /var/lib/hugetlbfs/global/pagesize-2097152/hugepagefile.MPICH.0.5841.kvs_14638087, err Cannot allocate memory This is caused by available huge page memory being not sufficient on one or more of the allocated compute nodes. The above error happens more often with jobs using the "-ss" option for the aprun command. It is confirmed

86

How to Run DomainParser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run DomainParser Run DomainParser The structure for partition needs to be prepared in the PDB format. In most cases, running DomainParser using defaults should give satisfactory partitions. However, several options offered in DomainParser can provide a partition that a user desires or correct some overcut/undercut partitions. Here, we use a PDB file 1atna.pdb as an example to show how to use the DomainParser program. Run DomainParser using defaults: domainparser 1atna.pdb The output shows the partition for each domain in terms of ranges of residue numbers: 4 domains have been found for 1atna: Domain 1 : 34-96. Domain 2 : 181-272. Domain 3 : 148-180; 273-336. Domain 4 : 0-33; 97-147; 337-372. The program also generates a new file 1atna_dom.pdb, with the "temperature factor" column (column 61-66 of an "ATOM" entry) showing domain numbers. A

87

BEAM SCRUBBING FOR RHIC POLARIZED PROTON RUN.  

SciTech Connect

One of the intensity limiting factor of RHIC polarized proton beam is the electron cloud induced pressure rise. A beam scrubbing study shows that with a reasonable period of time of running high intensity 112-bunch proton beam, the pressure rise can be reduced, allowing higher beam intensity.

ZHANG,S.Y.FISCHER,W.HUANG,H.ROSER,T.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

88

B PHYSICS AT THE TEVATRON RUN II.  

SciTech Connect

We present the B physics results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab and their future prospect. This includes various B mass and lifetime measurements, B mixing, the confirmation of the discovery of the X particle, rare decays, CP violation, and spectroscopy.

YIP,K.

2004-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

The D0 run II trigger system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs  

SciTech Connect

In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 -...

92

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog Blog Archive Run, Dishwasher...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Run, Dishwasher, Run Saturday, September 24, 2011 By Alexis Powers The typical college student does about two loads of laundry a week. However, the student decathletes must go...

93

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Physics Case for Extended Tevatron Running  

SciTech Connect

Run II of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab is currently scheduled to end late in 2011. Given the current performance of the collider and of the CDF and D0 detectors, it is estimated that the current data set could be approximately doubled with a run extended into 2014. A few examples are presented of the physics potential of these additional statistics. These are discussed in the context of the expected reach of the LHC 7 TeV data and the existing Tevatron data. In particular, an extraordinary opportunity is described which could probe the existence of a standard model Higgs boson with mass in the currently preferred region between 115 GeV and 150 GeV.

Wood, Darien R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The influence of tropical adaptation and breedtype on adrenal and testicular function in beef bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulls of various breedtypes including Angus (Bos taurus), Bonsmara (Sanga X Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), Romosinuano (Criollo), Tuli (Sanga) and Wagyu (Japanese Bos taurus) were utilized to evaluate the influence of tropical adaptation on adrenal and testicular function. The objectives were to determine if tropical adaptation influenced: a) response to management stressors, b) organ and gland weights, adrenal and testis StAR and P450 content and total adrenal, medullary and cortical areas, c) basal and hCG-induced testosterone and d) testis and epididymal sperm concentrations. Blood samples were obtained within 5 min before and after transportation and during restraint every 15 min for 6 h to evaluate cortical response. Angus, Brahman and Romosinuano bulls were slaughtered following sexual maturity. Cortical responses to transportation and restraint were not influenced by tropical adaptation. Response to these stressors could be categorized into high responders (Angus, Brahman), intermediate responders (Romosinuano, Tuli) and low responders (Wagyu, Bonsmara). Tropically-adapted breedtypes were not categorized into a single group; therefore, cortical responses to management stressors were influenced by breedtype, but not by tropical adaptation. Most organ and gland weights (actual weight and weight corrected for BW) and the steroid precursors, StAR and P450, were not influenced by tropical adaptation, but were by breedtype. Paired adrenal gland weight, total adrenal area, medullary and cortical areas were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had lighter glands and smaller areas than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes. All breedtypes except Wagyu had similar basal concentrations of plasma testosterone prior to hCG administration; therefore, basal testosterone was not influenced by tropical adaptation, but only by breedtype. Wagyu had greater basal concentrations of testosterone than other breedtypes. Testosterone concentrations following hCG administration was similar between adaptation groups and breedtypes. As expected, testis and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had greater testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes during the summer months. In summary, adrenal weight and area and testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Cortical response to management stressors, basal testosterone and StAR and P450 content were influenced by breedtype, not tropical adaptation.

Koch, Jeffrey William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

98

Organic Mathematics: David H. Bailey - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The second eldest is a talented athlete, competing in field hockey and soccer. The third may have inherited some of her father's flair for mathematics, and the...

99

Comparing Computer Run Time of Building Simulation Programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an approach to comparing computer run time of building simulation programs. The computing run time of a simulation program depends on several key factors, including the calculation algorithm and modeling capabilities of the program, the run period, the simulation time step, the complexity of the energy models, the run control settings, and the software and hardware configurations of the computer that is used to make the simulation runs. To demonstrate the approach, simulation runs are performed for several representative DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus energy models. The computer run time of these energy models are then compared and analyzed.

Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip; Selkowitz, Stephen; Wetter, Michael

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Entropy signature of the running cosmological constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renormalization group (RG) improved cosmologies based upon a RG trajectory of Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) with realistic parameter values are investigated using a system of cosmological evolution equations which allows for an unrestricted energy exchange between the vacuum and the matter sector. It is demonstrated that the scale dependence of the gravitational parameters, the cosmological constant in particular, leads to an entropy production in the matter system. The picture emerges that the Universe started out from a state of vanishing entropy, and that the radiation entropy observed today is essentially due to the coarse graining (RG flow) in the quantum gravity sector which is related to the expansion of the Universe. Furthermore, the RG improved field equations are shown to possess solutions with an epoch of power law inflation immediately after the initial singularity. The inflation is driven by the cosmological constant and ends automatically once the RG running has reduced the vacuum energy to the...

Bonanno, Alfio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

LHC Computing: The First Run and Beyond  

SciTech Connect

Even in between the last two generations of high energy physics detectors there has been a tremendous amount of progress in the area of computing. The distributed computing systems used in the LHC are composed of large-scale facilities on 5 continents, executing over a million processing requests a day, and moving peta-bytes of data a month. In this presentation I will discuss the operational experience of the LHC experiments and the challenges faced in the first run. I will discuss how the techniques have evolved and I will cover future projects to improve the distributed computing infrastructure and services. I will close by speaking of some potential new technologies being explored.

Fisk, Ian [Michigan State Univeristy

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

ATLAS Trigger Performance and Initial Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient trigger will be crucial to charged Higgs boson searches at the LHC. The ATLAS trigger will need to achieve a rejection factor of about 10^7 against random proton-proton collisions, and still be able to efficiently select signal events. Commissioning of the ATLAS trigger is progressing well, and much has already been done using cosmic rays and by replaying simulated physics events through the system. Detailed plans have been developed for commissioning with single LHC beams and the first collisions. The evolution of the ATLAS trigger towards stable running will be discussed in view of the searches for the charged Higgs boson. In particular, the determination of the trigger efficiency will be discussed, both in the case of the inclusive lepton triggers and the combined triggers needed for charged Higgs boson searches.

Winklmeier, F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

104

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

105

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Counties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Documents & Publications

106

Cloud Coverage in the Joint OSSE Nature Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A successful observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is fundamentally dependent on the simulation of the global observing system used in the experiment. In many applications, a free-running numerical model simulation, called a nature run, is ...

Will McCarty; Ronald M. Errico; Ronald Gelaro

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

TianRun UILK LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name TianRun UILK LLC Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based joint venture formed by TianRun USA, Horizon Wind, and Dakota Wind to develop the UILK wind...

108

PHENIX Beam Use Proposal for RHIC Runs 5-9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- larized proton collisions. Building on the successes of Runs 1-4, the requested running conditions of an Aerogel Cerenkov Counter (ACC). This detector, con- sisting of 160 elements of hydrophobic aerogel

Homes, Christopher C.

109

Another Bull Market Consolidation or Have Oil Prices Headed South for the Winter?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation was given at the New York Energy Forum on September 5, 2006. It explores the reasons behind rising oil prices over the last few years and discusses whether the drop in oil prices seen in late August and early September 2005 is the start of a long-running trend or is only a temporary decline.

Information Center

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Guided Summarization Results GOOGLE Google Inc Run ID: GOOGLE1 Overall Responsiveness 1.000 Overall ...

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Production-run software failure diagnosis via hardware performance counters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential and concurrency bugs are widespread in deployed software. They cause severe failures and huge financial loss during production runs. Tools that diagnose production-run failures with low overhead are needed. The state-of-the-art diagnosis techniques ... Keywords: concurrency bugs, failure diagnosis, performance counters, production run

Joy Arulraj; Po-Chun Chang; Guoliang Jin; Shan Lu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Designs of control charts with supplementary runs rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article studies the designs of the control charts with the supplementary runs rules (zone rules). It also investigates, compares and ranks 15 resultant control charts based on steady-state Average Run Length (ARL) that is evaluated by computer simulation. ... Keywords: Computer simulation, Control charts, Optimization design, Quality control, Runs rules

Sheng Zhang; Zhang Wu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

OIL PRICES AND LONG-RUN RISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide an excellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low future aggregate consumption growth. Motivated by these facts, I add an oil consumption good to the long-run risk model of Bansal and Yaron [2004] to study the asset pricing implications of observed changes in the dynamic interaction of consumption and oil prices. Empirically I observe that, compared to the first half of my 1987- 2010 sample, oil consumption growth in the last 10 years is unresponsive to levels of oil prices, creating an decrease in the mean-reversion of oil prices, and an increase in the persistence of oil price shocks. The model implies that the change in the dynamics of oil consumption generates increased systematic risk from oil price shocks due to their increased persistence. However, persistent oil prices also act as a counterweight for shocks to expected consumption growth, with high expected growth creating high expectations of future oil prices which in turn slow down growth. The combined effect is to reduce overall consumption risk and lower the equity premium. The model also predicts that these changes affect the riskiness of of oil futures contracts, and combine to create a hump shaped

Robert Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Robert Clayton Ready; Amir Yaron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PDSF FAQ - Why don't my jobs run?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

don't my don't my jobs run? Why don't my jobs run? If your jobs are just sitting in the "qw" state and not starting you cannot ask SGE directly why they aren't running (that service is turned off for scalability) so you have to do some detective work. Things to consider include: - Is the cluster full? Maybe you just need to be patient, especially if your project doesn't have any shares. In that case your jobs won't run until the cluster isn't full. In any event your jobs can't run until some other jobs finish and sometimes there are a lot of relatively long jobs running. - Check your job's resource requirements. It might be that you are incorrectly specifying some resource or requesting something that is not available. For example you might be specifying "-l eliza18io=1" and

117

SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26/02 26/02 Run Shutdown Weekends Maintenance / AP Injector Startup University Holidays PPS Certification Injector / SPEAR Startup SLAC Closed Edited - Robleto, Scott 10 11 12 AP 13 14 12 AP MA/AP 13 14 15 8 9 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I T 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 4 25 26 29 30 28 30 5 6 5 6 8 9 22 16 17 15 16 N 23 24 25 5 17 18 19 Startup 23 24 23 22 21 1 2 3 MA/AP 10 4 5 AP 6 7 8 9 20 22 18 24 24 17 22 23 20 21 14 15 11 16 10 12 9 13 7 8 S T A 1 2 3 15 4 5 5 6 8 6 4 5 R T 8 1 7 6 7 U P 2 3 10 9 10 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 31 25 26 27 28 29 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 21 15 16 13 14 10 27 28 26 22 23 24 25 8 9 10 21 20 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 12 22 23 15 16 21 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 15 16 29 30 31 29 31 28 20 28 21 22 23 24 25 17 26 27 18 19 20 24

118

FY2003 Run Sched.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/16/02 7/16/02 Run Maint/AP PPS Certification SLAC Closed Shutdown Startup Weekends University Holidays AP AP 15 8 9 10 11 12 14 12 AP MA/AP 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I 7 8 9 T S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I Edited by J. Robleto, B. Scott 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 N 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 29 30 31 10 5 6 5 6 7 8 9 22 23 MA/AP AP A E 5 17 18 19 10 11 12 9 MA/AP 18 Startup 24 23 22 21 16 17 15 1 2 3 15 10 4 5 AP 5 6 16 13 20 21 20 22 23 24 24 16 17 13 14 5 6 7 8 4 5 1 2 3 6 4 5 1 2 3 8 9 7 6 7 10 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 31 24 25 26 27 30 18 19 28 29 20 21 22 23 S T A R T U P 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 19 20 21 22 1 2 3 4 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 19 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 22 23 13 14 15 16 20 17 18 19 25 26 27 28 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 15 16 13 14 10 25 17 18 19 20 22 21 29 22 23 24 25 27 28 26 21 19 20 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 22 23 15 16 21 25 17 18 19 20 24 4 8 9 10 5 6 7 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 22 23 16 17 18 19 26 27 28 30 25 24 20 21 23 24 14 1 2 3 4 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 15 16 29 30 31 26 27 28

119

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular February 25, 2003 In ab initio molecular dynamics, whenever information about the potential energy surface advances for both approaches are discussed. Key Words : Ab initio molecular dynamics, Direct classical

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

120

Big Run, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigRun,Pennsylvania&oldid227772" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Mira Runs Break New Ground with Turbulence Simulations July 16, 2013 Printer-friendly version Shortly after Mira, the ALCF's new 10-petaflops supercomputer, entered...

122

Predicting Baseball Home Run Records Using Exponential Frequency Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new model, which uses the frequency of individuals' annual home run totals, is employed to predict future home run totals and records in Major League Baseball. Complete home run frequency data from 1903--2005 is analyzed, resulting in annual exponential distributions whose changes can be a used as a measure of progression in the sport and serve as a basis against which record-setting performances can be compared. We show that there is an 80% chance that Barry Bonds' current 73 home run record will be broken in the next 10 years, despite the longevity of previous records held by baseball legends Babe Ruth and Roger Marris.

Kelley, D J; Phillips, J A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

124

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 35.0 55.0 75.0 95.0 115.0 135.0 155.0 175.0 195.0 215.0 235.0 255.0 275.0 295.0 315.0 Hours Run Number APS Run History Operational Statistics Average Fill Duration Without a...

125

SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 14, 2012 August 14, 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Coun- ties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned property. Completing this project reduces the site's footprint by another 10 percent. "We excavated and disposed of over five million pounds of contaminated soil from three specific sites along the stream, erected miles of fence and placed over 2,000 signs in order to make Lower Three Runs safe and to reduce our site's footprint by another 10 percent," said Chris

126

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

127

Computing Models of CDF and D0 in Run II  

SciTech Connect

The next collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron, Run II, is scheduled for autumn of 1999. Both experiments, the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the D0 experiment are being modified to cope with the higher luminosity and shorter bunch spacing of the Tevatron. New detector components, higher event complexity, and an increased data volume require changes from the data acquisition systems up to the analysis systems. In this paper we present a summary of the computing models of the two experiments for Run II.

Lammel, S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II  

SciTech Connect

The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scheduled Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A-hr) Hours of Top- up Scheduled Top-up Injector Availability MTBF Run 97-7 741.9 698.2 94.1% 17 2.6 0.58 52.9 N/A N/A 41.1 Run 98-1 703.1 640.6 91.1% 21 3.0 0.79 48.7 N/A N/A 30.5 Run 98-2 714.5 656.4 91.9% 27 2.2 0.99 50.3 N/A N/A 24.3 Run 98-3 1154.2 1091.1 94.5% 28 2.3 0.62 85.1 N/A N/A 39.0 Run 98-4 1152.2 1076.9 93.5% 31 2.4 0.69 84.2 N/A N/A 34.7 Run 98-5 1093.6 987.4 90.3% 49 2.2 1.19 79.3 N/A N/A 20.2 Run 99-1 976.6 923.6 94.6% 35 1.5 0.91 75.3 N/A N/A 26.4 Run 99-2 831.2 794.9 95.6% 19 1.9 0.57 65.1 N/A N/A 41.8 Run 99-3 832.0 805.6 96.8% 31 0.9 0.92 58.5 N/A N/A 26.0 Run 99-4 1320.0 1256.2 95.2% 42 1.5 0.80 102.5 N/A N/A 29.9 Run 99-5 1024.0 970.8 94.8% 44 1.2 1.09 82.0 N/A N/A 22.1 Run 00-1 1511.0

130

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

131

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Facility Brent Run Generating Station Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Genesee County, Michigan Coordinates 43.0777289°, -83.6773928° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0777289,"lon":-83.6773928,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy March 12, 2012 - 11:39am Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities-picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime-baseball. In the past five years, major league baseball teams have increasingly made strides in greening up their stadiums. Here are several examples of teams that are hitting a home run for clean energy: Cleveland Indians Progressive Field - As the first American League ballpark to use solar energy back in 2007, the stadium boasts an upper deck solar panel array. The electricity produced from its 42 solar panels is

133

Running fermi with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout, performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Running FERMI with one-stage compressor: advantages, layout,a lattice with one-stage compressor, it was thought at thetime that the two bunch compressors configuration was still

Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national ... Early science runs prepare Sequoia for national security missions Posted By Office of Public Affairs

135

Holographic fermions with running chemical potential and dipole coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the properties of the holographic fermions in extremal $R$-charged black hole background with a running chemical potential, as well as the dipole coupling between fermions and the gauge field in the bulk. We find that although the running chemical potential effect the location of the Fermi surface, it does not change the type of fermions. We also study the onset of the Fermi gap and the gap effected by running chemical potential and the dipole coupling. The spectral function in the limit $\\omega\\rightarrow0$ and the existence of the Fermi liquid are also investigated. The running chemical potential and the dipole coupling altogether can make a non-Fermi liquid become the Landau-Fermi type.

Li Qing Fang; Xian-Hui Ge; Xiao-Mei Kuang

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Using Dynamic Tracing Sampling to Measure Long Running Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed cache simulation can be useful to both system developers and application writers to understand an application's performance. However, measuring long running programs can be extremely slow. In this paper we present a technique to use dynamic ...

Jeffrey Odom; Jeffrey K. Hollingsworth; Luiz DeRose; Kattamuri Ekanadham; Simone Sbaraglia

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANLHEPWF Note 184 June 3, 1999 Summary of June 2 Step-up Transformer Experiment Run Wei Gai for AWA group Purpose: To verify efficient Wakefield energy coupling from stage I to...

138

Estimation of run times in a freight rail transportation network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the accuracy of individual freight train run time predictions defined as the time between departure from an origin node to arrival at a destination node not including yard time. ...

Bonsra, Kunal (Kunal Baldev)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

TianRun USA Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name TianRun USA Inc. Place Minnesota Sector Wind energy Product Minnesota-based investment arm of Goldwind Science & Technology, Beijing Tianrun invested USD 3m to set up the...

140

First operational experience with the CMS Run Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Run Control System of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN's new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) controls the sub-detector and central data acquisition systems and the high-level trigger farm of the experiment. ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 11:41am Addthis Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Economic Impact Editor's Note: This article is cross-posted from the Office of Fossil Energy. Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the Energy Department's long-running minority educational research program. The awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions program - are $200,000 each

142

DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) long running minority educational research program. The DOE awards - presented under the Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions (HBCU/OMIs) program - are $200,000 each for projects that will address high-performance materials for long-term fossil energy applications, such as advanced ultrasupercritical

143

Silicon detector upgrades for the Tevatron Run 2  

SciTech Connect

The current silicon devices being used by the D0 and CDF collaborations for the Tevatron Run 2a, which is expected to end in 2005 after accumulating about 2 fb{sup -1} of data, will need to be replaced due to radiation damage for the following data collection period designated as Run 2b. We will discuss these silicon replacement plans, the more uniform design of the detectors between D0 and CDF, and the current status of their fabrication.

M. Kruse

2002-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pomeron fan diagrams with an infrared cutoff and running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By direct numerical calculations the influence of a physically relevant infrared cutoff and running coupling on the gluon density and structure function of a large nucleus is studied in the perturbative QCD approach. It is found that the infrared cutoff changes the solutions very little. Running of the coupling produces a bigger change, considerably lowering both the saturation momentum and values of the structure functions.

M. A. Braun

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

Running Dry at the Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Running Dry at the Power Plant Securing sufficient supplies of fresh water for societal, industrial, and agricultural uses while protecting the natural environment is becoming increasingly difficult in many parts of the United States. Climate variability and change may exacerbate the situation through hotter weather and disrupted precipitation patterns that promote regional droughts. Achieving long- term water sustainability will require balancing competing needs effectively, managing water resources more holistically, and developing innovative approaches to water use and conserva- tion. Utility companies-which use substantial amounts of water for plant cooling and other needs-are doing their part by pursuing water-conserving

146

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities May 28, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts?

147

Mill Run Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mill Run Wind Power Project Facility Mill Run Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Atlantic Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Exelon Location Mill Run PA Coordinates 39.921026°, -79.388666° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.921026,"lon":-79.388666,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Performance data from the ZEPLIN-III second science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ZEPLIN-III is a two-phase xenon direct dark matter experiment located at the Boulby Mine (UK). After its first science run in 2008 it was upgraded with: an array of low background photomultipliers, a new anti-coincidence detector system with plastic scintillator and an improved calibration system. After 319 days of data taking the second science run ended in May 2011. In this paper we describe the instrument performance with emphasis on the position and energy reconstruction algorithm and summarise the final science results.

Majewski, P; Akimov, D Yu; Araujo, H M; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Chepel, V; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Murphy, A St J; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Smith, N J T; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Run-time optimization of adaptive irregular applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compared to traditional compile-time optimization, run-time optimization could o?er signi?cant performance improvements when parallelizing and optimizing adaptive irregular applications, because it performs program analysis and adaptive optimizations during program execution. Run-time techniques can succeed where static techniques fail because they exploit the characteristics of input data, programs' dynamic behaviors, and the underneath execution environment. When optimizing adaptive irregular applications for parallel execution, a common observation is that the effectiveness of the optimizing transformations depends on programs' input data and their dynamic phases. This dissertation presents a set of run-time optimization techniques that match the characteristics of programs' dynamic memory access patterns and the appropriate optimization (parallelization) transformations. First, we present a general adaptive algorithm selection framework to automatically and adaptively select at run-time the best performing, functionally equivalent algorithm for each of its execution instances. The selection process is based on off-line automatically generated prediction models and characteristics (collected and analyzed dynamically) of the algorithm's input data, In this dissertation, we specialize this framework for automatic selection of reduction algorithms. In this research, we have identi?ed a small set of machine independent high-level characterization parameters and then we deployed an off-line, systematic experiment process to generate prediction models. These models, in turn, match the parameters to the best optimization transformations for a given machine. The technique has been evaluated thoroughly in terms of applications, platforms, and programs' dynamic behaviors. Speci?cally, for the reduction algorithm selection, the selected performance is within 2% of optimal performance and on average is 60% better than "Replicated Buffer," the default parallel reduction algorithm speci?ed by OpenMP standard. To reduce the overhead of speculative run-time parallelization, we have developed an adaptive run-time parallelization technique that dynamically chooses effcient shadow structures to record a program's dynamic memory access patterns for parallelization. This technique complements the original speculative run-time parallelization technique, the LRPD test, in parallelizing loops with sparse memory accesses. The techniques presented in this dissertation have been implemented in an optimizing research compiler and can be viewed as effective building blocks for comprehensive run-time optimization systems, e.g., feedback-directed optimization systems and dynamic compilation systems.

Yu, Hao

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Race Fusion 5K Benefit Run/Walk ·This event will be held in recognition of Alex who is living already love him so much!" ­Alex Keefover Fus-ion: The process or result of joining two or more things

Mohaghegh, Shahab

151

Floodplain modeling for Paddy's Run at the DOE Fernald Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restoration work for an intermittent stream, Paddy's Run, in the boundaries of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, managed by Fluor Fernald, involved floodplain expansion and the installation of grade control structures. Floodplain ... Keywords: Fernald, HEC-RAS, RiverCAD, floodplain, surface water

Marek H. Zaluski; Mark A. Ewanic; Steve D. Dunstan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Performance monitoring strategies for effective running of commercial refrigeration systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems often represent the largest electricity consumers in the supermarkets. Therefore there is a clear need for running these systems effectively. Performance monitoring uses different techniques to determine the actual system state. ... Keywords: COP, FDD, energy monitoring, performance measure, refrigeration

Martin Hrn?r; Petr Stluka

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The long-run evolution of energy prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DOE-1: sample run book. [Four different bldgs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of DOE-1 energy analysis runs are presented for four different buildings: a simple structure; a 31-story office building; a modified 31-story office building with a solar-heating system; and a small medical-office building. The intention is to progress from minimal to complex uses of the program. The simple structure introduces the new user to DOE-1. The large office building demonstrates runs on a variety of systems and plant options. The modified office building is a more complex treatment that illustrates the use of DOE-1 to determine energy code compliance. The medical building demonstrates a number of available options, such as simulation of shading surfaces and use of heat recovery. The following is given for each run: a simplified drawing of the building, detailed specifications, DOE-1 input, and selected output reports. The building specifications were compiled to allow the reader to relate the input to the actual physical characteristics of the architecture, distribution system, and central plant for each building. The input shown is that echoed by the program, complete with line numbers supplied by the Building Design Language processor. All of the runs were made on the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory CDC 7600 computer using Version 1.4 of the DOE-1 (formerly Cal-ERDA) program.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

Southern Company Services

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Quantifying disturbance rejection of SLIP-like running systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speed and maneuverability at which legged animals can travel across rough and cluttered landscapes has provided inspiration for the development of legged robots with similar capabilities. Researchers have developed a number of robots that can run ... Keywords: Legged robot, biologically-inspired robot, disturbance rejection, stability

Bruce Miller; John Schmitt; Jonathan E Clark

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Run-time validation of knowledge-based systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As knowledge bases become more complex it is increasingly unlikely that they will have been validated against all possible data and therefore an increasing risk of making errors. Run-time validation is checking whether the output of a knowledge base ... Keywords: anomalies, outliers, prudence, ripple-down rules, validation

Angela Finlayson, Paul Compton

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental Run Schedule Experimental Run Schedule SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will be closed for the winter holidays, December 21, 2013 through January 5, 2014. SSRL generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. SSRL operates at 500mA and employs a frequent fill schedule to maintain the SPEAR3 current approximately constant. Automatic injections will be conducted every 5 minutes. Automatic injections will only occur at the designated 5 minute intervals (i.e., on the hour and every 5 minutes thereafter). If the injector is not functional at the designated fill time, then the fill will be skipped. The current will be replenished at the next scheduled fill time after the injector is repaired and normal injection intervals will resume. The operator will give

159

Dry Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1042277°, -84.330494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1042277,"lon":-84.330494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Running Springs, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2077859°, -117.1092049° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2077859,"lon":-117.1092049,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SUMMARY OF HRE-2 RUN 13 (INITIAL POWER OPERATION)  

SciTech Connect

The first power operation of the HRE-2, referred to as Run 13, occurred in February 1958. In five days of power operation, the maximum sustained power was 1.5 Mw and the total power generated was 4B Mw-hr. During the first part of the power operation, the fuel solution contained very little internal recombination catalyst. This part of the run was characterized by high concentrations of radiolytic gas and significant loss of reactivity at very low powers. After an addition of copper and acid, reactivity losses were observed only nt higher powers. Power operation was terminated after samples showed high nickel concentrations in the fuel solution, indicating a very high stainless steel corrosion rate. Subsequent subcritical operation ended because of power wiring insulation failures. (auth)

Engel, J.R.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Hernandez-Fragoso, J.; Richardson, D.M.

1958-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

THE ANALYSIS OF DEPOLARIZATION FACTORS IN THE LAST RHIC RUN.  

SciTech Connect

Polarized proton beams were accelerated successfully at RHIC up to 100 Gev with the use of Siberian Snakes. Although the snakes were designed to preserve polarization, the successful acceleration and storage of polarized beams was dependent also on beam characteristics, like closed orbit, betatron tunes and even betatron coupling. The high-order spin resonances were observed and evaluated. The paper summarizes depolarizing effects observed during the run.

PTITSYN,V.LUCCIO,A.U.RANJBAR,V.H.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Snowmass Benchmark Points and Three-Loop Running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the full three-loop beta-functions for the MSSM generalised to include additional matter multiplets in 5, 10 representations of SU(5). We analyse in detail the effect of three-loop running on the sparticle spectrum for the MSSM Snowmass Benchmark Points. We also consider the effect on these spectra of additional matter multiplets (the semi-perturbative unification scenario).

I. Jack; D. R. T. Jones; A. F. Kord

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Succinct suffix arrays based on run-length encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A succinet full-text self-index is a data structure built on a text T = t1t2...tn, which takes little space (ideally close to that of the compressed text), permits efficient search for the ... Keywords: burrows-wheeler transform, compressed full-text self-indexes, empirical k-th order entropy, indexed string matching, run-length compression, suffix arrays, text retrieval

Veli Mkinen; Gonzalo Navarro

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Federal Reserve Bank of New York Staff Reports Repo Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings and is being distributed to economists and other interested readers solely to stimulate discussion and elicit comments. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and are not necessarily reflective of views at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York or the Federal Reserve System. Any errors or omissions are the responsibility of the authors. Repo Runs

Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Antoine Martin; David Skeie; Ernst-ludwig Von Thadden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Search for gravitational wave bursts in LIGO's third science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts in data from the three LIGO interferometric detectors during their third science run. The search targets subsecond bursts in the frequency range 100-1100 Hz for which no waveform model is assumed, and has a sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude of hrss ~ 10^{-20} / sqrt(Hz). No gravitational wave signals were detected in the 8 days of analyzed data.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2005-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design and first tests of the CDF Run 2 farms  

SciTech Connect

The high energy physics experiment CDF, located in the anti-proton-proton collider at Fermilab, will write data in Run 2 at a rate of 20 MByte/s, twenty times the rate of Run 1. The offline production system must be able to handle this rate. Components of that system include a large PC farm, I/O systems to read/write data to and from mass storage, and a system to split the reconstructed data into physics streams which are required for analysis. All of the components must work together seamlessly to ensure the necessary throughput. A description will be given of the overall hardware and software design for the system. A small prototype farm has been used for about one year to study performance, to test software designs and for the first Mock Data Challenge. Results from the tests and experience from the first Mock Data Challenge will be discussed. The hardware for the first production farm is in place and will be used for the second Mock Data Challenge. Finally, the possible scaling of the system to handle larger rates foreseen later in Run 2 will be described.

Jaroslav Antos et al.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The State of Supersymmetry after Run I of the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In these lectures I survey the state of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model in light of data from the first run of the LHC. After assessing pre-LHC expectations based on principles of naturalness and parsimony, I review the landscape of direct and indirect search limits at the LHC, including the implications of the observed Higgs mass and couplings. Finally, I survey several broad classes of supersymmetric models that are consistent with current data and enumerate the most promising search strategies and model-building directions for the future.

Nathaniel Craig

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

First LQCD Physics Runs with MILC and P4RHMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial series of physics LQCD runs were submitted to the BG/L science bank with the milc and p4rhmc. Both runs were for lattice dimensions of 32{sup 2} x 8. The p4 calculation was performed with v2.0 QMP{_}MPI.X (semioptomized p4 code using qmp over mpi) and milc v7.2, also using RHMC, but not specifically optimized for BlueGene. Calculations were performed along lines of constant physics, with the light quark masses 2-3 times their physics values and the strange quark mass set by m{sub ud} = 0.1m{sub s}. Job submissions was performed using the standard milc and p4 scripts provided on the ubgl cluster. Initial thermalized lattices for each code were also provided in this way. The only modifications for running on BG/L were to the directory names and the mT parameter which determines job durations (24 hrs on BG/L vs. 4 hrs on ubgl). The milc scripts were set to resubmit themselves 10 times, and the p4 scripts were submitted serially using the ''psub -d'' job dependency option. The runp4rhmc.tcsh could not be used to resubmit due to the 30m time limit imposed on interactive jobs. Most jobs were submitted to the smallest, 512 node partitions, but both codes could also run on the 1024 node partitions with a gain of only 30-50%. The majority of jobs ran without error. Stalled jobs were often indicative of a communication gap within a partition that LC was able to fix quickly. On some occasion a zero-length lattice file was deleted to allow jobs to restart successfully. Approximately 1000 trajectories were calculated for each beta value, see Table . The analysis was performed with the standard analysis scripts for each code, make{_}summary.pl for milc and analysis.tcsh for p4rhmc. All lattices, log files, and job submission scripts have been archived to permanent storage for subsequent analysis.

Soltz, R; Gupta, R

2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Long-Run Evolution of Energy Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: I examine the long-run behavior of oil, coal, and natural gas prices, using up to 127 years of data, and address the following questions: What does over a century of data tell us about the stochastic dynamics of price evolution, and how it should be modeled? Can models of reversion to stochastically fluctuating trend lines help us forecast prices over horizons of 20 years or more? And what do the answers to these questions tell us about investment decisions that are dependent on prices and their stochastic evolution?

Robert S. Pindyck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Hybrid Run-time Power Management Technique for Realtime  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new run-time power management technique for real-time embedded systems which consist of a voltage scalable processor and power controllable peripheral devices. We have observed that there exist significant trade-offs in terms of energy consumption between the Dynamic Power Management (DPM) scheme and the Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS) scheme over a wide range of system operating conditions. The proposed technique fully exploits workload-variation slack time by partitioning the task into several timeslots and shut down the unneeded peripheral device on timeslot-by-timeslot basis.

Minyoung Kim; Embedded System With

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Full core reactor analysis: Running Denovo on Jaguar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully-consistent, full-core, 3D, deterministic neutron transport simulations using the orthogonal mesh code Denovo were run on the massively parallel computing architecture Jaguar XT5. Using energy and spatial parallelization schemes, Denovo was able to efficiently scale to more than 160 k processors. Cell-homogenized cross sections were used with step-characteristics, linear-discontinuous finite element, and trilinear-discontinuous finite element spatial methods. It was determined that using the finite element methods gave considerably more accurate eigenvalue solutions for large-aspect ratio meshes than using step-characteristics. (authors)

Jarrell, J. J.; Godfrey, A. T.; Evans, T. M.; Davidson, G. G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Bailey County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4.0913057°, -102.8975098° 4.0913057°, -102.8975098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0913057,"lon":-102.8975098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

1/15/12 1 MARK W. BAILEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consultant (March 2001­September 2004). Information Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Rome, NY. Visiting Fellowship. National Research Council/United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Summer 2003 (1998­1999). PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Editor, ACM SIGPLAN Notices (2005­2011). Member (ex-officio), ACM

Bailey, Mark W.

178

DOE-2 sample run book: Version 2.1E  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-2 Sample Run Book shows inputs and outputs for a variety of building and system types. The samples start with a simple structure and continue to a high-rise office building, a medical building, three small office buildings, a bar/lounge, a single-family residence, a small office building with daylighting, a single family residence with an attached sunspace, a ``parameterized`` building using input macros, and a metric input/output example. All of the samples use Chicago TRY weather. The main purpose of the Sample Run Book is instructional. It shows the relationship of LOADS-SYSTEMS-PLANT-ECONOMICS inputs, displays various input styles, and illustrates many of the basic and advanced features of the program. Many of the sample runs are preceded by a sketch of the building showing its general appearance and the zoning used in the input. In some cases we also show a 3-D rendering of the building as produced by the program DrawBDL. Descriptive material has been added as comments in the input itself. We find that a number of users have loaded these samples onto their editing systems and use them as ``templates`` for creating new inputs. Another way of using them would be to store various portions as files that can be read into the input using the {number_sign}{number_sign} include command, which is part of the Input Macro feature introduced in version DOE-2.lD. Note that the energy rate structures here are the same as in the DOE-2.lD samples, but have been rewritten using the new DOE-2.lE commands and keywords for ECONOMICS. The samples contained in this report are the same as those found on the DOE-2 release files. However, the output numbers that appear here may differ slightly from those obtained from the release files. The output on the release files can be used as a check set to compare results on your computer.

Winkelmann, F.C.; Birdsall, B.E.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Hirsch, J.J.; Gates, S. [Hirsch (James J.) and Associates, Camarillo, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 (will not work with VISTA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 for a terminal window to appear. The wait may be 30 to 70 seconds on some machines. 6. Use the terminal window, and shut down the X server. 12. Remove CD from drive. #12;[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January

Meagher, Mary

180

The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb muon detector, part of the first LHCb trigger level (L0), has been built to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25 ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a Pr resolution of 20%. The detector has been built using Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier technology. The chambers are arranged in five stations, interspersed with iron filter placed along the beam pipe. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers and the measured performances are presented. The strategies foreseen for the detector calibration, the results of the space and time alignment efforts and few first running scenarios are discussed.

Furcas, S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania School Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... Feb. 16, 2013 Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas F ind out how schools in Pennsylvania transport students in compressed

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Santa Fe Metro Fleet Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... June 8, 2010 Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas " CNG buses are reliable, have cleaner-burning engines, offer increased oil life, and have lower fuel costs than diesel.

184

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models September 11, 2008...

185

Using the Bran Luminosity Detectors for Beam Emittance Monitoring During LHC Physics Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MONITORING DURING LHC PHYSICS RUNS* A. Ratti", H.S. Matis,IP5 during each of the Physics Runs. This provides a toolthe luminous regions from the physics experiments. Operator

Ratti, A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's Batch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF Batch System Introduction Quick Overview Setup Basic Idea Including a Tarball Using runManySections.py to Create Command File Running Compiled Root Macros Debugging Jobs Locally CERN (LSF) versus FNAL (Condor) Differences Introduction runManySections.py is designed to make it easy to run many different sections (or jobs) at once on the CMSLPC CAF or CERN's batch system. It is designed to complement CRAB as runManySections.py is designed to be used with non-cmsRun executables. The general idea is that you pass in a list of commands you would like run and you get the output of these commands back. It is currently configured to run for the Condor system at CMSLPC CAF and CERN's LSF batch system. It is very easy to configure to run on other

187

China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd Hua Run | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hua Run Hua Run Jump to: navigation, search Name China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) Place Shantou, Guangdong Province, China Zip 515041 Sector Wind energy Product A company engages in developing wind power project. References China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) is a company located in Shantou, Guangdong Province, China . References ↑ "China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=China_Resources_Wind_Power_Development_Co_Ltd_Hua_Run&oldid=343528

188

[Global warming and the running average sunspot number  

SciTech Connect

It has been reported in your pages that the Bush administration`s views and actions regarding how or whether to react to possible global warming due to greenhouse gases have been influenced by the so-called Marshall report. This unrefereed report, released by the George C. Marshall Institute, had as its principal conclusion the finding that the 0.5{degree} C global warming of the last century was mostly due to solar variability and, thus, the greenhouse warming of the 21st century can be expected to be a relatively small l{degree} C or so. The authors support this finding by comparing the 33-year running average sunspot number with the trend in annual average global temperature and noting the parallel between the two, especially during the 1940s--1960s when the temperature trend was downward. Subsequent letters to Science debated the merits of this and other conclusions contained in the report. I now present additional technical evidence which shows that, quite aside from the question of whether the data presented in the report support its conclusions, the actual figure on which the above conclusion is based is in error.

Fernau, M.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Commissioning Run of the CRESST-II Dark Matter Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CRESST cryogenic direct dark matter search at Gran Sasso, searching for WIMPs via nuclear recoil, has been upgraded to CRESST-II by several changes and improvements.We present the results of a commissioning run carried out in 2007. The basic element of CRESST-II is a detector module consisting of a large (~ 300 g) CaWO_4 crystal and a very sensitive smaller (~ 2 g) light detector to detect the scintillation light from the CaWO_4.Information from light-quenching factor studies allows the definition of a region of the energy-light yield plane which corresponds to tungsten recoils. A neutron test is reported which supports the principle of using the light yield to identify the recoiling nucleus. Data obtained with two detector modules for a total exposure of 48 kg-days are presented. Judging by the rate of events in the "all nuclear recoils" acceptance region the apparatus shows a factor ~ten improvement with respect to previous results, which we attribute principally to the presence of the neutron shield. In the "tungsten recoils" acceptance region three events are found, corresponding to a rate of 0.063 per kg-day. Standard assumptions on the dark matter flux, coherent or spin independent interactions,then yield a limit for WIMP-nucleon scattering of 4.8 \\times 10^{-7}pb, at M{WIMP} ~50 GeV.

G. Angloher; M. Bauer; I. Bavykina; A. Bento; A. Brown; C. Bucci; C. Ciemniak; C. Coppi; G. Deuter; F. von Feilitzsch; D. Hauff; S. Henry; P. Huff; J. Imber; S. Ingleby; C. Isaila; J. Jochum; M. Kiefer; M. Kimmerle; H. Kraus; J. -C. Lanfranchi; R. F. Lang; B. Majorovits; M. Malek; R. McGowan; V. B. Mikhailik; E. Pantic; F. Petricca; S. Pfister; W. Potzel; F. Proebst; W. Rau; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; K. Schaeffner; J. Schmaler; S. Scholl; W. Seidel; L. Stodolsky; A. J. B. Tolhurst; I. Usherov; W. Westphal

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

191

LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

Furcas, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing  

SciTech Connect

SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; /Fermilab; St. Denis, R.; /Glasgow U.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

LCLS-scheduling-run_V_Ver9c.xlsx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tue Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day Com Com Com Com Com L421 Coffee Night L477 Robinson Gruebel (L304, run 4) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thur Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day L498 Yachandra L487 Sokoloswski-Tinten IH Bozek L447 Harmand Night IH Lemke L396 Scherz L396 Scherz L409 Boeglin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Day L399/433 Fromme/Neutze L467 Madsen Night Com Com Com L467 Mad L399/433 Fromme Com Com 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri

194

Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

Southern Company Services

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data is disclosed. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer. 3 figs.

Berlin, G.J.

1997-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, Gary J. (Beech Island, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

Berlin, G.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2/04 2/04 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup SLAC Closed Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays 17 MA/AP 18 MA 5 1 1 1 AP 3 4 7 4 9 5 6 8 10 20 10 11 12 11 AP 9 1 4 1 2 8 12 20 24 21 22 21 26 5 5 2 3 6 7 16 MA O 9 12 I 15 10 S 8 9 13 11 11 12 13 6 2 MA MA/AP AP 3 2 4 2 1 1 AP 3 T 17 17 18 16 16 4 3 13 14 12 8 14 15 U 20 10 21 13 MA 15 12 11 9 MA 4 5 5 3 MA 6 1 9 MA 16 13 3 4 1 13 M 5 12 11 M S C 8 11 M M 14 14 15 A E B M 31 M 29 28 MA 18 19 17 4 10 11 7 18 22 17 19 21 20 23 26 25 A 25 24 30 20 24 25 P 29 28 U 31 29 30 MA/AP 29 2003 2004 5 17 4 9 10 11 8 12 13 14 H D 15 16 14 O 13 N 7 User Conf. W 7 7 3 3 9 10 6 4 2 2 6 27 T 2003 2004 1 2 3 24 S 26 R 22 23 T AP 30 29 29 30 31 AP A M E 20 T 30 22 23 24 30 24 MA 25 N N 19 25 17 MA B 20 17 19 18 O W/ I S 27 C 7 8 6 14 15 16 7 10 9 8 10 6 6 7 5 17 15 MA 9 12 11 14 24 26 23 21 26 23 22 I N 2 3 5 2 3 4 8 1 S T 7 6 A L L 7 7 8 9 10 T 6 A I 11 12 I I 10 O 9 11 12 13 10 14 15 16 17 24 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 30 28 29 O N 22 23 28 20 13 14 15 16 18 19 25 26 O 22 18 27 24 27 22 23 24 30 29 28 21 12 13 22 31 25 23 21 29 30 13 14 27 19 26 24 25 15 16 27 28 29 28 27 26 29 N 28 I 31

199

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 1: Run 247  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 247 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was to obtain performance data for the TSL system and the individual process units with particular emphasis on hydrotreating catalyst performance. Secondary objectives were to demonstrate operability for the system and the respective ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-E 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agreed to work with the United Nations to curb production and encourage ... 35 Run-E 2 XIE19990605.0194 Besides supplying crude oil to Cuba, the ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources is essen-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptable engines Running on biofuels and beyond Utilizing a wide variety of energy resources; natural gas; hydrogen; synthetic fuels; biofuels including biogas, biodiesels, and alcohols--even syngas

Endres. William J.

202

SEE HOW WE RUN...At WIPP, We Really Mean Business  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will ensure accuracy and reliability of information, as well as reduced cycle time for information retrieval. W Why is it important to run WIPP like a business? Continually...

203

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Elasticity of Demand for Relative Petroleum Inventory in the Short Run MICHAEL YE,? JOHN ZYREN,?? AND JOANNE SHORE?? Abstract To better understand petroleum ...

204

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

The online system of the PHENIX experiment in the RHIC run 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHENIX [1] is one of two large experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). At the time of this conference, the Run 5 of RHIC is in progress and has been very successful so far. Compared to the previous run, ...

Martin L. Purschke

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue June 8, 2011 - 5:25pm Addthis Wendy Wolfson...

207

PoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- gency situation handling were defined, e.g. remote shifter replacement with a local (Fnal) one in casePoS(ACAT)027 Online Monitoring for the CDF Run II Experiment and the Remote Operation Facilities T the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with enphasis on the remote monitoring shift

208

FORODT: Fortran debug routine for the PDP-11 (RT-11). [For run-time debugging  

SciTech Connect

FORODT provides run-time debug features to PDP-11 Fortran programs running with the RT-11 operating system. Digital Equipment Corporation's ODT program has been extended to include Fortran breakpoints, decimal integer and floating point data input, and output options. 3 figures.

Tanner, D.N.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Asymmetric trajectory generation and impedance control for running of biped robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An online asymmetric trajectory generation method for biped robots is proposed to maintain dynamical postural stability and increase energy autonomy, based on the running stability criterion defined in phases. In a support phase, an asymmetric trajectories ... Keywords: Angular momentum, Asymmetric trajectory, Biped robot, Impedance control, Running stability

Ohung Kwon; Jong Hyeon Park

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Initial steps towards run-time support for norm-governed systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a knowledge representation framework with an associated run-time support infrastructure that is able to compute, for the benefit of the members of a norm-governed multi-agent system, the physically possible and permitted actions at each time, ... Keywords: GOLEM, event calculus, run-time service, social interaction

Visara Urovi; Stefano Bromuri; Kostas Stathis; Alexander Artikis

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

DZero Experiment Run 1 (1992-1996) Event Display Gallery from the Fermilab Tevatron  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This web page provides access to images captured during D0 experiments Run I. In addition, the user can see live event displays from the current Run II for both the CDF and the DZero experiments at http://www.fnal.gov/pub/now/live_events/index.html. Another interesting offering from the D0 groups at Fermilab is the large collection of "Plain English Summaries" of their published reports and papers. These Summaries are excellent for layman's understanding of the high energy physics research done at Fermilab and can serve as introductions to the published papers themselves. The Summaries are at http://www-d0.fnal.gov/public/pubs/d0_physics_summaries.html for Run I and http://www-d0.fnal.gov/Run2Physics/WWW/results/summary.htm for Run II.

214

Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

OVERVIEW OF BEAM STUDIES AT RHIC DURING THE YEAR 2000 RUN.  

SciTech Connect

During the Year 2000 run, RHIC has been commissioned and brought into operation reaching 10% of the design luminosity. A program for beam studies and machine development has been setup before the run with the goal of improving machine performance. The plan was implemented during the run in a series of beam studies, focusing initially on interaction region correction, intrabeam scattering, 3-dimensional beam reconstruction and luminosity optimization. An overview of the results is given with pointers to individual contributions where data are presented in more detail. The program for dedicated machine development at RHIC during the Year 2001 is reviewed and discussed.

PILAT,F.; BAI,M.; DREES,A.; FISCHER,W.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Comments on momentum aperture of 100 GeV/n Au runs in RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In RHIC 2010 100 GeV/n Au run, the momentum aperture has been an issue in the re-bucketing and the beam intensity lifetime in store. Both Blue and Yellow beams with comparable storage RF voltage and peak current have suffered more beam loss than in Run 2007. In this note, some comments are made for the momentum aperture of the lattices used from the Au runs in 2007, 2008 and 2010. From the wigglings and the beam decays of each lattice, information regarding the machine momentum aperture is presented. Several directions in further improvement are discussed.

Zhang, S.Y.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recent beauty results from CDF and the Run-II upgrades  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the most recent results from the Collider Detector Facility (CDF) from 110 pb{sup -1} of data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron from 1992 to 1995. Improved measurements of B meson spectroscopy, lifetimes, and searches for new particle states are presented. Evidence for the effectiveness of same side tagging techniques in the context of mixing measurements is shown with applicability for CP violation studies in Run-II explained. The planned upgrades of importance to {ital b} physics for Run-II are briefly detailed with an emphasis on the expected physics reach in Run-II by CDF.

Huffman, B.T. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States); CDF Collaboration

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 2: Run 248  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 248 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run began on 8 February 1985 and continued through 5 May 1985. A total of 170 tons of Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal was fed in 1,904 hours of operation. The primary run objectives included the demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal with the low-contact time (LCT) reactor in place at the thermal liquefaction unit (TLU) in both the Double Integrated T...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Two Stage Liquefaction With Illinois 6 Coal: Volume 3: Run 250  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 250 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run operated in a Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) mode using Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary run objective was demonstration of unit and system operability for bituminous coal in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (CC-ITSL) mode of operation. In CC-ITSL the products from the thermal (first stage) reactor are sent directly ...

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 0: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote 70: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass T-570: HP Security Bulletin - HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass March 4, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Potential Security Impact: Remote execution of arbitrary code, Denial of Service (DoS), authentication bypass. PLATFORM: HP-UX B.11.11, B.11.23, B.11.31 running OpenSSL before vA.00.09.08q. ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass. reference LINKS: Net-Security Advisory: HPSBUX02638

222

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? September 16, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Shannon told you about biodiesel, a renewable fuel that can power a vehicle using less fuel and producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. DOE has an Alternative Fuel Station Locator that can help drivers find the nearest fueling station to fill up their vehicles. Would you consider driving a vehicle that can run on biodiesel? Why or why not? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at

223

Submission for question 1 with items numbered: 1 Run-B 1 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 9 Run-B 2 XIE19971228.0012 The United States has pressured Kazakhstan to shelve a plan for pipeline through Iran in favor of a US backed ...

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

224

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

diff -ruN oommf12a4pre-20100719/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl oommf12a4pre-20100719bis/app/mmdisp/scripts/mmdisp.tcl --- oommf12a4pre ...

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

The impact of "Never Run Out" policy assured supply chain with dual reorder point expediting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing a big supply chain for one of the largest quick service restaurant companies, especially when the company has a policy called "Never Run Out," is very challenging. A traditional way of managing inventory requires ...

Lee, Gil Su

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Drilling history and stratigraphic correlation of Rose Run sandstone of northeastern Ohio  

SciTech Connect

To date, 40 known tests have penetrated the Knox unconformity in Ashtabula, Lake, Trumbull, Geauga, and Portage Counties, Ohio. Prior to 1980, there were only 22 tests. Of these, only 10 penetrated and logged rocks older than the Rose Run sandstone. In the period 1980-1986, two Rose Run discoveries were drilled, one in New Lyme Township of Ashtabula County and one in Burton Township of Geauga County. Both discovery wells have been offset. Attempts have been made to correlate these two areas with older tests in northeastern Ohio and with the Rose Run sandstones of Coshocton County. In northeastern Ohio, preliminary studies indicate a Rose Run sandstone and/or dolomite interval approximately 100 ft thick. The upper 50 ft is predominantly sandstone and the lower 50 ft changes locally from sandstone to dolomite. The upper sandy member can be correlated to the A, B, and C sandstone units of Coshocton County.

Moyer, C.C.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

IR Radiation from Trees to a Ski Run: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately calculating the surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is crucial when determining snow surface temperature and other snow-related variables, knowledge of which is important for ski racing. Downwelling longwave radiation can ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzing the Long-run Impact of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative on Maryland Power Sectors Costs and CO2 Emissions Speaker(s): Yihsu Chen Date: June 14, 2007 - 12:00pm...

230

Selection of tau leptons with the CDF Run 2 trigger system  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented triggers for hadronically decaying tau leptons within a framework of the CDF Run 2 trigger system. We describe the triggers, along with their physics motivations, and report on their initial performance.

A. Anastassov; S. Baroiant; M. Chertok

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Evaluation of a Fast-Running Urban Dispersion Modeling System Using Joint Urban 2003 Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban dispersion modeling system was evaluated using the Joint Urban 2003 field data. The system consists of a fast-running urban airflow model (RUSTIC, for Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants) that is coupled with a ...

Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Beuf, Guillaume

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

An alternative scaling solution for high-energy QCD saturation with running coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of approximate scaling compatible with the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling is found, which is different from the previously known running coupling geometric scaling. The corresponding asymptotic traveling wave solution is derived. Although featuring different scaling behaviors, the two solutions are complementary approximations of the same universal solution, and they become equivalent in the high energy limit. The new type of scaling is observed in the small-x DIS data.

Guillaume Beuf

2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

How Long For the Long-Run Equilibrium in a Cointegration System?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In economics the period of "long-run" often signifies the length of time within which transient fluctuations disappear, and a system eventually comes back to an equilibrium state (or path), if any. Among some interesting cases of long run analysis, the concept of cointegration is a relatively new concept of the long run equilibrium. This paper discusses how to determine the length of the long-run period for a cointegration relation. In an application to a consumption-income relation we found that the length of the long-run period for the relation is about ten quarters. Keywords: Long run equilibrium, cointegration. 1 Department of Economics, State University of New York - Albany, Albany, NY 12222. (518) 442-4926, jykim@cnsunix.albany.edu 1 1 Introduction The concept of cointegration defined by Engle and Granger (1987) has become useful for analyzing linear dynamic systems in economics. The existence of a cointegration relation among a set of variables implies that there exists a...

How Long; Long-run Equilibrium; Jae-young Kim; Jae-young Kim

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Residential response to price changes in natural gas service: A short-run analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential consumer demand for natural gas services is determined by numerous components including natural gas and competing fuel prices, weather patterns, appliance ownership characteristics, income, and energy conservation measure implementation. This study utilizes household-level data on a set of the determinants of residential natural gas demand, combined with corresponding consumption observations, to analyze the price response over the [open quotes]short-run[close quotes] period, in which primary natural gas-consuming appliances are fixed. Two model specifications are employed in this study to model the natural gas demand function and derive short-run price elasticity estimates. These are the Error Components (EC) and Fixed Effects (FE) models. These specifications result in elastic short-run responses estimates ranging between [minus]2.164 and [minus]7.015. These values contrast with the inelastic short-run estimated responses presented in previous empirical work, and the likelihood of actually observing such large short-run responses is expected to be small. The large estimates developed in the current study are evidently due to the use of household-specific data that incorporates disaggregated factors that influence monthly fluctuations in demand. This level of detail is subsumed within the aggregated data employed in prior studies. The price elasticity estimates developed in this study are directly applicable to short-run fuel demand analyses. The estimates are also applicable to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy conservation programs.

Wilson, P.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effects of Heat Stress and Increased Protein Fed in Milk Replacers on the Health and Growth Parameters of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives of the study were to evaluate if calves fed 6 L of high protein milk replacer (HPMR; 1135 g/d, 28% crude protein (CP), 20% fat) had improved performance and health as compared to calves fed 4 L of a conventional milk replacer (CMR; 454 g/d, 20% CP, 20% fat) in heat stress and non heat stress environments. Holstein bull calves (n=52) Water consumption (WC) in mL and starter intake (SI) in grams was measured daily. Feed conversion (FC) was also calculated for each nutritional treatment and environment. Fecal scores (FS) of 1 to 4 (1=hard, firm, 2=soft, firm, 3=no form, and 4=watery) were recorded daily. Calves with a FS of >3 were considered to have diarrhea and required treatment. Respiration rates (RR) were recorded at 0630 (AM) and 1830 (PM) to monitor respiratory challenges while rectal temperatures (RT) were also measured using a digital thermometer daily in AM and PM to monitor febrile events. If RT was greater than 39.2 degrees C for NHS calves and 39.7 degrees C for HS calves, they were treated for febrile events (FE). Data was analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS 9.2). HPMR had a greater (P < 0.01) WH, HG, BL, HH, ADG, WC, and FS than the CMR (0.15 vs. 0.11, 0.37 vs. 0.28, 0.27 vs. 0.22, 0.21 vs. 0.14, 0.82 vs. 0.58, 4235 vs. 2656, and 2.05 vs. 1.73, respectively). HS had a greater (P < 0.01) WC than NHS (4365 vs. 2526, respectively). CMR had a greater SI and FC (P < 0.05) than HPMR (0.942 vs. 0.437, and 1.99 vs. 1.78, respectively). HS had a higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM (P<0.01) than NHS (38.87 vs. 38.77, 39.03 vs. 38.79, 35.79 vs. 32.77, and 55.73 vs. 38.57, respectively. Calves in NHS had a higher FE (P<0.01) than the HS calves (6.24 vs. 2.33). There was no significant difference in growth parameters in HS or NHS in calves of like feeding strategies. The results show calves in HS experienced higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM. The increased protein and energy fed to the HPMR calves resulted in greater FS and increased growth.

Krenek, Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sensitivity to Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescences Achieved during LIGO's Fifth and Virgo's First Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the sensitivity achieved by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors for compact binary coalescence (CBC) searches during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. We present noise spectral density curves for each of the four detectors that operated during these science runs which are representative of the typical performance achieved by the detectors for CBC searches. These spectra are intended for release to the public as a summary of detector performance for CBC searches during these science runs.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; S. Aoudia; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; K. G. Arun; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Astone; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. G. Beker; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; S. Bigotta; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; C. Boccara; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; L. Bosi; M. Boyle; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. Capano; F. Carbognani; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; C. Corda; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; J. -P. Coulon; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; A. Dari; K. Das; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; M. Davier; G. Davies; A. Davis; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; P. Devanka; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. Dueck; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; L. Gammaitoni; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; I. Gholami; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; P. Hall; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh--Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; C. Kim; H. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; T. Krause; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; J. Li; T. G. F. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; J. M. Mackowski; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; E. Majorana; C. Mak; N. Man; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; E. Maros; J. Marque; F. Martelli

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: Analysis of coal-derived synthetic crude from HRI CTSL Run CC-15 and HRI Run CMSL-2  

SciTech Connect

Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (US DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-89PC89883), IIT Research Institute, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research applied a suite of petroleum inspection tests to two direct coal liquefactions net product oils produced in two direct coal liquefaction processing runs. Two technical reports, authored by NIPER, are presented here. The following assessment briefly describes the two coal liquefaction runs and highlights the major findings of the project. It generally is concluded that the methods used in these studies can help define the value of liquefaction products and the requirements for further processing. The application of these methods adds substantially to our understanding of the coal liquefaction process and the chemistry of coal-derived materials. These results will be incorporated by CONSOL into a general overview of the application of novel analytical techniques to coal-derived materials at the conclusion of this contract.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Kim, J.; Shay, J. [National Inst. for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

SLUDGE BATCH SUPPLEMENTAL SRAT RUNS EFFECTS OF YIELD STRESS AND CYCLE TIME INCREASE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has transitioned from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing. Phase III-Tank 40 Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet simulations have been completed to determine the initial processing conditions for the DWPF transition. The impact of higher yield stress (SB-25) and cycle time extension (SB6-26) on the physical and chemical effects of SB6 processing during the SRAT (Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank) cycle were evaluated. No significant impacts on the SRAT chemistry were noted during the higher yield stress run. In particular, no impact on mercury stripping was noted, indicating that settling of elemental mercury was not the primary factor in the low mercury recovery noted in the flowsheet testing. The SRAT product from this run retained the higher yield stress of the starting sludge. The run indicated that ultrasonication is an effective tool to increase the yield stress of simulants to targeted values and the chemistry of downstream processing is not impacted. Significant differences were noted in the cycle time extension test compared to the Phase III flowsheet baseline runs. Large decreases in the ammonia and hydrogen generation rates were noted along with reduced mercury stripping efficiency. The latter effect is similar to that of operating under a high acid stoichiometry. It is conceivable that, under the distinctly different conditions of high formic acid concentration (high acid run) or slow formic acid addition (extended run), that mercury could form amalgams with noble metals, possibly rendering both inert. Thus, the removal of free mercury and noble metals could decrease the rate of catalytic formic acid reactions which would decrease generation of ammonium and hydrogen. The potential underlying reasons for the behavior noted during this run would require additional testing.

Fernandez, A.

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts using data from LIGO Science Run 5 and Virgo Science Run 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with 137 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. The data used in this analysis were collected from 2005 November 4 to 2007 October 1, and most of the GRB triggers were from the Swift satellite. The search uses a coherent network analysis method that takes into account the different locations and orientations of the interferometers at the three LIGO-Virgo sites. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave burst signals associated with this sample of GRBs. Using simulated short-duration (<1 s) waveforms, we set upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves associated with each GRB. We also place lower bounds on the distance to each GRB under the assumption of a fixed energy emission in gravitational waves, with typical limits of D ~ 15 Mpc (E_GW^iso / 0.01 M_o c^2)^1/2 for emission at frequencies around 150 Hz, where the LIGO-Virgo detector network has best sensitivity. We present astrophysical interpretations and implications of these results, and prospects for corresponding searches during future LIGO-Virgo runs.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; F. Acernese; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; M. Alshourbagy; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; F. Antonucci; S. Aoudia; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; H. Armandula; P. Armor; K. G. Arun; Y. Aso; S. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; C. Barker; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; Th. S. Bauer; B. Behnke; M. Beker; M. Benacquista; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; S. Bigotta; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; S. Birindelli; R. Biswas; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; C. Boccara; T. P. Bodiya; L. Bogue; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bork; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; C. Van Den Broeck; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Brummit; G. Brunet; R. Budzy?ski; T. Bulik; A. Bullington; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; O. Burmeister; D. Buskulic; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; E. Campagna; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; F. Carbognani; L. Cardenas; S. Caride; G. Castaldi; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chatterji; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; N. Christensen; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; T. Cokelaer; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. C. Corbitt; C. Corda; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; J. -P. Coulon; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; A. Dari; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; M. Davier; G. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; M. del Prete; V. Dergachev; S. Desai; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. Dueck; I. Duke; J. -C. Dumas; J. G. Dwyer; C. Echols; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; E. Espinoza; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Faltas; Y. Fan; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; A. Franzen; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. Fyffe; V. Galdi; L. Gammaitoni; J. A. Garofoli; F. Garufi; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; I. Gholami; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; K. Goda; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goezetler; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; V. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; M. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; F. Grimaldi; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; M. Guenther; G. Guidi; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. D. Hammond; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; D. Hoyland; D. Huet; B. Hughey; S. H. Huttner; D. R. Ingram; T. Isogai; M. Ito; A. Ivanov; P. Jaranowski; B. Johnson; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Sancho de la Jordana; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; D. Kasprzyk; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; R. Khan; E. Khazanov; P. King; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. La Penna; P. K. Lam; M. Landry; B. Lantz; A. Lazzarini; H. Lei; M. Lei; N. Leindecker; I. Leonor; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; C. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; T. B. Littenberg; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Longo; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; M. Lormand; G. Losurdo; P. Lu; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; J. -M. Mackowski; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; E. Majorana; N. Man; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; A. Markosyan; J. Markowitz; E. Maros; J. Marque; F. Martelli; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; A. Masserot; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; M. McHugh; G. McIntyre; D. J. A. McKechan; K. McKenzie; M. Mehmet; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menndez

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

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241

RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN  

SciTech Connect

Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2010-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models September 8, 2008 - 9:45am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time for the U.S. Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore advanced climate change models at three of DOE's national laboratories as part of a three-year memorandum of understanding on collaborative climate research signed today by the two agencies. NOAA will work with climate change models as well as perform near real-time high-impact (non-production) weather prediction research using computing

244

New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running March 16, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. “WIPP is America’s only and the world’s best,” Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco, right, exchanges greetings with Mark Long, Jr., a Washington TRU Solutions LLC employee, at a WIPP all-hands meeting in February. "WIPP is America's only and the world's best," Franco said of the deep geologic repository for nuclear waste. CARLSBAD, N.M. - If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office

245

PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces November 14, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured) serves as a control and doesn’t get changed during any of the experiments. | Photo courtesy of PNNL. At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in

246

FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems | Argonne Leadership Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservations Queueing Running Jobs HTC Mode MPMD and MPIEXEC FAQs Queueing and Running Debugging and Profiling Performance Tools and APIs IBM References Software and Libraries Tukey Eureka / Gadzooks Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] FAQs Queueing and Running on BG/P Systems Contents Is there a limit on stack size? What are typical boot times for a job My job had empty stdout, and the stderr looks like it died immediately after it started. What happened? Where can I find the details of a job submission? Back to top Is there a limit on stack size? There is no strict limit on the stack size. The stack and heap grow towards each other until a collision occurs. If your job terminates with an error

247

PARLO: PArallel Run-Time Layout Optimization for Scientific Data Explorations with Heterogeneous Access Pattern  

SciTech Connect

Download Citation Email Print Request Permissions Save to Project The size and scope of cutting-edge scientific simulations are growing much faster than the I/O and storage capabilities of their run-time environments. The growing gap is exacerbated by exploratory, data-intensive analytics, such as querying simulation data with multivariate, spatio-temporal constraints, which induces heterogeneous access patterns that stress the performance of the underlying storage system. Previous work addresses data layout and indexing techniques to improve query performance for a single access pattern, which is not sufficient for complex analytics jobs. We present PARLO a parallel run-time layout optimization framework, to achieve multi-level data layout optimization for scientific applications at run-time before data is written to storage. The layout schemes optimize for heterogeneous access patterns with user-specified priorities. PARLO is integrated with ADIOS, a high-performance parallel I/O middleware for large-scale HPC applications, to achieve user-transparent, light-weight layout optimization for scientific datasets. It offers simple XML-based configuration for users to achieve flexible layout optimization without the need to modify or recompile application codes. Experiments show that PARLO improves performance by 2 to 26 times for queries with heterogeneous access patterns compared to state-of-the-art scientific database management systems. Compared to traditional post-processing approaches, its underlying run-time layout optimization achieves a 56% savings in processing time and a reduction in storage overhead of up to 50%. PARLO also exhibits a low run-time resource requirement, while also limiting the performance impact on running applications to a reasonable level.

Gong, Zhenhuan [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Boyuka, David [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Zou, X [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Liu, Gary [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Ma, Xiaosong [North Carolina State University, Raleigh; Samatova, Nagiza F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction regions substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

THE COUPLING CORRECTION SYSTEM AT RHIC: RESULTS FOR THE RUN 2000 AND PLANS FOR 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC coupling correction system has been commissioned during the Year 2000 run, which marked the successful first year of operation of the machine. The RHIC coupling correction system is described with particular emphasis on its flexibility, which allows using both global and local coupling compensation techniques. Coupling measurements and correction data are presented for the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings, together with the procedure used to reduce the minimum tune separation to 0.001, the typical resolution for tune measurements during run 2000. They further demonstrate how local coupling compensation in the interaction region substantially reduces the strength of the skew quadrupole families used for global coupling compensation.

PILAT,F.; FISCHER,W.; PEGGS,S.; PTITSYN,V.; TEPIKIAN,S.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

250

GridRun: A lightweight packaging and execution environment forcompact, multi-architecture binaries  

SciTech Connect

GridRun offers a very simple set of tools for creating and executing multi-platform binary executables. These ''fat-binaries'' archive native machine code into compact packages that are typically a fraction the size of the original binary images they store, enabling efficient staging of executables for heterogeneous parallel jobs. GridRun interoperates with existing distributed job launchers/managers like Condor and the Globus GRAM to greatly simplify the logic required launching native binary applications in distributed heterogeneous environments.

Shalf, John; Goodale, Tom

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Emergent Run-and-Tumble Behavior in a Simple Model of Chlamydomonas with Intrinsic Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments on the green alga Chlamydomonas that swims using synchronized beating of a pair of flagella have revealed that it exhibits a run-and-tumble behavior similar to that of bacteria such as E. Coli. Using a simple purely hydrodynamic model that incorporates a stroke cycle and an intrinsic Gaussian white noise, we show that a stochastic run-and-tumble behavior could emerge, due to the nonlinearity of the combined synchronization-rotation-translation dynamics. This suggests the intriguing possibility that the alga might exploit nonlinear mechanics---as opposed to sophisticated biochemical circuitry as used by bacteria---to control its behavior.

Rachel R. Bennett; Ramin Golestanian

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II  

SciTech Connect

Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automakers' Short-Run Responses to Changing Gasoline Prices and the Implications for Energy Policy Policy, 735 S. State St. #5224, Ann Arbor, MI 48109. Miller: Economic Analysis Group, U.S. Department of intervention, the market is likely to produce efficient outcomes.1 We examine the empirical relationship

Edwards, Paul N.

254

Authority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF COMMUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The magnitude of the disaster overwhelmed institutions normally responsible for providing relief--forums, bulletin boards, blogs, and personal websites--to coordinate a massive grassroots response to the disasterAuthority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF

Kiesler, Sara

255

The average running time of an algorithm as a midpoint between fuzzy sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, Nieto and Torres introduced the notions of segment and midpoint between fuzzy sets with the aim of giving applications to medicine [J.J. Nieto, A. Torres, Midpoints for fuzzy sets and their application in medicine, Artif. Intell. Med. 27 (2003) ... Keywords: Asymmetric distance, Fuzzy set, Midpoint, Running time of computing, Weighted maximum distance

Pedro Tirado; Oscar Valero

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Segmentation of historical machine-printed documents using Adaptive Run Length Smoothing and skeleton segmentation paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the valuable historical collections. In order to achieve accu- rate recognition results, a robust and efficientSegmentation of historical machine-printed documents using Adaptive Run Length Smoothing Stamatopoulos b , Nikos Papamarkos a a Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University

Gatos, Basilios

257

Statistical emulation of climate model projections based on precomputed GCM runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new approach for emulating the output of a fully coupled climate model under arbitrary forcing scenarios that is based on a small set of precomputed runs from the model. We express temperature and precipitation as simple functions of ...

Stefano Castruccio; David J. McInerney; Michael L. Stein; Feifei Liu; Robert L. Jacob; Elisabeth J. Moyer

258

Modeling the Downwelling Longwave Radiation over a Groomed Ski Run under Clear Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface radiation budget of a groomed ski run is important to ski racing. Variables such as snow-surface temperature and liquid water content depend upon the surface radiation budget and are crucial to preparing fast skis. This case study ...

Rosie Howard; Roland Stull

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Technology 1 Running Head: USE OF TECHNOLGY IN A MEDICAL SETTING The Use of Different Technologies During a Medical Interview: Effects on Perceived Quality of Care Julia M. DeBlasio, Britt Caldwell of Technology GVU Technical Report # GIT-GVU-07-13 October, 2007 #12;Medical Technology 2 Abstract This two

260

Explaining Long-Run Changes in the Energy Intensity of the U.S. Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent events have revived interest in explaining the long-run changes in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy. We use a KLEM dataset for 35 industries over 39 years to decompose changes in the aggregate energy-GDP ...

Sue Wing, Ian.

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261

Run-time Modeling and Estimation of Operating System Power Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

software power evaluation, as well as power management (e.g. dynamic thermal control and equal energy of a commercial OS across a wide spectrum of applications to understand OS energy profiles and then proposes to track run- time OS energy profiles, the proposed routine level OS power model offers superior accuracy

John, Lizy Kurian

262

A library to run evolutionary algorithms in the cloud using mapreduce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss ongoing development of an evolutionary algorithm library to run on the cloud. We relate how we have used the Hadoop open-source MapReduce distributed data processing framework to implement a single "island" with a potentially very large population. ... Keywords: Hadoop, cloud computing, evolutionary algorithms, mapreduce

Pedro Fazenda; James McDermott; Una-May O'Reilly

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The benefits and costs of DyC's run-time optimizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DyC selectively dynamically compiles programs during their execution, utilizing the run-time-computed values of variables and data structures to apply optimizations that are based on partial evaluation. The dynamic optimizations are preplanned at static ... Keywords: dynamic compilation, specialization

Brian Grant; Markus Mock; Matthai Philipose; Craig Chambers; Susan J. Eggers

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Prototyping a fault-tolerant multiprocessor SoC with run-time fault recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern integrated circuits (ICs) are becoming increasingly complex. The complexity makes it difficult to design, manufacture and integrate these high performance ICs. The advent of multiprocessor Systems-on-chips (SoCs) makes it even more challenging ... Keywords: fault-tolerance, multiprocessor system, network-on-chip, retargetable simulation, run-time verification, system-on-chip

Xinping Zhu; Wei Qin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A new coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled fluid-structure modeling methodology for running ductile fracture in pressurized pipelines has been developed. The pipe material and fracture propagation have been modeled using the finite-element method with a ductile fracture criterion. The ... Keywords: CFD, FEM, Fluid-structure, Fracture, Leak, Pipeline

H. O. Nordhagen; S. Kragset; T. Berstad; A. Morin; C. Drum; S. T. Munkejord

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

1D Solution NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1D Solution NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP) Jerry Hu, x7914 NMR yourself; Take everything ferromagnetic or vulnerable to magnetic field, such as mechanic watches them somewhere away from magnets; Table of Contents 1D Solution NMR Procedure

Akhmedov, Azer

267

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation test pump-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides the results of the run-in test of the replacement mixer pump for the Tank 241-SY-101. The test was conducted at the 400 Area MASF facility between August 12 and September 29, 1994. The report includes findings, analysis, recommendations, and corrective actions taken.

Brewer, A.K.; Kolowith, R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endrczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. K. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts during LIGO science run 6 and Virgo science runs 2 and 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole; and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10^-2 M c^2 at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc respectively. These ...

Briggs, M S; Hurley, K C; Jenke, P A; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X -L; Abadie, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barayoga, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endrczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardt, A; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES ASSOCIATED WITH GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO SCIENCE RUN 6 AND VIRGO SCIENCE RUNS 2 AND 3  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a search for gravitational waves associated with 154 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments in 2009-2010, during the sixth LIGO science run and the second and third Virgo science runs. We perform two distinct searches: a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, and a search for generic, unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave counterparts, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For all GRBs we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under the optimistic assumption of a gravitational-wave emission energy of 10{sup -2} M {sub Sun} c {sup 2} at 150 Hz, with a median limit of 17 Mpc. For short-hard GRBs we place exclusion distances on binary neutron star and neutron-star-black-hole progenitors, using astrophysically motivated priors on the source parameters, with median values of 16 Mpc and 28 Mpc, respectively. These distance limits, while significantly larger than for a search that is not aided by GRB satellite observations, are not large enough to expect a coincidence with a GRB. However, projecting these exclusions to the sensitivities of Advanced LIGO and Virgo, which should begin operation in 2015, we find that the detection of gravitational waves associated with GRBs will become quite possible.

Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Agathos, M. [Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agatsuma, K. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Collaboration: LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Luminosity issues in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run  

SciTech Connect

Several luminosity issues are reviewed. Questions remain, which are stated for further investigation. Some suggestions are made for possible luminosity improvement. There are several factors affecting the luminosity in 2009 100 GeV polarized proton run: (1) The highest bunch intensity at RHIC early store (1.5 hour after accramp in this note) in 2009 is 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. In 2008 run, it was 1.42 x 10{sup 11} protons, which gives rise to 30% higher luminosity if other conditions are the same. Yellow ramp efficiency is identified as one of the main problem. Meanwhile, the beam-beam induced loss in about 1 hour into collision accounts actually no less than the ramp. (2) The typical transverse emittance at early store is 13 {pi}{micro}m for bunch intensity of 10{sup 11} protons, but it is 17 {pi}{micro} for 1.25 x 10{sup 11} protons. The increase of the emittance implies a 30% difference in luminosity if other conditions are the same. The emittance growth with electron cloud below instability threshold may be partially responsible. Meanwhile, the Booster scraping may also be relevant. (3) The luminosity lifetime in 2009 run is significantly lower than that in 2005, 2006, and 2008 runs. At the beam-beam parameter of 0.01, the typical average luminosity lifetime in early store is 10 hours in 2009, and it is 15 hours in previous runs. Given 8 hours of store time, this implies more than 20% of the difference in integrated luminosity. The 0.7 m betastar adopted in 2009 might be relevant, but the evidence is not fully convincing. On the other hand, the continuing RF voltage ramp in store may be of concern. (4) In the last month of the run, the polarization at RHIC early store is declined from 60% to 55%, a 30% reduction in p{sup 4} factor. It is noted that the Booster scraping is reduced in order to increase bunch intensity at RHIC, and the source polarization is also declined at the same time. Questions regarding these issues are discussed, and some suggestions are made.

Zhang,S.Y.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOAA Awarded 2.6 NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models NOAA Awarded 2.6 Million Processor Hours at NERSC to Run Climate Change Models September 11, 2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time for the U.S. Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore advanced climate change models at three of DOE's national laboratories as part of a three-year memorandum of understanding on collaborative climate research signed today by the two agencies. NOAA will work with climate change models as well as perform near real-time high-impact (non-production) weather prediction research using computing time on DOE Office of Science resources including two of the world's top

273

REPROCESSING OF ARE FUEL, VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT RUNS E-3 THROUGH E-6  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing of the ARE fuel was resumed after extensive leak testing in the pilot plant. This was considered necessary to assure no recurrence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ leaks as experienced in Run E-2. In the four additional runs required to complete the program, about 641 kg of fluoride salt containing 40.64 kg of fully enriched uranium was reprocessed. Recovery as UF/sub 6/ product represented 97.97% of the feed, with 0.01% measured losses. An additional 2.14% was reclaimed from NaF beds. The product was of sufficient purity to meet specifications for material designated for reduction to uranium metal. Decontamination from fission products was essentially complete. Calculations based on the entire ARE program indicated 96.38% product recovery, with 0.06% measured losses. An additional 2.50% was reclaimed from NaF beds and equipment washes. (auth)

Whitmarsh, C.L.

1959-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Extending the CRESST-II commissioning run limits to lower masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the recent interest in light WIMPs of mass ~O(10 GeV), an extension of the elastic, spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section limits resulting from the CRESST-II commissioning run (2007) are presented. Previously, these data were used to set cross-section limits from 1000 GeV down to ~17 GeV, using tungsten recoils, in 47.9 kg-days of exposure of calcium tungstate. Here, the overlap of the oxygen and calcium bands with the acceptance region of the commissioning run data set is reconstructed using previously published quenching factors. The resulting elastic WIMP cross section limits, accounting for the additional exposure of oxygen and calcium, are presented down to 5 GeV.

Andrew Brown; Sam Henry; Hans Kraus; Christopher McCabe

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

275

The LSC Glitch Group : Monitoring Noise Transients during the fifth LIGO Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC) glitch group is part of the LIGO detector characterization effort. It consists of data analysts and detector experts who, during and after science runs, collaborate for a better understanding of noise transients in the detectors. Goals of the glitch group during the fifth LIGO science run (S5) included (1) offline assessment of the detector data quality, with focus on noise transients, (2) veto recommendations for astrophysical analysis and (3) feedback to the commissioning team on anomalies seen in gravitational wave and auxiliary data channels. Other activities included the study of auto-correlation of triggers from burst searches, stationarity of the detector noise and veto studies. The group identified causes for several noise transients that triggered false alarms in the gravitational wave searches; the times of such transients were identified and vetoed from the data generating the LSC astrophysical results.

L. Blackburn; L. Cadonati; S. Caride; S. Caudill; S. Chatterji; N. Christensen; J. Dalrymple; S. Desai; A. Di Credico; G. Ely; J. Garofoli; L. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; R. Gouaty; C. Gray; A. Gretarsson; D. Hoak; T. Isogai; E. Katsavounidis; J. Kissel; S. Klimenko; R. A. Mercer; S. Mohapatra; S. Mukherjee; F. Raab; K. Riles; P. Saulson; R. Schofield; P. Shawhan; J. Slutsky; J. R. Smith; R. Stone; C. Vorvick; M. Zanolin; N. Zotov; J. Zweizig

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

276

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Improved interval estimation of long run response from a dynamic linear model: A highest density region approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new method of interval estimation for the long run response (or elasticity) parameter from a general linear dynamic model. We employ the bias-corrected bootstrap, in which small sample biases associated with the parameter estimators ... Keywords: ARDL model, Bias-correction, Bootstrapping, Highest density region, Long run elasticity

Jae H. Kim; Iain Fraser; Rob J. Hyndman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Uncertainty quantification given discontinuous climate model response and a limited number of model runs.  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty quantification in complex climate models is challenged by the sparsity of available climate model predictions due to the high computational cost of model runs. Another feature that prevents classical uncertainty analysis from being readily applicable is bifurcative behavior in climate model response with respect to certain input parameters. A typical example is the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The predicted maximum overturning stream function exhibits discontinuity across a curve in the space of two uncertain parameters, namely climate sensitivity and CO2 forcing. We outline a methodology for uncertainty quantification given discontinuous model response and a limited number of model runs. Our approach is two-fold. First we detect the discontinuity with Bayesian inference, thus obtaining a probabilistic representation of the discontinuity curve shape and location for arbitrarily distributed input parameter values. Then, we construct spectral representations of uncertainty, using Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions on either side of the discontinuity curve, leading to an averaged-PC representation of the forward model that allows efficient uncertainty quantification. The approach is enabled by a Rosenblatt transformation that maps each side of the discontinuity to regular domains where desirable orthogonality properties for the spectral bases hold. We obtain PC modes by either orthogonal projection or Bayesian inference, and argue for a hybrid approach that targets a balance between the accuracy provided by the orthogonal projection and the flexibility provided by the Bayesian inference - where the latter allows obtaining reasonable expansions without extra forward model runs. The model output, and its associated uncertainty at specific design points, are then computed by taking an ensemble average over PC expansions corresponding to possible realizations of the discontinuity curve. The methodology is tested on synthetic examples of discontinuous model data with adjustable sharpness and structure.

Safta, Cosmin; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.; Sargsyan, Khachik

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and implementation of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control plans was mandated by the 1972 Federal Pollution Control Act Amendments, Public Law 92-500. The purpose of this particular report is to present the results of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages in the watershed; (c) the costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion controls, and (d) on-farm economics of soil conservation practices. Erosion controls considered include the traditional voluntary programs combined with economic incentives as well as possible regulatory programs. The focus of the study is on erosion and sedimentation because sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants. Practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This is a study of both conservation and environmental economics, two areas that tend to be closely related. For this project, the concern was over potential pollution (an off-site problem), but because of long-run farm income consequences, this concern cannot be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for the specific soil mapping units in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The results of this study are applicable to the majority of the soils in the High Plains Land Resource Area. Only sheet and rill erosion are considered in the study. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. The second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences of implementation, both to agricultural producers as a group, and to society.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Calibration of the LIGO Gravitational Wave Detectors in the Fifth Science Run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of three detectors built to detect local perturbations in the space-time metric from astrophysical sources. These detectors, two in Hanford, WA and one in Livingston, LA, are power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometers. In their fifth science run (S5), between November 2005 and October 2007, these detectors accumulated one year of triple coincident data while operating at their designed sensitivity. In this paper, we describe the calibration of the instruments in the S5 data set, including measurement techniques and uncertainty estimation.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; M; Abernathy; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; P. Ajith; B. Allen; G. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; R. S. Amin; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; M. A. Arain; M. Araya; M. Aronsson; Y. Aso; S. Aston; D. E. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; S. Babak; P. Baker; S. Ballmer; D. Barker; S. Barnum; B. Barr; P. Barriga; L. Barsotti; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; J. Bauchrowitz; B. Behnke; M. Benacquista; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; R. Bondarescu; R. Bork; M. Born; S. Bose; M. Boyle; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; D. O. Bridges; M. Brinkmann; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; O. Burmeister; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. C. Cannon; J. Cao; C. Capano; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; C. Cepeda; T. Chalermsongsak; E. Chalkley; P. Charlton; S. Chelkowski; Y. Chen; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; D. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; N. Cornish; C. A. Costa; D. Coward; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; R. M. Culter; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; K. Danzmann; K. Das; B. Daudert; G. Davies; A. Davis; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; D. DeBra; J. Degallaix; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; P. Devanka; S. Dhurandhar; I. Di Palma; M. Daz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; E. E. Doomes; S. Dorsher; E. S. D. Douglas; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; J. Dueck; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; R. Engel; T. Etzel; M. Evans; T. Evans; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; L. S. Finn; M. Flanigan; K. Flasch; S. Foley; C. Forrest; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. A. Garofoli; I. Gholami; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; C. Gill; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; C. Graef; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hage; P. Hall; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; I. S. Heng; A. Heptonstall; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; E. Hirose; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. Howell; D. Hoyland; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh--Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; J. Kanner; E. Katsavounidis; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; H. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; V. Kondrashov; R. Kopparapu; S. Koranda; D. Kozak; T. Krause; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; G. Kuehn; J. Kullman; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; M. Landry; M. Lang; B. Lantz; N. Lastzka; A. Lazzarini; P. Leaci; J. Leong; I. Leonor; J. Li; H. Lin; P. E. Lindquist; N. A. Lockerbie; D. Lodhia; M. Lormand; P. Lu; J. Luan; M. Lubinski; A. Lucianetti; H. Lck; A. Lundgren; B. Machenschalk; M. MacInnis; M. Mageswaran; K. Mailand; C. Mak; I. Mandel; V. Mandic; S. Mrka; Z. Mrka; E. Maros; I. W. Martin; R. M. Martin; J. N. Marx; K. Mason; F. Matichard; L. Matone; R. A. Matzner; N. Mavalvala; R. McCarthy; D. E. McClelland; S. C. McGuire; G. McIntyre; G. McIvor; D. J. A. McKechan; G. Meadors; M. Mehmet; T. Meier; A. Melatos; A. C. Melissinos; G. Mendell; D. F. Menndez; R. A. Mercer; L. Merill; S. Meshkov; C. Messenger; M. S. Meyer; H. Miao; J. Miller; Y. Mino; S. Mitra; V. P. Mitrofanov; G. Mitselmakher; R. Mittleman; B. Moe; S. D. Mohanty; S. R. P. Mohapatra; D. Moraru; G. Moreno; T. Morioka; K. Mors; K. Mossavi; C. MowLowry; G. Mueller; S. Mukherjee; A. Mullavey; H. Mller-Ebhardt; J. Munch; P. G. Murray; T. Nash; R. Nawrodt; J. Nelson; G. Newton; A. Nishizawa; D. Nolting; E. Ochsner; J. O'Dell; G. H. Ogin; R. G. Oldenburg; B. O'Reilly; R. O'Shaughnessy; C. Osthelder; D. J. Ottaway; R. S. Ottens; H. Overmier; B. J. Owen; A. Page; Y. Pan; C. Pankow; M. A. Papa; M. Pareja; P. Patel; M. Pedraza; L. Pekowsky; S. Penn; C. Peralta; A. Perreca; M. Pickenpack; I. M. Pinto; M. Pitkin; H. J. Pletsch; M. V. Plissi; F. Postiglione; V. Predoi; L. R. Price; M. Prijatelj; M. Principe; R. Prix; L. Prokhorov; O. Puncken; V. Quetschke; F. J. Raab; T. Radke; H. Radkins; P. Raffai; M. Rakhmanov; B. Rankins; V. Raymond; C. M. Reed; T. Reed; S. Reid; D. H. Reitze; R. Riesen

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Prototype geothermal power plant summary of operation for automatic-run test phase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Prototype Power Plant was built to demonstrate and learn the operation of a binary power cycle, and then serve as a test bed for pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from a moderate temperature geothermal fluid resource. The operation to date of the prototype plant is summarized with primary emphasis on the automatic-run phase, during which the plant was operated over a five-month period with minimal operator surveillance.

Mines, G.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of Pipe Supports with a Trunnion Welded to the Main Piping Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One configuration of pipe support that is gaining popularity, particularly on main steam and hot reheat high-energy piping, is the trunnion. In a trunnion support system, load is transferred from the main pipe to a hanger system through trunnions welded to the main pipe run. Welded trunnions are used in a variety of support configurations, and, in several cases, the support frame around the trunnion would have to be dismantled to permit inspection of the pipe-to-trunnion weld. In other ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Distribution Management System Planning Guide: How to Run a Distribution Automation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this distribution automation (DA) guide is to provide a comprehensive volume from which a DA project manager or project team member faced with making choices about a DA deployment can learn about the key issues, key decision points, and pros and cons of each choice that in the end will lead to a successful outcome. Success, in the case of a DA deployment, is not merely about doing a good job in selecting a vendor, managing a successful proof of concept, running a strong pilot, or even ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

ParaGraph-RTS: A parallel reduction-based run-time system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are investigating the use of the functional programming paradigm on multiprocessor computers. We have developed a parallel graph reduction run-time system called ParaGraph-RTS (Parallel Graph Reduction) that provides both significant amounts of exploitable parallelism and the robustness to support development of large scientific codes. This system allows us to empirically investigate the functional programming paradigm within computationally intensive application domains. In this paper, we describe an implementation of ParaGraph-RTS on a shared-memory multiprocessor. The implementation strategy reflects insights gained through performance characterizations of the reduction process. Preliminary performance results and analyses are presented. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Yantis, B.; Rich, D.; Michelsen, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

LCLS-schedul_run-II_10_05_6-detail.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User-Assisted Commissioning Run II Detailed Schedule, May 6-September 13, 2010 User-Assisted Commissioning Run II Detailed Schedule, May 6-September 13, 2010 Thurs Fri Sat Sun Mon Tues Wed BL Prop# Spokesperson/ PI Planned Activity/Experiment Title POC AD Program Deputy Week 1 6-May 7-May 8-May 9-May 10-May 11-May 12-May Day SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com MD MD SXR L805 Bill Schlotter SXR Commissioning Schlotter H-D. Nuhn Night Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper MD ROD AMO L011 Jochen Küpper Diffractive Imaging of Oriented Molecules in the Gas Phase Bostedt (H. Loos on Monday) Week 2 13-May 14-May 15-May 16-May 17-May 18-May 19-May Day SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com SXR com MD MD SXR L805 Bill Schlotter SXR Commissioning Schlotter A. Brachman Night Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper Küpper MD ROD AMO L128 Jochen Küpper Fragmentation Holography: Diffractive imaging of ultrafast dissociation dynamics of aligned and

287

Search for gravitational-wave bursts in LIGO data from the fourth science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fourth science run of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational-wave detectors, carried out in early 2005, collected data with significantly lower noise than previous science runs. We report on a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts with arbitrary waveform in the 64-1600 Hz frequency range appearing in all three LIGO interferometers. Signal consistency tests, data quality cuts, and auxiliary-channel vetoes are applied to reduce the rate of spurious triggers. No gravitational-wave signals are detected in 15.5 days of live observation time; we set a frequentist upper limit of 0.15 per day (at 90% confidence level) on the rate of bursts with large enough amplitudes to be detected reliably. The amplitude sensitivity of the search, characterized using Monte Carlo simulations, is several times better than that of previous searches. We also provide rough estimates of the distances at which representative supernova and binary black hole merger signals could be detected with 50% efficiency by this analysis.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

288

Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

WIMP-nucleon cross-section results from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report experimental upper limits on WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering cross sections from the second science run of ZEPLIN-III at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. A raw fiducial exposure of 1,344 kg.days was accrued over 319 days of continuous operation between June 2010 and May 2011. A total of eight events was observed in the signal acceptance region in the nuclear recoil energy range 7-29 keV, which is compatible with background expectations. This allows the exclusion of the scalar cross-section above 4.8E-8 pb near 50 GeV/c^2 WIMP mass with 90% confidence. Combined with data from the first run, this result improves to 3.9E-8 pb. The corresponding WIMP-neutron spin-dependent cross-section limit is 8.0E-3 pb. The ZEPLIN programme reaches thus its conclusion at Boulby, having deployed and exploited successfully three liquid xenon experiments of increasing reach.

D. Yu. Akimov; H. M. Araujo; E. J. Barnes; V. A. Belov; A. Bewick; A. A. Burenkov; V. Chepel; A. Currie; L. DeViveiros; B. Edwards; C. Ghag; A. Hollingsworth; M. Horn; W. G. Jones; G. E. Kalmus; A. S. Kobyakin; A. G. Kovalenko; V. N. Lebedenko; A. Lindote; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; P. Majewski; A. StJ. Murphy; F. Neves; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; R. Preece; J. J. Quenby; L. Reichhart; P. R. Scovell; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; V. N. Stekhanov; T. J. Sumner; C. Thorne; R. J. Walker

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Studies and proposed changes to the RHIC p-Carbon polarimeters for the upcoming RUN-11  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The RHIC polarized proton complex utilizes polarimeters in each of the Blue and Yellow beams that measure the beam polarization through the p-Carbon elastic scattering process in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference kinematic region. This along with a Polarized Hydrogen Jet Target that utilizes the proton-proton elastic scattering process to first measure the analyzing power of the reaction and using the reverse process to measure the beam polarization. The latter is used to calibrate the p-Carbon polarimeters at the desired beam energy. In Run 9 RHIC ran with beams at center-of-mass energies of 200 and 500 GeV respectively. The higher beam intensities as well as the fact that the 250 GeV beam size is much smaller than that at 100 GeV resulted in significantly higher rates seen by the polarimeters and led to observed instability. In this paper, we will discuss the problems encountered and the tests that were carried out using the AGS as a proxy in an attempt to solve the problems and the path forward we took towards the upcoming polarized proton Run11.

Makdisi, Y.; Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Morozov, B.; Svirida, D.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

A Comparison of Climates Simulated by a General Circulation Model when Run in the Annual Cycle and Perpetual Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the climate simulated by the Canadian Climate Centre (CCC) General Circulation Model when run its usual annual cyclemode, in which the solar declination angle varies annually, and the climate which is simulated when ...

F. W. Zwiers; G. J. Boer

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Enabling run-time memory data transfer optimizations at the system level with automated extraction of embedded software metadata information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information about the run-time behavior of software applications is crucial for enabling system level optimizations for embedded systems. This embedded Software Metadata information is especially important today, because several complex multi-threaded ...

Alexandros Bartzas; Miguel Peon-Quiros; Stylianos Mamagkakis; Francky Catthoor; Dimitrios Soudris; Jose M. Mendias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 RUNNING OUT OF AND INTO OIL: ANALYZING GLOBAL OIL DEPLETION AND TRANSITION THROUGH 2050 October 2003 David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Janet L. Hopson Research Assistant Jia Li Senior Research Technician DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm

294

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

295

Have we run out of oil yet? Oil Peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 (2006) 515-531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective $ David L. Greene à , Janet L. Hopson, Jia Li Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Transportation Research Center, University of Tennessee, 2360 Cherahala Boulevard, Knoxville, TN 37932, USA Available online 27 December 2005 Abstract This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or

296

Potential impact of consumer choice on cogenerator's short-run price and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

Conditions were derived under which optimal price-output combinations can be determined for a profit-maximizing cogenerator faced with a demand constraint for useful energy. Four cases were considered. In two cases, all energy produced was sold to the end-use market and, in the other two, some electricity was sold to the grid. The effects of price regulation on energy output were also covered. In the short-run, in all four cases, whether or not the necessary conditions for Pareto optimality are satisfied is problematic. If the cogenerator monopolizes alternative supplies of energy, price regulation will not necessarily reduce energy expenditures. The short-term effects of constrained energy demand can only be determined with a knowledge of the cost and demand functions of thermal energy and electricity.

Poyer, D.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Analyses and applications of pressure, flowrate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing conveyed perforating (TCP), underbalanced perforating, high shot density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems are some of the developments that have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development, described in this paper, is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements during a perforating run and has the capability of selectively firing a number of guns at different depths or times. These measurements include pressure, flow rate, temperature, GR, CCL, and cable tension. The simultaneous downhole measurements, in addition to providing better control of the perforating process, can in a single trip provide a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions.

Tariq, S.M.; Ayestaran, L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Measurement of the t tbar cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dissertation measures the t{bar t} production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p{bar p} collider with center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 {+-} 0.1 fb{sup -1}. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t{bar t} events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t{bar t} production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.14 {+-} 0.25 (stat){sub -0.86}{sup +0.61}(sys) pb.

Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric; /Tufts U.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The ATLAS Muon Trigger - Experience and Performance in the first 3 years of LHC pp runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) deploys three-levels processing scheme for the trigger system. The level-1 muon trigger system gets its input from fast muon trigger detectors. Fast sector logic boards select muon candidates, which are passed via an interface board to the central trigger processor and then to the High Level Trigger (HLT). The muon HLT is purely software based and encompasses a level-2 trigger followed by an event filter for a staged trigger approach. It has access to the data of the precision muon detectors and other detector elements to refine the muon hypothesis. The ATLAS experiment has taken data with high efficiency continuously over entire running periods form 2010 to 2012, for which sophisticated triggers to guard the highest physics output while reducing effectively the event rate were mandatory. The ATLAS Muon trigger has successfully adapted to this changing environment. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analysis involving mu...

Ventura, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Drying damaged K West fuel elements (Summary of whole element furnace runs 1 through 8)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

N Reactor fuel elements stored in the Hanford K Basins were subjected to high temperatures and vacuum conditions to remove water. Results of the first series of whole element furnace tests i.e., Runs 1 through 8 were collected in this summary report. The report focuses on the six tests with breached fuel from the K West Basin which ranged from a simple fracture at the approximate mid-point to severe damage with cladding breaches at the top and bottom ends with axial breaches and fuel loss. Results of the tests are summarized and compared for moisture released during cold vacuum drying, moisture remaining after drying, effects of drying on the fuel element condition, and hydrogen and fission product release.

LAWRENCE, L.A.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect

This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tan{beta} vs. M{sub A}, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; /Valencia U., IFIC

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

DiStravolo, M.A. [comp.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is dependent on the production of oil and gas, and every day the demand increases. Technologies have to keep up with the demand of this resource to keep the world running. Since hydrocarbons are finite and will eventually run out, the increasing demand of oil and gas is the impetus to search for oil in more difficult and challenging areas. One challenging area is offshore in ultradeep water, with water depths greater than 5000 ft. This is the new arena for drilling technology. Unfortunately with greater challenges there are greater risks of losing control and blowing out a well. A dynamic kill simulator was developed in late 2004 to model initial conditions of a blowout in ultradeep water and to calculate the minimum kill rate required to kill a blowing well using the dynamic kill method. The simulator was simple and efficient, but had limitations; only vertical wells could be simulated. To keep up with technology, modifications were made to the simulator to model directional wells. COMASim (Cherokee, Offshore Technology Research Center, Minerals Management Service, Texas A&M Simulator) is the name of the dynamic kill simulator. The new version, COMASim1.0, has the ability to model almost any type of wellbore geometry when provided the measured and vertical depths of the well. Eighteen models with varying wellbore geometry were simulated to examine the effects of wellbore geometry on the minimum kill rate requirement. The main observation was that lower kill rate requirement was needed in wells with larger measured depth. COMASim 1.0 cannot determine whether the inputs provided by the user are practical; COMASim 1.0 can only determine if the inputs are incorrect, inconsistent or cannot be computed. If unreasonable drilling scenarios are input, unreasonable outputs will result. COMASim1.0 adds greater functionality to the previous version while maintaining the original framework and simplicity of calculations and usage.

Meier, Hector Ulysses

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

2004 HALL CENTER STAFF Victor Bailey Director and Professor of History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

union." In the beauty of its design, and in the energy with which it encourages vigorous intellectual, "The Origins of the Literary Vampire in German Literature." Crawford will travel to the German Folksong on the vampire figure. The vampire has been one of the most popular figures in horror literature since 18th

Peterson, Blake R.

305

The Quest for Pi David H. Bailey, Jonathan M. Borwein ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 25, 1996 ... the computation of is given in Tables 1 and 2. 1. .... the Indiana House of Representatives a bill that would introduce new Mathematical truth".

306

Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first year of the fifth LIGO science run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results obtained from an all-sky search for gravitational-wave (GW) bursts in the 64-2000 Hz frequency range in data collected by the LIGO detectors during the first year (November 2005--November 2006) of their fifth science run. The total analyzed live time was 268.6 days. Multiple hierarchical data analysis methods were invoked in this search. The overall sensitivity expressed in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude h{sub rss} for gravitational-wave bursts with various morphologies was in the range of 6x10{sup -22} Hz{sup -1/2} to a fewx10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. No GW signals were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 3.75 events per year on the rate of strong GW bursts was placed at the 90% confidence level. As in our previous searches, we also combined this rate limit with the detection efficiency for selected waveform morphologies to obtain event rate versus strength exclusion curves. In sensitivity, these exclusion curves are the most stringent to date.

Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Barton, M. A.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Influence of the Magnetic Field on Running Penumbral Waves in the Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use images of high spatial and temporal resolution, obtained using both ground- and space-based instrumentation, to investigate the role magnetic field inclination angles play in the propagation characteristics of running penumbral waves in the solar chromosphere. Analysis of a near-circular sunspot, close to the center of the solar disk, reveals a smooth rise in oscillatory period as a function of distance from the umbral barycenter. However, in one directional quadrant, corresponding to the north direction, a pronounced kink in the period-distance diagram is found. Utilizing a combination of the inversion of magnetic Stokes vectors and force-free field extrapolations, we attribute this behaviour to the cut-off frequency imposed by the magnetic field geometry in this location. A rapid, localised inclination of the magnetic field lines in the north direction results in a faster increase in the dominant periodicity due to an accelerated reduction in the cut-off frequency. For the first time we reveal how th...

Jess, D B; Van Doorsselaere, T; Keys, P H; Mackay, D H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Run05 Proton Beam Polarization Measurements by pC-Polarimeter (ver. 1.1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polarization of the proton beams [1, 2] at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)[3] RHIC ring. The H-Jet polarimeter is located at the collision point allowing measurements of absolute normalization is provided by the hydrogen polarimeter, which measures over 1 {approx} 2 another measurement rather than measuring the absolute polarization. both beams. Two identical pC-polarimeters are equipped in the yellow and blue rings, where carbon ribbon target, providing fast feedback to beam operations and experiments. The days to obtain {approx} 5% statistical uncertainty (in Run05). Thus, the operation of the carbon is measured using both an atomic beam source hydrogen gas jet (H-Jet)[4, 5] and proton-carbon polarimeters was focused on better control of relative stability between one measurement to statistical accuracy within 20 to 30 seconds using an ultra-thin (typically 6 {approx} 8 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) the rings are separated. The pC-polarimeter measures relative polarization to a few percent.

Nakagawa,I.; Alekseev, I.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bravar, A.; Bunce, G.; Dhawan, S.; Eyser, K.O.; Gill, R.; Haeberli, W.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nass, A.; Okada, H.; Stephenson, E.; Svirida, D.N.; Wise, T.; Wood, J.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RU RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE MAYFIELD VANDERGRIF T GIRT Y SAY NEW SALEM WET MOR E COWANSHAN NOC K ST ILLWAT ER ELD ERS RIDGE BLAIR CARROLLT OWN BU RNIN G WELL COOKPORT MCCREA FU RNACE RIDGWAY NEW ALEXANDR IA IRISH RU N WILC OX PLU M CREEK PADDYTOWN KEATING HOR TON GUF FEY WH ITESBURG BET ULA SMELTZ ER ODONN ELL DECAT UR W HAZELHU RST ST RONGSTOWN COL EGROVE SH EFFIELD WERT Z H OLLOW RED HILL ULYSSES PLATT SVIL LE BR ANCH W LATR OBE LEID Y TRIU

311

Performance of the ATLAS High Level Trigger in the 2011 and 2012 run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector operated during the last 3 years in the LHC beam line, collecting more than 27 fb^-1 of proton-proton events. This allowed researchers to detect a new boson, compatible in many of its properties with the long sought Higgs Boson. One of the main ATLAS components is its complex calorimeter system. This sub-detector is able to detect many of the fundamental processes involved in the physics search. For instance, photon, electron, taus and jets candidates detection as well as missing transverse energy measurement are per- formed using calorimetric information. The calorimeter also plays a central role in the ATLAS trigger system, helping to reduce the large amount of input events (order of 20-30 millions of events per second) to a manageable rate (few hundreds of events per second) recorded for more detailed physics analysis. The trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one implemented in electronic boards and the other two with programs running on a dedicated computing cluster inte...

Bernius, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Performances of the ATLAS High Level Trigger in the 2011 and 2012 run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector operated during the last 3 years in the LHC beam line, collecting more than 27 fb?1 of proton-proton events. This allowed researchers to detect a new boson, compatible in many of its properties with the long sought Higgs Boson. One of the main ATLAS components is its complex calorimeter system. This sub-detector is able to detect many of the fundamental processes involved in the physics search. For instance, photon, electron, taus and jets candidates detection as well as missing transverse energy measurement are per- formed using calorimetric information. The calorimeter also plays a central role in the ATLAS trigger system, helping to reduce the large amount of input events (order of 20-30 millions of events per second) to a manageable rate (few hundreds of events per second) recorded for more detailed physics analysis. The trigger system is divided in three levels, the first one implemented in electronic boards and the other two with programs running on a dedicated computing cluster int...

Bernius, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Communication library for run-time visualization of distributed, asynchronous data  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a method for collecting and visualizing data generated by a parallel computational simulation during run time. Data distributed across multiple processes is sent across parallel communication lines to a remote workstation, which sorts and queues the data for visualization. We have implemented our method in a set of tools called PORTAL (for Parallel aRchitecture data-TrAnsfer Library). The tools comprise generic routines for sending data from a parallel program (callable from either C or FORTRAN), a semi-parallel communication scheme currently built upon Unix Sockets, and a real-time connection to the scientific visualization program AVS. Our method is most valuable when used to examine large datasets that can be efficiently generated and do not need to be stored on disk. The PORTAL source libraries, detailed documentation, and a working example can be obtained by anonymous ftp from info.mcs.anl.gov from the file portal.tar.Z from the directory pub/portal.

Rowlan, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wightman, B.T. [Wisconsin Univ., Oshkosh, WI (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

W-026 integrated engineering cold run operational test report for balance of plant (BOP)  

SciTech Connect

This Cold Run test is designed to demonstrate the functionality of systems necessary to move waste drums throughout the plant using approved procedures, and the compatibility of these systems to function as an integrated process. This test excludes all internal functions of the gloveboxes. In the interest of efficiency and support of the facility schedule, the initial revision of the test (rev 0) was limited to the following: Receipt and storage of eight overpacked drums, four LLW and four TRU; Receipt, routing, and staging of eleven empty drums to the process area where they will be used later in this test; Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 9); Receipt, processing, and shipping of two verification drums (Route 1). The above listed operations were tested using the rev 0 test document, through Section 5.4.25. The document was later revised to include movement of all staged drums to and from the LLW and TRU process and RWM gloveboxes. This testing was performed using Sections 5.5 though 5.11 of the rev 1 test document. The primary focus of this test is to prove the functionality of automatic operations for all mechanical and control processes listed. When necessary, the test demonstrates manual mode operations as well. Though the gloveboxes are listed, only waste and empty drum movement to, from, and between the gloveboxes was tested.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

LHCb: LHCb High Level Trigger design issues for post Long Stop 1 running  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LHCb High Level Trigger uses two stages of software running on an Event Filter Farm (EFF) to select events for offline reconstruction and analysis. The first stage (Hlt1) processes approximately 1 MHz of events accepted by a hardware trigger. In 2012, the second stage (Hlt2) wrote 5 kHz to permanent storage for later processing. Following the LHC's Long Stop 1 (anticipated for 2015), the machine energy will increase from 8 TeV in the center-of-mass to 13 TeV and the cross sections for beauty and charm are expected to grow proportionately. We plan to increase the Hlt2 output to 12 kHz, some for immediate offline processing, some for later offline processing, and some ready for immediate analysis. By increasing the absolute computing power of the EFF, and buffering data for processing between machine fills, we should be able to significantly increase the efficiency for signal while improving signal-to-background ratios. In this poster we will present several strategies under consideration and some of th...

Albrecht, J; Raven, G; Sokoloff, M D; Williams, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

Farrer, R.; Longshore, A. [comps.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

Bharat L. Bhatt

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Results of hydrotreating the kerosene fraction of HTI`S first proof of concept run  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Sandia`s hydrotreating study is to determine the relationships between hydrotreating conditions and product characteristics for coal liquids produced using current technologies. The coal-derived liquid used in the current work is the kerosene fraction of the product from Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc.`s first proof-of-concept run for it`s Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction Technology. Sandia`s hydrotreating experiments were performed in a continuous operation, microflow reactor system using aged HDN-60 catalyst. A factorial experimental design with three variables (temperature, pressure, liquid hourly space velocity) was used in this work. Nitrogen and sulfur contents of the feed and hydrotreated products were determined using an Antek 7000 Sulfur and Nitrogen Analyzer. Multiple samples were collected at each set of reaction conditions to ensure that each condition was lined out. Hydrotreating at each set of reaction conditions was repeated so that results could be normalized for catalyst deactivation. The normalized results were statistically analyzed. Increases in temperature and pressure had the greatest effects on nitrogen removal. The highest severity condition (388{degrees}C, 1500 psig H{sub 2}, 1.5g/h/g(cat)) gave a measured nitrogen value of <5 ppm.

Stohl, F.V.; Lott, S.E.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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321

A study on D0 Run2b stave structural performance  

SciTech Connect

Two different structural solutions have been proposed and studied for the D0 Run2b stave. The way the stave structural stiffness is achieved in both designs is essentially the same: the structural material is displaced as far as possible from the neutral axis in order to increase the bending moment of the stave. The agreement of the measured data with what has been theoretically predicted is excellent. The C channel stave with dog-bones glued on top of the sensor (stave No.2) has outperformed the other mockups with a predicted sag of 51{micro}m for a distributed load of 2.28 N/m [0.013 lbf/in] and a consequent natural frequency of 89.2Hz. The other three C channel staves with the dog-bones not glued on the sensor have a bending stiffness that is -19.0%, -10.8%, +4.0% of that of stave No.2, being 11.0%, 7.8%, 15.1% lighter respectively. An optimized stave structural proposal with 130.5% of the design stiffness within the mass budget is presented at the end of this paper.

Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A study on D0 Run2b stave structural performance  

SciTech Connect

Two different structural solutions have been proposed and studied for the D0 Run2b stave (Figure 1 and Figure 3). The way the stave structural stiffness is achieved in both designs is essentially the same: the structural material is displaced as far as possible from the neutral axis in order to increase the bending moment of the stave. The agreement of the measured data with what has been theoretically predicted is excellent. The C channel stave with dog-bones glued on top of the sensor (stave No.2) has outperformed the other mockups with a predicted sag of 51 {micro}m for a distributed load of 2.28 N/m [0.013 lbf/in] and a consequent natural frequency of 89.2Hz. The other three C channel staves with the dog-bones not glued on the sensor have a bending stiffness that is -19.0%, -10.8%, +4.0% of that of stave No.2, being 11.0%, 7.8%, 15.1% lighter respectively. An optimized stave structural proposal with 130.5% of the design stiffness within the mass budget is presented at the end of this paper.

Lanfranco, Giobatta; /Fermilab

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Study of the Influence of Air Supply Temperature on Air Distribution in the Run-through Large Space Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduces the concept and features of run-through large space. By using CFD technology, the paper simulates a velocity field and temperature field in the important air conditioned zone of China's science and technology museum (new museum) under winter operating conditions. At the same time, the indoor air flow regulations are summarized according to the simulation results. On the above basis, a new solution for airflow control of the connection in a run-through large space is put forward. The conclusion of this paper will offer guidance and reference for the air conditioning design of homogeneous architecture.

Tian, Z.; Zhang, J.; Zhu, M.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II  

SciTech Connect

This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electroweak production of the top quark in the Run II of the D0 experiment  

SciTech Connect

The work exposed in this thesis deals with the search for electroweak production of top quark (single top) in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This production mode has not been observed yet. Analyzed data have been collected during the Run II of the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}. In the Standard Model, the decay of a top quark always produce a high momentum bottom quark. Therefore bottom quark jets identification plays a major role in this analysis. The large lifetime of b hadrons and the subsequent large impact parameters relative to the interaction vertex of charged particle tracks are used to tag bottom quark jets. Impact parameters of tracks attached to a jet are converted into the probability for the jet to originate from the primary vertex. This algorithm has a 45% tagging efficiency for a 0.5% mistag rate. Two processes (s and t channels) dominate single top production with slightly different final states. The searched signature consists in 2 to 4 jets with at least one bottom quark jet, one charged lepton (electron or muon) and missing energy accounting for a neutrino. This final state is background dominated and multivariate techniques are needed to separate the signal from the two main backgrounds: associated production of a W boson and jets and top quarks pair production. The achieved sensitivity is not enough to reach observation and we computed upper limits at the 95% confidence level at 5 pb (s-channel) and 4.3 pb (t-channel) on single top production cross-sections.

Clement, Benoit; /Strasbourg, IReS

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 1990 (Run 1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100-Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basins have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuels in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 8.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first of those tests (Run 1), which was conducted on an N-Reactor inner fuel element (1990) that had been stored underwater in the K-West Basin (see Section 2.0). This fuel element was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The testing was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 3.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in Section 4.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 5.0. These results are further discussed in Section 6.0.

Marschman, S.C.; Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

An analysis of the costs of running a station car fleet  

SciTech Connect

Station cars are electric vehicles available at transit stations which may be used for transportation between the transit station and home, work, and/or for errands. This transportation service would be provided by the local transit agency. This report discusses an economic model of the costs of running a station car fleet. While some of these costs are highly uncertain, this analysis is a first look at the required user fees for full cost recovery. The model considers the capital costs of the vehicles and the required infrastructure; the annual fixed vehicle costs for insurance, registration, etc.; the mileage-based costs; and the annual non-vehicle costs for administration, infrastructure maintenance, etc. The model also includes various factors such as the fleet size, the annual mileage, the number of transit stations that would have facilities for station cars, and the number of users. The model specifically examines the cost of using of electric vehicles; however, for comparison, the cost of using a fleet of gasoline-powered vehicles also is calculated. This report examines the sensitivity of the model to the various factors. A principal conclusion from the analysis is that the largest cost contributor is the initial vehicle purchase price. For a given initial purchase price, the factor driving the user fee required for full cost recovery is the number of different daily users of a vehicle. The model also compares the annual cost of transportation using station cars and mass transit to the annual cost of solo commuting. If a station car is used by more than one person a day, and this use replaces the ownership of a conventional vehicle, the annual cost of transportation may be similar. However, for the base case assumptions, the station car user fee required for full cost recovery is higher than the cost of solo commuting.

Zurn, R.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Hopson, Dr Janet L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Li, Jia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Liquid-Phase Methanol (LPMeOHTM) Process Development Unit (PDU)--40-Day Run at LaPorte, Texas (1984)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustained catalyst life is a key to improved methanol synthesis from coal gasification products. A demonstration of scaled-up PDU operation--first using a large-particle catalyst and then a liquid-entrained slurry in a single run--produced a significant amount of crude methanol.

1986-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGOs fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 ...

Zucker, Michael E.

332

Geyser-1: a MIPS R3000 CPU core with fine-grained run-time power gating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geyser-1 is a MIPS CPU which provides a fine-grained run-time power gating (PG) controlled by instructions. Unlike traditional PGs, it uses special standard cells in which the virtual ground (VGND) is separated from the real ground, and a certain number ...

D. Ikebuchi; N. Seki; Y. Kojima; M. Kamata; L. Zhao; H. Amano; T. Shirai; S. Koyama; T. Hashida; Y. Umahashi; H. Masuda; K. Usami; S. Takeda; H. Nakamura; M. Namiki; M. Kondo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Hungry Lion A hungry lion runs inside a circus arena which is a circle of radius 10 meters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hungry Lion A hungry lion runs inside a circus arena which is a circle of radius 10 meters is never more than 10 meters away from the lion, the initial and final positions of the center are at most 20 meters apart. By a form of the triangle inequality, the total length of arcs is at least 30, 000

Sadeh, Norman M.

334

On the Validity of Reynolds Assumptions for Running-Mean Filters in the Absence of a Spectral Gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A running-mean operator is used to average predefined signals in order to calculate subgrid-scale (SGS) contributions. The role of the Leonard and cross terms (l and C, respectively) in the definition of the SGS is studied as a function of the ...

S. Galmarini; P. Thunis

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

1D Solid-state NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1D Solid-state NMR Procedure (Bruker AVANCE Machines running TopSpin under WINDOWS XP) Jerry Hu, x NMR yourself. Be aware of High Radio-Frequency Power in Solid-state NMR. Take everything ferromagnetic of Contents 1D Solid-state NMR Procedure ................................................................... 1

Akhmedov, Azer

336

Test report for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report will provide the findings of the demonstration test conducted on the Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 HMR Pump-3 in accordance with WHC-SDWM-TP-434 ``Test plan for run-in acceptance testing of hydrogen mitigation/retrieval pump-3`` at the 400 Area Maintenance and Storage Facility (MASF) building from 7 June 1996 through 30 July 1996 per work package 4A-96-92/W. The DST 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation retrieval Pump-3 is a 200-HP submersible electric driven pump that has been modified for use in the DST 241-SY-101 containing mixed waste located in the 200W area. The pump has a motor driven rotation mechanism that allows the pump column to rotate through 355{degree}. Prior to operation, pre-operational checks were performed which included loop calibration grooming and alignment of instruments, learning how plumb HMR-3 assembly hung in a vertical position and bump test of the motor to determine rotation direction. The pump was tested in the MASF Large Diameter Cleaning Vessel (LDCV) with process water at controlled temperatures and levels. In addition, the water temperature of the cooling water to the motor oil heat exchanger was recorded during testing. A 480-volt source powered a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD). The VFD powered the pump at various frequencies and voltages to control speed and power output of the pump. A second VFD powered the oil cooling pump. A third VFD was not available to operate the rotational drive motor during the 72 hour test, so it was demonstrated as operational before and after the test. A Mini Acquisition and Control System (Mini-DACS) controls pump functions and monitoring of the pump parameters. The Mini-DACS consists of three computers, software and some Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC). Startup and shutdown of either the pump motor or the oil cooling pump can be accomplished by the Mini-DACS. When the pump was in operation, the Mini-DACS monitors automatically collects data electronically. However, some required data from ancillary systems was collected manually and recorded on log sheets.

Berglin, B.G.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Testing of the TriP Chip Running at 132 nsec Using a Modified AFE Board  

SciTech Connect

In this note we describe the first set of tests done with a sample of TriP chips that were mounted on a modified AFE board. The modifications consisted of different firmware and the replacement of one power supply switch. The board used was a standard AFEIc board (red type) on which new MCMs (MCMIIs) were mounted. The new MCMs were designed to support the TriP and emulate the SVX for readout when mounted on an AFEIc board. The TriP and the MCMs are described in Ref. [1]. Two versions of the MCMII were designed and built: one (MCMIIb) supports two TriP chips wirebonded directly to the MCM substrate. The other, (MCMIIc) supports one TriP which can be either wirebonded directly or packaged into a standard TQFP surface mount package. Due to space constraints, this MCM can support only 1 TriP. We tested 6 TriP chips on 3 different MCMIIb (MCMIIb-1, MCMIIb-2 and MCMIIb-3) and 2 other TriPs were tested on MCMIIc, one of them with an unpackaged TriP (MCMIIc-1) and the other with a packaged TriP (MCMIIc-2). A set of 10 programable internal registers control the TriP operation, the description of these registers can be found in [1]. Table 1 shows the values used for the tests described in this note. In Ref. [1] there is a description of the signals that are needed to operate the TriP chip. We implemented in a Field Programable Gate Array (FPGA), also part of the MCM, a set of shift registers that allow us to download via the 1553 interface to the AFE board, any desired timing for the signals that the FPGA has to send to the TriP chip. These registers are run with a 121.21 MHz clock (which is 16x the crossing clock and phase locked to it), which means that each bit corresponds to a time interval of 8.25 nsec. Finer control of timing is possible, but this changing the programing of the FPGA and recompiling. The bits downloaded to these shift registers inside the TriP are listed in Table 2.

Juan Estrada et al.

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 3128W (run 2)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-East Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from an open K-East canister (3128W) during the first fuel selection campaign conducted in 1995, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. Although it was judged to be breached during in-basin (i.e., K-Basin) examinations, visual inspection of this fuel element in the hot cell indicated that it was likely intact. Some scratches on the coating covering the cladding were identified before the furnace test. The drying test was conducted in the Whole Element Furnace Testing System located in G-Cell within the PTL. This test system is composed of three basic systems: the in-cell furnace equipment, the system gas loop, and the analytical instrument package. Element 3128W was subjected to the drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step. Results of the Pressure Rise and Gas Evolution Tests suggest that most of the free water in the system was released during the extended CVD cycle (68 hr versus 8 hr for the first run). An additional {approximately}0.34 g of water was released during the subsequent HVD phase, characterized by multiple water release peaks, with a principle peak at {approximately}180 C. This additional water is attributed to decomposition of a uranium hydrate (UO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O/UO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) coating that was observed to be covering the surface of the fuel element to a thickness of {approximately}1.6 mg/cm{sup 2}. A limited quantity of hydrogen ({approximately}9 mg) was also released during HVD, mainly at temperatures above 300 C, likely from hydride decomposition.

Abrefah, J.; Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Marshman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Flament, T.A. [Numatec Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

run 873 - 7 September 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - 26 GeV, Orbit distortions due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion

Gourber, J P

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Run 888 - 28 October 1977, Rings 1 and 2 - GeV, Orbit distortion due to sextupole fields with the low-beta insertion - part 2

Brand, K

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Feasibility Test Run of C-12(e,e'K{sup +}) Reaction at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high quality and high duty factor (100%) electron beam at Jefferson Lab offers an opportunity to broaden their view of hypernuclear physics by studying the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction with high resolution. The present data represent a feasibility study of such a reaction on a carbon target. The test run was carried out during experiments E91-16 (Electroproduction of Kaons and Light Hypernuclei) and E93-18 (Kaon Electroproduction on p(e,e{prime}K{sup +})Y). These two experiments used liquid deuterium and hydrogen targets, respectively. There exist data on an aluminum target for the background calibration of the liquid targets which are suitable also for a feasibility study of electroproduction of hypernuclei. These data are still under analysis. The goal of this test run is to evaluate issues concerned with the electroproduction of hypernuclei. These issues include: (1) the quasi-free production rate, which had not been measured previously, (2) random coincidence background, (3) keon identification over a possibly large hadronic background, and (4) possible evaluation of the production rate of the bound hypernuclear structures. This test run will supply significant knowledge for running high quality hypernuclear experiments at Jefferson Lab. The spectroscopy of hypernuclei has been studied mainly in two ways: the strangeness-exchange reaction (K{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}), and associated strangeness production ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}). The (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction has the advantage of exciting both natural- and unnatural-parity states and the possibility of obtaining good energy resolution. The cross section for the (e,e{prime}K{sup +}) reaction is about a hundred times smaller than for the corresponding hadronic production reactions but it is compensated for by the availability of high intensity and high duty factor electron beams. In order to optimize the production rate, the kinematic setting requires both the scattered electron and kaon to be detected at very forward angles. The test run was not optimized for hypernuclear production, but it serves as an important technical evaluation for future hypernuclear programs at Jefferson Lab. The first high-resolution spectroscopy experiment on p-shell lambda hypernuclei is tentatively scheduled to run in 1999 in Hall C at Jefferson Lab.

Wendy Hinton

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

OMAE2009-79052 CFD SIMULATION OF WAVE RUN-UP ON A SEMI-SUBMERSIBLE AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of CFD tools for industrial offshore applications is a common practice nowadays. So is the need for validation of such tools against experimental results. This paper presents one of the CFD tools, ComFLOW, which solves Navier-Stokes equations and employs an improved Volume of Fluid (iVOF) method to find temporary location of fluids free surface. The code is used to simulate flow around a semi-submersible offshore platform due to an incoming regular wave. In particular, wave run-up on the semis columns and under-deck fluid impact phenomena are investigated on high-accuracy computational grids with number of cells being in range of 10 millions. Results of numerical simulations are compared with experimental data and focus is on local fluid flow details in immediate vicinity of the platform. Wave run-up on the platforms columns

Bogdan Iwanowski; Marc Lefranc; Rik Wemmenhove

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W {yields} e{nu} decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. With a sample of 499,830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

Osta, Jyotsna; /Notre Dame U.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

RunMC - an object-oriented analysis framework for Monte Carlo simulation of high-energy particle collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RunMC is an object-oriented framework aimed to generate and to analyse high-energy collisions of elementary particles using Monte Carlo simulations. This package, being based on C++ adopted by CERN as the main programming language for the LHC experiments, provides a common interface to different Monte Carlo models using modern physics libraries. Physics calculations (projects) can easily be loaded and saved as external modules. This simplifies the development of complicated calculations for high energy physics in large collaborations.This desktop program is open-source licensed and is available on the LINUX and Windows/Cygwin platforms.

S. Chekanov

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the second joint LIGO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between July 7, 2009 and October 20, 2010: data are analyzed when at least two of the three LIGO-Virgo detectors are in coincident operation, with a total observation time of 207 days. The analysis searches for transients of duration < 1 s over the frequency band 64-5000 Hz, without other assumptions on the signal waveform, polarization, direction or occurrence time. All identified events are consistent with the expected accidental background. We set frequentist upper limits on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts by combining this search with the previous LIGO-Virgo search on the data collected between November 2005 and October 2007. The upper limit on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts at the Earth is 1.3 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present upper limits on source rate density per year and Mpc^3 for sample populations of standard-candle sources. As in the previous joint run, typical sensitivities of the search in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for these waveforms lie in the range 5 10^-22 Hz^-1/2 to 1 10^-20 Hz^-1/2. The combination of the two joint runs entails the most sensitive all-sky search for generic gravitational-wave bursts and synthesizes the results achieved by the initial generation of interferometric detectors.

the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; A. Hardt; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Searches for inspiral gravitational waves associated with short gamma-ray bursts in LIGO's fifth and Virgo's first science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mergers of two compact objects, like two neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, are the probable progenitor of short gamma-ray bursts. These events are also promising sources of gravitational waves, that are currently motivating related searches by an international network of gravitational wave detectors. Here we describe a search for gravitational waves from the in-spiral phase of two coalescing compact objects, in coincidence with short GRBs occurred during during LIGO's fifth science run and Virgo's first science run. The search includes 22 GRBs for which data from more than one of the detectors in the LIGO/Virgo network were available. No statistically significant gravitational-wave candidate has been found, and a parametric test shows no excess of weak gravitational-wave signals in our sample of GRBs. The 90\\%~C.L. median exclusion distance for GRBs in our sample is of 6.7 Mpc, under the hypothesis of a neutron star - black hole progenitor model.

Alexander Dietz

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

348

APPLICATION OF CONDITIONAL SIMULATION MODEL TO RUN-OF-MINE COAL SAMPLING FREQUENCY DETERMINATION AND COAL QUALITY CONTROL AT THE POWER PLANT (BLENDING, GOAL PROGRAMMING, MICROCOMPUTER).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Run-of-mine (ROM) coal sampling is one of the most important factors in determining the disposition of ROM coal for an overall emission control strategy. Determination (more)

BARUA, SUKHENDU LAL.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Free-running InGaAs/InP Avalanche Photodiode with Active Quenching for Single Photon Counting at Telecom Wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode with an active quenching circuit on an ASIC (application specific integrated circuit) that is capable of operating in both gated and free-running modes. The 1.6mm2 ASIC chip is fabricated using CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology guaranteeing long-term stability, reliability and compactness. In the free-running mode we find a single photon detection efficiency of 10% with <2kHz of noise.

R. T. Thew; D. Stucki; J-D. Gautier; A. Rochas; H. Zbinden

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Linda Fellers | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linda Fellers Linda Fellers Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake...

351

Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 kHz. We discuss the unique properties of interferometric data in this regime. 161.3 days of triple-coincident data were analyzed. No gravitational events above threshold were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 5.4 year{sup -1} on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts was placed at a 90% confidence level. Implications for specific theoretical models of gravitational-wave emission are also discussed.

Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Barton, M. A.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T. [LIGO - California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Measurement of W-Boson Polarization in Top-quark Decay using the Full CDF Run II Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the polarization of W bosons from top-quark (t) decays into final states with a charged lepton and jets, tt --> WbWb --> lvbqqb, using the full Run II data set collected by the CDF II detector. A model-independent method simultaneously determines the fraction of longitudinal (f_0) and right-handed (f_+) W bosons to yield f_0 = 0.726 +/- 0.066 (stat) +/- 0.067 (syst) and f_+ = -0.045 +/- 0.044 (stat) +/- 0.058 (syst) with a correlation coefficient of -0.69. Additional results are presented under various standard model assumptions. No significant discrepencies with the standard model are observed.

CDF Collaboration

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

353

Supersymmetric discovery potential and benchmarks for early runs at {radical}(s)=7 TeV at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carry out an analysis of the potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to discover supersymmetry in runs at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with an accumulated luminosity of (0.1-2) fb{sup -1} of data. The analysis is done with both minimal supergravity and supergravity models with nonuniversal soft breaking. Benchmarks for early discovery with (0.1-2) fb{sup -1} of data are given. We provide an update of b-tagging efficiencies in PGS 4 appropriate for LHC analyses. A large number of signature channels are analyzed, and it is shown that each of the models exhibited are discoverable at the 5{sigma} level or more above the standard model background in several signature channels which would provide cross checks for a discovery of supersymmetry. It is shown that some of the benchmarks are discoverable with 0.1 fb{sup -1} of data again with detectable signals in several channels.

Altunkaynak, Baris; Holmes, Michael; Nath, Pran; Nelson, Brent D.; Peim, Gregory [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Swiss Watch Running on Chilean Time: A Progress Report on Two New Automated CORALIE RV Pipelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the current status of two new fully automated reduction and analysis pipelines, built for the Euler telescope and the CORALIE spectrograph. Both pipelines have been designed and built independently at the Universidad de Chile and Universidad Catolica by the two authors. Each pipeline has also been written on two different platforms, IDL and Python, and both can run fully automatically through full reduction and analysis of CORALIE datasets. The reduction goes through all standard steps from bias subtraction, flat-fielding, scattered light removal, optimal extraction and full wavelength calibration of the data using well exposed ThAr arc lamps. The reduced data are then cross-correlated with a binary template matched to the spectral type of each star and the cross-correlation functions are fit with a Gaussian to extract precision radial-velocities. For error analysis we are currently testing bootstrap, jackknifing and cross validation methods to properly determine uncertainties directly from the dat...

Jenkins, James S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Current status of the Run-Beyond-Cladding Breach (RBCB) tests for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Metallic Fuels Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuel Run-Beyond-Cladding-Breach (RBCB) experiments conducted in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Included in the report are scoping test results and the data collected from the prototypical tests as well as the exam results and discussion from a naturally occurring breach of one of the lead IFR fuel tests. All results showed a characteristic delayed neutron and fission gas release pattern that readily allows for identification and evaluation of cladding breach events. Also, cladding breaches are very small and do not propagate during extensive post breach operation. Loss of fuel from breached cladding was found to be insignificant. The paper will conclude with a brief description of future RBCB experiments planned for irradiation in EBR-II.

Batte, G.L.; Pahl, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Measurement of the W Boson Mass with the D0 Run II Detector using the Electron P(T) Spectrum  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is a description of the measurement of the W boson mass using the D0 Run II detector with 770 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. These collisions were produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV between 2002 and 2006. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} and Z {yields} ee decays to determine the W boson mass with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and the transverse mass distribution of the boson. We measure M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 37 (stat.) {+-} 26 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 68 MeV with the transverse momentum distribution of the electron and M{sub W} = XXXXX {+-} 28 (stat.) {+-} 17 (sys. theo.) {+-} 51 (sys. exp.) MeV = XXXXX {+-} 61 MeV with the transverse mass distribution.

Andeen, Timothy R., Jr.; /Northwestern U.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Running Large Scale Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Org Chart NERSC History NERSC Stakeholders...

358

Running with Java  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Powering Scientific Discovery Since 1974 Login Site Map | My NERSC search... Go Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Org Chart NERSC History NERSC Stakeholders...

359

Run II Student Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyze the Data Activities Analyze the Data Activities Here's a Puzzle Wanted by FNAL Looking for Suspects Candidate Events Assignments Evidence for B A. B Data B. Explaining Data Forms 1. Becoming Familiar with Events a. Event Pictures - PDF file b. Making a Histogram B. Identifying B Mesons C. B Threshold Decay Length 1. Data 2. Data Analysis Help 3. Sample Histogram Special Project Calculating B Lifetime 1. More on Lifetime 2. Derivation of Equation 3. Data 4. Data Analysis Help A. Graphing the Data 1. Data Analysis Help 2. Making a Histogram Evidence for W A. W Data B. Explaining Forms of the Data 1. Becoming Familiar with Events a. Event Pictures - PDF file b. Making a Histogram B. W Decay C. Threshold Momenta D. W Transverse Mass Histogram 1. Data 2. Data Analysis Help E. Some Data Analysis 1. Help with Data Anaysis

360

Run to Discovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and not necesarily those of the Foundation or Department. Project Contact: Thomas Jordan - jordant@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: qnet-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Update: 7 March, 2001...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Hitting the ground running  

SciTech Connect

Very few of us get to start clean: getting a new organization, new space, and hiring new people for a new information management program. In over 20 years in some aspect of this profession, the author has never faced that particular challenge. By far the majority of information management opportunities involve taking over from someone else. Sometimes, a predecessor has gone on to better things on his/her initiative; that is not always the case. Sometimes the group is one you were a part of yesterday. If the function functions, time moves on and changes may be needed to accommodate new technology, additional and/or changed tasks, and alterations in corporate missions. If the function does not, it is a good bet that you were hired or promoted as an agent of change. Each of these situations poses challenges. This presentation is about that first few months and first year in a new assignment. In other words, you have the job, now what?

KEENEN,MARTHA JANE; NUSBAUM,ANNA W.

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Running jobs on Euclid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data analysis,...

363

Techniques of evaluation of QCD low-energy physical quantities with running coupling with infrared fixed point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perturbative QCD (pQCD) running coupling a(Q^2) (=alpha_s(Q^2)/pi) is expected to get modified at low spacelike momenta 0 1 GeV by nonperturbative (NP) terms, typically by some power-suppressed terms ~1/(Q^2)^N. Evaluations of low-energy physical QCD quantities in terms of such A(Q^2) couplings (with IR fixed point) at a level beyond one-loop are usually performed with (truncated) power series in A(Q^2). We argue that such an evaluation is not correct, because the NP terms in general get out of control as the number of terms in the power series increases. The series consequently become increasingly unstable under the variation of the renormalization scale, and have a fast asymptotic divergent behavior compounded by the renormalon problem. We argue that an alternative series in terms of logarithmic derivatives of A(Q^2) should be used. Further, a Pad\\'e-related resummation based on this series gives results which are renormalization scale independent and show very good convergence. Timelike low-energy observables can be evaluated analogously, using the integral transformation which relates the timelike observable with the corresponding spacelike observable.

Gorazd Cveti?

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

364

Analyses and applications of pressure, flow rate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run. [Measurement while perforating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing-conveyed perforating, underbalanced perforating, high-shot-density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development described in this paper is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements (including pressure, flow rate, temperature, gamma ray, casing-collar locator (CCL), and cable tension) during a perforating run and can selectively fire a number of guns at different depths or times. In addition to providing better control of the perforating process, the simultaneous downhole measurements can provide in a single trip a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions. Thus, the completion can be evaluated in real time and any needed remedial reperforating can be performed while the gun is still in the hole. Other applications include limited-entry perforating, monitoring of bottomhole pressure (BHP) during minifracture jobs, better depth control with a gamma ray detector, fluid-level monitoring, and underbalance control. The applications of these measurements, with field data obtained with the Measurement While Perforating (MWP{sup SM}) tool, are the subject of this paper. Examples show the capabilities and the versatility of the MWP tool.

Tariq, S.M. (Schlumberger Perforating and Testing Center (US)); Ayestaran, L.C. (Schlumberger Well Services (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Application of a Hough search for continuous gravitational waves on data from the 5th LIGO science run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an all-sky search for periodic gravitational waves in the frequency range $\\mathrm{50-1000 Hz}$ with the first derivative of frequency in the range $-8.9 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s to zero in two years of data collected during LIGO's fifth science run. Our results employ a Hough transform technique, introducing a $\\chi^2$ test and analysis of coincidences between the signal levels in years 1 and 2 of observations that offers a significant improvement in the product of strain sensitivity with compute cycles per data sample compared to previously published searches. Since our search yields no surviving candidates, we present results taking the form of frequency dependent, 95$%$ confidence upper limits on the strain amplitude $h_0$. The most stringent upper limit from year 1 is $1.0\\times 10^{-24}$ in the $\\mathrm{158.00-158.25 Hz}$ band. In year 2, the most stringent upper limit is $\\mathrm{8.9\\times10^{-25}}$ in the $\\mathrm{146.50-146.75 Hz}$ band. This improved detection pipeline, which is computationally efficient by at least two orders of magnitude better than our flagship Einstein$@$Home search, will be important for "quick-look" searches in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector era.

The LIGO Scientific Collaboration; The Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. Abbott; M. R. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; N. Aggarwal; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; R. A. Anderson; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; J. Areeda; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. T. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. W. Ballmer; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; S. H. Barnum; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; I. Belopolski; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; D. Bersanetti; A. Bertolini; D. Bessis; J. Betzwieser; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbhade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; M. Boer; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; C. A. Brannen; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brckner; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; J. Caldern Bustillo; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. C. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; R. Chakraborty; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr.; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. W. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; S. G. Crowder; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; T. Dal Canton; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; E. Deleeuw; S. Delglise; W. Del Pozzo; T. Denker; T. Dent; H. Dereli; V. Dergachev; R. T. DeRosa; R. De Rosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; M. Daz; A. Dietz; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; K. Dmitry; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; J. Eichholz; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endroczi; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; S. Farinon; B. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. Fisher; R. Flaminio; E. Foley; S. Foley; E. Forsi; N. Fotopoulos; J. D. Fournier; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; N. Gehrels; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; R. Goetz; L. Gondan; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; P. Groot; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; K. E. Gushwa; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; B. Hall; E. Hall; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; M. Hanke; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; T. Hong; S. Hooper; T. Horrom; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; Y. Hu; Z. Hua; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; J. Iafrate; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; F. Jimnez-Forteza; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; Haris K; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gas Spring Losses in Linear Clearance Seal Compressors P.B. Bailey, M.W. Dadd, J.S. Reed*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat transfer in a nearly-isothermal Stirling engine." SAE, 1985. 5. Kornhauser A.A., Smith, J.L., "The

367

Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Reacting Flows l Aerodynamics l Internal-Combustion Engines l Stirling Engines l Computational Fluid internal-combustion engines l Cross-flow and co-flow combustion facilities l Flammability test apparatus l

368

To users of the Western Wind Dataset: We have run into some issues on the wind dataset. For many uses of the dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-the-art forecasts would use on-site data to correct the wind energy forecast and effectively remove this biasTo users of the Western Wind Dataset: We have run into some issues on the wind dataset. For many), these issues may not affect you. However, if you are using the dataset for an extensive wind integration study

369

Long-run incremental costs and the pricing of electricity. Part II. [Comparative evaluation of marginal cost pricing and average cost pricing  

SciTech Connect

Total costs have essentially the same cost components whether long-run average costs or long-run incremental costs are used. The variable components, chiefly fuel, may be somewhat different in the new incremental plant compared to the old average plant; where the difference is between nuclear fuel and fossil fuel, its size is substantial. However, given the same kind of plant, the current prices of materials and labor will be essentially the same whether used in the new or the old plant with long-run incremental costs (LRIC) or long-run average costs (LRAC). The lower cost of electricity produced in nuclear plants constructed today, as compared to fossil fuel plants constructed at the same time, is not to be confused with the relation between LRIC and LRAC. LRAC is the average cost of electricity from all existing plants priced at their historical costs, which were generally lower than current costs. These average historical costs per kilowatt are still likely to be lower than the current incremental cost per kilowatt of the newest nuclear plant built at present price levels. LRAC is, therefore, still likely to be lower than LRIC for either fossil or nuclear. Data from the Wisconsin Power and Light Company, the Madison Gas and Electric Company, and Tuscon Gas and Electric Company are examined to study some comparisons. Some pricing principles that vary seasonally for resort hotels are reviewed. (MCW)

Morton, W.A.

1976-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

370

Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

LIGO Scientific Collaboration

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 559 (2006) 417419 Detector commissioning for the CDMS-II final run at the Soudan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) TESs uniformly distributed and electrically connected in p candidate for the dark matter in the universe. The most recent data run utilized 12 ZIP detectors (six Ge Al grids to function as the ionization electrodes for the charge readout, and photolithographically

372

As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4) Peak hydroxide-water interface temperature >140 C; and (5) Peak heat flux >565 W/cm2.

Donna P. Guillen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

None

374

Wheel running from a juvenile age delays onset of specific motor deficits but does not alter protein aggregate density in a mouse model of Huntington's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of age (Fig. 2B; wheel running: F [1, 25] = 0.40, P = 0.72; 2-way ANOVA). At 5 months, an effect of the HD BMC Neuroscience 2008, 9:34 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/9/34 mutation on performance was observed (Fig. 2B; HD: F[1, 28] = 8.58, P < 0... in activity on the second day of testing (2nd blocks in Fig. 3B) in non-enriched HD mice (F[1,38] = 38.25, P < 0.001; 2-way ANOVA). Thus environmental enrichment and wheel running both rescued the abnor- mal habituation of rearing behavior in HD mice...

van Dellen, Anton; Cordery, Patricia M; Spires, Tara L; Blakemore, Colin; Hannan, Anthony J

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

01-02253B_OR_Knox_map.ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INN BULL RUN STEAM PLANT (TVA) COMFORT INN JAMESON INN BENEFITS OFFICE OF TECH. TRANSFER SNS PROJECT OFFICE COMMERCE PARK OAK RIDGEKNOXVILLE ROUTE MAP A B C D E F G H I J K L M N...

376

A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan  

SciTech Connect

Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Organic constituents in sour condensates from shale-oil and petroleum-crude runs at Sohio's Toledo refinery: identification and wastewater-control-technology considerations  

SciTech Connect

Samples of sour condensate generated from the continuous processing of both crude shale oil and petroleum crude were collected and extracted with methylene chloride. The extracts were analyzed using capillary-column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry at Argonne National Laboratory and Radian Corporation. Qualitatively, the predominant types of organic compounds present in the shale-oil sour condensate were pyridines and anilines; semiquantitatively, these compounds were present at a concentration of 5.7 ppM, or about 78% of the total concentration of components detected. In contrast, straight-chain alkanes were the predominant types of compounds found in the sour condensate produced during isocracking of conventional crude oil. The approximate concentration of straight-chain alkanes, 8.3 ppM, and of other branched and/or unsaturated hydrocarbons, 6.8 ppM, amounted to 88% of the total concentration of components detected in the sour condensate from the petroleum-crude run. Nitrogen compounds in the shale-oil sour condensate may necessitate alterations of the sour water and refinery wastewater-treatment facilities to provide for organics degradation and to accommodate the potentially greater ammonia loadings. This would include use of larger amounts of caustic to enhance ammonia removal by steam stripping. Possible problems associated with biological removal of organic-nitrogen compounds should be investigated in future experimental shale-oil refining runs.

Wingender, R J; Harrison, W; Raphaelian, L A

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Bulls, Bears and Excess Volatility: can currency intervention help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in G.M. Constantinides, M. Harris and R. Stulz (eds), Handbook of the Eco- nomics of Finance, Elsevier Science. [4] Bergsten, C. F. (1997), The Dollar and the Euro , Foreign Affairs, 76(40), 83-93. [5] Corrado, L., Miller, M. H. and L. Zhang (2002... ): Exchange Rate Monitoring Band: Theory and Policy, CEPR DP 3337. [6] Corsetti G., A. Dasgupta, S. Morris and H. S. Shin (2004), Does One Soros Make a Difference? A Theory of Currency Crises with Large and Small Traders, Review of Economic Studies, 71...

Corrado, Luisa; Miller, Marcus; Zhang, Lei

379

Running Interactive Jobs on Edison  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the debug queue. edison% qsub -I -V -q debug -l mppwidth32 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -V...

380

Prepare Mode: Setting up Runs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A4-end The value of motor 4 for the last point in the pattern. ... Field This invokes a menu for setting magnetic field conditions. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Running Grid Jobs at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

146581182211679 You will receive a contact URL that you may use to query the job. Here are some sample queries that you can make: To query job status: %...

382

Physics at Tevatron Run II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present recent physics results from the Tevatron Collider experiments CDF and D0. (contribution to Lattice 2004)

Daria Zieminska

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Sampling and analysis of water from Upper Three Runs and its wetlands near Tank 16 and the Mixed Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

In April and September 1993, sampling was conducted to characterize the Upper Three Runs (UTR) wetland waters near the Mixed Waste Management Facility to determine if contaminants migrating from MWMF are outcropping into the floodplain wetlands. For the spring sampling event, 37 wetlands and five stream water samples were collected. Thirty-six wetland and six stream water samples were collected for the fall sampling event. Background seepline and stream water samples were also collected for both sampling events. All samples were analyzed for RCRA Appendix IX volatiles, inorganics appearing on the Target Analyte List, tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and gross radiological activity. Most of the analytical data for both the spring and fall sampling events were reported as below method detection limits. The primary exceptions were the routine water quality indicators (e.g., turbidity, alkalinity, total suspended solids, etc.), iron, manganese, and tritium. During the spring, cadmium, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, potassium-40, ruthenium-106, and trichloroethylene were also detected above the MCLs from at least one location. A secondary objective of this project was to identify any UTR wetland water quality impacts resulting from leaks from Tank 16 located at the H-Area Tank Farm.

Dixon, K.L.; Cummins, C.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, which typically run between $500  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be completed by MBA students. Accepted projects will cost $2,500 depending on scope, plus expenses, whichThe Edwards School of Business is once again taking proposals for consulting projects typically run between $500 and $1,000. Though you are not limited to these, typically projects fall within

Saskatchewan, University of

385

COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 1897: Professor L. H. Bailey, Cornell University, M.A.C. Class of 1882 (June 18), Ithaca, New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. England, Jr., LLMT `72 Ira S. Epstein Ruth Espey-Romero Orlando L. Evora Spencer G. Feldman recipient, Joke Dekeersschieter, Burton Young Externship award recipient, Bernard P. Perlmutter, JD'83 Foundation Peter andYuriko Lederer Ivor Massey, Jr., JD `79 Paul J. McMahon Hon. Peter R. Palermo, JD `50

Landis, Doug

386

Supercomputers Crack Sixty-Trillionth Binary Digit of Pi-Squared |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputers Crack Sixty-Trillionth Binary Digit of Pi-Squared Supercomputers Crack Sixty-Trillionth Binary Digit of Pi-Squared Supercomputers Crack Sixty-Trillionth Binary Digit of Pi-Squared April 28, 2011 - 11:28am Addthis David H. Bailey | Photo Courtesy of Lawrence Berkely National Lab David H. Bailey | Photo Courtesy of Lawrence Berkely National Lab Linda Vu What are the key facts? Australian researchers have found the sixty-trillionth binary digit of Pi-squared. The calculation would have taken a single computer processor unit (CPU) 1,500 years to calculate, but it took just a few months on IBM's "BlueGene/P" supercomputer, which is designed to run continuously at one quadrillion calculations per second. Pi is one of the most mysterious numbers in mathematics and can never be expressed as a finite decimal number -- humanity will never have

387

Evaluation of the 2008 Predictions of Run-Timing and Survival of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Steelhead on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia Basin Research uses the COMPASS model on a daily basis during the outmigration of Snake River Chinook and steelhead smolts to predict downstream passage and survival. Fish arrival predictions and observations from program RealTime along with predicted and observed environmental conditions are used to make in-season predictions of arrival and survival to various dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. For 2008, calibrations of travel and survival parameters for two stocks of fish-Snake River yearling PIT-tagged wild chinook salmon (chin1pit) and Snake River PIT-tagged steelhead (lgrStlhd)-were used to model travel and survival of steelhead and chinook stocks from Lower Granite Dam (LWG) or McNary Dam (MCN) to Bonneville Dam (BON). This report summarizes the success of the COMPASS/RealTime process to model these migrations as they occur. We compared model results on timing and survival to data from two sources: stock specific counts at dams and end-of-season control survival estimates (Jim Faulkner, NOAA, pers. comm. Dec. 16, 2008). The difference between the predicted and observed day of median passage and the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between predicted and observed arrival cumulative distributions are measures of timing accuracy. MAD is essentially the average percentage error over the season. The difference between the predicted and observed survivals is a measure of survival accuracy. Model results and timing data were in good agreement from LWG to John Day Dam (JDA). Predictions of median passage days for the chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were 0 and 2 days (respectively) later than observed. MAD for chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks at JDA were 2.3% and 5.9% (respectively). Between JDA and BON modeling and timing data were not as well matched. At BON, median passage predictions were 6 and 10 days later than observed and MAD values were 7.8% and 16.0% respectively. Model results and survival data were in good agreement from LWG to MCN. COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.77 and 0.69 for chin1pit and lgrStlhd, while the data control's survivals were 0.79 and 0.68. The differences are 0.02 and 0.01 (respectively), nearly identical. However, from MCN to BON, COMPASS predicted survivals of 0.74 and 0.69 while the data controls survivals were 0.47 and 0.53 respectively. Differences of 0.27 and 0.16. In summary: Travel and survival of chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were well modeled in the upper reaches. Fish in the lower reaches down through BON suffered unmodeled mortality, and/or passed BON undetected. A drop in bypass fraction and unmodeled mortality during the run could produce such patterns by shifting the observed median passage day to appear artificially early.

Beer, W. Nicholas; Iltis, Susannah; Anderson, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

NERSC_Capability_Run_Rules.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC---8 NERSC---8 C apability I mprovement R un R ules As d escribed i n s ection 3 .5.5 o f t he t echnical r equirements, N ERSC w ill r equire t he installed s ystem t o p rovide a n ominal 8 x c apability i mprovement o ver N ERSC's Hopper s ystem ( 6,384 n odes, 1 53,214 c ores). F or N ERSC, c apability i mprovement will b e j udged b y t he r esults o f t hree o f t he b enchmarks s upplied f or t he i nitial R FP: GTC, M ILC, a nd m iniDFT. For e ach b enchmark, N ERSC w ill p rovide a b enchmark p roblem t hat u tilizes, nominally, t wo---thirds ( 2/3) o f H opper's c urrent c ompute p artition. T he O fferor w ill then s cale e ach b enchmark p roblem, u sing t he g uidance p rovided i n t he R EADME's for e ach b enchmark a nd d uplicated b elow, t o u tilize, n ominally, t wo---thirds o f t he compute p artition o f t he i nstalled s ystem.

389

Running the R-code Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test. The blue horizontal lines on the plot represent twice the standard deviation among machines (on a percentage scale). ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sizing Sun Ray Servers Running Windows Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This product or document is protected by copyright and distributed under licenses restricting its use, copying, distribution, and decompilation. No part of this product or document may be reproduced in any form by any means without prior written authorization of Sun and its licensors, if any. Third-party software, including font technology, is copyrighted and licensed from Sun suppliers. Parts of the product may be derived from Berkeley BSD systems, licensed from the University of California. UNIX is a registered trademark in the U.S. and other countries, exclusively licensed through X/Open Company, Ltd.

Sunpci Iipro

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

2005_Run 3-29-05.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28 14 17 18 19 16 2 24 31 29 30 26 27 28 27 Dwn - 12pm 30 1 6 3 1 4 2 2 3 5 3 2 H 6 O D 7 1 S 1 3 U T 4 2 7 3 4 6 5 7 11 9 9 10 9 8 7 4 29 1 11 16 6 7 31 30 29 30 29 24 19 12 18 17...

392

06 Run 6-16-05.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintenance AP Accel startup Accel. down Beam line commissiong 10-24-05 (Rev. 6-16-06) User 26 22 20 22 26 24 24 25 13 AP 19 6 MA Conf Dwn 4pm 18 22 21 19 AP AP AP 15 17...

393

FY2000 Run Schedule v6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

00 SPEAR Operation Cycle 00 SPEAR Operation Cycle Oct-99 Nov-99 Dec-99 Jan-00 Feb-00 Mar-00 Apr-00 May-00 Jun-00 Jul-00 Aug-00 Sep-00 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M/A 1 1 1 1 2 2 ñý½’ü ¢ :Kd·Ð ‚¢I%` èÀ›]€ƒc0öén›D5‚Ë7-)%ˆÀsÞãS÷‡Ù˜—r*¸YÆþõ/⸡åû]šòCbšÀ°ì™Šo«²/+ìF¬éç—C÷¶Z¸” øhƒÒvY:ƒ‰!Ý?€^i‡ZK~_!O"S¦la*ÚèõÐ^¶¡ƒV[3Ì{[_F_JéN2;FGÂë ó«fºÝà¦ØeË 6—$C\ ¶MxÒM|„”M1@lIv†…møS\u“xO²tdE5®ŒÙ1µÔ!x6êUsqýÖ1ü&Ï|:!i;ÖTAÊÉìŸ9 ÍâË-Eé$ŽÕ@ðþ€î÷=z-UðáôïÛà§" ˔fi”nªJn7ð2?ãG/ò÷ì ʑMÑå%½˜*¢±ÿnrb;Âä“Ë«€-ï„….AX½‚—:£,]ßtfI ì¨ OІo©j/ŸÄv¦Ãχ!»g|XÀ¹==Šá©£»ÙÉ|Ê/56®Y9¹!âtà]ã§Åeý3ܔ)ZpjÇæyÿ«l©àåÍÁ¿—G˜†Zö¹i†äCcŒ¾ìÿғŒL-ÙZZ†'n?3ì?Y‡Ï#sléÐN¡Îw_}K›I..‚ ¾µ$ –8¼Oðš¼`螾ÏX֑kY2K 3 3 3 PPS 3 3 3 3 3

394

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total HVAC electricity and gas usage. Compared with the baseheat supply and usage as well as electricity and gas. Within

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

TRECVID 2011 Runs and Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nofa.0 PKU-IDM.m.balanced.cascade Peking University-IDM PKU-IDM.m.nofa. cascade PRISMA.m.balanced.EhdGry University of Chile PRISMA.m ...

396

TRECVID 2012 Runs and Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... University NO PKU-ICST-MIPL 3 NO PKU-ICST-MIPL 4 NO prisma-four90px 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Chile NO prisma ...

397

TREC 2002 Video Track Runs (cont.)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... examples); 87 - Find shots of oil fields, rigs, derricks, oil drilling/pumping equipment. Shots just of refineries are not desired. (1 video example); 88 ...

398

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A local Clean Cities coalition helped Idaho's Valley Regional Transit switch to compressed natural gas buses, allowing the transit authority to maintain its service while reducing harmful emissions.

399

Life extension runs into environmental barriers  

SciTech Connect

The author discusses the effects of the EPA ruling that a life extension plan for a Wisconsin utility's power plant would have to meet the same regulations for a new power plant. According to the author, the result will be a significant increase in the retirement of old plants. This article also discusses the increased interest in the life extension of nuclear power plants. The life extension project at Yankee Atomic Electric Company is detailed.

Smock, R

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

TRANSVERSE OPTICS IMPROVEMENTS FOR RHIC RUN 4.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic settings in RHIC are driven by an on-line model, and the quality of the resulting lattice functions depend on the correctness of the settings, and knowledge of the magnet transfer-functions. Here we first present the different inputs into the model, including dipole sextupole components, used to set tunes and chromaticities along the ramp. Based on an analysis of measured tunes along the FY03 polarized proton ramp, we present predictions for quadrupole transfer-function changes which have been implemented for the FY04 Au ramp. We show the improved model agreement for tunes along the ramp, and measured transverse phase-advance at store.

VAN ZEIJTS,J.

2004-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAIN SUPPLY FAN (CFM ) SYSTEM DESIGN PARAMETERS ALTITUDEF) I.02 FAN KW 31- STORY OFFICE BLDG, CHICAGO DESIGN - LOAD2A SYST_ DESIGN PARAMETERS SYSTEm4 NAME SYSI SUPPLY FAN (CFM)

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Designing and Running for High Accelerator Availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides an overview and examples of high availability design considerations and operational aspects making references to some of the available methods to assess and improve on accelerator reliability.

Willeke,F.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

403

Great Plains gets a running start  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States first commercial synthetic fuel plant has been geared up to deliver the $2 billion project by late 1984 in Beulah, North Dakota. The Great Plains coal gasification plant is rising quickly under a compressed 44 month schedule. Delivery of synthetic natural gas from the 125 million-cu-ft-a-day plant by 1984 is possible. Getting the $1.4 billion gasification plant, 22,000-ton-per-day coal mine and 365-mile, 20-in. dia pipeline connection completed on schedule and within budget is critical. The price of the product gas, which will be mixed with relatively cheap natural gas in the consortium's pipelines, has been set by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission at $6.75 per thousand cubic feet. This project has been planned since 1972. (DP)

Not Available

1981-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF 12NOON TILL 6PM. AN ABSORPTION CHILLER RECOVERS THE HEATOLDER BUILDINGS, THE PLANT HAS AN ABSORPTION CHILLER. THETHE USE OF THE ABSORPTION CHILLER AS AN ELECTRIC PEAK

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VAV SYSTR IN OFFICE ICE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR OFFICEVAV SYST_ IN OFFICE ICE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR OFFICEBUILDING & OPEN ATRIA ICE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR OFFICE

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

AGS pp Run Discussion May 22, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Haixin Huang6 Conundrum: P(Vrf) --- Why this slope? #12;Haixin Huang7 #12;Haixin Huang8 #12;Haixin Huang9

Ohta, Shigemi

407

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24 and Support for California Energy Commission Staff Use ofCEC Project Manager California Energy Commission 1516 NinthBerkeley, CA 94720 California Energy Commission EnergyPlus

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Run to the Hills! Ubiquitous Computing Meltdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have seen the future of ubiquitous computing, and it's gloomy. While the various technologies keep advancing at a breakneck pace, and half of human race are already carrying computing systems with them, the goal of transparently integrating all those ... Keywords: Calm Computing, Context Awareness, Interoperability, Overload, Privacy, Systems Design, Ubiquitous Computing, Usability

Pertti Huuskonen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

EnergyPlus Run Time Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

envelope, daylighting, and HVAC systems. Sensitivity ofand windows, daylighting and controls, HVAC system types andand daylighting, service water heating, HVAC systems, and

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Building Technologies Office: Run a Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefits. In addition to helping homeowners, businesses, and institutions save money by saving energy, these programs spur economic growth by supporting energy efficiency job...

411

Designing Novel CRIMSON Running System through Numerical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This method leaves the energy saving as subsidiary one. As a partner of this project, the AEROMET international PLC provides thin wall aluminium filter housing...

412

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDOUIPI4EI_'QU-JU:) HW-BOILER-HII_*FFLRIK,R-HIA-LrFLR SIZE INSTD (MBTU/H) AVAIL HW-BOILER HERM-REC-CHLR I I SIMPLEOVHAUL OVHAUL COST ($) IM- BOILER HEP_I- _C-CHLIR I SIMPLE

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Running Infiniband on the Cray XT3  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to utilize the performance and cost benefits of the infiniband interconnect, this paper will discuss what was needed to install and load a single data rate infiniband host channel adapter into a service node on the Cray XT3. Along with the discussion on how to do it, this paper will also provide some performance numbers achieved from this connection to a remote system.

Minich, Makia [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

TRECVID 2012 Runs and Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Glasses 297. ... Skier 440. Soldiers 10 FEATUREPAIRS (judged): 901 Beach + Mountain 902 Old_People + Flags 903 Animal + Snow 904 Bird ...

415

Race, waste and long-run outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the hypothesis that hazardous waste facilities are disproportionately located in minority neighborhoods. We also ask whether such facilities provide observable economic benefits to the surrounding community. the ...

Bernard, Andrew B.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Oil Prices and Long-Run Risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I show that relative levels of aggregate consumption and personal oil consumption provide anexcellent proxy for oil prices, and that high oil prices predict low (more)

READY, ROBERT

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

2.1E Sample Run Book  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTR LOAD (MWH) WASTED RCVRABL ENERGY (HB'rU) FUEL INPUTELECTR LOAD (MWH) WASTED RCVRABL ENERGY (HB'rU) FUEL INPUTELE_:TR LOAD (MWH) WASTED RCVRABL ENERGY (MSTU) FUEL INPUT

Winkelmann, F.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Higgs Boson in RG running Inflationary Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An intriguing hypothesis is that gravity may be non-perturbatively renormalizable via the notion of asymptotic safety. We show that the Higgs sector of the SM minimally coupled to asymptotically safe gravity can generate the observed near scale-invariant spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background through the curvaton mechanism. The resulting primordial power spectrum places an upper bound on the Higgs mass, which for finely tuned values of the curvaton parameters, is compatible with the recently released Large Hadron Collider data.

Yi-Fu Cai; Damien A. Easson

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Analysis of Performance Accelerator Running ETMSP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates new approaches to parallel computer processing capable of accelerating certain classes of power system problems. The results show that a speedup of 30 times over conventional workstation computers is possible.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fifth Annual Health Information Security Conference Runs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... conference is an opportunity for HIPAA security rule implementers; security, privacy and compliance officers; assessment teams and audit staff in ...

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TRECVID 2011 Runs and Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 NO AXES_DCU_4 4 TOPICS inbrief: Number: Type Text 9023 OBJECT setting sun 9024 LOCATION upstairs, inside the windmill 9025 OBJECT ...

422

Comments on Lateral Dispersion from Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few minor errors in a paper by Hanna are noted and several questions are raised about apparent inconsistencies. One question is why substantial enhancement of ?y, by buoyancy was noted for the Bull Run data but was unmentioned for the Kincaid ...

Gary A. Briggs

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Lateral Dispersion from Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly ground-level concentrations of SF6 at downwind distances ranging from 0.5 to 50 km were observed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on dense monitoring networks around power plants at Kincaid, Illinois, and Bull Run, ...

Steven R. Hanna

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

Griswold, Jim

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Integrated model-based run-to-run uniformity control for epitaxial silicon deposition.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiconductor fabrication facilities require an increasingly expensive and integrated set of processes. The bounds on efficiency and repeatability for each process step continue to tighten under the pressure of economic ...

Gower, Aaron E. (Aaron Elwood)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S., Schwartz, M.K., McKelvey, K.S., Foresman, K.R., Pilgrim, K.L., Giddings, B.J., and Lofroth, E.C. 2006. When

428

4.1 Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) 4.1.1 Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, energy, climate change, and disasters before turning our attention to the role of gender in climate) November 13 ­ Gender, Energy and Climate Change · Mark D. Smith (2007). Chapter 4: Mitigation of Climate Kelkar (2007). Appropriate Gender-Analysis for Unpacking the Gender-Energy-Poverty Nexus. Gender

429

Appendix 67 A Review of Bull Trout Life-History and Habitat Use in Relation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Tui System", Univ. of British Columbia, 1996. [11] Pradeep K. Sinha, "Distributed operating systems;Pipeline input task T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 bitvector to indicate supported PE Types Light Medium Heavy Pipeline Pipeline output task 1 1 0 01 0 0 0 1 0 0 01 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 Type 3RHType 2 Type 1

430

The influence of energy and protein level on the carcase and lean quality in young bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tallow, and meat which is light in colour. To furfil these requirements it is necessary to know how, is more or less the same, irrespective of the slaughter weight or energy level. The percentage of tallow

Recanati, Catherine

431

I. Bulls and Bears One of the timeliest and most prescient books  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Antonio shouts: "Hang, cur! Hang, you whoreson, insolent noise-maker! We are less afraid to be drowned a look of destiny about him and that the fate of someone so insolent as this cannot be an anonymous consulted for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Hart's primary research interests are early

Hemmers, Oliver

432

Wilson Bull., 95(4), 1983, pp, 628-635 GENERAL NOTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of young hatched during the preceding breeding season (Ketterson and Nolan 1976; Auk %:532-536, 1979; Auk about 31 December by inspection of

433

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

434

August 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2013 August 2013 Print Thursday, 22 August 2013 10:26 Sue Bailey, User Services Group Leader bailey As head of ALS User Services for the past six years, my goal has been to...

435

August 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 2013 Print Sue Bailey, User Services Group Leader bailey As head of ALS User Services for the past six years, my goal has been to make the ALS user experience as smooth and...

436

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Am. J.Trop. Med. Hyg., 82(4), 2010, pp. 693695 doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0540  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MJ, Mabey DCW, Bailey RL, 2008. Risk factors for active trachoma in The Gambia. Trans R Soc Trop Med

Elimelech, Menachem

438

TEST VERSION Mathematics by Experiment: Plausible ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jonathan M. Borwein Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics Department of Mathematics Simon Fraser University David H. Bailey Lawrence...

439

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative Response Measurement of Cell Substrate Interactions via RT-PCR. Matthew L. Becker, 1 LeeAnn O. Bailey ...

440

2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held the 2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) on October 31 November 2, 2006 at the Dearborn Inn in Dearborn, Michigan and at DTE Energy's Monroe Station. Post-Combustion NOX Control Program members, invited speakers, and EPRI staff participated in this two and a half day event. The workshop agenda was comprised of twenty-seven presentations, two panel discussions, and a plant tour. Operating experience reports on SCR systems at Baldwin, Bowen, Bull Run, Crist, Cumberland, Gaston, Go...

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull run bailey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume IX : Evaluation of the 2001 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Migrant Salmon and Steelhead Trout Migrating to Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day Dams using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 2001 inseason outmigration via the internet for eighteen PIT-tagged stocks of wild salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams and eleven passage-indexed stocks to Rock Island, McNary, or John Day dams. Nine of the PIT-tagged stocks tracked this year were new to the project. Thirteen ESUs of wild subyearling and yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and one ESU of hatchery-reared sockeye salmon were tracked and forecasted to Lower Granite Dam. Eight wild ESUs of subyearling and yearling chinook salmon, sockeye salmon and steelhead were tracked to McNary Dam for the first time this year. Wild PIT-tagged ESUs tracked to Lower Granite Dam included yearling spring/summer chinook salmon release-recovery stocks (from Bear Valley Creek, Catherine Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Johnson Creek, Lostine River, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, Secesh River, and Valley Creek), PIT-tagged wild runs-at-large of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead, and a PIT-tagged stock of subyearling fall chinook salmon. The stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon smolts outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam, consisted this year of a new stock of fish from Alturas Lake Creek, Redfish Lake Creek Trap and Sawtooth Trap. The passage-indexed stocks, counted using FPC passage indices, included combined wild- and hatchery-reared runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead migrating to Rock Island and McNary dams, and, new this year, combined wild and hatchery subyearling chinook salmon to John Day Dam. Unusual run-timing and fish passage characteristics were observed in this low-flow, negligible-spill migration year. The period for the middle 80% of fish passage (i.e., progress from the 10th to the 90th percentiles) was unusually short for nine out of ten PIT-tagged yearling spring/summer chinook salmon stocks tracked to Lower Granite Dam. It was the shortest on record for seven of these ten stocks. The nine stocks recording unusually short middle 80% periods also recorded higher-than-average recovery percentages. However the opposite trend was observed for the PIT-tagged wild subyearling chinook salmon and hatchery sockeye salmon stocks whose middle 80% period of passage to Lower Granite Dam was average to above average. Recovery percentages for these two stocks were average, compared to historical recoveries. The performance results of Program RealTime to make accurate predictions of percentiles of fish passage at an index site were mixed this year. The release-recovery stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon tracked to Lower Granite Dam were predicted less accurately than usual, on average, with two exceptions. One of these exceptions was a stock that had its best prediction (first-half, last-half, and season-wide) ever to occur. On average, however, performance was down for predicting these stocks. The RealTime Select composite season-wide MAD was 4.3%, larger than the historical average of 2.1%. Passage percentiles for PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild Snake River yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and of wild steelhead outmigrating to Lower Granite Dam were predicted very well this year, their second year of inclusion in the project, with season-wide MADs of 3.6%, 4.7%, and 1.8% respectively. These results, too, were mixed with respect to comparison with last year's performance. The yearling chinook stock was predicted somewhat better last year (up from 1.7% last year to 3.6% this year) but the subyearling chinook salmon and steelhead stocks were predicted better this year than last, season-wide. The steelhead stock, in particular, was predicted much better this year than last year, down to 1.8% this year from 4.8% last year. The PIT-tagged runs-at-large of wild salmon and steelhead tracked to McNary Dam in 2001 for the first time, were also well-predicted. In particular, the Snake River stocks were well-predicted, with season-wide MADs of 4.7% for subyearling chinook salmon, 3.3% for year

Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Pleasant Run Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.3031126°, -84.5480009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3031126,"lon":-84.5480009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Run your research: on the effectiveness of lightweight mechanization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal models serve in many roles in the programming language community. In its primary role, a model communicates the idea of a language design; the architecture of a language tool; or the essence of a program analysis. No matter which role it plays, ... Keywords: lightweight semantics engineering

Casey Klein; John Clements; Christos Dimoulas; Carl Eastlund; Matthias Felleisen; Matthew Flatt; Jay A. McCarthy; Jon Rafkind; Sam Tobin-Hochstadt; Robert Bruce Findler

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Powering Cell Phones with Fuel Cells Running on Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major goals of this project were to increase lifetime, increase energy density, and reduce material costs. The combination of identifying corrosion resistant materials and changing catalysts increased lifetimes. Work to increase the energy density included increasing the concentration of the formic acid fuel from 12M (ca. 50 wt%) to 22M (ca. 85 wt%) and decreasing the amount of fuel crossing over. The largest expense of the device is the cathode catalyst. At the beginning of the project Pt loading was over 8 mg/cm2 on our cathodes. Through optimization work we managed to bring down the cathode loading to approximately half of what we started with.

Dr. Ruiming Zhang

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Effects of Noise on Thorpe Scales and Run Lengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimating the diapycnal mixing rate from standard CTD data by identifying overturning regions in the water column (the Thorpe-scale approach) provides good spatial and temporal coverage but is sometimes limited by instrument noise. This noise ...

Helen L. Johnson; Chris Garrett

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

maintenance, users reporting get the error message similar as follows occassionaly: PE456:inetarpaddresslookup:Failed to read output of sbinarp -a -i ipogif0 command. Try...

447

Streamlined determination of processive run length and mechanochemical coupling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RecBCD helicase determined from single turnover chemical quenched-flow kinetic studies. J. Mol. Biol, for both basic research and technological applications. Here, we present a streamlined analytical method of kinetic time courses of NTP hydrolysis that have not been addressed in previous analyses, and also

Derényi, Imre

448

The bioenergetics of walking and running in space suits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space-suited activity is critical for human spaceflight, and is synonymous with human planetary exploration. Space suits impose kinematic and kinetic boundary conditions that affect movement and locomotion, and in doing ...

Carr, Christopher E. (Christopher Edward), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Short & long run transmission incentives for generation location  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is about one aspect of Britain's electricity trading system, its advantages and its weaknesses concerning the incentives it provides or fails to provide for the location of generation. (Similar considerations ...

Turvey, Ralph

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Scenario Getting Started- A River Runs Through It  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

classroom. After waiting for the excitement to subside a bit the teacher asks, "What skills would you need in order to become an expert in our river study? The children...

451

WILL OIL PRICES DECLINE OVER THE LONG RUN? 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2008 all ECB publications feature a motif taken from the 10 banknote. This paper can be downloaded without charge from

Robert Kaufmann; Pavlos Karadeloglou; Robert Kaufmann; Pavlos Karadeloglou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Run_HistoryStatistics_4_plots.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year Year Scheduled User Hours User Beam Available hours User beam Availability (%) Total Faults Mean Time to Recovery Faults Per Day of Delivered Beam Delivered Integrated Current (A- hr) Hours of Top-up Scheduled Top-up Injector Availability MTBF 1998 4465.9 4163.2 93.22% 124 2.4 0.71 321.2 0.0 N/A 33.6 1999 5053.4 4767.7 94.35% 176 1.6 0.89 380.7 0.0 N/A 27.1 2000 5047.2 4723.8 93.59% 160 2.0 0.81 390.2 0.0 N/A 29.5 2001 5000.3 4788.7 95.77% 188 1.1 0.94 409.8 1032.0 96.1% 25.5 2002 4999.0 4855.4 97.13% 147 1.0 0.73 469.1 3680.0 94.9% 33.0 2003 4912.0 4772.5 97.16% 107 1.3 0.54 467.6 3592.0 97.6% 44.6 2004 5225.0 5112.5 97.85% 89 1.3 0.42 509.9 3865.6 97.9% 57.4 2005 5001.5 4931.0 98.59% 49 1.4 0.24 433.7 3976.5 98.5% 100.6 2006 5000.0 4875.5 97.51% 57 2.2 0.28 488.9 3928.0 97.3% 85.5 2007 4832.0 4750.8 98.32% 49 1.7 0.25 476.2 3816.0 98.4% 97.0 2008 4588.1 4478.8

453

Pleasant Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2997791°, -84.5635567° 2997791°, -84.5635567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2997791,"lon":-84.5635567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Running the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data archive server  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Archive Server (DAS) provides public access to over 12Tb of data in 17 million files produced by the SDSS data reduction pipeline. Many tasks which seem trivial when serving smaller, less complex data sets present challenges when serving data of this volume and technical complexity. The included output files should be chosen to support as much science as possible from publicly released data, and only publicly released data. Users must have the resources needed to read and interpret the data correctly. Server administrators must generate new data releases at regular intervals, monitor usage, quickly recover from hardware failures, and monitor the data served by the DAS both for contents and corruption. We discuss these challenges, describe tools we use to administer and support the DAS, and discuss future development plans.

Neilsen, Eric H., Jr.; Stoughton, Chris; /Fermilab

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Thermally efficient PEM fuel cell that runs on ethanol  

onboard conversion of ethanol into hydrogen fuel Liquid ethanol feedstock eliminates problems with storage and transportation of gaseous hydrogen Control of temperature maximizes selectivity of reformation process and prevents membrane fouling ...

456

Importing Western Childhoods into a Chinese State-Run Orphanage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s most severely ill and disabled children. This articlepractices to tend to sick and disabled children from variouss most severely ill and disabled children. The unit assumes

Wang, Leslie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of AUSC coal-fired power systems and high temperatures (above 1700C) of advanced gas turbines. Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, La.) - Southern University...

458

The Ravenscar-compliant hardware run-time (Ravenhart) kernel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time embedded systems are increasingly becoming the foundation of control systems in both the aerospace and automotive worlds. This class of systems has to meet three requirements: strict timing constraints on operational ...

Silbovitz, Anna, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Run2013-3DowntimeDetails.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1613 10:40 1.40 CTL CTL CTL Inhibits beam to user 11 101613 10:40 101613 15:23 4.72 Human Error (AOP) 106066 101613 15:23 101613 15:25 0.03 0.03 AOP AOP AOP Store Lost...

460

Technical Assistance Program: Off to a Running Start (Newsletter)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Winter 2012. Between December 2, 2011, and January 15, 2012, 46 American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes submitted applications to receive technical assistance through the program, which provides Tribes with on-the-ground technical support from DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) staff to help move tribal energy efficiency and renewable energy projects forward. The applications are being considered through the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) selection process, which incorporates expert reviews and outreach to Tribes who present a need for assistance with their community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The final successful applicants will be selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of STA