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Sample records for bull run bailey

  1. BaileyQdo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bailey - LBNL High Throughput Computing! at NERSC and Beyond 1 Stephen Bailey
 Amy Nesky" Physics! Dan Gunter" Monte Goode" CRD! Damir Sudar" Life Sciences! Anubhav Jain" Kristen Persson" EETD! David Skinner" Shane Cannon" NERSC Photo: Michael Wolf, Mother Jones Magazine 3D Map of the Universe" Current Generation" - 2.5M galaxies, 2600 jobs, 50k CPU-hours! Next Generation" - 25M galaxies, 100k (?) jobs, 10M CPU-hours! ! How to adapt this

  2. Ed Bailey | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ed Bailey Ed Bailey Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Ed Bailey A close

  3. Jim Bailey | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim Bailey Jim Bailey Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Jim Bailey Gives a

  4. Kay Bailey | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bailey Kay Bailey Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Kay Bailey Housekeeper

  5. Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Baileys Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  6. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Bailey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - Continued Storage Rule_Marissa Bailey

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Continued Storage Rule Marissa Bailey, Director Division of Fuel Cycle Safety, Safeguards, and Environmental Review Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Continued Storage Background * Historically, Commission's generic determination about spent fuel storage * Two parts - - Waste Confidence Decision * Generic statement about storing spent fuel * Repository availability - Rule codifying environmental impacts * Court vacated 2010 version Outline of

  8. Bull Solar GmbH Bull Holding AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Bull Holding AG) Place: North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany Sector: Solar Product: German solar installer. References: Bull Solar GmbH (Bull Holding AG)1 This article is a stub....

  9. Lawrence O. "Larry" Bailey, Jr., Joins Carlsbad Field Office as Deputy Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence O. "Larry" Bailey, Jr., Joins Carlsbad Field Office as Deputy Manager CARLSBAD, N.M., October 4, 2000 - Lawrence O. "Larry" Bailey, Jr., has been named Deputy Manager for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office. "I am delighted to have Larry as a member of my management team," said Dr. Inés Triay, Manager of the Carlsbad Field Office. "His expertise and background will help us elevate the Carlsbad Field Office to a center of

  10. Bull Outdoor Products: Order (2015-CE-14014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Bull Outdoor Products, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Bull had failed to certify that refrigerator basic model BC-130 complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - NRC Managent Persectives_Marissa Bailey [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Welcome and Perspective Marissa Bailey, Director of Division of Fuel Cycle Safety, Safeguards, and Environmental Review Summary  Fuel Cycle Safety and Environmental Review (FSCE) - What do we do?  Material Control and Accounting Coordinator - Responsibility and contact information  Tips for Success This Week 2 Fuel Cycle Safety, Safeguards, and Environmental Review Division Activities Include:  Issue licenses for fuel cycle facilities.  Complete environmental reviews for

  12. Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Facility Bull Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Market...

  13. Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: San Diego, California Sector: Biomass Product: Focused on development of biomass waste energy projects. References: Bull Moose Energy LLC1 This article is a stub. You...

  14. Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bull Moose Energy Address: P.O. Box 231501 Place: Encinitas, California Zip: 92023 Region: Southern CA Area Sector: Biomass Product:...

  15. BullDog BioDiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BullDog BioDiesel Jump to: navigation, search Name: BullDog BioDiesel Place: Ellenwood, Georgia Zip: 30294 Product: BullDog operates a 68.2mLpa (12m gallon) capacity,...

  16. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Submitting Jobs To Mendel+ How to submit your job to the UGE. Read More Running with Java Solutions to some of the common problems users have with running on Genepool when the...

  17. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Also pointers to more NERSC documentations on SLURM. Read More Interactive Jobs Learn how to run interactive jobs on Cori. Read More Batch Jobs SLURM keywords and...

  18. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moab scheduler and Torque resource manager. Read More Interactive Jobs There are two types of interactive jobs. The first type runs on a login node. These applications are...

  19. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jobs may be run on Edison by requesting resources from the batch system. "salloc -p debug -N " is the basic command to request interactive resources. Read More Batch Jobs...

  20. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running jobs Running jobs Overview and Basic Description Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI job, type in this at the shell prompt: % mpirun -np numprocs executable_name where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data

  1. Running Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Scripts Running Scripts Login versus Compute Nodes On Cray system login nodes, use Python as you normally would in any Unix environment, but be mindful of resource consumption since login nodes are shared by many users at the same time. To execute a Python script in the Edison or Cori batch/interactive environment (via sbatch/salloc) use srun: srun -n 1 python ./hello-world.py Of course, if the script has executable permission and contains "#!/usr/bin/env python" as its first

  2. Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Frog Green Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bull Frog Green Energy LLC Place: Carlsbad, California Zip: 92009 Product: A company, probably an individual, which has...

  3. Running with Java

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running with Java Running with Java Workflows that require the Java Virtual Machine will run into a couple of issues when running on Genepool. Java Software installed on Genepool...

  4. Bull Outdoor Products: Proposed Penalty (2015-CE-14014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Bull Outdoor Products, Inc. failed to certify refrigerator basic model BC-130 as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. Running Jobs Efficiently

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Running Jobs Efficiently Running Jobs Efficiently Job Efficiency A job's efficiency is the ratio of its CPU time to the actual time it took to run, i.e., cputime ...

  6. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running on Carver Running on Carver STAR software has been copied from the usual installation on common on PDSF to projectprojectdirsstarcommon. At this point the installation...

  7. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Large Scale Jobs Running Large Scale Jobs Users face various challenges with running and scaling large scale jobs on peta-scale production systems. For example, certain applications may not have enough memory per core, the default environment variables may need to be adjusted, or I/O dominates run time. This page lists some available programming and run time tuning options and tips users can try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers

  8. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running on Carver Running on Carver ATLAS software is obtained via cvmfs which is installed on PDSF nodes. There is presently no cvmfs installation available on Carver so it is not...

  9. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:40

  10. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  11. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running on Carver Running on Carver The ALICE software is installed on /project so no porting of code is necessary. Users can simply set up their environment as they do on PDSF and run. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:1

  12. Running on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running on Carver Running on Carver The Daya Bay software is installed on PDSF on /common so is therefore unavailable on Carver. At this point there has been no effort to port the code to /project for use on Carver. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:13

  13. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly; Olson, Jason

    2009-07-13

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  14. Running Jobs Intermittently Slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs Intermittently Slow Running Jobs Intermittently Slow October 2, 2014 Symptom: User jobs are seeing intermittent slowness, jobs can run very slow in certain stages or appear hung. This could happen to jobs having input/output on global file systems (/project, /global/homes, /global/scratch2). It could also happen to aplications using shared libraries, or CCM jobs on any Hopper file systems. The slowness is identified to be related to DVS/GPFS issues, the cause of slownwss yet

  15. Running Jobs Efficiently

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization » Running Jobs Efficiently Running Jobs Efficiently Job Efficiency A job's efficiency is the ratio of its CPU time to the actual time it took to run, i.e., cputime / walltime. A good efficiency at PDSF might be 70% or higher. Certainly an efficiency of less than 50% is indicative of some sort of problem with the job. The most common reason for low efficiency is slow IO reading data from disk but other factors, such as loading software, also can contribute. To see the efficiency for

  16. Microsoft Word - SAND BBDBMooring BrefortBull final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Unlimited Release Printed September 2014 Mooring Design for the Floating Oscillating Water Column Reference Model Dorian Brefort, Diana Bull Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract

  17. Wiley Coyotes Santa Run

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wiley Coyotes Santa Run AirSoft rifles are used to scare coyotes away from heavily used areas. WSI reaches major milestone with more than two million safe driving miles. Employees geared up for the annual run with thousands of Saint Nicks. See page 8. See page 3. See page 6. Revolutionary Gemini Gives Scientists Exciting Data Scientists at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are excited about the Gemini subcritical experiment series they're

  18. Stan Bull, Long-Time NREL Leader, Named AAAS Fellow - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stan Bull, Long-Time NREL Leader, Named AAAS Fellow January 11, 2011 Stanley R. Bull, former associate director for Science and Technology at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been awarded the distinction of Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Bull, a Midwest Research Institute vice president when he served at NREL, is now MRI's director of Energy Programs and an NREL emeritus researcher. He was cited for "distinguished

  19. T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD About Us T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD T.M. Bull Bennett, PhD Dr. T. M. Bull Bennett (Mi'kmaq), was born in Brunswick, ME, and grew up in the mountains and prairies of Wyoming. As an undergraduate he studied field ecology earning a BS in Biology from Black Hills State University. He completed his MS in Zoology and Physiology at the University of Wyoming where he studied captive propagation of black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) as part of the National Black-Footed Ferret

  20. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

    2002-12-01

    This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

  1. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. You can do this locally on PDSF by following

  2. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2002-03-01

    This report summarizes the second year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. An enumeration fence and traps were installed on the creek from September 6th to October 12th 2001 to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 273 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length and weight were determined for all bull trout captured. In total, 39 fish of undetermined sex, 61 males and 173 females were processed through the fence. An additional 19 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 12th. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during this project was 292 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), Rocky Mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and kokanee (O. nerka). A total of 143 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in two different locations (river km 27.5-30.5, and km 24.0-25.5) on October 3rd. The majority of redds (n=132) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past five years. The additional 11 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Buhl Creek, and Skookumchuck Creek at three locations suggested that water temperatures were within the temperature range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  3. SSRL- Experimental Run Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY2008 Experimental Run Schedules 2008 Run Ends August 11, 2008. User Operations will resume November 2008. Operating / Maintenance Beam Line Schedule FY2009 FY2008 X-ray (1-4, 2-1, 2-3, 4-2, 6-2, 7-2, 7-3, 9-3, 10-2, 11-2, 11-3) Macromolecular Crystallography Support Staff Schedule (1-5, 7-1, 9-1, 9-2, 11-1) VUV (5-1, 5-2, 5-4, 8-1, 8-2, 10-1) Schedules for previous years Accelerator Schedule (for staff): Accelerator Physics SPEAR Maintenance and Shutdown SPEAR Startup Injector Startup

  4. Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, James S.; Baxter, Jeremy

    2001-02-01

    An enumeration fence and traps were installed on Skookumchuck Creek from September 7 th to October 16 th to enable the capture of post-spawning bull trout emigrating out of the watershed. During the study period, a total of 252 bull trout were sampled through the enumeration fence. Length, weight, and sex were determined for all but one of the 252 bull trout captured. In total, one fish of undetermined sex, 63 males and 188 females were processed through the fence. A total of 67 bull trout were observed on a snorkel survey prior to the fence being removed on October 16 th . Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout count during this project was 319 fish. Several other species of fish were captured at the enumeration fence including westslope cutthroat trout, Rocky Mountain whitefish, kokanee, sucker, and Eastern brook trout. Redds were observed during ground surveys in three different locations (river km 27.5- 28.5, km 29-30, and km 24-25). The largest concentration of redds were noted in the upper two sections which have served as the index sections over the past four years. A total of 197 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground on October 4 th . The majority of redds (n=189) were observed in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past four years. The additional 8 redds were observed in a 1.5 km section (river km 24.0-25.5). Summary plots of water temperature for Bradford Creek, Sandown Creek, Skookumchuck Creek at km 39.5, and Skookumchuck Creek at the fence site suggested that water temperatures were within the range preferred by bull trout for spawning, egg incubation, and rearing.

  5. PDU Run 10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    PDU Run 10, a 46-day H-Coal syncrude mode operation using Wyodak coal, successfully met all targeted objectives, and was the longest PDU operation to date in this program. Targeted coal conversion of 90 W % was exceeded with a C/sub 4/-975/sup 0/F distillate yield of 43 to 48 W %. Amocat 1A catalyst was qualified for Pilot Plant operation based on improved operation and superior performance. PDU 10 achieved improved yields and lower hydrogen consumption compared to PDU 6, a similar operation. High hydroclone efficiency and high solids content in the vacuum still were maintained throughout the run. Steady operations at lower oil/solids ratios were demonstrated. Microautoclave testing was introduced as an operational aid. Four additional studies were successfully completed during PDU 10. These included a catalyst tracer study in conjunction with Sandia Laboratories; tests on letdown valve trims for Battelle; a fluid dynamics study with Amoco; and special high-pressure liquid sampling.

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Switchyard Feeder Repair Mark Dixson Little Rock District US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Original Equipment - 52 years old. * Unit 1 Oil filled cable pothead failed and exploded on Sept 6 2006. * Resulting fire and fire suppression damaged oil insulated cable system * Minor damage to power plant.

  7. Weighted Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weighted Running Jobs by Group Weighted Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:59

  8. Access, Compiling and Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Access Compiling and Running Jobs Access, Compiling and Running Jobs Access Dirac Dirac can be accessed by logging into carver.nersc.gov. Compile To compile your code, you need to...

  9. Coordinating the 2009 RHIC Run

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab - Mei Bai

    2010-01-08

    Physicists working at the Brookhaven National Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are exploring the puzzle of proton spin as they begin taking data during the 2009 RHIC run. For the first time, RHIC is running at a record energy of 500 giga-elect

  10. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2004-04-01

    We collected 279 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Tucannon River during the Spring and Fall of 2003. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 191 of them, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 31bull trout. Thirty five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Fourteen radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 21 remained in the river through December 31, 2003. Four bull trout that were radio-tagged in spring 2002 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring and/or summer of 2003. One of these fish spent the winter near river mile (RM) 13.0; the other 3 over-wintered in the vicinity of the Tucannon Hatchery between RM 34 and 36. Twenty-one radio tags from bull trout tagged in 2002 were recovered during the spring and summer, 2003. These tags became stationary the winter of 2002/2003, and were recovered between RM 11 and 55. We were unable to recover the remaining 15 tags from 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. We observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 6.4, near Lower Monumental Pool. As in 2002, we did not conduct work associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the Federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged ATS model F1830 radio-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20 and 30 ft. Tests were conducted using an ATS R-4000 Receiver equipped with an ''H'' antenna at 200 and 700 feet above water surface from a helicopter. Audible detection and frequency separation were possible at both elevations. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we are planning to reduce the size of the radio tags that we implant, and delay most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  11. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2003-06-01

    We collected, radio-tagged, and PIT-tagged 41 bull trout at the Tucannon River Hatchery trap from May 17, through June 14, 2002. An additional 65 bull trout were also collected and PIT tagged by June 24, at which time we ceased PIT tagging operations because water temperatures were reaching 16.0 C or higher on a regular basis. Six radio-tags were recovered shortly after tagging, and as a result, 35 remained in the river through November 30, 2002. During the month of July, radio-tagged bull trout exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon Subbasin. We began to observe some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October. These movements appeared to be associated with post spawning migrations. As of November 30, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and distributed from the headwaters downstream to river mile 11.3, near Pataha Creek. None of the radio-tagged bull trout left the Tucannon Subbasin and entered the federal hydropower system on the mainstem Snake River. We conducted some initial transmission tests of submerged radio tags at depths of 25, 35, 45, and 55 ft. in Lower Monumental Pool to test our capability of detection at these depths. Equipment used included Lotek model MCFT-3A transmitters, an SRX 400 receiver, a 4 element Yagi antenna, and a Lotek ''H'' antenna. Test results indicated that depth transmission of these tags was poor; only the transmitter placed at 25 ft. was audibly detectable.

  12. Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rules Benchmark Distribution & Run Rules Applications and micro-benchmarks for the Crossroads/NERSC-9 procurement. You can find more information by clicking on the header for each of the topics listed below. Change Log Change and update notes for the benchmark suite. Application Benchmarks The following applications will be used by the Sustained System Improvement metric in measuring the performance improvement of proposed systems relative to NERSC's Edison platform. General Run Rules

  13. Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl

    2005-11-01

    We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

  14. Run

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAMM / AP Low alpha University Holidays AP/PAMM Spear Down Oct Nov S 1 Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1/8/2015 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2014-2015 2014 2015 Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar S 2 1 1 TBD M 3 1 2 1 1 2 2 PAMM PAMM 3 1 2 2 3 W 1 5 AP 4 1 2 AP 3 3 T 4 4 2 4 3 1 5 4 1 3 4 1 5 F 3 7 2 6 3 2 4 1 5 5 T 2 6 6 4 2 Lock 6 5 3 7 6 3 1 5 2 6 low α 3 SP 7 S 5 9 4 8 5 4 2 6 3 7 low α 7 S 4 8 7 5 9 8 5 3 7 4 8 low α 5 9 9 M 6 10 8 6 4 8 7 11 9 5 9 AP PAMM PAMM PAMM PAMM 6 10 7 AP 6 4 8 W 8 12 10 6 10 TBD 7 11

  15. Run

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maintenance AP Spear Down University Holidays Sep Oct S 1 1 Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 442013 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2012-2013 2012 2013 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb S 2 1 1 M 3 1 2...

  16. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  17. Access, Compiling and Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Access Compiling and Running Jobs Access, Compiling and Running Jobs Access Dirac Dirac can be accessed by logging into carver.nersc.gov. Compile To compile your code, you need to land on a dirac compute node 1st: qsub -q dirac_reg -l nodes=1 -l walltime=00:30:00 -I After you are inside the job, you can load the necessary module for compile: module unload pgi module unload openmpi module unload cuda module load gcc-sl6 module load openmpi-gcc-sl6 module load cuda Now you can compile your code.

  18. PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning

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    PRELIMINARY Run Shutdown BL Commissioning Maintenance / AP SPEAR Down / Injector Startup University Holidays Spear Down SPEAR Startup MA Sep Oct 2011 2012 MA Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb S 30 31 31 S 31 29 30 30 F 30 28 30 29 31 29 T 29 31 27 29 28 30 28 29 W 28 30 28 30 29 26 AP 31 AP 28 27 29 27 31 T 27 31 25 30 27 26 30 28 26 30 27 28 M 26 31 28 24 29 26 25 29 27 25 29 26 29 AP S 25 27 30 27 23 28 25 29 24 28 26 24 28 25 27 24 S 24 29 30 26 24 28 26 25 22 27 24 23 27 25 23

  19. Run on Sun | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Run on Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name: Run on Sun Address: 655 S Raymond AV Place: Pasadena, California Country: United States Zip: 91105 Region: Southern CA Area Sector:...

  20. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P. D.; Jefferson, D. R.

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  1. Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faler, Michael P.; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl

    2008-11-20

    The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

  2. Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage Overview SLURM (Simple Linux Utility For Resource Management) batch scheduler is used on Babbage. Basically SLURM job commands are: salloc (ask nodes for interactive job) sbatch: submit a batch job scancel: delete a queued or running job squeue: check queued jobs sinfo: check queue configuration More details on on SLURM keywords, job control and monitoring commands, etc. can be found at the SLURM Introduction (with links to

  3. Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility Facility Brent Run Generating Station Sector Biomass...

  4. Mill Run Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Run Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Mill Run Wind Power Project Facility Mill Run Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  5. Diana Bull

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... During her tenure at Ocean Power Technologies, she contributed to the development of multiple ocean deployed WECs. In her current role, she mentors undergraduate and graduate ...

  6. LCLS Experimental Run Schedules | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Experimental Run Schedules Check-In | Computer Accounts | Data Collection & Analysis | Policies | Proposals | Shipping | User Portal LCLS generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. LCLS Tentative Long-Range Operating Plans Run 13 (March to August 2016) Run 12 (October 2015 to March 2016) Run 11 (March to August 2015) Run 10 (October 2014 to March 2015) Run 9 (March to August 2014) Run 8 (July 2013 to March 2014) Run 7

  7. RHIC Polarized proton performance in run-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Bai, M.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Abreu, N.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Bunce, G.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Kayran, D.A.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Lin, F.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schultheiss, C.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; D. Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2008-10-06

    During Run-8, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided collisions of spin-polarized proton beams at two interaction regions. Physics data were taken with vertical orientation of the beam polarization, which in the 'Yellow' RHIC ring was significantly lower than in previous years. We present recent developments and improvements as well as the luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-8, and we discuss possible causes of the not as high as previously achieved polarization performance of the 'Yellow' ring.

  8. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  9. Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP 5.000 Electric Vehicles in 2020 Ashok R, Horst Terhalle, Marcus Wagner November 14th 2014 © 2014 SAP SE or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 2 Public Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP AGENDA Why is e-Mobility important Marcus Wagner Our strategy "20% e-cars by 2020" Marcus Wagner Regional highlights Ashok R. E-Mobility Service Provider Solution Horst Terhalle FAQ all © 2014 SAP SE or an SAP affiliate company. All rights reserved. 3

  10. Rotary running tool for rotary lock mandrel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollison, W.W.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a running tool for a rotary lock mandrel. It comprises: a housing having a connection on the end thereof; an anvil slidably mounted in the housing and extending from the other end of the housing; means in the housing for rotating the anvil relative to the housing including: a helical slot in the housing, a lug slidably mounted in the helical slot and attached to the anvil and a spring biasing the anvil to extend from the housing; and means on the extending anvil for rotatively and releasably connecting the running tool to a rotary lock mandrel.

  11. 07-08 Run R3.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -22-2007 Run Shutdown Maintenance AP Injector SPEAR Startup Spear Down University Holidays 23 MA AP AP 27 MA 24 22 24 22 26 20 22 22 24 25 21 18 17 21 15 23 18 3 4 15 14 13 6 8...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Airport Shuttles Run on Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Airport Shuttles Run on Propane on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  13. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models ...

  14. China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd Hua Run | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd Hua Run Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Resources Wind Power Development Co Ltd (Hua Run) Place: Shantou, Guangdong Province, China...

  15. Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Presentation). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

  16. OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Abstract). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and...

  17. Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Running against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  18. Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our

  19. SSRL_2003_Run_Sched.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/02 Run Shutdown Weekends Maintenance / AP Injector Startup University Holidays PPS Certification Injector / SPEAR Startup SLAC Closed Edited - Robleto, Scott 10 11 12 AP 13 14 12 AP MA/AP 13 14 15 8 9 7 3 L A 11 12 8 9 I S N 30 11 O 12 13 14 18 A I T 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 4 25 26 29 30 28 30 5 6 5 6 8 9 22 16 17 15 16 N 23 24 25 5 17 18 19 Startup 23 24 23 22 21 1 2 3 MA/AP 10 4 5 AP 6 7 8 9 20 22 18 24 24 17 22 23 20 21 14 15 11 16 10 12 9 13 7 8 S T A 1 2 3 15 4 5 5 6 8

  20. Sandia Energy - Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power News News & Events Developing a Fast-Running Turbine Wake Model Previous Next Developing a...

  1. Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  2. Leprechaun fun run and walk | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leprechaun fun run and walk March 17, 2016 12:00PM to 1:00PM Location Building 617 Type Social Event A three-mile run and two-mile walk will be featured with refreshments available at the finish line. Meet at Bldg. 600 (near the Exchange Club). All employees and their guests are welcome. Related Sites Argonne Running Club

  3. The NUHM? after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flcher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 10? points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs?????) by LHCb and CMS togethermorewith other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 2Hu 2Hd 2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with ?2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and ?2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.less

  4. 2005_Run 1-21-05.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21-05 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup Spear Down Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays AP 7 24 26 MA 13 10 11 9 25 29 30 30 27 28 28 29 31 3 4 3 7 8 2 1 1 1 5 1 4 5 7 6 9 10 11 8 3 1 12 3 AP 4 7 30 2 20 19 14 17 30 2 1 4 5 9 10 7 13 9 12 14 4 2 3 2 2 1 6 3 7 5 19 9 10 6 1 3 5 5 16 3 13 6 7 9 8 9 15 11 14 12 29 17 25 17 16 23 24 25 18 30 27 28 27 25 26 24 23 29 31 28 27 31 30 29 2004 2005 31 18 19 20 12 15 16 17 14 9 8 14 15 13 11 13 11 12 10 8 5 3 8 13 10 12 11 4 6 5 4 2 2

  5. 2005_Run 3-29-05.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLAC Shutdown SSRL 2004-2005 SPEAR RUN SCHEDULE AP 7 14 13 10 11 9 30 27 26 28 24 23 25 30 27 28 26 28 29 31 29 2 1 3 4 3 7 1 8 2 1 1 1 4 1 2 4 6 9 10 11 8 3 12 3 AP 4 1 5 7 5 30 19 20 16 17 14 14 20 19 14 17 2 13 5 30 9 10 9 12 3 13 11 10 12 2 1 2 3 10 6 3 7 5 4 MA 10 11 11 9 7 18 12 15 6 1 3 5 5 4 9 8 9 7 3 13 6 7 15 11 14 12 29 User Conf. 17 25 17 16 23 24 30 27 28 26 29 29 29 31 30 8 2004 2005 31 9 15 13 25 22 11 13 11 12 8 5 3 6 MA 8 13 10 12 11 4 6 5 4 2 2 7 24 23 14 31 29 30 27 29 29 30

  6. APEX: A Prime EXperiment at Jefferson Lab - Test Run Results and Full Run Plans; Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beacham, James

    2015-06-01

    APEX is an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in Virginia, USA, that searches for a new gauge boson (A') with sub-GeV mass and coupling to ordinary matter of g' ~ (10^-6 - 10?)e. Electrons impinge upon a fixed target of high-Z material. An A' is produced via a process analogous to photon bremsstrahlung, decaying to an e?+e? pair. A test run was held in July of 2010, covering mA' = 175 to 250 MeV and couplings g'/e > 10?. A full run is approved and will cover mA' ~ 65 to 525 MeV and g'/e > 2.3 x 10??, and is expected to occur sometime in 2016 or 2017.

  7. The NUHM2 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 × 10⁸ points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ⁺μ⁻) by LHCb and CMS togethermore » with other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 < 0, as well as m2Hu < m2Hd < 0. The tension present in the CMSSM and NUHM1 between the supersymmetric interpretation of (g – 2)μ and the absence to date of SUSY at the LHC is not significantly alleviated in the NUHM2. We find that the minimum χ2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with χ2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and χ2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.« less

  8. Queueing & Running Jobs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Overview Data Storage & File Systems Compiling & Linking Queueing & Running Jobs Reservations Cobalt Job Control How to Queue a Job Running Jobs FAQs Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Queueing &

  9. Polarization simulations in the RHIC run 15 lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meot, F.; Huang, H.; Luo, Y.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2015-05-03

    RHIC polarized proton Run 15 uses a new acceleration ramp optics, compared to RHIC Run 13 and earlier runs, in relation with electron-lens beam-beam compensation developments. The new optics induces different strengths in the depolarizing snake resonance sequence, from injection to top energy. As a consequence, polarization transport along the new ramp has been investigated, based on spin tracking simulations. Sample results are reported and discussed.

  10. Dynamic aperture evaluation for the RHIC 2009 polarized proton runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Tepikain, S.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Fischer, W.; Montag, c.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-05-04

    In this article we numerically evaluate the dynamic apertures of the proposed lattices for the coming Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2009 polarized proton (pp) 100 GeV and 250 GeV runs. One goal of this study is to find out the appropriate {beta}* for the coming 2009 pp runs. Another goal is to check the effect of second order chromaticity correction in the RHIC pp runs.

  11. DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program DOE Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific discovery and economic competitiveness while producing a diverse next generation of scientists and engineers have been selected as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) long running minority educational research

  12. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    14, 2012 AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project. Twenty miles long, Lower Three Runs leaves the main body of the 310-square mile site and runs through parts of Barnwell and Allendale Coun- ties until it flows into the Savannah River. Government property on both sides of the stream acts as a buffer as it runs through privately-owned

  13. Birch Run, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Run, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2508585, -83.7941309 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  14. Pleasant Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2997791, -84.5635567 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"go...

  15. Pleasant Run Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Run Farm, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.3031126, -84.5480009 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  16. Dry Run, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dry Run, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1042277, -84.330494 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  17. LCLS-scheduling-run_6_Ver4.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS shutdown LCLS Approved Experiments for Run 6, June-December 2012 Instrument Prop Proposal Title Spokesperson XPP L503 Ultrafast Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering...

  18. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS...

  19. Instrument Front-Ends at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas; Slimmer, David; Voy, Duane; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The optimization of an accelerator relies on the ability to monitor the behavior of the beam in an intelligent and timely fashion. The use of processor-driven front-ends allowed for the deployment of smart systems in the field for improved data collection and analysis during Run II. This paper describes the implementation of the two main systems used: National Instruments LabVIEW running on PCs, and WindRiver's VxWorks real-time operating system running in a VME crate processor.

  20. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  1. Run VMC 5K | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Run VMC 5K Run VMC 5K Posted: January 13, 2016 - 4:40pm Y-12's team for the Volunteer Ministry Center 5K. Run VMC is not a new rap group, but the 5K to benefit the Volunteer Ministry Center is a wrap. Y-12's team consisted of more than 20 employees and retirees. The race began and ended at Hardin Valley Elementary, and several team members received accolades. Travis Wilson from Mission Support/Infrastructure was the overall winner with a time of 16:48. Other team members who finished in the top

  2. Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Washington State Ferries, owned and operated by the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry service in the United States and the third largest in the world. Thanks in part to an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) investment from EERE, the ferries now run on a blended biodiesel fuel that will prevent more than 29,000 metric

  3. New Carlsbad Field Office Manager Hits the Ground Running

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, you may have to run. In fact, his first weeks in his new job have looked like a sprint.

  4. TianRun USA Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minnesota Sector: Wind energy Product: Minnesota-based investment arm of Goldwind Science & Technology, Beijing Tianrun invested USD 3m to set up the TianRun USA subsidiary in...

  5. TianRun UILK LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minnesota Sector: Wind energy Product: Minnesota-based joint venture formed by TianRun USA, Horizon Wind, and Dakota Wind to develop the UILK wind farm project in Minnesota....

  6. SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act can now claim that 85 percent of the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been cleaned up with the recent completion of the Lower Three Runs (stream) Project.

  7. OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Abstract). (Conference) | SciTech Connect OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Abstract). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: OVIS: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Abstract). Abstract not provided. Authors: Chen, Frank Xiaoxiao ; Das, Ananya Publication Date: 2009-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1141424 Report Number(s): SAND2009-4761C 506638 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  8. Launching applications on compute and service processors running under

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    different operating systems in scalable network of processor boards with routers (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Launching applications on compute and service processors running under different operating systems in scalable network of processor boards with routers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Launching applications on compute and service processors running under different operating systems in scalable network of processor boards with routers A multiple processor computing

  9. Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Program | Department of Energy Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational Research Program April 19, 2012 - 11:41am Addthis Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Education and Community Development Editor's Note: This article is cross-posted from the Office of Fossil Energy. Four projects that will strengthen and promote U.S. energy security, scientific

  10. Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Presentation). (Conference) | SciTech Connect Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Presentation). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scalable Run Time Data Collection Analysis and Visualization (Presentation). Abstract not provided. Authors: Gentile, Ann C. ; Chen, Frank Xiaoxiao [1] ; Das, Ananya + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA Publication Date: 2009-07-01 OSTI Identifier:

  11. Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities May 28, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean

  12. Running the Race for Clean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Running the Race for Clean Energy Running the Race for Clean Energy September 16, 2015 - 2:39pm Addthis Through the Energy Department's Climate Action Champions initiative, cities like Boston and Minneapolis have identified ways to reduce their carbon footprint by as much as 80 percent by 2050. Through the Energy Department's Climate Action Champions initiative, cities like Boston and Minneapolis have identified ways to reduce their carbon footprint by as much as 80 percent by 2050. Linda

  13. Well casing hanger and packoff running and retrieval tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, J.R.; Valka, W.A.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a well tool for running a casing hanger and a packoff into, and retrieving a packoff from, a subsea wellhead. It comprises a tubular body including means to releasably connect a packoff to the body for running the packoff into a subsea wellhead; means to releasably connect a packoff to the body for retrieving the packoff from a subsea wellhead; means to relocate the packoff running means and the packoff retrieving means between their functional and non-functional positions; means to releasably connect a casing hanger to the body for running the hanger into a subsea wellhead; a tubular mandrel surrounded by and rotatable with respect to the body; means surrounding the mandrel for moving the casing hanger connection means into functional position; first anti-rotation means preventing relative rotation between the body and the means for moving the casing hanger connection means; second anti-rotation means for preventing relative rotation between connection means; second anti-rotation means for preventing relative rotation between the body and a casing hanger connected thereto: and means for connecting the mandrel to a pipe string for running the tool into a subsea wellhead.

  14. Comments on Injector Proton Beam Study in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    During the entire period of injector proton study in run 2014, it seems that the beam transverse emittance out of Booster is larger than that in run 2013. The emittance measured at the BtA transfer line and also the transmission from Booster late to AGS late are presented for this argument. In addition to this problem, it seems that the multiturn Booster injection, which defines the transverse emittance, needs more attention. Moreover, for high intensity operations, the space charge effect may be already relevant in RHIC polarized proton runs. With the RHIC proton intensity improvement in the next several years, higher Booster input intensity is needed, therefore, the space charge effect at the Booster injection and early ramp may become a new limiting factor.

  15. Fast Bunch Integrators at Fermilab During Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Thomas; Briegel, Charles; Fellenz, Brian; Vogel, Greg; /Fermilab

    2011-07-13

    The Fast Bunch Integrator is a bunch intensity monitor designed around the measurements made from Resistive Wall Current Monitors. During the Run II period these were used in both Tevatron and Main Injector for single and multiple bunch intensity measurements. This paper presents an overview of the design and use of these systems during this period. During the Run II era the Fast Bunch integrators have found a multitude of uses. From antiproton transfers to muti-bunch beam coalescing, Main Injector transfers to halo scraping and lifetime measurements, the Fast Bunch Integrators have proved invaluable in the creation and maintenance of Colliding Beams stores at Fermilab.

  16. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OPERABLE UNIT (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR OPERABLE UNIT No abstract prepared. Authors: Paller, M. ; Dyer, S. ; Scott, S. Publication Date: 2011-07-18 OSTI Identifier: 1023278 Report Number(s): SRNL-TR-2011-00201 TRN: US201118%%1082 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC09-08SR22470

  17. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  18. CNS Running Crew conquers marathon | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Crew conquers ... CNS Running Crew conquers marathon Posted: April 16, 2015 - 1:27pm Print version Marathon runner Barbara King with LiveWise Athletic Trainer Robert Eichin "It was amazing!" That is how Y-12 employee Barbara King described her first marathon. The 53-year-old Information, Solutions and Services worker, who joined the "Couch to 5K LiveWise program two years ago, accomplished her feat at the Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon on March 29. She was one of 26

  19. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: Results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; et al

    2015-09-16

    The accurate determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided somore » far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. As a result, this document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.« less

  20. SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration SARA Cadets and Midshipmen Hit the Ground Running | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases

  1. NNSA employees run to raise awareness about concussions | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration run to raise awareness about concussions | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo

  2. Pantexans run against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    run against hunger | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA

  3. Holland, Marika; Bailey, David A 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    states. This document provides the agenda and list of participants for the conference. Web materials for all lectures and practical sessions available from: http:...

  4. Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Features: Relict Geothermal Features: Volcanic Age: Host Rock Age: Host Rock Lithology: Cap Rock Age: Cap Rock Lithology: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Geofluid...

  5. Bailey County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elec Coop Assn Place: Texas Phone Number: (806) 272-4504 Website: www.bcecoop.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.combcecoop Outage Hotline: (806) 272-4504 References: EIA Form...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania

  7. CMS Data Processing Workflows during an Extended Cosmic Ray Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    The CMS Collaboration conducted a month-long data taking exercise, the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla, during October-November 2008, with the goal of commissioning the experiment for extended operation. With all installed detector systems participating, CMS recorded 270 million cosmic ray events with the solenoid at a magnetic field strength of 3.8 T. This paper describes the data flow from the detector through the various online and offline computing systems, as well as the workflows used for recording the data, for aligning and calibrating the detector, and for analysis of the data.

  8. Tevatron End-of-Run Beam Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valishev, A.; Gu, X.; Miyamoto, R.; White, S.; Schmidt, F.; Qiang, J.; /LBNL

    2012-05-01

    Before the Tevatron Collider Run II ended in September of 2011, a number of specialized beam study periods were dedicated to the experiments on various accelerator physics concepts and effects during the last year of the machine operation. The study topics included collimation with bent crystals and hollow electron beams, diffusion measurements and various aspects of beam-beam interactions. In this report we concentrate on the subject of beam-beam interactions, summarizing the results of beam experiments. The covered topics include offset collisions, coherent beam stability, effect of the bunch-length-to-beta-function ratio, and operation of AC dipole with colliding beams.

  9. Experimental Run Schedules for Previous Years | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Run Schedules for Previous Years SPEAR Operating / Maintenance Beam Line Schedule Accelerator Physics FY2015 X-ray VUV, BL13 Macromolecular Crystallography FY2014 X-ray VUV, BL13 Macromolecular Crystallography FY2013 X-ray VUV Macromolecular Crystallography FY2012 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2011 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV BL13 2011 FY2010 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2009 X-ray Macromolecular Crystallography VUV FY2008 X-ray

  10. WIMP-Search Results from the Second CDMSlite Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnese, R.

    2015-09-08

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  11. SSRL Experimental Run Schedule | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Run Schedule November 2015- May 2016 Schedules for X-ray, VUV and Macromolecular Crystallography beamlines. X-ray VUV (BL5, 8, 10-1, 13-1/2/3) Macromolecular Crystallography see also: Support Staff Schedule SPEAR3 Operating / Maintenance LCLS see Schedule Archive The SSRL storage ring team is in the final stages of installing hardware that will enable reducing the SPEAR3 emittance to 6 nm from its present value of 10 nm. The last piece is the installation of the thin septum

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on

  13. DOE-2 sample run book: Version 2.1E

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelmann, F.C.; Birdsall, B.E.; Buhl, W.F.; Ellington, K.L.; Erdem, A.E.; Hirsch, J.J.; Gates, S.

    1993-11-01

    The DOE-2 Sample Run Book shows inputs and outputs for a variety of building and system types. The samples start with a simple structure and continue to a high-rise office building, a medical building, three small office buildings, a bar/lounge, a single-family residence, a small office building with daylighting, a single family residence with an attached sunspace, a ``parameterized`` building using input macros, and a metric input/output example. All of the samples use Chicago TRY weather. The main purpose of the Sample Run Book is instructional. It shows the relationship of LOADS-SYSTEMS-PLANT-ECONOMICS inputs, displays various input styles, and illustrates many of the basic and advanced features of the program. Many of the sample runs are preceded by a sketch of the building showing its general appearance and the zoning used in the input. In some cases we also show a 3-D rendering of the building as produced by the program DrawBDL. Descriptive material has been added as comments in the input itself. We find that a number of users have loaded these samples onto their editing systems and use them as ``templates`` for creating new inputs. Another way of using them would be to store various portions as files that can be read into the input using the {number_sign}{number_sign} include command, which is part of the Input Macro feature introduced in version DOE-2.lD. Note that the energy rate structures here are the same as in the DOE-2.lD samples, but have been rewritten using the new DOE-2.lE commands and keywords for ECONOMICS. The samples contained in this report are the same as those found on the DOE-2 release files. However, the output numbers that appear here may differ slightly from those obtained from the release files. The output on the release files can be used as a check set to compare results on your computer.

  14. Impedances and collective instabilities of the Tevatron at Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, King-Yuen, FERMI

    1998-09-01

    The longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances of the Tevatron vacuum chamber are estimated and summed up. The resistive-wall impedances of the beam pipe and the laminations in the Lambertson magnets dominate below {approximately} 50 MHz. Then come the inductive parts of the bellows and BPM`s. The longitudinal and transverse collective instabilities, for both single bunch and multi bunches, are studied using Run II parameters. As expected the transverse coupled-bunch instability driven by the resistive-wall impedance is the most severe collective instability. However, it can be damped by a transverse damper designed for the correction of injection offsets. The power of such a damper has been studied.

  15. Computer support to run models of the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, I.

    1996-08-30

    This research is focused on a better quantification of the variations in CO{sub 2} exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere and the factors responsible for these exchangers. The principal approach is to infer the variations in the exchanges from variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} distribution. The principal tool involves using a global three-dimensional tracer transport model to advect and convect CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The tracer model the authors used was developed at the Goddard institute for Space Studies (GISS) and is derived from the GISS atmospheric general circulation model. A special run of the GCM is made to save high-frequency winds and mixing statistics for the tracer model.

  16. LCLS-scheduling-run_V_Ver9c.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day Com Com Com Com Com L421 Coffee Night L477 Robinson Gruebel (L304, run 4) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thur Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day L498

  17. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results...

  18. Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fair | Department of Energy Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair December 18, 2014 - 12:13pm Addthis Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair View all student infographics by clicking on website links through the BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair map. Last week concluded the beta run of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)

  19. The cce/8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The cce8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison The cce8.3.0 C++ compiler may run into a linking error on Edison July 1, 2014 You may run into the following...

  20. The CMSSM and NUHM1 after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; De Roeck, A.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Marrouche, J.; Martinez Santos, D.; et al

    2014-06-13

    We analyze the impact of data from the full Run 1 of the LHC at 7 and 8 TeV on the CMSSM with μ > 0 and < 0 and the NUHM1 with μ > 0, incorporating the constraints imposed by other experiments such as precision electroweak measurements, flavour measurements, the cosmological density of cold dark matter and the direct search for the scattering of dark matter particles in the LUX experiment. We use the following results from the LHC experiments: ATLAS searches for events with E/T accompanied by jets with the full 7 and 8 TeV data, the ATLASmore » and CMS measurements of the mass of the Higgs boson, the CMS searches for heavy neutral Higgs bosons and a combination of the LHCb and CMS measurements of BR(Bs → μ+μ–) and BR(Bd → μ+μ–). Our results are based on samplings of the parameter spaces of the CMSSM for both μ > 0 and μ < 0 and of the NUHM1 for μ > 0 with 6.8×106, 6.2×106 and 1.6×107 points, respectively, obtained using the MultiNest tool. The impact of the Higgs-mass constraint is assessed using FeynHiggs 2.10.0, which provides an improved prediction for the masses of the MSSM Higgs bosons in the region of heavy squark masses. It yields in general larger values of Mh than previous versions of FeynHiggs, reducing the pressure on the CMSSM and NUHM1. We find that the global χ2 functions for the supersymmetric models vary slowly over most of the parameter spaces allowed by the Higgs-mass and the E/T searches, with best-fit values that are comparable to the χ2/dof for the best Standard Model fit. As a result, we provide 95% CL lower limits on the masses of various sparticles and assess the prospects for observing them during Run 2 of the LHC.« less

  1. An overview of Booster and AGS polarized proton operation during Run 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeno, K.

    2015-10-20

    This note is an overview of the Booster and AGS for the 2015 Polarized Proton RHIC run from an operations perspective. There are some notable differences between this and previous runs. In particular, the polarized source intensity was expected to be, and was, higher this year than in previous RHIC runs. The hope was to make use of this higher input intensity by allowing the beam to be scraped down more in the Booster to provide a brighter and smaller beam for the AGS and RHIC. The RHIC intensity requirements were also higher this run than in previous runs, which caused additional challenges because the AGS polarization and emittance are normally intensity dependent.

  2. SSRL_2004_Run_Sched_3_22_04.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22/04 Run Shutdown Maintenance / AP Injector Startup SLAC Closed Injector / SPEAR Startup University Holidays 17 MA/AP 18 MA 5 1 1 1 AP 3 4 7 4 9 5 6 8 10 20 10 11 12 11 AP 9 1 4 1 2 8 12 20 24 21 22 21 26 5 5 2 3 6 7 16 MA O 9 12 I 15 10 S 8 9 13 11 11 12 13 6 2 MA MA/AP AP 3 2 4 2 1 1 AP 3 T 17 17 18 16 16 4 3 13 14 12 8 14 15 U 20 10 21 13 MA 15 12 11 9 MA 4 5 5 3 MA 6 1 9 MA 16 13 3 4 1 13 M 5 12 11 M S C 8 11 M M 14 14 15 A E B M 31 M 29 28 MA 18 19 17 4 10 11 7 18 22 17 19 21 20 23 26 25 A

  3. Hydrogen production at run-of-river hydro plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarnay, D.S.

    1983-12-01

    Production of energy from non-renewable petroleum, natural gas and coal is declining due to depletion and high prices. Presently, the research concentrates on reduction of consumption and more efficient use of traditional fuels, and on development of renewable sources of energy and new energy technologies. Most of the new energy sources, however, are not available in a convenient form for consumer. The new energy must be renewable, economically feasible and transportable. Not all the available renewable energy sources have these qualities. Many scientists and engineers believe that hydrogen meets these criteria best. Hydrogen can be produced from various renewable sources such as solar, wind, geothermal, tidal and glacier energies, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), and obviously from - waterpower. The production of hydrogen at run-of-river hydropower plants via electrolysis could be the front-runner in developing new hydrogen energy technologies, and open the way to a new hydrogen era, similarly as the polyphase system and the a-c current generator of N. Tesla used at the Niagara Falls Hydropower Plant, opened the door to a new electrical age in 1895.

  4. Recent program evaluations: Implications for long-run planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.; Schultz, D.K.

    1994-06-08

    Demand-side management (DSM) remains the centerpiece of California`s energy policy. Over the coming decade, California plans to meet 30 percent of the state`s incremental electricity demand and 50 percent of its peak demand with (DSM) programs. The major investor-owned utilities in California recently completed the first round of program impact studies for energy efficiency programs implemented in 1990 and 1991. The central focus of this paper is to assess the resource planning and policy implications of Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) Company`s recent program evaluations. The paper has three goals. First, we identify and discuss major issues that surfaced from our attempt to apply evaluation results to forecasting and planning questions. Second, we review and summarize the evaluation results for PG&E`s primary energy efficiency programs. Third, we change long-run program assumptions, based on our assessment in the second task, and then examine the impacts of these changes on a recent PG&E demand-side management forecast and resource plan.

  5. 2013 CEF RUN - PHASE 1 DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.

    2014-05-08

    Phase 1 of the 2013 Cold cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) test was completed on June 3, 2013 after a 5-day round-the-clock feeding and pouring operation. The main goal of the test was to characterize the CEF off-gas produced from a nitric-formic acid flowsheet feed and confirm whether the CEF platform is capable of producing scalable off-gas data necessary for the revision of the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model; the revised model will be used to define new safety controls on the key operating parameters for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet feeds including total organic carbon (TOC). Whether the CEF off-gas data were scalable for the purpose of predicting the potential flammability of the DWPF melter exhaust was determined by comparing the predicted H{sub 2} and CO concentrations using the current DWPF melter off-gas flammability model to those measured during Phase 1; data were deemed scalable if the calculated fractional conversions of TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO at varying melter vapor space temperatures were found to trend and further bound the respective measured data with some margin of safety. Being scalable thus means that for a given feed chemistry the instantaneous flow rates of H{sub 2} and CO in the DWPF melter exhaust can be estimated with some degree of conservatism by multiplying those of the respective gases from a pilot-scale melter by the feed rate ratio. This report documents the results of the Phase 1 data analysis and the necessary calculations performed to determine the scalability of the CEF off-gas data. A total of six steady state runs were made during Phase 1 under non-bubbled conditions by varying the CEF vapor space temperature from near 700 to below 300C, as measured in a thermowell (T{sub tw}). At each steady state temperature, the off-gas composition was monitored continuously for two hours using MS, GC, and FTIR in order to track mainly H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and organic gases such as CH{sub 4}. The standard deviation of the average vapor space temperature during each steady state ranged from 2 to 6C; however, those of the measured off-gas data were much larger due to the inherent cold cap instabilities in the slurry-fed melters. In order to predict the off-gas composition at the sampling location downstream of the film cooler, the measured feed composition was charge-reconciled and input into the DWPF melter off-gas flammability model, which was then run under the conditions for each of the six Phase 1 steady states. In doing so, it was necessary to perform an overall heat/mass balance calculation from the melter to the Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in order to estimate the rate of air inleakage as well as the true gas temperature in the CEF vapor space (T{sub gas}) during each steady state by taking into account the effects of thermal radiation on the measured temperature (T{sub tw}). The results of Phase 1 data analysis and subsequent model runs showed that the predicted concentrations of H{sub 2} and CO by the DWPF model correctly trended and further bounded the respective measured data in the CEF off-gas by over predicting the TOC-to-H{sub 2} and TOC-to-CO conversion ratios by a factor of 2 to 5; an exception was the 7X over prediction of the latter at T{sub gas} = 371C but the impact of CO on the off-gas flammability potential is only minor compared to that of H{sub 2}. More importantly, the seemingly-excessive over prediction of the TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversion by a factor of 4 or higher at T{sub gas} < ~350C was attributed to the conservative antifoam decomposition scheme added recently to the model and therefore is considered a modeling issue and not a design issue. At T{sub gas} > ~350C, the predicted TOC-to-H{sub 2} conversions were closer to but still higher than the measured data by a factor of 2, which may be regarded as adequate from the safety margin standpoint. The heat/mass balance calculations also showed that the correlation between T{sub tw} and T{sub gas} in the CEF vapor space was close to that of the scale SGM, whose data were ta

  6. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1997-12-23

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data is disclosed. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer. 3 figs.

  7. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  8. Method for compression of data using single pass LZSS and run-length encoding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlin, Gary J. (Beech Island, SC)

    1997-01-01

    A method used preferably with LZSS-based compression methods for compressing a stream of digital data. The method uses a run-length encoding scheme especially suited for data strings of identical data bytes having large run-lengths, such as data representing scanned images. The method reads an input data stream to determine the length of the data strings. Longer data strings are then encoded in one of two ways depending on the length of the string. For data strings having run-lengths less than 18 bytes, a cleared offset and the actual run-length are written to an output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. For data strings of 18 bytes or longer, a set offset and an encoded run-length are written to the output buffer and then a run byte is written to the output buffer. The encoded run-length is written in two parts obtained by dividing the run length by a factor of 255. The first of two parts of the encoded run-length is the quotient; the second part is the remainder. Data bytes that are not part of data strings of sufficient length are written directly to the output buffer.

  9. CNS Running Crew tackles Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Running Crew tackles ... CNS Running Crew tackles Covenant Health Knoxville Marathon Posted: March 6, 2015 - 1:59pm Members of the CNS Running Crew show off their bling at Melton Hill Lake. Front row, Toni Roberts, Debbie Ledford, Jennifer Christmas, Jessica Chadwell, Marianne Griffith, Karen Lacey, Jeff Gates and Barbara King. Back row, Robert Eichin, Jeff Gates, Christopher Hammonds and Brian Paul. By Gene Patterson - When the gun sounds on the 2015 Covenant Health

  10. Dynamic aperture evaluation of the proposed lattices for the RHIC 2009 polarized proton run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2009-01-02

    In the article we evaluate the dynamic apertures of the proposed lattices for the coming Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2009 polarized proton (pp) 100 GeV and 250 GeV runs. One goal of this study is to find out the appropriate {beta}* for the coming 2009 pp runs. Another goal is to study the effect of second order chromaticity correction in the RHIC pp runs.

  11. DOE Selects Carnegie Mellon to Run Traineeship in Robotics | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Carnegie Mellon to Run Traineeship in Robotics DOE Selects Carnegie Mellon to Run Traineeship in Robotics March 16, 2016 - 1:00pm Addthis Media Contact: Darlene Prather, (202) 586- 8581 darlene.prather@hq.doe.gov Washington D.C.-The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has selected Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) in Pittsburgh, PA for award consideration of a cooperative agreement to run a university traineeship in Robotics. The 5-year cooperative

  12. Enhanced sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 imaging for the detection of regional ischemic coronary disease by combining SPECT with bull's eye analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasabali, B.; Woodard, M.L.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.; Blend, M.J. (Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the combination of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and quantitative bull's eye analysis (QBA) TI-201 cardiac stress imaging may improve the detection of myocardial ischemia over that achieved with planar (PLN) imaging. This study will evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT and QBA in the detection of disease in the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX), and right coronary artery. Ninety-nine patients who underwent both TI-201 stress imaging and coronary arteriography were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 99, 62 had PLN imaging and 37 were evaluated with SPECT; 23 of these 37 had QBA. The overall sensitivity and specificity were as follows: PLN, 94% and 50%; SPECT, 90% and 67%; QBA, 100% and 20%; and SPECT with QBA, 92% and 72%, respectively. The regional sensitivity and specificity of PLN for individual coronary arteries were as follows: RCA, 78% and 74%; LAD, 89% and 60%; LCX, 50% and 89%, respectively. For SPECT, the results were: RCA, 86% and 93%; LAD, 85% and 88%; and LCX, 60% and 88%. For QBA alone, the results were: RCA, 100% and 75%; LAD, 88% and 53%; and LCX, 100% and 89%. The results for QBA with SPECT were: RCA, 100% and 94%; LAD, 88% and 80%; and LCX, 67% and 95%. Thus, SPECT interpreted on conjunction with QBA showed higher sensitivity for evaluation of ischemia in the RCA and LCX arteries and higher specificity in the detection of LAD and RCA disease than did PLN TI-201 imaging. Because of the low specificity of QBA (20%), caution is advised in the interpretation of QBA alone without reviewing SPECT images.

  13. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

  14. The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Vries, K. J.; Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; et al

    2015-09-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale MSUSY ≡ √mmore » $$\\tilde{t}$$1m$$\\tilde{t}$$2 : the gaugino masses M1,2,3 , the first-and second-generation squark masses m$$\\tilde{q}$$1 = m$$\\tilde{q}$$2 , the third-generation squark mass m$$\\tilde{q}$$3, a common slepton mass m$$\\tilde{ℓ}$$ and a common trilinear mixing parameter A , as well as the Higgs mixing parameter μ , the pseudoscalar Higgs mass MA and tanβ , the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ∼ 1.2 ×109 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + E-slashT signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ+μ-) by LHCb and CMS, other B -physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino χ-tilde10 . We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of (g-2)μ , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum χ2=20.5 with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a χ2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with χ2/d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses, and we show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the other models, e.g., the gluino may be as light as ∼ 1250 GeV at the 68 % CL, and squarks, stops, electroweak gauginos and sleptons may be much lighter than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, e+e- colliders and direct detection experiments.« less

  15. The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Vries, K. J.; Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; Santos, D. Martínez; Olive, K. A.; Sakurai, K.; Weiglein, G.

    2015-09-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale MSUSY ≡ $\\sqrt{m$\\tilde{t}$1m$\\tilde{t}$2}$ : the gaugino masses M1,2,3 , the first-and second-generation squark masses m$\\tilde{q}$1 = m$\\tilde{q}$2 , the third-generation squark mass m$\\tilde{q}$3, a common slepton mass m$\\tilde{ℓ}$ and a common trilinear mixing parameter A , as well as the Higgs mixing parameter μ , the pseudoscalar Higgs mass MA and tanβ , the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ∼ 1.2 ×109 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + E-slashT signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ+μ-) by LHCb and CMS, other B -physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino χ-tilde10 . We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of (g-2)μ , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum χ2=20.5 with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a χ2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with χ2/d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses, and we show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the other models, e.g., the gluino may be as light as ∼ 1250 GeV at the 68 % CL, and squarks, stops, electroweak gauginos and sleptons may be much lighter than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, e+e- colliders and direct detection experiments.

  16. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  17. Off-momentum dynamic aperture for lattices in the RHIC heavy ion runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo Y.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Gu, X.; Fischer, W.; Marusic, A.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Zhang, S.

    2012-05-20

    To reduce transverse emittance growth rates from intrabeam scattering in the RHIC heavy ion runs, a lattice with an increased phase advance in the arc FODO cells was adopted in 2008-2011. During these runs, a large beam loss due to limited off-momentum dynamic aperture was observed during longitudinal RF re-bucketing and with transverse cooling. Based on the beam loss observations in the previous ion runs and the calculated off-momentum apertures, we decided to adopt the lattice used before 2008 for the 2012 U-U and Cu-Au runs. The observed beam decay and the measured momentum aperture in the 2012 U-U run are presented.

  18. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher (Schenectady, NY); Cocoma, John Paul (Clifton Park, NY); Roberts, Victor David (Burnt Hills, NY)

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  19. RHIC performance for FY2011 Au+Au heavy ion run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, G.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blackler, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.J.; Gassner, D.M.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.F.; Jamilkowski, J.P.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Laster, J.S.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Mapes, M.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.J.; Minty, M.G.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Naylor, C.; Nemesure, S.; Polizzo, S.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.E.; VanKuik, B.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-09-04

    Following the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 (Run-10) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Au+Au run, RHIC experiment upgrades sought to improve detector capabilities. In turn, accelerator improvements were made to improve the luminosity available to the experiments for this run (Run-11). These improvements included: a redesign of the stochastic cooling systems for improved reliability; a relocation of 'common' RF cavities to alleviate intensity limits due to beam loading; and an improved usage of feedback systems to control orbit, tune and coupling during energy ramps as well as while colliding at top energy. We present an overview of changes to the Collider and review the performance of the collider with respect to instantaneous and integrated luminosity goals. At the conclusion of the FY 2011 polarized proton run, preparations for heavy ion run proceeded on April 18, with Au+Au collisions continuing through June 28. Our standard operations at 100 GeV/nucleon beam energy was bracketed by two shorter periods of collisions at lower energies (9.8 and 13.5 GeV/nucleon), continuing a previously established program of low and medium energy runs. Table 1 summarizes our history of heavy ion operations at RHIC.

  20. Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-10-01

    The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

  1. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs October 19, 2015 - 12:38pm Addthis ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an important step toward the commercialization of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass and energy sorghum.

  2. Top and bottom squark searches in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Top and bottom squark searches in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top and bottom squark searches in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron We estimate the Fermilab Tevatron run II potential for top and bottom squark searches. We find an impressive reach in several of the possible discovery channels. We also study some new channels which may arise in nonconventional supersymmetry models. In each case we rely on a detailed Monte

  3. Two-loop ultrasoft running of the O(v{sup 2}) QCD quark potentials (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Two-loop ultrasoft running of the O(v{sup 2}) QCD quark potentials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-loop ultrasoft running of the O(v{sup 2}) QCD quark potentials The two-loop ultrasoft contributions to the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) running of the QCD potentials at order v{sup 2} are determined. The results represent an important step towards the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) description of heavy quark pair production and

  4. EERE Success Story-Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel EERE Success Story-Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel April 18, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Washington State Ferries, owned and operated by the Washington State Department of Transportation, is the largest ferry service in the United States and the third largest in the world. Thanks in part to an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) investment from EERE, the ferries now run on a blended biodiesel fuel

  5. Queuing and Running on BG/Q Systems FAQ | Argonne Leadership...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queuing and Running on BGQ Systems FAQ Contents Is there a limit on stack size? My job had empty stdout, and the stderr looks like it died immediately after it started. What...

  6. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  7. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an...

  8. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St....

  9. LCLS-schedul_run-II_10_05_6-detail.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Run II Detailed Schedule, May 6-September 13, 2010 Thurs Fri Sat Sun Mon Tues Wed BL Prop Spokesperson PI Planned ActivityExperiment Title POC AD Program Deputy Week 1 6-May...

  10. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google...

  11. RHIC Performance as a 100 GeV Polarized Proton Collider in Run-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag, C.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.V.; Fischer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.; Hahn, H.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Ingrassia, P.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lee, R.C.; Luccio, A.U.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Menga, P.M.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Pile, P.; Pozdeyev, E.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Severino, F.; Sivertz, M.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    During the second half of Run-9, the Relativisitc Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provided polarized proton collisions at two interaction points. The spin orientation of both beams at these collision points was controlled by helical spin rotators, and physics data were taken with different orientations of the beam polarization. Recent developments and improvements will be presented, as well as luminosity and polarization performance achieved during Run-9.

  12. New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:45pm Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition was one of 25 recipients to receive funding from the EERE Clean Cities' Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The approximately $15 million in funding allowed he city to purchase nearly 300 compressed natural gas vehicles, including 190 Atlantic City

  13. PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces PNNL's Lab Homes Run Energy-Efficient Technologies Through the Paces November 14, 2013 - 10:10am Addthis At the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), researchers are using two modular homes to test energy-efficient products and calculate their energy savings. Researchers test new technologies in the Experimental home (pictured above), while the Baseline home (not pictured)

  14. Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station Illinois: Ozinga Concrete Runs on Natural Gas and Opens Private Station November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2012, Ozinga Brothers Concrete opened Chicago's first privately owned compressed natural gas fueling station to local businesses and government agencies. The station is specifically designed for medium and heavy-use trucks and buses, but can handle light-duty vehicles and can fill more than

  15. New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition was one of 25 recipients to receive funding from the EERE Clean Cities' Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The approximately $15 million in funding allowed he city to purchase nearly 300 compressed natural gas vehicles, including 190 Atlantic City

  16. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Change Models | Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA's Climate Change Models September 8, 2008 - 9:45am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time for the U.S. Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to explore advanced climate change models

  17. EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas | Department of Energy Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:45pm Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey Clean Cities Coalition was one of 25 recipients to receive funding from the EERE Clean Cities' Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The approximately $15 million in funding allowed he city to purchase nearly 300 compressed natural gas vehicles, including 190

  18. Bull Hill | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    First Wind Energy Purchaser NSTAR Location Hancock County ME Coordinates 44.723076, -68.170852 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  19. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has 8 GB (8192 MB) of physical memory, but, not all that memory is available to user programs. A user can change MPI buffer sizes by setting certain MPICH environment variables....

  20. Antineutrino Running

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Timescale Outline Images of the MiniBooNE horn MiniBooNE Overview 8 GeV KE protons from Fermilab Booster Accelerator 1.7 ! beryllium target (HARP results coming soon!) horn focusses + sign mesons " and K Can reverse polarity (anti-# beam) 50 m decay region >99% pure # µ flavor beam 490 m dirt berm 800 ton CH 2 detector 1520 PMTs 1280 + 240 in veto NuFact05, 22 June 2005 Jocelyn Monroe, Columbia University MiniBooNE Overview 8 GeV KE protons from Fermilab Booster Accelerator 1.7 !

  1. Run Rules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the DOE's NNSA and Office of Science platform roadmaps. As such, application benchmarking and performance analysis will play a critical role in evaluation of the Offeror's...

  2. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status...

  3. Antineutrino Running

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overview 8 GeV KE protons from Fermilab Booster Accelerator 1.7 beryllium target (HARP results coming soon) horn focusses + sign mesons " and K Can reverse polarity (anti-...

  4. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are...

  5. RHIC PERFORMANCE DURING THE FY10 200 GeV Au+Au HEAVY ION RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.; Bruno, D.; Carlson, C.; Connolly, R.; de Maria, R.; DOttavio, T.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Fu, W.; Gardner, C.; Gassner, D.; Glenn, J.W.; Hao, Y.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Lee, R.; Litvinenko, V.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Oerter, B.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Sampson, P.; Sandberg, J.; Satogata, T.; Severino, F.; Schoefer, V.; Schultheiss, C.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Theisen, C.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2010-05-23

    Since the last successful RHIC Au+Au run in 2007 (Run-7), the RHIC experiments have made numerous detector improvements and upgrades. In order to benefit from the enhanced detector capabilities and to increase the yield of rare events in the acquired heavy ion data a significant increase in luminosity is essential. In Run-7 RHIC achieved an average store luminosity of = 12 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} by operating with 103 bunches (out of 111 possible), and by squeezing to {beta}* = 0.85 m. This year, Run-10, we achieved = 20 x 10{sup 26} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which put us an order of magnitude above the RHIC design luminosity. To reach these luminosity levels we decreased {beta}* to 0.75 m, operated with 111 bunches per ring, and reduced longitudinal and transverse emittances by means of bunched-beam stochastic cooling. In addition we introduced a lattice to suppress intra-beam scattering (IBS) in both RHIC rings, upgraded the RF control system, and separated transition crossing times in the two rings. We present an overview of the changes and the results of Run-10 performance.

  6. Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-run growth rate in a random multiplicative model We consider the long-run growth rate of the average value of a random multiplicative process x{sub i+1} = a{sub i}x{sub i} where the multipliers a{sub i}=1+ρexp(σW{sub i}-1/2 σ²t{sub i}) have Markovian dependence given by the exponential of a standard Brownian motion W{sub i}. The average value (x{sub n}) is given by the

  7. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  8. The Renormalization Group Running of the Higgs Quartic Coupling: Unification vs. Phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montes de Oca Y, J. H.; Juarez W, S. R.; Kielanowski, P.

    2007-02-09

    Within the framework of the standard model (SM) of elementary particles, we obtained numerical solutions for the running Higgs mass, considering the renormalization group equations at the one and two loop approximation. Through the triviality condition (TC) and stability condition (SC) on the Higgs quartic coupling {lambda}H the bounds on the Higgs running mass have been fixed. The numerical results are presented for two special cases. One considering an unification of the three gauge couplings at the energy EU 1013 GeV and the other using the current experimental data for the gauge couplings.

  9. SEE HOW WE RUN...At WIPP, We Really Mean Business

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEE HOW WE RUN At WIPP, We Really Mean Business CARLSBAD, N.M., December 10, 2001 - Early this year, Dr. Inés Triay, manager of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office, challenged Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) employees to operate the nation's first nuclear waste repository like a business. So, what do we mean when we say we run WIPP "like a business?" Is it the organizational charts? Production schedules? It's more about the innovators who are WIPP employees.

  10. RHIC POWER SUPPLIES-FAILURE STATISTICS FOR RUNS 4, 5, AND 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRUNO,D.; GANETIS, G.; SANDBERG, J.; LOUIE, W.; HEPPNER, G.; SCHULTHEISS, C.

    2007-06-25

    The two rings in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RFIIC) require a total of 933 power supplies to supply current to highly inductive superconducting magnets. Failure statistics for the RHIC power supplies will be failure associated with the CEPS group's responsibilities. presented for the last three RHIC runs. The failures of the power supplies will be analyzed. The statistics associated with the power supply failures will be presented. Comparisons of the failure statistics for the last three RHIC runs will be shown. Improvements that have increased power supply availability will be discussed.

  11. GridRun: A lightweight packaging and execution environment forcompact, multi-architecture binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shalf, John; Goodale, Tom

    2004-02-01

    GridRun offers a very simple set of tools for creating and executing multi-platform binary executables. These ''fat-binaries'' archive native machine code into compact packages that are typically a fraction the size of the original binary images they store, enabling efficient staging of executables for heterogeneous parallel jobs. GridRun interoperates with existing distributed job launchers/managers like Condor and the Globus GRAM to greatly simplify the logic required launching native binary applications in distributed heterogeneous environments.

  12. Low-energy run of Fermilab Electron Cooler's beam generation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prost, Lionel; Shemyakin, Alexander; Fedotov, Alexei; Kewisch, Jorg; /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    As a part of a feasibility study of using the Fermilab Electron Cooler for a low-energy Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) run at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), the cooler operation at 1.6 MeV electron beam energy was tested in a short beam line configuration. The main result of the study is that the cooler beam generation system is suitable for BNL needs. In a striking difference with running 4.3 MeV beam, no unprovoked beam recirculation interruptions were observed.

  13. Run 2 Upgrades to the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Run 2 Upgrades to the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Run 2 Upgrades to the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger Authors: Kreis, B. ; et al. Publication Date: 2015-11-18 OSTI Identifier: 1230049 Report Number(s): FERMILAB-CONF-15-503-CMS arXiv eprint number arXiv:1511.05855 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: JINST; Conference: Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics.

  14. Builds in U.S. natural gas storage running above five-year average

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Builds in U.S. natural gas storage running above five-year average The amount of natural gas put into underground storage since the beginning of the so-called "injection season" in April has been above the five-year average by a wide margin. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said natural gas inventories, which are running more than 50% above year ago levels, are on track to reach almost 4 trillion cubic feet by the end of October which marks the start of

  15. Tips for Running an Air Conditioner Without Breaking the Bank | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy for Running an Air Conditioner Without Breaking the Bank Tips for Running an Air Conditioner Without Breaking the Bank July 22, 2014 - 3:15pm Addthis Cooling your home doesn't have to break the bank, with these tips you can save money and stay comfortable.| Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/galinast Cooling your home doesn't have to break the bank, with these tips you can save money and stay comfortable.| Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/galinast Elizabeth Spencer

  16. Operation of the DC current transformer intensity monitors at FNAL during run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M.A.; Meyer, T.; Vogel, G.; /Fermilab

    2012-01-01

    Circulating beam intensity measurements at FNAL are provided by five DC current transformers (DCCT), one per machine. With the exception of the DCCT in the Recycler, all DCCT systems were designed and built at FNAL. This paper presents an overview of both DCCT systems, including the sensor, the electronics, and the front-end instrumentation software, as well as their performance during Run II.

  17. A Simplified Method for Implementing Run-Time Polymorphism in Fortran95

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Decyk, Viktor K.; Norton, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a simplified technique for software emulation of inheritance and run-time polymorphism in Fortran95. This technique involves retaining the same type throughout an inheritance hierarchy, so that only functions which are modified in a derived class need to be implemented.

  18. Negative running of the spectral index, hemispherical asymmetry and the consistency of Planck with large r

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, John

    2014-11-01

    Planck favours a negative running of the spectral index, with the likelihood being dominated by low multipoles l?<50 and no preference for running at higher l. A negative spectral index is also necessary for the 2- Planck upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r to be consistent with values significantly larger than 0.1. Planck has also observed a hemispherical asymmetry of the CMB power spectrum, again mostly at low multipoles. Here we consider whether the physics responsible for the hemispherical asymmetry could also account for the negative running of the spectral index and the consistency of Planck with a large value of r. A negative running of the spectral index can be generated if the hemispherical asymmetry is due to a scale- and space-dependent modulation which suppresses the CMB power spectrum at low multipoles. We show that the observed hemispherical asymmetry at low l can be generated while satisfying constraints on the asymmetry at higher l and generating a negative spectral index of the right magnitude to account for the Planck observation and to allow Planck to be consistent with a large value of r.

  19. Running of the Yukawa Couplings in a Two Higgs Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montes de Oca Y, J. H.; Juarez W, S. R.; Kielanowski, P.

    2008-07-02

    We solve the one loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGE) for the Yukawa couplings in the Standard Model with two Higgs doublets. In the RGE we include the contributions of the up and down quarks. In this approximation we explore universality and unification assumptions to study the mass-hierarchy problem through the running of the vacuum expectation values.

  20. Running coupling constant from lattice studies of gluon and ghost propagators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-12-02

    We present a numerical study of the running coupling constant in four-dimensional pure-SU(2) lattice gauge theory. The running coupling is evaluated by fitting data for the gluon and ghost propagators in minimal Landau gauge. Following Refs. [1, 2], the fitting formulae are obtained by a simultaneous integration of the {beta} function and of a function coinciding with the anomalous dimension of the propagator in the momentum subtraction scheme. We consider these formulae at three and four loops. The fitting method works well, especially for the ghost case, for which statistical error and hyper-cubic effects are very small. Our present result for {lambda}MS is 200{sub -40}{sup +60} MeV, where the error is purely systematic. We are currently extending this analysis to five loops in order to reduce this systematic error.

  1. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II¹

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J.; Fellenz, B.; Fitzgerald, J.; Heikkinen, D.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2011-10-06

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. With Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  2. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  3. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful computer to be delivered to Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility By John Greenwald June 1, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence in a fusion plasma. (Simulation: Seung-Hoe Ku/PPPL. Visualization: David Pugmire/ORNL) Computer simulation and visualization of edge turbulence

  4. Experimental "Wind to Hydrogen" System Up and Running - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Experimental "Wind to Hydrogen" System Up and Running December 14, 2006 Xcel Energy (NYSE:XEL) and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory today unveiled a unique facility that uses electricity from wind turbines to produce and store pure hydrogen, offering what may become an important new template for future energy production. Several dozen journalists, environmental leaders, government officials and Xcel Energy managers today toured the joint

  5. Apex Gold discussion fosters international cooperation in run-up to 2016

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration discussion fosters international cooperation in run-up to 2016 Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations

  6. Accelerating Innovation: PowerAmerica Is Up and Running | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2, 2015 - 2:00pm Addthis Accelerating Innovation: PowerAmerica Is Up and Running -Rob Ivester, Deputy Director, Advanced Manufacturing Office The excitement and drive to deliver was evident to me last week when I joined nearly 100 PowerAmerica members for their kick-off meeting at NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina. PowerAmerica, also called the Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, will develop advanced manufacturing processes and work to

  7. Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

  8. THE RHIC INJECTOR ACCELERATORS CONFIGURATIONS, AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RHIC 2003 AU - D PHYSICS RUN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L; Benjamin, J; Blaskiewicz, M; Brennan, J M; Brown, K A; Carlson, K A; Delong, J; D' Ottavio, T; Frak, B; Gardner, C J; Glenn, J W; Harvey, M; Hayes, T; Hseuh, H- C; Ingrassia, P; Lowenstein, D; Mackay, W; Marr, G; Morris, J; Roser, T; Satogata, T; Smith, G; Smith, K S; Steski, D; Tsoupas, N; Thieberger, P; Zeno, K

    2003-05-12

    The RHIC 2003 Physics Run [1] required collisions between gold ions and deuterons. The injector necessarily had to deliver adequate quality (transverse and longitudinal emittance) and quantity of both species. For gold this was a continuing evolution from past work [2]. For deuterons it was new territory. For the filling of the RHIC the injector not only had to deliver quality beams but also had to switch between these species quickly. This paper details the collider requirements and our success in meeting these. Some details of the configurations employed are given.

  9. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  10. SACO-1: a fast-running LMFBR accident-analysis code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Vaurio, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    SACO is a fast-running computer code that simulates hypothetical accidents in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors to the point of permanent subcriticality or to the initiation of a prompt-critical excursion. In the tradition of the SAS codes, each subassembly is modeled by a representative fuel pin with three distinct axial regions to simulate the blanket and core regions. However, analytic and integral models are used wherever possible to cut down the computing time and storage requirements. The physical models and basic equations are described in detail. Comparisons of SACO results to analogous SAS3D results comprise the qualifications of SACO and are illustrated and discussed.

  11. Diffraction and forward physics results of the ATLAS experiment from the Run I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taevsk, Marek

    2015-04-10

    Various aspects of forward physics have been studied by the ATLAS collaboration using data from Run I at the LHC. In this text, main results of four published analyses are summarized, all based on data from proton-proton collisions at ?(s)=7 TeV collected in 2010 or 2011. Two analyses deal with the diffractive signature, one based on single-sided events, the other on large rapidity gaps in soft events. In addition, a recent measurement of the total pp cross section using the ALFA subdetector and a recent study of higher-order QCD effects using a jet veto are discussed.

  12. MiniBooNE: Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana State University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Up and Running Morgan Wascko Morgan Wascko Louisiana State University Louisiana State University Morgan O. Wascko, LSU Yang Institute Conference 11 October, 2002 MiniBooNE detector at Fermi National Accelerator Lab Outline Motivation MiniBooNE Overview Physics at MiniBooNE Current Status First Data! Morgan O. Wascko, LSU Yang Institute Conference 11 October, 2002 Neutrino Oscillations The Evidence So Far ... Solar Solar ∆ ∆ m m 2 2 ~ ~ 10 10 -(4~5) -(4~5) Atmospheric Atmospheric ∆ ∆ m m

  13. RHIC polarized proton-proton operation at 100 GeV in Run 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoefer, V.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atoian, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K. A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; D Ottavio, T.; Drees, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Gu, X.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Marusic, A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Narayan, G.; Nemesure, S.; Pile, P.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; Schmidke, W. B.; Severino, F.; Shrey, T.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; White, S.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2015-05-03

    The first part of RHIC Run 15 consisted of ten weeks of polarized proton on proton collisions at a beam energy of 100 GeV at two interaction points. In this paper we discuss several of the upgrades to the collider complex that allowed for improved performance. The largest effort consisted in commissioning of the electron lenses, one in each ring, which are designed to compensate one of the two beam-beam interactions experienced by the proton bunches. The e-lenses raise the per bunch intensity at which luminosity becomes beam-beam limited. A new lattice was designed to create the phase advances necessary for a beam-beam compensation with the e-lens, which also has an improved off-momentum dynamic aperture relative to previous runs. In order to take advantage of the new, higher intensity limit without suffering intensity driven emittance deterioration, other features were commissioned including a continuous transverse bunch-by-bunch damper in RHIC and a double harmonic RF cature scheme in the Booster. Other high intensity protections include improvements to the abort system and the installation of masks to intercept beam lost due to abort kicker pre-fires.

  14. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  15. Emissions of Volatile Particulate Components from Turboshaft Engines running JP-8 and Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Landgraf, Bradley J

    2009-01-01

    Rotating-wing aircraft or helicopters are heavily used by the US military and also a wide range of commercial applications around the world, but emissions data for this class of engines are limited. In this study, we focus on emissions from T700-GE-700 and T700-GE-701C engines; T700 engine was run with military JP-8 and T701C run with both JP-8 and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels. Each engine was run at three engine power settings from the idle to maximum power in sequence. Exhaust particles measured at the engine exhaust plane (EEP) have a peak mobility diameter less than 50nm in all engine power settings. At a 4-m downstream location, sulfate/sulfur measurements indicate all particulate sulfur exists practically as sulfate, and the particulate sulfur and sulfate contents increased as the engine power increased. The conversion of sulfur to sulfate was found not to be dependent on engine power setting. Analysis also showed that conversion of sulfur to sulfate was not by the adsorption of sulfur dioxide gas on the soot particles and then subsequently oxidized to form sulfate, but by gas-phase conversion of SO2 via OH or O then subsequently forming H2SO4 and condensing on soot particles. Without the sulfur and aromatic components, use of the FT fuel led to significant reduction of soot emissions as compared to that of the JP-8 fuel producing less number of particles than that of the JP-8 fuel; however, the FT fuel produced much higher number concentrations of particles smaller than 7nm than that of JP-8 in all engine power settings. This indicates non-aromatics components in the FT fuel could have contributed to the enhancement of emissions of particles smaller than 7nm. These small particles are volatile, not observed at the EEP, and may be important in playing a role for the formation of secondary particles in the atmosphere or serving as a site for effective cloud nuclei condensation to occur.

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A FAST-RUNNING TOOL TO CHARACTERIZE SHOCK DAMAGE WITHIN TUNNEL STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, L; Morris, J; Glenn, L; Krnjajic, M

    2009-03-31

    Successful but time-intensive use of high-fidelity computational capabilities for shock loading events and resultant effects on and within enclosed structures, e.g., tunnels, has led to an interest in developing more expedient methods of analysis. While several tools are currently available for the general study of the failure of structures under dynamic shock loads at a distance, presented are a pair of statistics- and physics-based tools that can be used to differentiate different types of damage (e.g., breach versus yield) as well as quantify the amount of damage within tunnels for loads close-in and with standoff. Use of such faster running tools allows for scoping and planning of more detailed model and test analysis and provides a way to address parametric sensitivity over a large multivariate space.

  17. Measurement of the t tbar cross section at the Run II Tevatron using Support Vector Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, Benjamin Eric; /Tufts U.

    2010-08-01

    This dissertation measures the t{bar t} production cross section at the Run II CDF detector using data from early 2001 through March 2007. The Tevatron at Fermilab is a p{bar p} collider with center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This data composes a sample with a time-integrated luminosity measured at 2.2 {+-} 0.1 fb{sup -1}. A system of learning machines is developed to recognize t{bar t} events in the 'lepton plus jets' decay channel. Support Vector Machines are described, and their ability to cope with a multi-class discrimination problem is provided. The t{bar t} production cross section is then measured in this framework, and found to be {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.14 {+-} 0.25 (stat){sub -0.86}{sup +0.61}(sys) pb.

  18. Search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in the ditau decay channels at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuenca Almenar, Cristobal; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2008-04-01

    This thesis presents the results on a search for the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs, with least one of these taus decays leptonically. The search was performed with a sample of 1.8 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Tevatron and collected by CDF Run II. No significant excess over the Standard Model prediction was found and a 95% confidence level exclusion limit have been set on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the Higgs boson mass. This limit has been translated into the MSSM Higgs sector parameter plane, tan{beta} vs. M{sub A}, for the four different benchmark scenarios.

  19. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  20. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

  1. FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill ? Unconsolidated to Consolidated.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-28

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two-phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in other realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Models for waste release scenarios in salt back-fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and validate. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potential usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mechanics, using sieved run-of-mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (~900 psi) and temperatures to 90C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone FY:15 Transport Properties of Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill Unconsolidated to Consolidated. Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time-dependent consolidation, or creep, to various degrees. Creep volume strain-time relations obey simple log-time behavior through the range of porosities (~50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as expected. Mercury porosimetry is used to determine characteristic capillary pressure curves from a series of consolidation tests and show characteristic saturation-capillary pressure curves that follow the common van Genuchten (1978, 1980) formulation at low stresses. Higher capillary pressure data are suspect due to the large potential for sample damage, including fluid inclusion decrepitation and pore collapse. Data are supportive of use of the Leverett J function (Leverett, 1941) to use for scaling characteristic curves at different degrees of consolidation, but better permeability determinations are needed to support this hypothesis. Recommendations for further and refined testing are made with the goal of developing a self- consistent set of constitutive laws for granular salt consolidation and multiphase (brine-air) flow.

  2. Effects of the running of the QCD coupling on the energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Jens; Pirner, Hans-Juergen

    2007-03-01

    Finite temperature modifies the running of the QCD coupling {alpha}{sub s}(k,T) with resolution k. After calculating the thermal quark and gluon masses self-consistently, we determine the quark-quark and quark-gluon cross sections in the plasma based on the running coupling. We find that the running coupling enhances these cross sections by factors of two to four depending on the temperature. We also compute the energy loss (dE/dx) of a high-energy quark in the plasma as a function of temperature. Our study suggests that, beside t-channel processes, inverse Compton scattering is a relevant process for a quantitative understanding of the energy loss of an incident quark in a hot plasma.

  3. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A Run-Time Verification Framework for Smart Grid Applications Implemented on Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2013-05-18

    Smart grid applications are implemented and tested with simulation frameworks as the developers usually do not have access to large sensor networks to be used as a test bed. The developers are forced to map the implementation onto these frameworks which results in a deviation between the architecture and the code. On its turn this deviation makes it hard to verify behavioral constraints that are de- scribed at the architectural level. We have developed the ConArch toolset to support the automated verification of architecture-level behavioral constraints. A key feature of ConArch is programmable mapping for architecture to the implementation. Here, developers implement queries to identify the points in the target program that correspond to architectural interactions. ConArch generates run- time observers that monitor the flow of execution between these points and verifies whether this flow conforms to the behavioral constraints. We illustrate how the programmable mappings can be exploited for verifying behavioral constraints of a smart grid appli- cation that is implemented with two simulation frameworks.

  5. Improved NLDAS-2 Noah-simulated Hydrometeorological Products with an Interim Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Youlong; Peter-Lidard, Christa; Huang, Maoyi; Wei, Helin; Ek, Michael

    2015-02-28

    In NLDAS-2 Noah simulation, the NLDAS team introduced an intermediate fix suggested by Slater et al. (2007) and Livneh et al. (2010) to reduce large sublimation. The fix is used to constraint surface exchange coefficient (CH) using CH =CHoriginal x max (1.0-RiB/0.5, 0.05) when atmospheric boundary layer is stable. RiB is Richardson number. In NLDAS-2 Noah version, this fix was used for all stable cases including snow-free grid cells. In this study, we simply applied this fix to the grid cells in which both stable atmospheric boundary layer and snow exist simultaneously excluding the snow-free grid cells as we recognize that the fix constraint in NLDAS-2 is too strong. We make a 31-year (1979-2009) Noah NLDAS-2 interim (NoahI) run. We use observed streamflow, evapotranspiration, land surface temperature, soil temperature, and ground heat flux to evaluate the results simulated from NoahI and make the reasonable comparison with those simulated from NLDAS-2 Noah (Xia et al., 2012). The results show that NoahI has the same performance as Noah does for snow water equivalent simulation. However, NoahI significantly improved the other hydrometeorological products simulation as described above when compared to Noah and the observations. This simple modification is being installed to the next Noah version. The hydrometeorological products simulated from NoahI will be staged on NCEP public server for the public in future.

  6. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  7. Trial Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Deibert, S.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction-box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic (PV) module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires), caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat', 'thermal-cycle', or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine 4 moisture-cured silicones, 4 foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 deg C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden, Miami, and Phoenix for 1 year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  8. Communication library for run-time visualization of distributed, asynchronous data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowlan, J.; Wightman, B.T.

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we present a method for collecting and visualizing data generated by a parallel computational simulation during run time. Data distributed across multiple processes is sent across parallel communication lines to a remote workstation, which sorts and queues the data for visualization. We have implemented our method in a set of tools called PORTAL (for Parallel aRchitecture data-TrAnsfer Library). The tools comprise generic routines for sending data from a parallel program (callable from either C or FORTRAN), a semi-parallel communication scheme currently built upon Unix Sockets, and a real-time connection to the scientific visualization program AVS. Our method is most valuable when used to examine large datasets that can be efficiently generated and do not need to be stored on disk. The PORTAL source libraries, detailed documentation, and a working example can be obtained by anonymous ftp from info.mcs.anl.gov from the file portal.tar.Z from the directory pub/portal.

  9. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  10. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  11. Search for non-standard model signatures in the WZ/ZZ final state at CDF run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Matthew; /UC, San Diego

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a search for non-Standard Model physics in heavy diboson production in the dilepton-dijet final state, using 1.9 fb{sup -1} of data from the CDF Run II detector. New limits are set on the anomalous coupling parameters for ZZ and WZ production based on limiting the production cross-section at high {cflx s}. Additionally limits are set on the direct decay of new physics to ZZ andWZ diboson pairs. The nature and parameters of the CDF Run II detector are discussed, as are the influences that it has on the methods of our analysis.

  12. Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laadan, Oren; Nieh, Jason; Phung, Dan

    2012-10-02

    Methods, media and systems for managing a distributed application running in a plurality of digital processing devices are provided. In some embodiments, a method includes running one or more processes associated with the distributed application in virtualized operating system environments on a plurality of digital processing devices, suspending the one or more processes, and saving network state information relating to network connections among the one or more processes. The method further include storing process information relating to the one or more processes, recreating the network connections using the saved network state information, and restarting the one or more processes using the stored process information.

  14. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  15. Dark Matter Benchmark Models for Early LHC Run-2 Searches. Report of the ATLAS/CMS Dark Matter Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Daniel

    2015-07-06

    One of the guiding principles of this report is to channel the efforts of the ATLAS and CMS collaborations towards a minimal basis of dark matter models that should influence the design of the early Run-2 searches. At the same time, a thorough survey of realistic collider signals of Dark Matter is a crucial input to the overall design of the search program.

  16. cx-bull-shoals-dam.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. cx-malden-neosho-bull-shoals.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  18. AGR-2 irradiation test final as-run report, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities; (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing; and, (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  19. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.471025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.531025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987C in Capsule 6 to 1296C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 210-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  20. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 x 1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). Well say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2 x 10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

  1. Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Tomče Runčevski | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Tomče Runčevski Previous Next List Runchevski Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: runcevski@berkeley.edu Phone: 510-708-2455 PhD in Materials Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research and Stuttgart University, Germany BS and MS in Applied Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia EFRC Research Structural characterization of materials is the key step in understanding their

  3. Ray Smith | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ray Smith Ray Smith Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case ...

  4. A Precision Measurement of the W Boson Mass with 1 Inverse Femtobarn of DZero Run IIa Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osta, Jyotsna; /Notre Dame U.

    2009-10-01

    This thesis is a detailed presentation of a precision measurement of the mass of the W boson. It has been obtained by analyzing W {yields} e{nu} decays. The data used for this analysis was collected from 2002 to 2006 with the D0 detector, during Run IIa of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1}. With a sample of 499,830 W {yields} e{nu} candidate events, we obtain a mass measurement of M{sub W} = 80.401 {+-} 0.043 GeV. This is the most precise measurement from a single experiment to date.

  5. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the tt dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-08-06

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb1. A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of tt dilepton signal and background. We measure a value for the top-quark mass of 171.51.9 (stat)2.5 (syst) GeV/c2.

  6. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korzh, B. Walenta, N.; Lunghi, T.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H.

    2014-02-24

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1?cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20??s of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of ?110?C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625?MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in the presence of 30?dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350?bps.

  7. Running Grid Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support job submission via Grid interfaces. Remote job submission is based on Globus GRAM. Jobs can be submitted either to the fork jobmanager (default) which will fork and...

  8. Running Jobs Intermittently Slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    happen to jobs having inputoutput on global file systems (project, globalhomes, globalscratch2). It could also happen to aplications using shared libraries, or CCM jobs...

  9. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    peta-scale production systems. For example, certain applications may not have enough memory per core, the default environment variables may need to be adjusted, or IO dominates...

  10. Running Large Scale Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    try on their large scale applications on Hopper for better performance. Try different compilers and compiler options The available compilers on Hopper are PGI, Cray, Intel, GNU,...

  11. Running.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IO * PROJECT * Sharing between peoplesystems * By request only File Systems % cc hello.c % .a.out Hello, world * Login nodes are not intended for computation * No MPI...

  12. Running Jobs.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... wwkkkSkk kkkkkkSk n2 k kkkkk - --kmm kkk k--c ----k--- cccccccc ---c c-- ccccc -- ... hhhk kk cccccekk ekkkyycc cccccc c ccccckk kkk yyyc n1 bddbbb eee eec bdoo oo eeeeeeee ...

  13. Fall Run | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exchanges of several cooling towers. The past several months have also seen the refurbishment of the Hall D refrigerator. This appears to have been a major success, and the...

  14. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    if the node of choice is not immediately available Start an interactive session in the debug queue qsh -l debug1 -now no qlogin -l debug1 -now no This is useful when the cluster...

  15. Trial-Run of a Junction-Box Attachment Test for Use in Photovoltaic Module Qualification: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Deibert, S. L.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2014-06-01

    Engineering robust adhesion of the junction box (j-box) is a hurdle typically encountered by photovoltaic module manufacturers during product development and manufacturing process control. There are historical incidences of adverse effects (e.g., fires) caused when the j-box/adhesive/module system has failed in the field. The addition of a weight to the j-box during the 'damp-heat,' 'thermal-cycle,' or 'creep' tests within the IEC qualification protocol is proposed to verify the basic robustness of the adhesion system. The details of the proposed test are described, in addition to a trial-run of the test procedure. The described experiments examine four moisture-cured silicones, four foam tapes, and a hot-melt adhesive used in conjunction with glass, KPE, THV, and TPE substrates. For the purpose of validating the experiment, j-boxes were adhered to a substrate, loaded with a prescribed weight, and then subjected to aging. The replicate mock-modules were aged in an environmental chamber (at 85 degrees C/85% relative humidity for 1000 hours; then 100 degrees C/<10% relative humidity for 200 hours) or fielded in Golden (CO), Miami (FL), and Phoenix (AZ) for one year. Attachment strength tests, including pluck and shear test geometries, were also performed on smaller component specimens.

  16. Making the most of the relic density for dark matter searches at the LHC 14 TeV Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busoni, Giorgio; Simone, Andrea De; Jacques, Thomas; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio

    2015-03-12

    As the LHC continues to search for new weakly interacting particles, it is important to remember that the search is strongly motivated by the existence of dark matter. In view of a possible positive signal, it is essential to ask whether the newly discovered weakly interacting particle can be be assigned the label “dark matter”. Within a given set of simplified models and modest working assumptions, we reinterpret the relic abundance bound as a relic abundance range, and compare the parameter space yielding the correct relic abundance with projections of the Run II exclusion regions. Assuming that dark matter is within the reach of the LHC, we also make the comparison with the potential 5σ discovery regions. Reversing the logic, relic density calculations can be used to optimize dark matter searches by motivating choices of parameters where the LHC can probe most deeply into the dark matter parameter space. In the event that DM is seen outside of the region giving the correct relic abundance, we will learn that either thermal relic DM is ruled out in that model, or the DM-quark coupling is suppressed relative to the DM coupling strength to other SM particles.

  17. THE MATRYOSHKA RUN. II. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENCE STATISTICS, STOCHASTIC PARTICLE ACCELERATION, AND MICROPHYSICS IMPACT IN A MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2015-02-10

    We use the Matryoshka run to study the time-dependent statistics of structure-formation-driven turbulence in the intracluster medium of a 10{sup 15} M {sub ?} galaxy cluster. We investigate the turbulent cascade in the inner megaparsec for both compressional and incompressible velocity components. The flow maintains approximate conditions of fully developed turbulence, with departures thereof settling in about an eddy-turnover time. Turbulent velocity dispersion remains above 700kms{sup 1} even at low mass accretion rate, with the fraction of compressional energy between 10% and 40%. The normalization and the slope of the compressional turbulence are susceptible to large variations on short timescales, unlike the incompressible counterpart. A major merger occurs around redshift z ? 0 and is accompanied by a long period of enhanced turbulence, ascribed to temporal clustering of mass accretion related to spatial clustering of matter. We test models of stochastic acceleration by compressional modes for the origin of diffuse radio emission in galaxy clusters. The turbulence simulation model constrains an important unknown of this complex problem and brings forth its dependence on the elusive microphysics of the intracluster plasma. In particular, the specifics of the plasma collisionality and the dissipation physics of weak shocks affect the cascade of compressional modes with strong impact on the acceleration rates. In this context radio halos emerge as complex phenomena in which a hierarchy of processes acting on progressively smaller scales are at work. Stochastic acceleration by compressional modes implies statistical correlation of radio power and spectral index with merging cores distance, both testable in principle with radio surveys.

  18. Data Plots of Run I - III Results from SLAC E-158: A precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Three physics runs were made in 2002 and 2003 by E-158. As a result, the E-158 Collaboration announced that it had made "the first observation of Parity Violation in electron-electron (Moller) scattering). This precise Parity Violation measurement gives the best determination of the electron's weak charge at low energy (low momentum transfer between interacting particles). E158's measurement tests the predicted running (or evolution) of this weak charge with energy, and searches for new phenomena at TeV energy scales (one thousand times the proton-mass energy scale).[Copied from the experiment's public home page at http://www-project slac.stanford.edu/3158/Default.htm] See also the E158 page for collaborators at http://www.slac.stanford.edu/exp/e158/. Both websites provide data and detailed information.

  19. Forced running exercise attenuates hippocampal neurogenesis impairment and the neurocognitive deficits induced by whole-brain irradiation via the BDNF-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Jian-feng; Ji, Sheng-jun; Sun, Rui; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Li-yuan; Tian, Ye

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: Forced exercise can ameliorate WBI induced cognitive impairment in our rat model. Mature BDNF plays an important role in the effects of forced exercise. Exercise may be a possible treatment of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. -- Abstract: Cranial radiotherapy induces progressive and debilitating cognitive deficits, particularly in long-term cancer survivors, which may in part be caused by the reduction of hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous studies suggested that voluntary exercise can reduce the cognitive impairment caused by radiation therapy. However, there is no study on the effect of forced wheel exercise and little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect of exercise. In the present study, we investigated whether the forced running exercise after irradiation had the protective effects of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Sixty-four Male SpragueDawley rats received a single dose of 20 Gy or sham whole-brain irradiation (WBI), behavioral test was evaluated using open field test and Morris water maze at 2 months after irradiation. Half of the rats accepted a 3-week forced running exercise before the behavior detection. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and Western blotting was used to assess changes in the levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor, protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase (CaMKII), cAMP-calcium response element binding protein (CREB) in the BDNFpCREB signaling. We found forced running exercise significantly prevented radiation-induced cognitive deficits, ameliorated the impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis and attenuated the down-regulation of these proteins. Moreover, exercise also increased behavioral performance, hippocampal neurogenesis and elevated BDNFpCREB signaling in non-irradiation group. These results suggest that forced running exercise offers a potentially effective treatment for radiation-induced cognitive deficits.

  20. Kalispel Tribe of Indians joins federal agencies to protect bull...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in an unprecedented set of agreements designed to improve habitat and strengthen fish stocks in the upper Columbia River Basin over the next 10 years. The new agreement...

  1. Microsoft Word - Bull--Optimal_Resistive_Control_Strategy_for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with a Wells Turbine in 3-dimensions. An array of field points defining the interior free surface allows hydrodynamic parameters relating to the fluctuating air-pressure within...

  2. 06 Run R1.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 11 14 AP 7 8 8 15 16 13 AP 12 11 14 MA 1 6 AP 1 16 MA 6 8 9 2 9 12 MA AP 21 25 26 24 23 22 20 Dwn 4pm 24 26 29 28 27 27 28 29 30 2 4 3 10 3 8 9 26 27 23 24 25 3 MA 7 3 3 4 1 1...

  3. Documentation and Instructions for Running Two Python Scripts that Aid in Setting up 3D Measurements using the Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohe, Daniel Peter

    2015-08-24

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently purchased a Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for vibration measurement. This device has proven to be a very nice tool for making vibration measurements, and has a number of advantages over traditional sensors such as accelerometers. The non-contact nature of the laser vibrometer means there is no mass loading due to measuring the response. Additionally, the laser scanning heads can position the laser spot much more quickly and accurately than placing an accelerometer or performing a roving hammer impact. The disadvantage of the system is that a significant amount of time must be invested to align the lasers with each other and the part so that the laser spots can be accurately positioned. The Polytec software includes a number of nice tools to aid in this procedure; however, certain portions are still tedious. Luckily, the Polytec software is readily extensible by programming macros for the system, so tedious portions of the procedure can be made easier by automating the process. The Polytec Software includes a WinWrap (similar to Visual Basic) editor and interface to run macros written in that programming language. The author, however, is much more proficient in Python, and the latter also has a much larger set of libraries that can be used to create very complex macros, while taking advantage of Pythons inherent readability and maintainability.

  4. CANTON LAKESHORE CANTON E BEST CON NEAUT GIDD INGS EAST N ELLSWORT

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    MCKEESPORT COR AOPOLIS-MOON REDHAW ST. CLAIR SC ROGGSFIELD FRANKLIN -OAK FOREST RIMERSBURG RENNERD AL E GREENVILL E PAT MOS CRABTR EE BLAC K ASH ROYALT ON N BAKERSTOWN QUEEN ROU GH RUN LUCAS BLAC K H ILL CRESTON WAT TSVILLE WADSWORTH -NORT H OAKLAN D HOM EWORT H UNIT Y ESSELBRUN ALAMED A PAR K-CROOKED RU CHERRY GROVE FRENC HTOWN ST EWART RUN MILL C REEK GLENF IELD-MOU NT NEBO HICKORY E HARRISVILLE E LEST ER GRIGGS CORNERS EN GLAN D WEST VIL LE LAKE BAILEY LAKE OAKFORD BR UNSWICK N HOR ACE

  5. Running Dry at the Power Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Securing sufficient supplies of fresh water for societal, industrial, and agricultural uses while protecting the natural environment is becoming increasingly difficult in many parts of the United...

  6. Run 1147 Event 0. August 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    34 cm 4

  7. Run 1147 Event 0. August 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    200 cm 20

  8. Run 1148 Event 1016. August 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1016. August 6 th 2015 17:15 20 cm 20

  9. Run 1148 Event 778. August 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    778. August 6 th 2015 17:16 40 cm 26

  10. Run 1153 Event 40. August 6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    53 Event 40. August 6 th 2015 21:07 40 cm 24

  11. Run Spear Down Low-alpha Shutdown

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spear Down Low-alpha Shutdown Maintenance / AP University Holidays Sep Oct S 1 Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 4/6/2012 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2011-2012 2011 2012 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb 1 2 M 3 1 1 1 S 2 4 1 3 1 AP 2 2 2 W 5 2 4 2 AP AP 3 3 AP 1 3 T 3 5 3 4 1 4 2 4 1 6 4 F 2 7 5 2 1 5 3 1 5 2 T 1 6 4 S 3 8 5 3 7 5 4 1 6 3 2 6 4 2 6 8 5 S 4 9 6 8 6 low 2 7 4 3 7 5 3 7 5 9 MA MA 9 7 M 5 10 3 8 5 4 alpha 8 6 4 T 6 11 8 6 10 8 7 4 9 MA 6 5 9 MA AP 7 13 11 9 W 7 12 9 5 10 AP 7 6 AP 10 8 6 AP 10 AP 7 AP 13

  12. SunRun Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94103 Region: Bay Area Sector: Solar Product: Solar installer Website: www.sunrunhome.com Coordinates: 37.7871306, -122.4041075...

  13. Supersymmetric Dark Matter after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; et al

    2015-10-23

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, χ~01, assumed here to be the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) and thus the dark matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle such as the lighter stau τ~1, stop t~1 or chargino χ~±1, resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H / A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-pointmore » region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2, and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the τ~1 coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for /ET events and long-lived charged particles, whereas theirH / A funnel, focus-point and χ~±1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. Furthermore, we find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is χ~±1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.« less

  14. Running River PLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6HQ Sector: Hydro Product: UK-based private equity investor that has interests in mini-hydro power generation assets. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading...

  15. Running Jobs | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    script job environment: COBALTPARTNAME - physical partition assigned by cobalt (e.g. MIR-XXXXX-YYYYY-512) COBALTPARTSIZE - size of the partition assigned by cobalt (e.g. 512)...

  16. Blue running of the primordial tensor spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2014-07-01

    We examine the possibility of positive spectral index of the power spectrum of the primordial tensor perturbation produced during inflation in the light of the detection of the B-mode polarization by the BICEP2 collaboration. We find a blue tilt is in general possible when the slow-roll parameter decays rapidly. We present two known examples in which a positive spectral index for the tensor power spectrum can be obtained. We also briefly discuss other consistency tests for further studies on inflationary dynamics.

  17. FY2000 Run Schedule v6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY2000 SPEAR Operation Cycle Oct-99 Nov-99 Dec-99 Jan-00 Feb-00 Mar-00 Apr-00 May-00 Jun-00 Jul-00 Aug-00 Sep-00 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M/A 1 1 1 1 2 2 ñý½’ü ¢ :Kd*Ð ‚¢I%` èÀ›]€ƒc0öén›D5‚Ë7-)%ˆÀsÞãS÷‡Ù˜—r*¸YÆþõ/⸡åû]šòCbšÀ°ì™Šo«²/+ìF¬éç—C÷¶Z¸”

  18. Supersymmetric Dark Matter after LHC Run 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flacher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Isidori, G.; Malik, S.; Santos, D. Martinez; Olive, K. A.; Sakurai, K.; de Vries, K. J.; Weiglein, G.

    2015-10-23

    Different mechanisms operate in various regions of the MSSM parameter space to bring the relic density of the lightest neutralino, ?~01, assumed here to be the lightest SUSY particle (LSP) and thus the dark matter (DM) particle, into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology. These mechanisms include coannihilation with some nearly degenerate next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle such as the lighter stau ?~1, stop t~1 or chargino ?~1, resonant annihilation via direct-channel heavy Higgs bosons H / A, the light Higgs boson h or the Z boson, and enhanced annihilation via a larger Higgsino component of the LSP in the focus-point region. These mechanisms typically select lower-dimensional subspaces in MSSM scenarios such as the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2, and pMSSM10. We analyze how future LHC and direct DM searches can complement each other in the exploration of the different DM mechanisms within these scenarios. We find that the ?~1 coannihilation regions of the CMSSM, NUHM1, NUHM2 can largely be explored at the LHC via searches for /ET events and long-lived charged particles, whereas theirH / A funnel, focus-point and ?~1 coannihilation regions can largely be explored by the LZ and Darwin DM direct detection experiments. Furthermore, we find that the dominant DM mechanism in our pMSSM10 analysis is ?~1 coannihilation: parts of its parameter space can be explored by the LHC, and a larger portion by future direct DM searches.

  19. Running Jobs under SLURM on Babbage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bash-4.1 srun mpirun.mic -n 2 -hostfile micfile.SLURMJOBID -ppn 1 .xthi.mic Hello from rank 0, thread 0, on bc0908-mic0. (core affinity 1) Hello from rank 0, thread...

  20. Running Greener: E-Mobility at SAP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO 2 neutral Reduce consumption of fossil fuels and noise Environmental Mobility Unique battery subsidy as benefit Enjoy free charging exclusively at SAP's charging spots...

  1. NERSC_Capability_Run_Rules.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w ill u se t he M PI+X e xecution m odel a nd a bide by t he r un r ules f or t he s ame a s d escribed i n t he R FP r un r ules d ocument. b. Each b enchmark's p roblem s ize...

  2. 05-RunningJobs-Turner.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o r eserve f or y our j ob * How l ong t o r eserve t hose n odes * OpBonal: w hat t o n ame S TDOUT fi les, w hat a ccount t o c harge, whether t o n oBfy y ou b y e mail w hen y...

  3. Hitting a Home Run for Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spring. With gentle breezes, blooming flowers, and warm sunshine, the season marks the beginning of fun outdoor activities—picnics, camping, hikes, and the classic American pastime—baseball. In the...

  4. 06 Run 6-16-05.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 MA MA 15 11 AP 7 14 12 5 26 16 16 18 20 22 21 Conf 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 User 16 15 21 22 23 1 1 5 AP 2 14 5 6 13 9 18 14 17 16 15 16 23 24 27 30 27 28 31 Oct Sep 26 BL May Aug...

  5. FY2003 Run Sched.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robleto, B. Scott 31 29 2002 2003 1 2 3 N 13 4 2002 2003 1 2 3 29 30 31 10 5 6 5 6 7 8 9 22 23 MAAP AP A E 5 17 18 19 10 11 12 9 MAAP 18 Startup 24 23 22 21 16 17 15 1 2 3 15 10...

  6. 2005_Run 3-29-05.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 2 N 9 11 10 6 8 AP 10 MA 15 17 AP MA 5 2 4 4 3 7 4 13 11 15 12 24 16 23 19 16 20 22 15 22 23 24 17 27 26 24 AP 23 22 28 25 29 30 27 26 25 24 30 28 27 2005 2006 28 29 30 31 26 19...

  7. Diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV, and the measurement of the efficiency of the D0 Run II luminosity monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Tamsin L

    2006-04-01

    The first analysis of diffractively produced Z bosons in the muon decay channel is presented, using data taken by the D0 detector at the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 109 pb{sup -1}. The diffractive sample is defined using the fractional momentum loss {zeta} of the intact proton or antiproton measured using the calorimeter and muon detector systems. In a sample of 10791 (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events, 24 diffractive candidate events are found with {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The first work towards measuring the cross section times branching ratio for diffractive production of (Z/{gamma})* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} is presented for the kinematic region {zeta} < 0.02. The systematic uncertainties are not yet sufficiently understood to present the cross section result. In addition, the first measurement of the efficiency of the Run II D0 Luminosity Monitor is presented, which is used in all cross section measurements. The efficiency is: {var_epsilon}{sub LM} = (90.9 {+-} 1.8)%.

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bailey, David A. (2) Bailey, David A (1) Holland, Marika (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or ...

  11. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Macromolecular Refinement, edited by E. Dodson, M. Moore, A. Ralph & S. Bailey, pp. 85-92. ... Macromolecular Refinement, edited by E. Dodson, M. Moore, A. Ralph & S. Bailey, pp. 75-84. ...

  12. Running Title: C and N Allocation in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-12-01

    A long standing challenge has been understanding how plants and ecosystems respond to shifts in the balance of resource availabilities. The continuing rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will induce changes in the availability and use of several terrestrial ecosystem resources. We report on the acquisition and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus ponderosa Laws. seedlings grown at three levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (370, 525, and 700 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) and three levels of soil nitrogen supply in a controlled environment experiment. Nitrogen was applied (0, 100, and 200 {micro}g N g soil{sup -1}) at planting and again at week 26 of a 58-week, 4-harvest experiment. At the final harvest, plants grown with variety low available soil nitrogen showed no significant response to atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Plants at higher N levels responded positively to CO{sub 2} with the highest biomass at the middle CO{sub 2} level. Plants growing at the lowest N levels immediately allocated a relatively large portion of their nitrogen and biomass to roots. Plants growing at near present ambient CO{sub 2} levels allocated relatively little material to roots when N was abundant but moved both carbon and nitrogen below-ground when N was withheld. Plants growing at higher CO{sub 2} levels, allocated more C and N to roots even when N was abundant, and made only small shifts in allocation patterns when N was no longer supplied. In general, allocation of C and N to roots tended to increase when N supply was restricted and also with increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. These allocation responses were consistent with patterns suggesting a functional balance in the acquisition of above-ground versus below-ground resources. In particular, variation in whole tree average nitrogen concentration can explain 68% of the variation ratio of root biomass to shoot biomass across the harvests. The capability to respond to temporal variation in nutrient conditions, the dynamics of nutrient uptake, and the dynamics of nutrient use were all seen to be influenced by the interplay between previous N supply, previous C supply, and the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The data suggest that in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere ponderosa pine seedlings will have higher root biomass and be likely to capture more N compared to seedlings today. Further, the combined growth and allocation responses of Ponderosa pine at elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in higher growth per unit N (nitrogen productivity) and lower N per gram of tissue (all tissues not just leaves) when nitrogen was not in abundant supply.

  13. Students flock to Science on Saturday, 22 years running | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The lab offered its first feature lecture series in 1994 aiming to inspire interest and knowledge in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) among middle and high school ...

  14. Office of Fossil Energy Continues Long-Running Minority Educational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... This project will focus on the development of structural materials for the high temperature and high pressures (760C and 5000 psi and higher) of AUSC coal-fired power systems and ...

  15. Running Jobs Scott French" NERSC User Services Group" New User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wait for job to start mom% cd PBSOWORKDIR mom% aprun -n 48 .mycode.x 18 Serial Jobs * Carver h as a s pecial q ueue f or r unning s erial j obs - A s ingle p rocess...

  16. Launching applications on compute and service processors running...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    job to be launched on processors that use different operating systems. Authors: Tomkins, James L. 1 ; Camp, William J. 1 + Show Author Affiliations (Albuquerque, NM)...

  17. Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. ...

  18. EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and diesel elsewhere. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety EERE Success Story-New Jersey: EERE-Supported ...

  19. Technical Assistance Program: Off to a Running Start (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    This newsletter describes key activities of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs for Winter 2012. Between December 2, 2011, and January 15, 2012, 46 American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes submitted applications to receive technical assistance through the program, which provides Tribes with on-the-ground technical support from DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) staff to help move tribal energy efficiency and renewable energy projects forward. The applications are being considered through the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) selection process, which incorporates expert reviews and outreach to Tribes who present a need for assistance with their community-based energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. The final successful applicants will be selected based on the clarity of their requests for technical assistance and the ability of START to successfully work with each unique project or community. At least three selected Tribes in Alaska will receive technical assistance between March and May 2012, and up to five selected Tribes in the contiguous United States will receive technical assistance between March and August 2012. During the months of START Program activity, DOE and NREL experts will work in the two locations. In Alaska, START experts will work directly with community-based project teams to analyze local energy issues and provide assistance with energy projects and cost savings initiatives. This effort will be bolstered by DOE-IE's partnership with the Denali Commission, which will provide further assistance and expertise. In the lower 48 states, NREL experts will work with the selected renewable energy START projects to evaluate financial and technical feasibility and provide early development technical assistance to better position the projects for financing and construction. This on-the-ground technical assistance is part of a broader DOE-IE effort to make reliable, accurate technical information and skills-based training available to tribal communities throughout the United States. The primary goal of the START initiative, according to DOE-IE Director Tracey A. LeBeau, is to bring about the next generation of energy development in Indian Country. Through energy project planning, quality training, and technical assistance, The START program will leverage the early-stage resource characterization and pre-feasibility investments that DOE has made in Indian Country over the years, and unlock the energy resources that exist on tribal lands to help build a 21st century tribal energy economy. Working collaboratively with a select group of Tribes and Alaska Native entities, the DOE Office of Indian Energy, NREL, and the Denali Commission will empower tribal leaders to make informed energy decisions and help build capacity to bring tribal energy visions to fruition and get renewable energy projects off the ground, said LeBeau. Ultimately, these efforts will serve to further the Obama Administration and DOE's shared commitment to provide Native American and Alaska Native communities with the tools and resources they need to foster tribal energy self-sufficiency and sustainability, advancing job creation and enhancing economic competitiveness.

  20. Accelerating Innovation: PowerAmerica Is Up and Running | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PowerAmerica, also called the Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation ... student training in WBG-based power electronics because it will create R&D and ...

  1. Apex Gold discussion fosters international cooperation in run...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz makes his opening statement during Apex Gold. NNSA Blog Facilitator Kevin O'Prey of FEMA led participants through the scenario-based policy ...

  2. Optimizing Sisal Compiler; Sisal Compiler and Running System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-11-12

    OSC is a compiler and runtime system for the functional language Sisal. Functional languages are based on mathematical principals, and may reduce the cost of parallel program development without sacrificing performance. OSC compiles Sisal source code to binary form, automatically inserting calls to the Sisal runtime system to manage parallel execution of independent tasks. Features include support for dynamic arrays, automatic vectorization, and automatic parallelization. At runtime, the user may specify the number of workers,more » the granularity of tasks, and other execution parameters.« less

  3. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility permit reopener run plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, A.R.

    1995-03-10

    The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) is authorized to discharge treated effluent to the Columbia River by National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit WA-002591-7. The letter accompanying the final permit noted the following: EPA recognizes that the TEDF is a new waste treatment facility for which full scale operation and effluent data has not been generated. The permit being issued by EPA contains discharge limits that are intended to force DOE`s treatment technology to the limit of its capability.`` Because of the excessively tight limits the permit contains a reopener clause which may allow limits to be renegotiated after at least one year of operation. The restrictions for reopening the permit are as follows: (1) The permittee has properly operated and maintained the TEDF for a sufficient period to stabilize treatment plant operations, but has nevertheless been unable to achieve the limitation specified in the permit. (2) Effluent data submitted by the permittee supports the effluent limitation modifications(s). (3) The permittee has submitted a formal request for the effluent limitation modification(s) to the Director. The purpose of this document is to guide plant operations for approximately one year to ensure appropriate data is collected for reopener negotiations.

  4. NERSC: Running Jobs Kjiersten Fagnan" NERSC User Services Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o r eserve f or y our j ob * How l ong t o r eserve t hose n odes * OpBonal: w hat t o n ame S TDOUT fi les, w hat a ccount t o c harge, whether t o n oBfy y ou b y e mail w hen y...

  5. Running Jobs Scott French" NERSC User Services Group" New User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j ob ( 2 4 n odes) * How l ong t o r eserve t hose n odes * OpBonal: w hat t o n ame S TDOUT fi les, w hat a ccount t o c harge, whether t o n oBfy y ou b y e mail w hen y...

  6. Running Jobs Scott French" NERSC User Services Group" New User...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j ob ( 2 4 n odes) * How l ong t o r eserve t hose n odes * OpConal: w hat t o n ame S TDOUT fi les, w hat a ccount t o c harge, whether t o n oCfy y ou b y e mail w hen y...

  7. ARE PULSING SOLITARY WAVES RUNNING INSIDE THE SUN?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Charles L.

    2012-09-10

    A precise sequence of frequencies-detected four independent ways-is interpreted as a system of solitary waves below the Sun's convective envelope. Six future observational or theoretical tests of this idea are suggested. Wave properties (rotation rates, radial energy distribution, nuclear excitation strength) follow from conventional dynamics of global oscillation modes after assuming a localized nuclear term strong enough to perturb and hold mode longitudes into alignments that form 'families'. To facilitate future tests, more details are derived for a system of two dozen solitary waves 2 {<=} l {<=} 25. Wave excitation by {sup 3}He and {sup 14}C burning is complex. It spikes by factors M{sub 1} {<=} 10{sup 3} when many waves overlap in longitude but its long-time average is M{sub 2} {<=} 10. Including mixing can raise overall excitation to {approx}50 times that in a standard solar model. These spikes cause tiny phase shifts that tend to pull wave rotation rates toward their ideal values {proportional_to}[l(l + 1)]{sup -1}. A system like this would generate some extra nuclear energy in two spots at low latitude on opposite sides of the Sun. Each covers about 20 Degree-Sign of longitude. Above a certain wave amplitude, the system starts giving distinctly more nuclear excitation to some waves (e.g., l = 9, 14, and 20) than to neighboring l values. The prominence of l = 20 has already been reported. This transition begins at temperature amplitudes {Delta}T/T = 0.03 in the solar core for a typical family of modes, which corresponds to {delta}T/T {approx} 0.001 for one of its many component oscillation modes.

  8. LCLS-scheduling-run_6_Ver4.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day IH L431 Frank Com HR CXI inhouse L456 Krasniqi L481/ L481/ Com. IH MEC L525 Night Feng RD Timing L481/494 Com L481/494 L406 Berrah L434 Fuchs June 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

  9. ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE UPPER THREE RUNS INTEGRATOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  10. Search for techniparticles at D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feligioni, Lorenzo; /Boston U.

    2006-01-01

    Technicolor theory (TC) accomplishes the necessary electroweak symmetry breaking responsible for the mass of the elementary particles. TC postulates the existence of a new SU(N{sub TC}) gauge theory. Like QCD the exchange of gauge bosons causes the existence of a non-vanishing chiral condensate which dynamically breaks the SU(N{sub TC}){sub L} x SU(N{sub TC}){sub R} symmetry. This gives rise to N{sub TC}{sup 2}-1 Nambu-Goldstone Bosons. Three of these Goldstone Bosons become the longitudinal components of the W{sup {+-}} and Z which therefore acquire mass; the remaining ones are new particles (technihadrons) that can be produced at the high energy colliders and detected. The Technicolor Straw Man Model (TCSM) is a version of the dynamical symmetry breaking with a large number of technifermions and a relative low value of their masses. One of the processes predicted by the TCSM is q{bar q} {yields} V{sub T} {yields} W{pi}{sub T}, where V{sub T} is the Technicolor equivalent of the QCD vector meson and {pi}{sub T} is the equivalent of the pion. W is the electroweak gauge boson of the Standard Model. This dissertation describes the search for W{pi}{sub T} with the D0 detector, a multi-purpose particle detector located at one of the collision points of the Tevatron accelerator situated in Batavia, IL. The final state considered for this thesis is a W boson that decays to electron and neutrino plus a {pi}{sub T} that decays into b{bar c} or b{bar b}, depending on the charge of the initial technivector meson produced. In the D0 detector this process will appear as a narrow cluster of energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter with an associated track reconstructed in the tracking detector. The undetected neutrino from the decay of the W boson will be seen as missing momentum. The fragmentation of the quarks from the decay of the {pi}{sub T} will produce two jets of collimated particles. Events where a b-quark is produced are selected by requesting at least one jet to be associated with a secondary vertex of interaction produced by the decay of B-meson (b-tagging). In the absence of an excess over the Standard Model prediction for the final state considered in this analysis, we compute a 95% Confidence Level upper limit on the techniparticle production cross section for the V{sub T} mass range: 190 GeV/c{sup 2} {le} m(V{sub T} ) {le} 220 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  11. Running Springs, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2077859, -117.1092049 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  12. LHC Physics Potential vs. Energy: Considerations for the 2011 Run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2011-02-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam energy from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.

  13. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.51025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the temperature in the twelve capsules relatively flat in a range of temperatures suitable for the measurement of fission product diffusion in compact matrix and structural graphite materials.

  14. Simple Dynamic Gasifier Model That Runs in Aspen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, P.J.; Luyben, W.L.

    2008-10-15

    Gasification (or partial oxidation) is a vital component of 'clean coal' technology. Sulfur and nitrogen emissions can be reduced, overall energy efficiency is increased, and carbon dioxide recovery and sequestration are facilitated. Gasification units in an electric power generation plant produce a fuel for driving combustion turbines. Gasification units in a chemical plant generate gas, which can be used to produce a wide spectrum of chemical products. Future plants are predicted to be hybrid power/chemical plants with gasification as the key unit operation. The widely used process simulator Aspen Plus provides a library of models that can be used to develop an overall gasifier model that handles solids. So steady-state design and optimization studies of processes with gasifiers can be undertaken. This paper presents a simple approximate method for achieving the objective of having a gasifier model that can be exported into Aspen Dynamics. The basic idea is to use a high molecular weight hydrocarbon that is present in the Aspen library as a pseudofuel. This component should have the same 1:1 hydrogen-to-carbon ratio that is found in coal and biomass. For many plantwide dynamic studies, a rigorous high-fidelity dynamic model of the gasifier is not needed because its dynamics are very fast and the gasifier gas volume is a relatively small fraction of the total volume of the entire plant. The proposed approximate model captures the essential macroscale thermal, flow, composition, and pressure dynamics. This paper does not attempt to optimize the design or control of gasifiers but merely presents an idea of how to dynamically simulate coal gasification in an approximate way.

  15. Launching applications on compute and service processors running...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. A multiple processor computing apparatus includes a physical interconnect structure that is flexibly configurable...

  16. Running Coulomb potential and Lamb shift in QCD (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Hoang, Andre H. ; Manohar, Aneesh V. ; Stewart, Iain W. Publication Date: 2001-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 40204494 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal ...

  17. Wuhu RunPhoton Tech Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co Ltd Place: Wuhu, Anhui Province, China Product: Produce PV-based products using a-Si thin-film PV modules. Coordinates: 31.192499, 118.585022 Show Map Loading map......

  18. FY2002 Run Sched 6-27-01.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    26 27 28 AP AP 20 28 29 30 MAAP AP Weekends 29 30 31 Jun Jul 17 18 19 20 15 16 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 MAAP AP 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 MAAP AP AP 17 18 19 13 14 25 24 20 21 23 24 29 30...

  19. Department of Energy to Provide Supercomputing Time to Run NOAA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    We can systematically compare it to other climate models and evaluate its simulations against data collected by atmosphericradiation measurements," said retired Navy Vice Admiral ...

  20. Agnes Houser | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agnes Houser Agnes Houser Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Agnes Houser A

  1. Harvey Kite | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Harvey Kite Harvey Kite Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Harvey Kite Fondly

  2. Gordon Fee, part 1 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Gordon Fee, part 1 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Gordon FeePart 1 |

  3. Gordon Fee, part 2 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Gordon Fee, part 2 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Gordon FeePart 1 |

  4. Jack Rains | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jack Rains Jack Rains Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Jack Rains Recalls

  5. Elmer Brummitt | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elmer Brummitt Elmer Brummitt Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Elmer

  6. Donald Raby | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donald Raby Donald Raby Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Donald Raby Don's

  7. Dorothy Coker | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dorothy Coker Dorothy Coker Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Dorothy Coker

  8. Naomi Brummit | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Naomi Brummit Naomi Brummit Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Naomi Brummitt

  9. Nathan Henry | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nathan Henry Nathan Henry Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Nathan Henry A

  10. Larry Case | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Larry Case Larry Case Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Larry Case Jack

  11. Linda Fellers | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linda Fellers Linda Fellers Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Linda Fellers

  12. Louis Freels | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Louis Freels Louis Freels Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Louis Freels A

  13. John Rice Irwin, part 1 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 John Rice Irwin, part 1 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript John Rice

  14. John Rice Irwin, part 2 | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 John Rice Irwin, part 2 Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript John Rice

  15. Kay Steed | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steed Kay Steed Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Kay Steed Secretary to Jack

  16. Ken Bernander | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bernander Ken Bernander Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Ken Bernander Tells

  17. Ken Sommerfeld | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sommerfeld Ken Sommerfeld Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Ken Sommerfeld

  18. Marie Guy | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marie Guy Marie Guy Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake Case Larry Case Patrick Case Dorothy Coker Gordon Fee Linda Fellers Louis Freels Marie Guy Nathan Henry Agnes Houser John Rice Irwin Harvey Kite Charlie Manning Alice Piercey Donald Raby Jack Rains Ray Smith Ken Sommerfeld Kay Steed Bill Wilcox Beverly Woods more ... Options Hide Chapters Show Transcript Marie Guy One of the

  19. Sacramento Area Technology Alliance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Name: Sacramento Area Technology Alliance Address: 5022 Bailey Loop Place:...

  20. Summary of the LHC Performance Workshop - Chamonix 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Summary of the LHC Performance Workshop, held in Chamonix from 25 - 29 January 2010. Steve Myers Chairman Roger Bailey Deputy Chairman Frank Zimmermann Scientific Secretary

  1. WIPP News Releases - 2000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mine Safety Award For Exceptional Underground Operations October 4 Lawrence O. "Larry" Bailey, Jr., Joins Carlsbad Field Office as Deputy Manager October 4 George T. Basabilvazo...

  2. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Redondo Peak Quadrangle, Sandoval...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and stratigraphy have been previously published by Griggs (1964), Bailey et al. (1969), Smith et al. (1970), Kelley (1978), Gardner (1985), Gardner and Goff (1984) and Gardner et...

  3. Paleomagnetism, Potassium-Argon Ages, and Geology of Rhyolites...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Dalrymple, 1966). Authors Richard R. Doell, G. Brent Dalrymple, Robert Leland Smith and Roy A. Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoirs, 1968 DOI...

  4. Field Mapping At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    based on surface mapping of the caldera. References Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith, Clarence Samuel Ross (1969) Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez...

  5. Resurgent cauldrons | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    library Journal Article: Resurgent cauldrons Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors R L Smith and R A Bailey Published Journal Geological Society of America Memoir 116, 1968 DOI...

  6. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Friedrich ; Anderson, Scott F. ; Anderton, Timothy ; Andrews, Brett H. ; Aubourg, Eric ; Bailey, Stephen ; Bastien, Fabienne A. ; Bautista, Julian E. ; Beers, Timothy C. ;...

  7. Introduction

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    VP, Product Strategy Cree Yan Rodriguez VP, Product and Technology Acuity Brands Lighting Ed Clark Sustainable Strategist ZGF Architects Chris Bailey Dir. of Bus. Develop. & Prod....

  8. Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results Print by Sue Bailey, User Services Group...

  9. Property:Purchasers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Baker Hot Spring...

  10. Property:OtherUses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  11. Category:Available for Case Study | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  12. Property:FirstWellFlowRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Aurora Geothermal Area B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area Bad Blumau Geothermal Area Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Julie K. (4) Maghribi, Mariam N. (4) Shusteff, Maxim (4) Strauch, Mark S. (4) Hamilton, Julie (3) Jung, Byoungsok (3) Maghribi, Mariam (3) Bailey, Christopher G. (2) ...

  14. Microfluidic ultrasonic particle separators with engineered node...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Rose, Klint A ; Fisher, Karl A ; Wajda, Douglas A ; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P ; Bailey, Christopher ; Dehlinger, Dietrich ; Shusteff, Maxim ; Jung, Byoungsok ; Ness, Kevin ...

  15. Renewable Energy Institute International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    International Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewable Energy Institute International Name: Renewable Energy Institute International Address: 5022 Bailey Loop Place: McClellan,...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    particle separators with engineered node locations and geometries Rose, Klint A ; Fisher, Karl A ; Wajda, Douglas A ; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P ; Bailey, Christopher ;...

  17. Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS DOE), Cathy Haney (Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards (NRC)), Marissa Bailey (Director, Division of Fuel...

  18. STEAB Meeting Minutes March 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... WAP Discussion: Mark Bailey began this discussion by informing the Board that despite all ...matrix may not necessarily require knowledge of "where the roadmap leads," but ...

  19. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organized by Education Program: J. Michael Doster, Sherry Bailey, Rose Montgomery, John Turner, and Linda Weltman 27 graduate students representing 9 universities 11...

  20. Fannin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Fannin County, Texas Bailey, Texas Bonham, Texas Dodd City, Texas Ector, Texas Honey Grove, Texas Ladonia, Texas Leonard, Texas Pecan Gap, Texas Ravenna, Texas Savoy,...

  1. Scott Campbell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bailey, Scott Campbell, Michael Corn, Deborah A. Frincke, Ardoth Hassler, Craig Jackson, James A. Marsteller, Rodney J. Petersen, Mark Servilla, Von Welch, "Report of the...

  2. 01-02253B_OR_Knox_map.ai

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Knoxville Nashville Oak Ridge via State Route 162 North OAK RIDGE INN & SUITES THE RIDGE INN and THE SUPER 8 MOTEL ORNL GRAPHITE REACTOR NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER ETTP OBSERVATION CENTER MELTON HILL DAM HAMPTON INN BULL RUN STEAM PLANT (TVA) COMFORT INN JAMESON INN BENEFITS OFFICE OF TECH. TRANSFER SNS PROJECT OFFICE COMMERCE PARK OAK RIDGE/KNOXVILLE ROUTE MAP A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W ORAU / ORISE / POLLARD AUDITORIUM U.S. POST OFFICE METHODIST MEDICAL

  3. NUGEX Queue Subcommittee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queue Subcommittee NUGEX Queue Subcommittee Members Anubhav Jain, Berkeley Lab (BES) Stephen Bailey, Berkeley Lab (HEP) Adrianne Middleton, NCAR (BER) Paul Kent, ORNL (BES) Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:42

  4. ALSNews Vol. 330

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS. Read the article for more details. NUFO Goes to Capitol Hill ALS representatives Sue Bailey and user Yves Idzerda joined other Berkeley Lab representatives in Washington, D.C....

  5. A Study of $B \\to J/\\psi K^{(*)} 0 X$ decays (Thesis/Dissertation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: A Study of B to Jpsi K(*) 0 X decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Study of B to Jpsi K(*) 0 X decays Authors: Bailey, Stephen...

  6. Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Roy A. Bailey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1984 Report Number Open File Report 84-939 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability:...

  7. Geologic Map of the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MexicoInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Abstract unavailable Cartographers Robert Leland Smith, Roy A. Bailey and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1970 DOI Not...

  8. Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the formations are refined by radiometric dating. Authors Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1969 DOI Not Provided Check...

  9. BPA-2010-00794-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2010 In reply refer to: DK-7 David W. Meyer Attorney at Law Bullivant, Houser, Bailey PC 805 Broadway Street, Suite 400 Vancouver, WA 98660-3310 RE: FOIA BPA-2010-00794-F Dear...

  10. BPA-2010-01043-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2010 In reply refer to: DK-7 David W. Meyer Attorney at Law Bullivant, Houser, Bailey, PC 805 Broadway Street, Suite 400 Vancouver, WA 98660-3310 RE: BPA-2010-01043-F Dear Mr....

  11. Microsoft Word - BPA-2010-01043-FResponse.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2010 In reply refer to: DK-7 David W. Meyer Attorney at Law Bullivant, Houser, Bailey, PC 805 Broadway Street, Suite 400 Vancouver, WA 98660-3310 RE: BPA-2010-01043-F Dear Mr....

  12. Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future Report to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It was cochaired by Rep. Lee H. Hamilton and Gen. Brent Scowcroft. Other Commissioners were Mr. Mark H. Ayers, the Hon. Vicky A. Bailey, Dr. Albert Carnesale, Sen. Pete Domenici, ...

  13. User Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section Sue Bailey This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it User Services Group Leader Prospective users Proprietary users...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Norris, Boyana (5) Gunter, Dan (4) Hovland, Paul (4) Mellor-Crummey, John (4) Moore, Shirley (4) Snavely, Allan (4) Bailey, David H. (3) Carrington, Laura (3) ...

  15. 3106_TSS_baldridge.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Council Annual Meeting, http:web.ics.purdue.edubrailesageGRCPos- terOct19.pdf. Braile, L. W., B. Bailey, J. Buening, R. Christianson, R. Davy, B., Judy, D. Kiyan, M....

  16. 2012 User Meeting Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Amorphous-to-Crystalline Transitions in CaCO3 Biominerals, with 20-nm Resolution Pupa Gilbert, University of Wisconsin 13:55 User Services Update Sue Bailey, LBNL 14:10...

  17. EinsteinCartan gravity, Asymptotic Safety, and the running Immirzi parameter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, J.-E.; Reuter, M.

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we analyze the functional renormalization group flow of quantum gravity on the EinsteinCartan theory space. The latter consists of all action functionals depending on the spin connection and the vielbein field (co-frame) which are invariant under both spacetime diffeomorphisms and local frame rotations. In the first part of the paper we develop a general methodology and corresponding calculational tools which can be used to analyze the flow equation for the pertinent effective average action for any truncation of this theory space. In the second part we apply it to a specific three-dimensional truncated theory space which is parametrized by Newtons constant, the cosmological constant, and the Immirzi parameter. A comprehensive analysis of their scale dependences is performed, and the possibility of defining an asymptotically safe theory on this hitherto unexplored theory space is investigated. In principle Asymptotic Safety of metric gravity (at least at the level of the effective average action) is neither necessary nor sufficient for Asymptotic Safety on the EinsteinCartan theory space which might accommodate different universality classes of microscopic quantum gravity theories. Nevertheless, we do find evidence for the existence of at least one non-Gaussian renormalization group fixed point which seems suitable for the Asymptotic Safety construction in a setting where the spin connection and the vielbein are the fundamental field variables. -- Highlights: A functional RG equation for a first order formulation of gravity is constructed. The theory space constituted by tetrad and spin connection variables is explored. The RG equation is solved in a 3 dimensional truncation of theory space. The flow of Newtons constant, the cosmological constant and the Immirzi parameter is analyzed. Evidence for the nonperturbative renormalizability of the theory is found.

  18. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  19. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical background for the search of the CEP using observables related to fluctuations and correlations. While new data are pouring in from the RHIC low energy scan program, many recent advances have also been made in the phenomenological and lattice gauge theory sides in order to have a better theoretical understanding of the wealth of new data. This workshop tried to create a synergy between the experimental, phenomenological and lattice QCD aspects of the fluctuation and correlation related studies of the RHIC low energy scan program. The workshop brought together all the leading experts from related fields under the same forum to share new ideas among themselves in order to streamline the continuing search of CEP in the RHIC low energy scan program.

  20. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation, and mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMSs tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.

  1. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation,more »and mini-split SUSY. We then explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMS’s tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. By adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.« less

  2. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics...

  3. Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has an Alternative Fuel Station Locator that can help drivers find the nearest fueling station to fill up their vehicles.

  4. Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2003-11-14

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at which unconventional oil production can be expanded, and the rate of growth of reserves and enhanced recovery. Analysis based on data produced by Campbell indicates that the peak of non-Middle East production will occur before 2010. For total world conventional oil production, the results indicate a peak somewhere between 2020 and 2050. Key determinants of the peak in world oil production are the rate at which the Middle East region expands its output and the minimum reserves-to-production ratios producers will tolerate. Once world conventional oil production peaks, first oil sands and heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Russia, and later some other source such as shale oil from the United States must expand if total world oil consumption is to continue to increase. Alternative sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, such as coal or natural gas are also possible resources but not considered in this analysis nor is the possibility of transition to a hydrogen economy. These limitations were adopted to simplify the transition analysis. Inspection of the paths of conventional oil production indicates that even if world oil production does not peak before 2020, output of conventional oil is likely to increase at a substantially slower rate after that date. The implication is that there will have to be increased production of unconventional oil after that date if world petroleum consumption is to grow.

  5. Running Out Of and Into Oil. Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L.; Hopson, Janet L.; Li, Jia

    2003-10-01

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value.

  6. Running into an out of oil: Scenarios of global oil use and resource depletion to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L.; Hopson, Janet L.; Li, Jia

    2002-07-23

    Is a transition from conventional oil imminent? Is it likely to lock the world into a high-carbon energy future? This report attempts to shed some light on these questions.

  7. USING RUNNING DIFFERENCE IMAGES TO TRACK PROPER MOTIONS OF XUV CORONAL INTENSITY ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Lee, J. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil; Chung, S.; Katz, J.; Namkung, M

    2014-12-20

    We have developed a procedure for observing and tracking proper motions of faint XUV coronal intensity on the Sun and have applied this procedure to study the collective motions of cellular plumes and the shorter-period waves in sunspots. Our space/time maps of cellular plumes show a series of tracks with the same 5-8minute repetition times and ?100kms{sup 1} sky-plane speeds found previously in active-region fans and in coronal hole plumes. By synchronizing movies and space/time maps, we find that the tracks are produced by elongated ejections from the unipolar flux concentrations at the bases of the cellular plumes and that the phases of these ejections are uncorrelated from cell to cell. Thus, the large-scale motion is not a continuous flow, but is more like a system of independent conveyor belts all moving in the same direction along the magnetic field. In contrast, the proper motions in sunspots are clearly waves resulting from periodic disturbances in the sunspot umbras. The periods are ?2.6minutes, but the sky-plane speeds and wavelengths depend on the heights of the waves above the sunspot. In the chromosphere, the waves decelerate from 35-45kms{sup 1} in the umbra to 7-8kms{sup 1} toward the outer edge of the penumbra, but in the corona, the waves accelerate to ?60-100kms{sup 1}. Because chromospheric and coronal tracks originate from the same space/time locations, the coronal waves must emerge from the same umbral flashes that produce the chromospheric waves.

  8. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenuemore » from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.« less

  9. Princeton and PPPL projects selected to run on super-powerful...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that are limited to simulating less frequent waves are able to produce. Simulating fusion plasmas from hot core to cold wall. Physicists led by C.S. Chang of PPPL will use...

  10. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF >100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  11. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No 2001 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, Eastern PA (Panel 3 of 7) Oil and Gas ...

  12. SIMULATION RESULTS OF RUNNING THE AGS MMPS, BY STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARNERIS, I.

    2006-09-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to equivalent maximum proton energy of 29 GeV. The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-go00 Volts. The peak magnet power is 49.5 Mwatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The motor is rated at 9 MW, input voltage 3 phase 13.8 KV 60 Hz. The generator is rated at 50 MVA its output voltage is 3 phase 7500 Volts. Thus the peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The rotor changes speed by about +/-2.5% of its nominal speed of 1200 Revolutions per Minute. The reason the power supply is powered by the Generator is that the local power company (LIPA) can not sustain power swings of +/- 50 MW in 0.5 sec if the power supply were to be interfaced directly with the AC lines. The Motor Generator is about 45 years old and Siemens is not manufacturing similar machines in the future. As a result we are looking at different ways of storing energy and being able to utilize it for our application. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. The simulation program used is called PSIM Version 6.1. The control system of the power supply will also be presented. The average power from LIPA into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  13. Draft Test Plan for Brine Migration Experimental Studies in Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Reed, Donald T.; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-02-02

    The primary objective of the experimental effort described here is to aid in understanding the complex nature of liquid, vapor, and solid transport occurring around heated nuclear waste in bedded salt. In order to gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that (a) hydrological and physiochemical parameters and (b) processes are correctly simulated. The experiments proposed here are designed to study aspects of the system that have not been satisfactorily quantified in prior work. In addition to exploring the complex coupled physical processes in support of numerical model validation, lessons learned from these experiments will facilitate preparations for larger-scale experiments that may utilize similar instrumentation techniques.

  14. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation,moreand mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMSs tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.less

  15. Run 2 Upgrades to the CMS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: JINST; Conference: Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics. Lisbon, Portugal, . Research Org: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory...

  16. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenue from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.

  17. DOE Funding Crunch Threatens Future of Only U.S. Collider Still Running

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Science) | Jefferson Lab www.sciencemag.org/content/335/6067/392.summary Submitted: Friday, January 27

  18. Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-27

    Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

  19. A W' boson near 2 TeV: Predictions for run 2 of the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Liu, Zhen

    2015-11-20

    We present a renormalizable theory that includes a W' boson of mass in the 1.8–2 TeV range, which may explain the excess events reported by the ATLAS Collaboration in a WZ final state, and by the CMS Collaboration in e+e– jj, Wh0, and jj final states. The W' boson couples to right-handed quarks and leptons, including Dirac neutrinos with TeV-scale masses. This theory predicts a Z' boson of mass in the 3.4–4.5 TeV range. The cross section times branching fractions for the narrow Z' dijet and dilepton peaks at the 13 TeV LHC are 10 and 0.6 fb, respectively, formore » MZ'=3.4 TeV, and an order of magnitude smaller for MZ'=4.5 TeV.« less

  20. Successful so far, coal lobby's campaign may run out of steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-15

    The anti-coal lobby has mounted a highly successful campaign that has brought the permitting, financing, and construction of new conventional coal-fired plants to a virtual halt. But the coal lobby is not yet ready to concede defeat. With powerful constituents in coal-mining and coal-burning states and influential utilities, mining companies, and railroads, it continues to fight for its survival using any and all gimmicks and scare tactics in the book. The battle is being waged in courtrooms, public forums, media campaigns, and especially in Congress. The problem with the coal lobby is that it refuses to admit that coal combustion to generate electricity is among the chief sources of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions; unless they address this issue honestly, effectively, and immediately, their efforts are going to win few converts in the courts of law or public opinion.

  1. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  2. Alternative fuel trucks case studies: Running refuse haulers on compressed natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-07-01

    This document details the experience of New York City`s compressed natural gas refuse haulers. These 35 ton vehicles have engines that displace 10 liters and provide 240 horsepower. Fuel economy, range, cost, maintenance, repair issues, and emissions are discussed. Photographs and figures illustrate the attributes of these alternative fuel vehicles.

  3. Students Share Experiences from First Run of BioenergizeME Virtual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winners were as follows: First place for highest number of likes, shares, and page views-Aston, Pennsylvania's Sun Valley High School, Science and Technology: Sustainable ...

  4. Search for the Trilepton Signal of the Minimal Supergravity Model in D0 Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binder, Meta; /Munich U.

    2005-06-01

    A search for associated chargino neutralino pair production is performed in the trilepton decay channel q{bar q} {yields} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 2}{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}} {nu} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0} {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}, using data collected with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of {approx}300 pb{sup -1}. A dedicated event selection is applied to all samples including the data sample and the Monte Carlo simulated samples for the Standard Model background and the Supersymmetry signal. Events with two muons plus an additional isolated track, replacing the requirement of a third charged lepton in the event, are analyzed. Additionally, selected events must have a large amount of missing transverse energy due to the neutrino and the two {tilde {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}. After all selection cuts are applied, 2 data events are found, with an expected number of background events of 1.75 {+-} 0.34 (stat.) {+-} 0.46 (syst.). No evidence for Supersymmetry is found and limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. When the presented analysis is considered in combination with three other decay channels, no evidence for Supersymmetry is found. Limits on the production cross section times leptonic branching fraction are set. A lower chargino mass limit of 117 GeV at 95% CL is then derived for the mSUGRA model in a region of parameter space with enhanced leptonic branching fractions.

  5. Excellence in Celebrating Small Business: Meet the Woman who Runs our Small Business Awards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Department of Energy, we are committed to supporting small and disadvantaged businesses. You can see this commitment through the various programs created within the Office of Small and...

  6. Search for Supersymmetry in the Dilepton Final State with Taus at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forrest, Robert David; /California U., Davis

    2011-09-01

    This thesis presents the results a search for chargino and neutralino supersymmetric particles yielding same signed dilepton final states including one hadronically decaying tau lepton using 6.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the the CDF II detector. This signature is important in SUSY models where, at high tan {beta}, the branching ratio of charginos and neutralinos to tau leptons becomes dominant. We study event acceptance, lepton identification cuts, and efficiencies. We set limits on the production cross section as a function of SUSY particle mass for certain generic models.

  7. Accelerating Innovation: PowerAmerica Is Up and Running | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3, 2015 - 1:58pm Addthis February 3, 2015 The excitement and drive to deliver was evident to me last week when I joined nearly 100 PowerAmerica members for their kick-off meeting at NC State University in Raleigh, North Carolina. PowerAmerica, also called the Next Generation Power Electronics Manufacturing Innovation Institute, will develop advanced manufacturing processes and work to accelerate the commercialization of wide bandgap (WBG) technologies. NC State University leadership,

  8. When the Internet Runs Out of Addresses, It'll be IPv6 to the Rescue! |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Wendy Wolfson Tsabba Communications Specialist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory What does this mean for me? There are "only" 3.2 billion unique addresses available across the Internet and we are quickly approaching that limit. Network engineers have been working on a new protocol called IPv6 to solve the problem. Happy World IPv6 Day! What is IPv6 you might ask? Well, IP is the Internet Protocol. It's the way all devices on the Internet from smartphones

  9. SPEAR 07-08 updated 3-6-08Run.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maintenance AP Injector SPEAR Startup Spear Down University Holidays 20 AP 18 24 23 27 22 11 18 8 M SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2007-2008 Feb 28 27 24 25 10 AP 21 19 20 22 23 16...

  10. CX-000550: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Equipment Upgrades to Bull Shoals Dam SubstationCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 10/19/2009Location(s): Bull Shoals Dam, ArkansasOffice(s): Southwestern Power Administration

  11. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B.K. Kerimov, A.I. Elgavkhari and A.G. Ganiev, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Fiz. 45 (1981) 2189; Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR Phys. Ser. 45 (1981) 145 1981KE1F kemper et al., Bull. Amer....

  12. Taney County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bull Creek, Missouri Forsyth, Missouri Hollister, Missouri Kirbyville, Missouri Merriam Woods, Missouri Rockaway Beach, Missouri Saddlebrooke, Missouri Taneyville, Missouri...

  13. EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2010 (final).pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT ISSUES * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May 2009) (May 2009) * * TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo are still being developed are still being developed Little Rock District, Southwestern

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT STATUS * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May (May 2009) 2009) 2009) 2009) * * TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed * * TMDL for Lake TMDL for Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo was approved by

  16. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B78 (1978) 36 1978DU1E Duffey et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 23 (1978) 558 1978EI1A Eisenstein et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 23 (1978) 80 1978EL1A Elwyn et al., Bull. Amer. Phys....

  17. Thermal-nutritional regulation of functional groups in running water ecosystems. Technical progress report, October 1, 1978-November 1, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    The research encompassed three general areas: (1) characterization of stream macroinvertebrate functional feeding groups (shredders, collectors, scrapers, and predators) based on morphological and behavioral adaptations and food-source-specific growth responses of selected species; (2) demonstration of the relative importance of temperature and food quality (in which maximum quality is defined as that producing the most growth) in controlling growth rate and survivorship of stream functional groups; and (3) derivation and refinement of conceptual and quantitative models of stream ecosystem structure and function, with particular emphasis on detrital processing. Verification of the functional group concept as a tool for assessing and predicting is reflected in alterations of the relative dominance of various functional groups. Food quality can strongly influence the growth rates of shredders, collectors and scrapers and override the effects of temperature in a number of cases. Gathering collectors may select food particles by size (or at least be restricted to a limited portion of the total range available) but representative species do not appear to select for quality.

  18. Search for Third Generation Squarks in the Missing Transverse Energy plus Jet Sample at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidal Marono, Miguel; /Madrid, CIEMAT /Madrid U.

    2010-03-01

    The twentieth century leaves behind one of the most impressive legacies, in terms of human knowledge, ever achieved. In particular the StandardModel (SM) of particle physics has proven to be one of the most accurate descriptions of Nature. The level of accuracy of some theoretical predictions has never been attained before. It includes the electromagnetic interaction, and the weak and strong force, developing the Lagrangian from symmetry principles. There are two different types of fundamental constituents of Nature, in the framework of the Standard Model: bosons and fermions. Bosons are those particles responsible for carrying the interactions among the fermions, which constitute matter. Fermions are divide into six quarks and six leptons, forming a three-folded structure. All these fermions and bosons have an antimatter partner. However, several difficulties point along with the idea that the Standard Model is only an effective low energy theory. These limitations include the difficulty to incorporate gravity and the lack of justification to fine tuning of some perturbative corrections. Moreover, some regions of the theory are not understood, like the mass spectrum of the Standard Model or the mechanism for electroweak symmetry breaking. Supersymmetry is a newer theoretical framework, thought to adress the problems found in the Standard Model, while preserving all its predictive power. It introduces a new symmetry that relates a new boson to each SM fermion and a new fermion to each SM boson. In this way, for every existing boson in the SM it must exist a fermionic super-partner (named with a sufix ino), and likewise, for every fermion a bosonic super-partner (named with a prefix s) must also exist. Moreover, another symmetry called R-parity is introduced to prevent baryon and lepton number violating interactions. If R-parity is conserved, super-particles can only be pair-produced and they cannot decay completely in SM particles. This implies the existence of a lightest SUSY particle (LSP) which would provide a candidate for cold dark matter, that account for 23% of the universe content, as strongly suggested by recent astrophysical data [1]. The Tevatron is a hadron collider operating at Fermilab, USA. This accelerator provides proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) collisions with a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. CDF and D0 are the detectors built to analyse the products of the collisions provided by the Tevatron. Both experiments have produced a very significant scientific output in the last few years, like the discovery of the top quark or the measurement of the B{sub s} mixing. The Tevatron experiments are also reaching sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson. The scientific program of CDF includes a broad spectrum on searches for physics signatures beyond the Standard Model. Tevatron is still the energy frontier, what means an unique opportunity to produce a discovery in physic beyond the Standard Model. The analyses presented in this thesis focus on the search for third generation squarks in the missing transverse energy plus jets final state. The production of sbottom ({tilde b}) and stop ({tilde t}) quarks could be highly enhanced at the Tevatron, giving the possibility of discovering new physics or limiting the parameter space available in the theory. No signal is found over the predicted Standard Model background in both searches. Instead, 95% confidence level limits are set on the production cross section, and then translated into the mass plane of the hypothetical particles. This thesis sketches the basic theory concepts of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Extension in Chapter 2. Chapter 3, describes the Tevatron and CDF. Based on the CDF subsystems information, Chapter 4 and 5 describe the analysis objet reconstruction and the heavy flavor tagging tools. The development of the analyses is shown in Chapter 6 and Chapter 7. Finally, Chapter 8 is devoted to discuss the results and conclusions of this work, and future prospects.

  19. Search for the Decays B0(s) ---> e+ mu- and B0(s) ---> e+ e- in CDF Run. II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /CSIC, Catalunya; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and the flavor-changing neutral-current decays B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}. The analysis uses data corresponding to 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the upgraded Collider Detector (CDF II) at the Fermilab Tevatron. The observed number of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} candidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting bayesian upper limits on the branching ratios at 90% credibility level are {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 2.0 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 6.4 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -7} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 8.3 x 10{sup -8}. From the limits on {Beta}(B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), the following lower bounds on the Pati-Salam leptoquark masses are also derived: M{sub LQ}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 47.8 TeV/c{sup 2}, and M{sub LQ}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 59.3 TeV/c{sup 2}, at 90% credibility level.

  20. Launching applications on compute and service processors running under different operating systems in scalable network of processor boards with routers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomkins, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Camp, William J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-03-17

    A multiple processor computing apparatus includes a physical interconnect structure that is flexibly configurable to support selective segregation of classified and unclassified users. The physical interconnect structure also permits easy physical scalability of the computing apparatus. The computing apparatus can include an emulator which permits applications from the same job to be launched on processors that use different operating systems.

  1. A cable SGEMP tutorial : running CEPXS, CEPTRE and EMPHASIS/CABANA to evaluate the electrical response of a cable.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liscum-Powell, Jennifer L.; Bohnhoff, William J.; Turner, C. David

    2007-05-01

    This tutorial is aimed at guiding a user through the process of performing a cable SGEMP simulation. The tutorial starts with processing a differential photon spectrum obtained from a Monte Carlo code such as ITS into a discrete (multi-group) spectrum used in CEPXS and CEPTRE. Guidance is given in the creation of a nite element mesh of the cable geometry. The set-up of a CEPTRE simulation is detailed. Users are instructed in evaluating the quality of the CEPTRE radiation transport results. The post-processing of CEPTRE results using Exostrip is detailed. And finally, an EMPHASIS/CABANA simulation is detailed including the interpretation of the output.

  2. A study of the organic emission from a turbocharged diesel engine running on 12 percent hexyl nitrate dissolved in ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walde, N.; Westerholm, R.; Persson, K.-A.

    1984-01-01

    A highly rated turbocharged diesel engine adapted for an alternative fuel based on ethanol and hexyl nitrate has been investigated with respect to the emission of organic compounds in the exhausts. The adaption involves: ignition nozzles with larger holes, a change of injection timing and more fuel injected per stroke. Emissions were measured at four different driving modes ie, 1, 8, 10 and 12 respectively, in the California Cycle. The exhaust composition are different compared to conventional diesel emissions. The main part of the organic pollutants consists of unburned ethanol and hexyl nitrate, acetaldehyde being the most abundant aldehyde.

  3. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb? Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-20

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb? using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV?MH?150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV?MH?145 GeV, the data exhibit an excess above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.

  4. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay; /Duke U.

    2004-07-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use {approx} 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section {sigma}({bar p}p {yields} ee* {yields} ee{gamma}) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (M{sub e*}) and the compositeness energy scale ({Lambda}). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find M{sub e*} < 906 GeV is excluded for M{sub e*} = {Lambda}. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the M{sub e*} versus the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. In comparison, other experiments have excluded M{sub e*} < 280 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  5. Summary of the ATLAS experiment’s sensitivity to supersymmetry after LHC Run 1 -- interpreted in the phenomenological MSSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. 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C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-21

    A summary of the constraints from the ATLAS experiment on R -parity-conserving supersymmetry is presented. Results from 22 separate ATLAS searches are considered, each based on analysis of up to 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collision data at centre-of-mass energies of √s =7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The results are interpreted in the context of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a neutralino, taking into account constraints from previous precision electroweak and flavour measurements as well as from dark matter related measurements. The results are presented in terms of constraints on supersymmetric particle masses and are compared to limits from simplified models. The impact of ATLAS searches on parameters such as the dark matter relic density, the couplings of the observed Higgs boson, and the degree of electroweak fine-tuning is also shown. As a result, spectra for surviving supersymmetry model points with low fine-tunings are presented.

  6. Summary of the ATLAS experiment’s sensitivity to supersymmetry after LHC Run 1 -- interpreted in the phenomenological MSSM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-10-21

    A summary of the constraints from the ATLAS experiment on R -parity-conserving supersymmetry is presented. Results from 22 separate ATLAS searches are considered, each based on analysis of up to 20.3 fb–1 of proton-proton collision data at centre-of-mass energies of √s =7 and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The results are interpreted in the context of the 19-parameter phenomenological minimal supersymmetric standard model, in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a neutralino, taking into account constraints from previous precision electroweak and flavour measurements as well as from dark matter related measurements. The results are presented in terms ofmore » constraints on supersymmetric particle masses and are compared to limits from simplified models. The impact of ATLAS searches on parameters such as the dark matter relic density, the couplings of the observed Higgs boson, and the degree of electroweak fine-tuning is also shown. As a result, spectra for surviving supersymmetry model points with low fine-tunings are presented.« less

  7. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Babu, M. Madan (M. Madan Babu) - Laboratory of Molecular Biology, MRC Badger, Jonathan (Jonathan Badger) - Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville Bailey, Timothy L. (Timothy L. Bailey) - Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland Baker, Barbara (Barbara Baker) - Department

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Dehlinger, Dietrich" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything4 Electronic Full Text4 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject Filter by Author Shusteff, Maxim (3) Mariella, Jr., Raymond P (2) Rose, Klint A (2) Bailey, Christopher (1) Bailey,

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * * ADEQ completed public review of draft ADEQ completed public review of draft TMDL for Bull Shoals and Norfork Dec TMDL for Bull Shoals and Norfork Dec 2008. 2008. CURRENT ISSUES Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * * Full listing of the sources contributing Full listing of the sources contributing to the low DO have not been

  10. EIS-0265-SA-88: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (CTWSRO), propose to complete seven types of fish habitat enhancement projects. The projects are located within bull trout and Middle...

  11. BPA-2015-00273-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    minutes and other correspondence between the Bonneville Power Administration and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding dam operations in bull trout critical habitat since...

  12. BPA-2014-01504-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and all associated decision documents, to include any that implement Inland Native Fish Strategy management direction. She also asks for bull trout specific biological...

  13. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N BPA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat and hatchery actions that effectively and efficiently advance the recovery of fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout . 6. Increase operational...

  14. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  15. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  16. Paper Title (use style: paper title)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development Roadmap: Design to Commercialization Kelley Ruehl and Diana Bull Water Power Technologies Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185 Email: kmruehl@sandia.gov...

  17. FY 2015 FOIA Requests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    related to bull trout critical habitat Nov 2010 - present Requester: Arlene Montgomery Comments: Released in its entirety. CLOSED Date Received: 1232014 Date Due: 130...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its capacity. Southwestern Power Administration Slide 4 2009 Projects Southwestern Power Administration Slide 5 Five Year Construction Plan 2010 Bull Shoals Dam Pothead...

  19. Carlsbad, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motors Bull Frog Green Energy LLC California Wind Systems Emission Power Solutions Plc EPS Macquarie Funds Management USA Inc Metallic Power Inc Peak Sun Silicon Corp...

  20. Microsoft Word - SANDIA REPORT - final RM6.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wave Energy Converter Diana Bull, Chris Smith, Dale Scott Jenne, Paul Jacob, Andrea ... New Mexico 87185-MS1124 Chris Smith, Steve Willits, Arnold Fontaine Applied ...

  1. Fermilab Today | State University of New York at Buffalo Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buffalo May 30, 2012 NAME: State University of New York at Buffalo HOME TOWN: Buffalo, New York MASCOT: Victor E. Bull SCHOOL COLORS: Blue and white PARTICLE PHYSICS...

  2. ALS Beamlines Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: This beamline is NOT open to general users. 3-20 keV S. Bailey (510) 486-7727 M. Banda (510) 495-2837 x2104 10.3.2 Bend Environmental and materials science, micro x-ray...

  3. D.O.E. Race to zero competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.O.E. RACE TO ZERO COMPETITION Volume 1: Solution Outline PRESENTED BY: Penn College-Williamsport Faculty Advisers: Dorothy Gerring Robert Wozniak STUDENTS: Dustin Bailey Samantha Callender Michael Fonti Peter Gauthier Justin Iman Adam Knoebel Chris Master Zach Robey Matthew Vent  ii TABLE OF CONTENTS A. Team Qualifications & Summary Description ........................................................................................................ 1 B. Design Goals

  4. LANSCE-NS Block Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANSCE Planned Run Schedule - 2015/2016 run_schedule

  5. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-12-15

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] {approx_equal} -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its predominantly blue horizontal branch morphology-which is more typical of Oosterhoff type II systems. We thus conclude that metallicity plays a key role in defining Oosterhoff type. Finally, based on an application of the 'A-method', we conclude that the cluster RR Lyrae stars have a similar He abundance as M3, although more work on the temperatures of the M62 RR Lyrae is needed before this result can be conclusively established.

  6. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  7. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

    1986-08-01

    We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

  8. Confirmation Run of the DWPF SRAT Cycle Using the Sludge-Only Flowsheet with Tank 40 Radioactive Sludge and Frit 200 in the Shielded Cells Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellinger, T.L.

    2002-08-29

    Several basic data reports have been issued concerning the recent demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Cycle, conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The SRTC demonstration was completed using the DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet with washed Tank 40 sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 2 or Macrobatch 3) in the Shielded Cells facility. The DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet calls for processing radioactive sludge slurry using nitric acid, concentrated formic acid, and frit 200.

  9. Liquid phase methanol LaPorte process development unit: Modification operation, and support studies. Task 3.6/3.7: Alternative catalyst/life run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-28

    In April 1987, Air Products started the third and final contract with the US Department of Energy to develop the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH) process. One of the objectives was to identify alternative commercial catalyst(s) for the process. This objective was strategically important as we want to demonstrate that the LPMEOH process is flexible and not catalyst selection limited. Among three commercially available catalysts evaluated in the lab, the catalyst with a designation of F21/0E75-43 was the most promising candidate. The initial judging criteria included not only the intrinsic catalyst activity but also the ability to be used effectively in a slurry reactor. The catalyst was then advanced for a 40-day life test in a laboratory 300 cc autoclave. The life test result also revealed superior stability when compared with that of a standard catalyst. Consequently, the new catalyst was recommended for demonstration in the Process Development Unit (PDU) at LaPorte, Texas. This report details the methodology of testing and selecting the catalyst.

  10. Glen Ganyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona. The short-run economic cost of environmental constraints on hydropower operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpman, D.A.

    1997-06-01

    In October of 1995, the Secretary of the Interior announced that Glen Canyon Dam would be operated under the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) criteria to protect downstream archeological, cultural, aquatic and riparian resources. Although the annual and monthly amounts of water released downstream remain the same, MLFF imposes a unique and complex set of constraints on hourly and daily hydropower operations. These constraints include restrictions on ramp rates (hourly rate of change in release), minimum flows, maximum flows, and the daily change in flow. In addition, a key component of MLFF operations is adaptive management which establishes a framework of research and monitoring on which future changes in operation will be based. Consequently, MLFF operations are not static and variants of these hourly constraints may be contemplated in the future. This paper summarizes the environmental concerns which led to MLFF, reviews some pertinent electric power concepts, and describes current institutional and market conditions. A generalized method for simulating and valuing hourly hydroelectric generation under various operational constraints is then introduced.

  11. When the facts are just not enough: Credibly communicating about risk is riskier when emotions run high and time is short

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Barbara J.

    2011-07-15

    When discussing risk with people, commonly subject matter experts believe that conveying the facts will be enough to allow people to assess a risk and respond rationally to that risk. Because of this expectation, experts often become exasperated by the seemingly illogical way people assess personal risk and choose to manage that risk. In crisis situations when the risk information is less defined and choices must be made within impossible time constraints, the thought processes may be even more susceptible to faulty heuristics. Understanding the perception of risk is essential to understanding why the public becomes more or less upset by events. This article explores the psychological underpinnings of risk assessment within emotionally laden events and the risk communication practices that may facilitate subject matter experts to provide the facts in a manner so they can be more certain those facts are being heard. Source credibility is foundational to risk communication practices. The public meeting is one example in which these best practices can be exercised. Risks are risky because risk perceptions differ and the psychosocial environment in which risk is discussed complicates making risk decisions. Experts who want to influence the actions of the public related to a threat or risk should understand that decisions often involve emotional as well as logical components. The media and other social entities will also influence the risk context. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention's crisis and emergency-risk communication (CERC) principles are intended to increase credibility and recognize emotional components of an event. During a risk event, CERC works to calm emotions and increase trust which can help people apply the expertise being offered by response officials.

  12. T-570: HP Security Bulletin- HP-UX Running OpenSSL, Remote Execution of Arbitrary Code, Denial of Service (DoS), Authentication Bypass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP-UX OpenSSL. This vulnerability could be exploited remotely to execute arbitrary code or create a Denial of Service (DoS) or an authentication bypass.

  13. PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

    2009-12-04

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  14. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  15. Combined Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Decaying to bb̄ Using the D0 Run II Data Set

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present the results of the combination of searches for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson and decaying into bb̄ using the data sample collected with the D0 detector in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the Higgs boson cross section relative to the standard model prediction in the mass range 100 GeV≤MH≤150 GeV, and we exclude Higgs bosons with masses smaller than 102 GeV at the 95% C.L. In the mass range 120 GeV≤MH≤145 GeV, the data exhibit an excessmore » above the background prediction with a global significance of 1.5 standard deviations, consistent with the expectation in the presence of a standard model Higgs boson.« less

  16. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values α, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ω = nω0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ω0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, θ is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  17. Technical Assistance Program: Off to a Running Start, Winter 2012 (Newsletter), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy (OIE), Indian Energy Beat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SHARING KNOWLEDGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 WINNING THE FUTURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 BUILDING BRIDGES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ON THE HORIZON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 LEADING THE CHARGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY ROUNDUP . . . . . . . . . . 4 "By leveraging our technical resources and expertise, we will help tribal communities, entrepreneurs and small businesses

  18. Young Womens Conference attracts more attendees in 2014! | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab Young Womens Conference attracts more attendees in 2014! June 9, 2014 Gallery: The 2014 Young Women's Conference is Science, Engineering, Technology, and Mathematics attracted students from all over New Jersey! With almost 400 students, 50, chaperones and almost 100 volunteers from PPPL and Princeton University, it was our largest event to date! Over 65 exhibitors showcased the various sciences in their field and our breakout speakers, Crystal Bailey, of the American Physical

  19. PMBP_report_110310

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 th Workshop on HPC Best Practices: Power Management Held September 28-29, 2010, San Francisco Workshop Report March 2011 Compiled by Kim Cupps and Mary Zosel Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-AR-472771 Workshop Steering Committee Anna Maria Bailey (LLNL), Kathye Chavez (SNL), Susan Coghlan (ANL), David Cowley (PNNL), James Craw (NERSC), Kim Cupps, workshop chair (LLNL), Sander Lee (NNSA/ASC/DOE HQ), Dave Martinez (SNL), Nick Nagy (LANL), James Rogers (ORNL), Yukiko Sekine

  20. Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results Notification of General User Proposal and Approved Program Results Print by Sue Bailey, User Services Group Leader The Proposal Study Panel (PSP) met on October 23 to oversee and finalize the scoring of General User Proposals for the 2016-1 Feb-June operating cycle and to make recommendations to the ALS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) on Approved Program applications. Beam time allocations are completed and users have been

  1. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VI-11 DIRECTOR Tribble

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan Peeler

  2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART - CYCLOTRON INSTITUTE VII-12 DIRECTOR Tribble

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    2 DIRECTOR Tribble SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Workers Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Kingsbury Mynar Piolet Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Cowden Eisenmann Gathings LaPoint Law Morgan

  3. Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports Harboring Pollution: Air Quality Impacts of Marine Ports 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Resources Defense Council PDF icon 2004_deer_bailey.pdf More Documents & Publications Cleaning Up Diesel Engines South Coast AQMD Clean Transportation Programs Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge Mounted PEM Fuel Cell: Project Scoping and Feasibility

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bailey, Stephen" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  5. Attendees

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    Attendees Attendees Registered Attendees Sean Ahern Oak Ridge National Laboratory William Allcock Argonne National Laboratory Sasha Ames Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Katie Antypas NERSC Stephen Bailey LBNL Robert Ballance Sandia National Laboratories Nick Balthaserr NERSC Ashley Barker Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Blaise Barney LLNL Christopher Beggio Sandia National Laboratories Wes Bethel LBNL Laura Biven DOE Kristofer Bouchard LBNL Jeff Broughton NERSC Suren Byna LBNL

  6. ATLAS 25th Anniversary Celebration

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    th Anniversary Celebration October 22-23, 2010 Argonne National Laboratory 1. Ahmad, Irshad Argonne National Lab 2. Alcorta, Martin Argonne National Lab 3. Austin, Sam Michigan State University 4. Back, Birger Argonne National Lab 5. Bailey, Kevin Argonne National Lab 6. Bedoor, Shadi A. Western Michigan University 7. Bernstein, Allan Argonne National Lab 8. Betts, Russell R. Illinois Institute of Technology 9. Caldwell, Shane A. University of Chicago 10. Carpenter, Michael Argonne National Lab

  7. Previous Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous ASCAC Members Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) ASCAC Home Meetings Members ASCAC Members Bio Previous ASCAC Members Charges/Reports ASCAC Charter 2015 - signed .pdf file (134KB) ASCR Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees ASCR Home Members Previous ASCAC Members Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Dr. F. Ronald Bailey Computer Sciences Corp. 591 Branciforte Ridge Santa Cruz, CA 95065 Dr. Horst D. Simon Director, Computational Research Division

  8. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Williams Biodiversity Research Institute 27 Oct. 2015 Wildlife distributions and habitat use on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf © Jonathan Fiely-BRI U.S. Dept. of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources Maryland Energy Administration Other sources Bureau of Ocean Energy Management U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sea Duck Joint Venture The Bailey Wildlife Foundation Collaborators: Biodiversity Research Institute North Carolina State University

  9. LSST Science Book, Version 2.0 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Article: LSST Science Book, Version 2.0 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LSST Science Book, Version 2.0 Authors: Abell, Paul A. ; /NASA, Houston ; Allison, Julius ; /Alabama A-M ; Anderson, Scott F. ; /Washington U., Seattle ; Andrew, John R. ; /NOAO, Tucson ; Angel, J.Roger P. ; /Arizona U. ; Armus, Lee ; /Spitzer Space Telescope ; Arnett, David ; /Arizona U. ; Asztalos, S.J. ; /LBL, Berkeley ; Axelrod, Tim S. ; /LSST Corp. ; Bailey, Stephen ; /Ecole Polytechnique more »;

  10. Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels Diesel Health Impacts & Recent Comparisons to Other Fuels 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Natural Resources Defense Council PDF icon 2002_deer_bailey.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary of Swedish Experiences on CNG and "Clean" Diesel Buses CNG and Diesel Transite Bus Emissions in Review ARB's Study of Emissions from Diesel and CNG Heavy-duty Transit Buses

  11. Microsoft Word - VI_11_Organizational Chart.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yennello SEE Line Proj. Manager H. Clark Brinkley Chen Chubaryan Horvat Hyman Roeder Tabacaru Graduate Students Research Associates Research Scientists Research Group Leaders Administration/ Accounting Jeske Computer Systems Hagel Burch Student Worker Senior Accelerator Physicist May Accelerator Physicists Kim H. Clark Roeder Tabacaru Operations Chief Abegglen Building Maint. Adams Mynar Student Worker Electrical Shop/Accelerator Tech. Bailey Carmona Cowden Eisenmann Foxworth Gathings LaPoint

  12. Structural basis for biomolecular recognition in overlapping binding sites

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in a diiron enzyme system (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structural basis for biomolecular recognition in overlapping binding sites in a diiron enzyme system Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural basis for biomolecular recognition in overlapping binding sites in a diiron enzyme system Authors: Acheson, Justin F. ; Bailey, Lucas J. ; Elsen, Nathaniel L. ; Fox, Brian G. [1] + Show Author Affiliations UW Publication Date: 2016-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1229904 Resource Type:

  13. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Mathematics And Computing | OSTI, US

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information 4 Most Viewed Documents for Mathematics And Computing Science Subject Feed Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III (2002) 291 /> Ten Problems in Experimental Mathematics Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Kapoor, Vishaal;Weisstein, Eric (2004) 101 /> The Effects of Nuclear Weapons Glasstone, Samuel (1964) 72 /> Levenberg--Marquardt algorithm: implementation and

  14. Advisory Board - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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    Advisory Board Dr. Sheila G. Bailey Senior Physicist at NASA Glenn Research Center Dr. David J. Eaglesham CEO at Pellion Technologies Dr. Alex Jen (website) Boeing/Johnson Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Director, Institute of Advanced Materials and Technology at the University of Washington Dr. Lawrence Kazmerski Executive Director of Science and Technology Partnerships at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dr. Venky Narayanamurti (website) Benjamin Peirce Professor of

  15. Technical Review Panel …NRELs Wind Energy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 4, 2014 A2e Merit Review Panel Feb 4 th & 5 th , 2014 Marriott Metro Center, Washington, DC Meeting Minutes Attendees: Merit Review Panel: Sandy Butterfield - Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer, Boulder Wind Power Robert Poore - Senior Advisor, Renewables Advisory, DNV GL - Energy Bruce Bailey - President/CEO, AWS Truepower Henrik Stiesdal - Chief Technology Officer, Siemens Wind Power Division Mark Jonkhof - Wind Technology Platform Leader, GE Global Research James (Jim) Lyons -

  16. Final Letter to DOE Regulatory Burden 9_7_2012.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE STEVE NARDELLA President (Winchester Homes Inc.) RICK BAILEY Vice President/Calvert Co. (Marrick Properties) DOUG MEEKER Vice President/Charles Co. (Elm Street Development) ROBERT J. SPALDING Vice President/Mont. Co. (Miller & Smith Homes) HILLARY P.COLT Vice President/Prince George's Co. (Konterra) MIKE MUMMAUGH Vice President/St. Mary's Co. (Paragon Properties Inc.) BRIAN "A.J." JACKSON Vice President/Washington DC (EYA, LLC) FRANK BOSSONG, IV, P.E Associate

  17. FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was

  18. Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy,

  19. Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Round 1 Emissions Results from Compressed Natural Gas Vans and Gasoline Controls Operating in the U.S. Federal Fleet Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S.

  20. Microsoft Word - Chapter 12 - 2-10-11

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2: List of Preparers and Contributors 12-1 CHAPTER 12: LIST OF PREPARERS AND CONTRIBUTORS Bailey, C. Lawson, Human Health & Safety, Tetra Tech B.S., Biology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA, 1979 Years of Experience: 26 Boltz, Jacqueline, Public Outreach Coordinator, Tetra Tech M.B.A., Business, Boston University, 1991 B.A., French Language and Literature, Boston University, 1991 Years of Experience: 15 Buenaflor, Delight, Deputy Project

  1. BPA-2014-00407-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pend d'Oreille and its tributaries, bull trout in Lake Pend d'Oreille and aquatic invasive species in Lake Pend d'Oreille related to the ongoing operations of Albeni Falls Dam....

  2. Microsoft Word - lblsubethers.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Coordinates, energies E and free energies G in a. u. of all calculated extrema. 24 ... Soc. Chem. Commun., 1983, 276. 4) M. E. Thompson, S. M. Baxter, A. R. Bulls, B. J. Berger, ...

  3. Monumental effort: How a dedicated team completed a massive beam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be adjusted. To align the beam, engineers used measurements to derive a bull's-eye on the inside of the vessel; technicians then used laser technology to zero in on the target. The...

  4. Research Highlight

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    S. J. Richardson, C. P. Bahrmann, M. Shupe, P. J. DeMott, A. J. Heymsfield, and R. Schofield, 2007: The Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment, Bull. Amer. Meteorol. Soc., 88,...

  5. Revised Manuscript

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    of Standards (1958) 1958MC1E McDonell and Sargood, Private Communication (1958) 1958ME77 L. Meyer-Schutzmeister and S.S. Hanna, Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 3 (1958) 188, K10 1958ME79...

  6. On the Use of ARM Data in the Validation and Refinement of a...

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    48, 3391-3409. Stephens, G. L., et al., 2003: The CloudSat mission and the A-Train: A new dimension of space-based observations of clouds and precipitation. Bull. Amer. Met. Soc.,...

  7. Microsoft Word - 2015-03-17_FINALRev0_SRNL-RP-2014-01198c

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Soc. 2003, 24, 1410- 1412. 16. Kalampounias, A. G. IR and Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Sol-Gel Derived Alkaline-Earth Silicate Glasses. Bull. Mater. Sci. 2011, 34, 299-303. 17. ...

  8. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A.S. Deineko and R.P. Slabospitskii, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Fiz. 40 (1976) 2189; Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR Phys. Ser. 40 (1976) 140 1976ME1C Meboniya and Surmava, Sov. J....

  9. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hyperfine Interactions 21 (1985) 251 1985TH08 J. Thaler, Phys. Rev. C32 (1985) 2189 1985WA02 A.H. Wapstra and G. Audi, Nucl. Phys. A432 (1985) 1 1985WA1C Walter, Bull....

  10. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I.I. Zalyubovskii and V.E. Storizhko, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Fiz. 43 (1979) 2189; Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR Phys. Ser. 43 (1979) 144 1979VA08 K. van der Borg, R.J. de...

  11. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A.S. Deineko and R.P. Slabospitskii, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Fiz. 40 (1976) 2189; Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR Phys. Ser. 40 (1976) 140 1976MI13 T. Mikumo, I. Kohno, K....

  12. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A.S. Deineko and R.P. Slabospitskii, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR Ser. Fiz. 40 (1976) 2189; Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR Phys. Ser. 40 (1976) 140 1976MAZG D.G. Mavis and H.F. Glavish,...

  13. ARM - VAP Process - armbe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G. Palanisamy, Y. Shi, and D.D. Turner, 2010: CLOUDS AND MORE: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 91, 13-20. DOI: 10.11752009BAMS2891.1. Data...

  14. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 (1961) 443 1961JA23 A. Jaidar, G. Lopez, M. Mazari and R. Dominguez, Rev. Mex. Fisica 10 (1961) 247 1961JO07 R.G. Johnson, L.F. Chase, Jr. and F.J. Vaughn, Bull. Amer....

  15. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    103 1985DEZY J. Derderian, R.E. Chrien, M. May, P. Pile, R. Sutter, P. Barnes, R. Eisenstein, G. Franklin, R. Grace, D. Marlow et al., Bull. Amer. Phys. Soc. 30 (1985) 793, IF2...

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork (May 2009) * TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed * TMDL for Lake Taneycomo was approved by the EPA for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 CURRENT ISSUES Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * Full understanding of the sources contributing to the low DO have not

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - HPConf2008 08-06-10.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2008 LITTLE ROCK DISTRICT STUDIES AFFECTING FEDERAL HYDROPOWER Hydropower Conference June 10, 2008 US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ®

  18. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation Feasibility Study Supporting Wind Development and Establishment of Renewable Energy and Energy Development Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-3437 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation  BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION  SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE  EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE  WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY  ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO)  WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY  OCETI SAKOWIN POWER PROJECT  ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION

  19. Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation: Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8540 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation OVERVIEW: BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE EECBG ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY ESTABLISHMENT OF RENEWABLE ENERGY & ENERGY DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (REEDO) STANDING ROCK ONE OF SEVEN RESERVATIONS OF THE GREAT SIOUX NATION LOCATED IN

  20. Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (Washee Zee) 701-854-8540 fwasinzi@standingrock.org Establishment of Renewable Energy & Energy Development Office Standing Rock Sioux Tribe - Lakota/Dakota Nation Joseph Smith 701-854-8540] jsmith@standingrock.org OVERVIEW: BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON STANDING ROCK RESERVATION SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND TURBINE EECBG (ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT) ENERGY EFFICIENCY & WIND TURBINE INSTALLATION AT SITTING BULL COLLEGE WIND ASSESSMENT STUDY WIND FEASIBILITY STUDY &