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1

Bull Moose Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Place San Diego, California Sector Biomass Product Focused on development of biomass waste energy projects. References Bull Moose Energy LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

2

Bull Moose Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Moose Energy Bull Moose Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Moose Energy Address P.O. Box 231501 Place Encinitas, California Zip 92023 Sector Biomass Product Developing a 23 MW power plant fueled by biomass waste Website http://bullmooseenergy.com/ Coordinates 33.0368°, -117.2914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0368,"lon":-117.2914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Moose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Moose Nature Bulletin No. 504-A October 27, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MOOSE The word "moose" came to us from Algonquian Indians. Consequently its plural, instead of being "mooses" or "meese", is the same as the singular. That is true of most Indian names whether of a tribe, such as the Winnebago and Potawatomi, or of an object such as papoose. It is also true of many wildlife names not of Indian origin -- for example: deer, mink and grouse. Moose are the monarchs of the north woods, particularly forests surrounding innumerable lakes and swamps. They are splendid swimmers fond of wading into waters where they dredge up lily roots and other aquatic plants. On land, although they do graze on grasses and sedges, moose are primarily browsers feeding on the leaves and tender twigs of hardwood trees and shrubs, especially willows, in summer; on balsam and white cedar or other conifers in winter: on twigs and bark in early spring.

4

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

5

Werner Schnurnberger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schnurnberger German Aerospace Center (DLR) Institute of Technical Thermodynamics werner.schnurnberger@dlr.de This Speaker's Seminars Fuel Cell Research at DLR-Latest Results and...

6

Werner Rsener (Hrsg.): - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

49 8 Buchbesprechungen. Werner Rsener (I-Irsg.): Kommunikation in der lndlichen Gesellschaft vom Mittelalter bis zur. Moderne. Gttingen: Vandenhoeck...

7

Moose models with vanishing $S$ parameter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the $S$ parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on $K$ SU(2) gauge groups, $K+1$ chiral fields and electroweak groups $SU(2)_L$ and $U(1)_Y$ at the ends of the chain of the moose. $S$ vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical non local field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of $S$ through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by Randall Sundrum metric.

R. Casalbuoni; S. De Curtis; D. Dominici

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Moose models with vanishing S parameter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the S parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on K SU(2) gauge groups, K+1 chiral fields, and electroweak groups SU(2){sub L} and U(1){sub Y} at the ends of the chain of the moose. S vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical nonlocal field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of S through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by the Randall Sundrum metric.

Casalbuoni, R.; De Curtis, S.; Dominici, D. [Department of Physics, University of Florence, and INFN, Florence (Italy)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

On two-distillable Werner states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider bipartite mixed states in a d x d quantum system with d at least 3. We say that such a state is PPT if its partial transpose is positive semidefinite, and otherwise that it is NPT. The well-known Werner states are partitioned into three types: a) the separable states (same as the PPT states), b) the 1-distillable states (necessarily NPT), and c) the NPT states which are not 1-distillable. We give several different formulations and provide further evidence for validity of the conjecture that the type c) Werner states are not 2-distillable.

Dragomir Z. Djokovic

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

WINTER HABITAT IJSE BY MOOSE IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA: IMI'1,ICATIONS FOR FOREST MANAGEMEN'I'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., and W. L. REGELIN. 1987. Forestsuccession,habitatmanage- ment, and moose on the Kenai National #12;ALCFS

Wagner, Diane

11

Werner Reichardt: the man and his scientific legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Excerpts from a talk given by Tomaso Poggio in Tbingen on the opening ofthe Werner Reichardt Centrun fr Integrative Neurowissenschaften, December 8, 2008.

Poggio, Tomaso

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

12

Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE MISSION M. W. Werner,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a cryogenic telescope in space with the great imaging and spectroscopic power of modern detector arraysTHE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE MISSION M. W. Werner,1 T. L. Roellig,2 F. J. Low,3 G. H. Rieke,3 M2 Receivved 2004 March 26; accepted 2004 May 26 ABSTRACT The Spitzer Space Telescope, NASA's Great

Galis, Frietson

14

Werner Steimle, MT(ASCP) OSU Student Health Services Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Werner Steimle, MT(ASCP) OSU Student Health Services Laboratory Staff Medical Technologist OSU Student Health Services Laboratory Corvallis, OR · 1998 ­ 2007 Section Supervisor, Laboratory Salem Hospital Regional Health Services Salem, OR · 1994 ­ 1998 Lead Medical Technologist/ Oregon

Tullos, Desiree

15

Moose Lake Water & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Water & Light Comm Lake Water & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Moose Lake Water & Light Comm Place Minnesota Utility Id 12897 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2-250HPS-FRO Lighting 250 HPS ELEOLY Lighting 3-250 HPS Lighting 4-250 HPS Lighting 400 HPS Rent Lighting BEST OIL CO Commercial BIKE TRAIL Commercial CIP Commercial Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Electricity Commercial Demand 1 Phase Industrial

16

Non separable Werner states in spontaneous parametric down-conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiphoton states generated by high-gain spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in presence of large losses are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The explicit form for the two-photon output state has been found to exhibit a Werner structure very resilient to losses for any value of the gain parameter, g. The theoretical results are found in agreement with the experimental data. The last ones are obtained by quantum tomography of the state generated by a high-gain SPDC.

Marco Caminati; Francesco De Martini; Riccardo Perris; Fabio Sciarrino; Veronica Secondi

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bull Hill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hill Hill Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Hill Facility Bull Hill Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner First Wind Developer First Wind Energy Purchaser NSTAR Location Hancock County ME Coordinates 44.723076°, -68.170852° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.723076,"lon":-68.170852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Pathogens, Nutritional Deficiency, and Climate Influences on a Declining Moose Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupancy and movements of radiocollared moose: (1) Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), (2) Red Lake migration during the study. The 249-km2 ANWR site was covered by marshes (;56%) comprised of cattails (Typha [USFWS], ANWR files). Both RLWMA and portions of AGR were located within the Beltrami Island State Forest

19

Bull Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bull Creek Wind Farm Bull Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Creek Wind Farm Facility Bull Creek Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Eurus Developer Eurus Energy Purchaser Market Location Near Gail TX Coordinates 32.933099°, -101.584425° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.933099,"lon":-101.584425,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Functionally with the WRN Helicase Defective in Wernersynthesis via its helicase activity. J Biol Chem 2003; 27:Nairn RS. Depletion of Werner helicase results in mitotic

Trego, Kelly S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Physics of Aquatic Systems II Werner Aeschbach-Hertig 1.1 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but also other branches of Earth sciences, leading to the related fields of isotope geology and isotopePhysics of Aquatic Systems II Werner Aeschbach-Hertig 1.1 2006 1 1. Introduction to Isotopes and Hydrology 1.1 Introduction to Isotope Hydrology "Isotope Hydrology" is a relatively young scientific

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

22

COMMENTS ON THE COUNTING AND SIZING OF BULL SPERMATOZOA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in determining volumes with this apparatus which have not been mentioned in earlier publications. It is these difficulties which induced us to write this report. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fresh bull ejaculates were diluted I spermatozoa (BEDFORD, i965). Formaldehyde (0.1 per cent w/v) was added to prevent growth of bacteria and algae

Recanati, Catherine

23

The composition and diagenesis of the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) at Virey and Moose Queen fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Permian Basin of West Texas and Eastern New Mexico has been a center of oil and gas exploration since the early 1940s. Hydrocarbon profusion is focused in the shelfal areas of the Permian Basil with one of the most prolific clastic reservoirs being the Queen Formation. The Queen Formation is part of the Artesia Group, a sequence of interbedded shelf carbonates. evaporates, and classics. The first purpose of this thesis is to characterize the facies and petrography of the Queen Formation and its sandstone reservoirs at the Moose and Virey Queen fields. The second purpose is to investigate the depositional and diagenetic processes that control the formation, size and quality of the sandstone reservoirs and non-reservoirs. The Queen Formation at the Moose and Virey Queen Gelds generally consist of feldspathic litharenites to litharenites in a complex sequence of interbreed very fine-grained sandstones, coarse grained milestones, anhydritic very fine-grained sandstones, halitic very fine-grained sandstones. Based upon grain size measurements and petrographic analyses, these sandstones can be classified as well sorted sandflat, saline sandflat, and intertidal sandstones from a fluvial depositional system represented by a sequence of coarsening and finning upward cycles.The primary porosity of all of the sandstones of the Queen Formation was reduced by the precipitation of authigenic clay, the infiltration of mud and the formation of soil structures, and the precipitation of authigenic cements such as halite and anhydrite. Reservoirs were formed in the sandflat facies by the dissolution of cements and labile grains, creating enhanced secondary porosity. This project is just one part of a regional study of the Queen Formation in the Permian Basil which can be added to the extensive database on the Queen sandstones in order to obtain a more accurate delineation of the processes responsible for the deposition of the Queen Formation.

Voncannon, Jennifer Catherine

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; White River Bull Trout Enumeration Project Summary, Progress Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the first year of a three-year bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on the White River and is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. The White River has been identified as an important bull trout spawning tributary of the upper Kootenay River in southeastern British Columbia. The objective was to collect information on the returning adult spawning population to the White River through the use of a fish fence and traps, and to conduct redd surveys at the conclusion of spawning to provide an index of spawning escapement and distribution. The fence was installed on September 9th, 2003 and was operated continuously (i.e. no high-water or breaching events) until the fence was removed on October 9th, 2003. Estimation of the spawning population of White River bull trout was incomplete. This was due to a larger and more protracted out-migration than expected. As a result, the bull trout spawning population of the White River was estimated to be somewhere above 899 fish. In comparison, this represents approximately one third the population estimate of the 2003 Wigwam River bull trout spawning population. Based on redd index data, the number of bull trout per redd was over twice that of the Wigwam River or Skookumchuck Creek. This was expected as the index sites on the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek cover the majority of the spawning area. This is not true on the White River. From previous redd counts, it is known that there are approximately twice as many redds in Blackfoot Creek as there are in the index site. Additionally, given the large size of the White River watershed and in particular, the large number of tributaries, there is a high likelihood that important bull trout spawning areas remain unidentified. Both floy tag and radio-telemetry data for the White River bull trout have identified extensive life history migrations. Similar data for the Wigwam River and Skookumchuck Creek populations illustrate there is considerable overlap and mixing among these three local populations within their over-wintering and feeding habitat. The upper Kootenay River, Lake Koocanusa and the lower Bull River provide overwintering and feeding habitat for the White River, Skookumchuck Creek and Wigwam River bull trout. Recommendations to improve escapement estimates and spawning distribution are provided. An accurate population estimate is especially important to provide baseline for any potential impacts due to wildfire and subsequent salvage logging that is currently underway immediately adjacent to and upstream of important spawning and rearing habitat in the Middlefork of the White River. Identification of important spawning habitat is important to meet management objectives for the White River.

Cope, R.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Factors in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of a multi-year research project studying aspects of bull trout life history, ecology and genetics. This report covers the activities of the project in 1996. Results and analysis are presented in the following five areas: (1) analysis of the genetic structure of Oregon bull trout populations; (2) distribution and habitat use of bull trout and brook trout in streams containing both species; (3) bull trout spawning surveys; (4) summary and analysis of historical juvenile bull trout downstream migrant trap catches in the Grande Ronde basin; and (5) food habits and feeding behavior of bull trout alone and in sympatry with brook trout.

Bellerud, Blane L.; Gunckel, Stephanie; Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Buchanan, David V.; Howell, Philip J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mutations in the consensus helicase domains of the Werner syndrome gene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disease with a complex phenotype that is suggestive of accelerated aging. WS is caused by mutations in a gene, WRN, that encodes a predicted 1,432-amino-acid protein with homology to DNA and RNA helicases. Previous work identified four WS mutations in the 3{prime} end of the gene, which resulted in predicted truncated protein products of 1,060-1,247 amino acids but did not disrupt the helicase domain region (amino acids 569-859). Here, additional WS subjects were screened for mutations, and the intron-exon structure of the gene was determined. A total of 35 exons were defined, with the coding sequences beginning in the second exon. Five new WS mutations were identified: two nonsense mutations at codons 369 and 889; a mutation at a splice-junction site, resulting in a predicted truncated protein of 760 amino acids; a 1-bp deletion causing a frameshift; and a predicted truncated protein of 391 amino acids. Another deletion is >15 kb of genomic DNA, including exons 19-23; the predicted protein is 1,186 amino acids long. Four of these new mutations either partially disrupt the helicase domain region or result in predicted protein products completely missing the helicase region. These results confirm that mutations in the WRN gene are responsible for WS. Also, the location of the mutations indicates that the presence or absence of the helicase domain does not influence the WS phenotype and suggests that WS is the result of complete loss of function of the WRN gene product. 63 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Yu, Chang-En; Oshima, Junko; Wijsman, E.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.

Baxter, Jeremy; Baxter, James S.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Final Addendum Appendix AD4: Bull Trout Species Report Walla Walla Subbasin Plan AD4-1 November 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and other bull trout, depending on availability (Delacy and Morton 1943; Jeppson 1963; Pratt 1992; Roos 1959

30

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Bull Frog Green Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frog Green Energy LLC Frog Green Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Bull Frog Green Energy LLC Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92009 Product A company, probably an individual, which has filed to develop large-scale PV projects on California Desert District land. Coordinates 31.60396°, -100.641609° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.60396,"lon":-100.641609,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Microsoft PowerPoint - Bull Shoals U1 repair MSB edit 3.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Bull Shoals Unit 1 161kV Switchyard Feeder Repair Switchyard Feeder Repair Mark Dixson Little Rock District US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Original Equipment - 52 years old. * Unit 1 Oil filled cable pothead failed and exploded on Sept 6 2006. * Resulting fire and fire suppression damaged oil insulated cable system * Minor damage to power plant. Background Background Background US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Transformer Unit 2 damaged and removed from service. * Cause of fire - Failure of Pothead stress cone assembly and build up of combustible gas * Power Plant lost all power and went in the

33

Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queen Formation is a member of the Artesia Group, which is a sequence of intermingling carbonates, classics and evaporates that were deposited during Guadalupian (Permian) time across the Northwest Shelf, Central Basin Platform, and Midland Basin of the Permian Basin, west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. In Moose and Virey Fields, the Queen is the main producing formation and consists entirely of intercepted back-reef shelf elastics and evaporates which were deposited in a variety of continental desert and marginal marine settings. The Queen desert was a broad and generally low-relief surface transected by warm temperatures, semi-arid climate, scarce vegetation, and alternating periods of dryness and intense storm-induced flashflooding. Sedimentation within the Queen desert took place in six separate depositional environments. The elastics of Moose and Virey Fields were deposited in proximal fluvial sandflat and fluvial-dominated sabra environments, and along the edge of a shallow hypersaline lagoon. The anhydrides (formerly gypsum) were precipitated subaqueously on the floor of and in the subsurface beneath a broad and shallow, hypersaline lagoon which was characterized by poor circulation and restriction from the normal marine environment. Some halides formed subaqueously in a large, but very shallow, isolated inland saliva situated in the topographic lows of the desert sabkha. Other halides formed in an ephemeral and sometimes desiccated salt-pan environment which was subjected to alternating 'wet' and 'dry' conditions. It is believed that the progression of depositional environments across the study area was in part controlled by fourth- and fifth-order relative sea level fluctuations during a major third-order marine regression. Two large subsurface structural collapse features with at least 200 feet of vertical relief are located in the central portions of Moose and Virey Fields. The collapse of the Queen Formation in these areas was induced by the post-depositional and post-burial dissolution of the halides primarily of the underlying Grayburg Formation, and to a lesser extent of the Queen Formation. It apparently occurred as a series of minor collapse events which first began in Post-oueen Guadalupian time, during deposition of the lower Seven Rivers Formation, and finally ended in the Ochoan during deposition of the Rustler Anhydrite.

Aller, Gregory Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir; Skookumchuck Creek Juvenile Bull Trout and Fish Habitat Monitoring Program, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Skookumchuck Creek juvenile bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and fish habitat-monitoring program is a co-operative initiative of the British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land, and Air Protection and Bonneville Power Administration. This project was commissioned in planning for fish habitat protection and forest development within the Skookumchuck Creek watershed and was intended to expand upon similar studies initiated within the Wigwam River from 2000 to 2002. The broad intent is to develop a better understanding of juvenile bull trout and Westslope cutthroat trout recruitment and the ongoing hydrologic and morphologic processes, especially as they relate to spawning and rearing habitat quality. The 2002 project year represents the first year of a long-term bull trout-monitoring program with current studies focused on collecting baseline information. This report provides a summary of results obtained to date. Bull trout represented 72.4% of the catch. Fry dominated the catch because site selection was biased towards electrofishing sample sites which favored high bull trout fry capture success. The mean density of all juvenile bull trout was estimated to be 6.6 fish/100m{sup 2}. This represents one-half the densities reported for the 2002 Wigwam River enumeration program, even though enumeration of bull trout redds was an order of magnitude higher for the Wigwam River. Typically, areas with combined fry and juvenile densities greater than 1.5 fish per 100 m{sup 2} are cited as critical rearing areas. Trends in abundance appeared to be related to proximity to spawning areas, bed material size, and water depth. Cover components utilized by juvenile and adult bull trout and cutthroat trout were interstices, boulder, depth, overhead vegetation and LWD. The range of morphological stream types encompass the stable and resilient spectrum (C3(1), C3 and B3c). The Skookumchuck can be generalized as a slightly entrenched, meandering, riffle-pool, cobble dominated channel with a well-developed floodplain. The presence of an undisturbed riparian ecosystem dominated by mature, coniferous forest, combined with a high percentage of coarse particles in the stream bank, result in stable stream banks with low sediment supply. The results of the habitat assessment concur with the stable stream channel type and channel disturbance features noted were infrequent and minor in nature. Detailed summaries of channel profile, pattern, dimension and materials are provided in Appendices. It was recommended that a fourth index site representing tributary spawning and rearing habitat be established in lower Sandown Creek and included for baseline data collection in year two.

Cope, R.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be stable in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings from the third year (2000) of the multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, genetics, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek by night snorkeling. In the Warm Springs R. juvenile bull trout were slightly more numerous than brook trout, however, both were found in low densities. Relative densities of both species declined from 1999 observations. Juvenile bull trout vastly out numbered brook trout in Shitike Cr. Relative densities of juvenile bull trout increased while brook trout abundance was similar to 1999 observations in eight index reaches. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance was assessed in the Warm Springs R. for the second year. Mean relative densities of both species, within the index reaches was slightly higher than what was observed in a 2.4 km control reach. Mill Creek was surveyed for the presence of juvenile bull trout. The American Fisheries Society ''Interim protocol for determining bull trout presence'' methodology was field tested. No bull trout were found in the 2 km survey area.

Brun, Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The DNA repair endonuclease XPG interacts directly and functionally with the WRN helicase defective in Werner syndrome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XPG is a structure-specific endonuclease required for nucleotide excision repair (NER). XPG incision defects result in the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, whereas truncating mutations of XPG cause the severe postnatal progeroid developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. We show that XPG interacts directly with WRN protein, which is defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, and that the two proteins undergo similar sub-nuclear redistribution in S-phase and co-localize in nuclear foci. The co-localization was observed in mid- to late-S-phase, when WRN moves from nucleoli to nuclear foci that have been shown to contain protein markers of both stalled replication forks and telomeric proteins. We mapped the interaction between XPG and WRN to the C-terminal domains of each and show that interaction with the C-terminal domain of XPG strongly stimulates WRN helicase activity. WRN also possesses a competing DNA single-strand annealing activity that, combined with unwinding, has been shown to coordinate regression of model replication forks to form Holliday junction/chicken foot intermediate structures. We tested whether XPG stimulated WRN annealing activity and found that XPG itself has intrinsic strand annealing activity that requires the unstructured R- and C-terminal domains, but not the conserved catalytic core or endonuclease activity. Annealing by XPG is cooperative, rather than additive, with WRN annealing. Taken together, our results suggest a novel function for XPG in S-phase that is at least in part carried out coordinately with WRN, and which may contribute to the severity of the phenotypes that occur upon loss of XPG.

Trego, Kelly S.; Chernikova, Sophia B.; Davalos, Albert R.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Finger, L. David; Ng, Cliff; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Yannone, Steven M.; Tainer, John A.; Campisi, Judith; Cooper, Priscilla K.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluate Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We sampled and released 313 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from the Tucannon River in 2004. Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags were inserted in 231 of these individuals, and we detected existing PIT tags in an additional 44 bull trout. Twenty-five of these were also surgically implanted with radio-tags, and we monitored the movements of these fish throughout the year. Ten bull trout that were radio-tagged in 2003 were known to survive and carry their tags through the spring of 2004. One of these fish outmigrated into the Snake River in the fall, and remained undetected until February, when it's tag was located near the confluence of Alkali Flat Creek and the Snake River. The remaining 9 fish spent the winter between Tucannon River miles 2.1 (Powers Road) and 36.0 (Tucannon Fish Hatchery). Seven of these fish retained their tags through the summer, and migrated to known spawning habitat prior to September 2004. During June and July, radio-tagged bull trout again exhibited a general upstream movement into the upper reaches of the Tucannon subbasin. As in past years, we observed some downstream movements of radio-tagged bull trout in mid to late September and throughout October, suggesting post spawning outmigrations. By late November and early December, radio tagged bull trout were relatively stationary, and were distributed from river mile 42 at Camp Wooten downstream to river mile 17, near the Highway 12 bridge. As in previous years, we did not collect data associated with objectives 2, 3, or 4 of this study, because we were unable to monitor migratory movement of radio-tagged bull trout into the vicinity of the hydropower dams on the main stem Snake River. Transmission tests of submerged Lotek model NTC-6-2 nano-tags in Lower Granite Pool showed that audible detection and individual tag identification was possible at depths of 20, 30, and 40 ft. We were able to maintain tag detection and code separation at all depths from both a boat and 200 ft. above water surface in a helicopter. However, we lost detection capability from 40 ft. water depth when we passed 700 ft. above the water surface in a helicopter. Two years of high tag loss, particularly after spawning, has prevented us from documenting fall and winter movements with an adequate sample of radio tagged bull trout. The high transmitter loss after spawning may be a reflection of high natural mortality for large, older age fish that we have been radio tagging to accommodate the longer life transmitters. Therefore, we reduced the size of the radio tags that we implanted, and delayed most of our collection and tagging of bull trout until after spawning. These changes are a new approach to try to maximize the number of radio tagged bull trout available post spawning to adequately document fall and winter movements and any use of the Snake River by bull trout from the Tucannon River.

Faler, Michael P. (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Fishery Resource Office, Ahsahka, ID); Mendel, Glen W.; Fulton, Carl (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Division, Dayton, WA)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Diet Overlap of Top-Level Predators in Recent Sympatry: Bull Trout and Nonnative Lake Trout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley:1160­1171. Jeppson PW, Platts WS. 1959. Ecology and control of the Columbia River squawfish in northern Idaho lakes

McMahon, Thomas E.

40

Influence of Bull Traits and Bull to Female Ratio on Reproductive Perfromance in Beef Females and of Nutrition During Gestation on Calving Difficulty in Primiparous Beef Females  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments that were conducted at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Uvalde, TX (semi-arid environment) from 2006 to 2008. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls ( n = 39; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous Bonsmara and Bonsmara-influenced females (n = 1013) during a 90-day breeding season in 2006, 2007, and 2008 to quantify the effects of a reduction in bull to female ratio on reproductive performance. Bulls were also placed with primiparous beef females ( n = 142). Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, social rank, serving capacity, and seminal traits to one of two bull to female (BFR) treatments: Low (1:30-1:45; n = 10 pastures) or Conventional (1:16-1:26; n = 12 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.36), calving date (P = 0.24), and calving rate (P = 0.25) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. The current experiment demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without negatively affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, Bonsmara heifers (3/4, 7/8, and full bloods) were exposed to Bonsmara bulls from April 15 to July 15 during each of the two years. Heifers were weighed, rectally palpated for pregnancy, and scored for BCS (1 thin - 9 fat) and frame score (1 short - 9 tall) in December (end of second trimester) during years 1 and 2. Heifers were stratified on expected calving date and randomly allotted to one of two levels of nutrition for the remainder of gestation. In year 1, heifers were allotted to range forage (n=31, low nutrition, LN) or to non-irrigated oat pasture (n=31, high nutrition, HN). In year 2, heifers were placed onto the same range environment as in year 1 (n=31, LN) or onto irrigated ryegrass pasture (n=31,HN). Heifers in the LN groups were supplemented with 20% CP cubes at the rate of 0.9 kg/heifer/day from January 2 until calving while HN heifers were not supplemented. Within 4 hr of birth, calves were weighed, and calf vigor and calving difficulty scores were recorded. Heifers were weighed within 72 hours of parturition. From treatment initiation through calving, HN heifers gained 48.6 kg whereas the LN females lost 15 kg. Twice as many HN heifers required major assistance at calving as compared to LN heifers. Calves born to the HN females weighed 3.7 kg more at birth than those born to LN females. These differences resulted in HN heifers having (P = 0.005) more calving difficulty than LN heifers (mean calving difficutly of 2.3 for HN and 1.6 for LN). The calves of the HN females were also less vigorous (P = 0.005) after birth than the calves from LN females (calf vigor score of 2.2 for HN and 3.3 for LN). Consequently, the level of nutrition during the third trimester of gestation can affect calving difficulty, calf vigor, and female weight.

Bloomberg, Blake David

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Using Bulls-Eye Commissioning to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building system commissioning comes highly recommended by energy efficiency experts; however, it is rarely undertaken due to the cost and care needed to do a comprehensive job. Many existing utility meters provide whole-building 15-minute interval data that can be used to pinpoint fan control and HVAC schedule problems. Bulls-eye commissioning uses interval metering to focus detailed commissioning efforts. This paper concentrates on a single customer and how bulls-eye commissioning can be applied to focus the commissioning process. Significant energy savings were found by using interval data in conjunction with outside air temperature to isolate problems with schedules and in the economizer controls. Evaluation of main meter profiles allows detailed commissioning work to be better focused and more effective without the wait and expense of full commissioning services. Bulls-eye commissioning can be applied on its own or can be coordinated with traditional commissioning. In either case, the main meter profile shows what will directly impact total energy use and the customer's bill.

Price, W.; Hart, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are native to many tributaries of the Snake River in southeast Washington. The Washington Department of Wildlife (WDW) and the American Fisheries Society (AFS) have identified bull trout as a species of special concern which means that they may become threatened or endangered by relatively, minor disturbances to their habitat. Steelhead trout/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O.tshawytscha) are also native to several tributaries of the Snake river in southeast Washington. These species of migratory fishes are depressed, partially due to the construction of several dams on the lower Snake river. In response to decreased run size, large hatchery program were initiated to produce juvenile steelhead and salmon to supplement repressed tributary stocks, a practice known as supplementation. There is a concern that supplementing streams with artificially high numbers of steelhead and salmon may have an impact on resident bull trout in these streams. Historically, these three species of fish existed together in large numbers, however, the amount of high-quality habitat necessary for reproduction and rearing has been severely reduced in recent years, as compared to historic amounts. The findings of the first year of a two year study aimed at identifying species interactions in southeast Washington streams are presented in this report. Data was collected to assess population dynamics; habitat utilization and preference, feeding habits, fish movement and migration, age, condition, growth, and the spawning requirements of bull trout in each of four streams. A comparison of the indices was then made between the study streams to determine if bull trout differ in the presence of the putative competitor species. Bull trout populations were highest in the Tucannon River (supplemented stream), followed by Mill Creek (unsupplemented stream). Young of the year bull trout utilized riffle and cascade habitat the most in all four streams. Juvenile bull trout utilized scour pool and run habitat the most in all four streams. YOY bull trout preferred plunge pool and scour pool habitat, as did juvenile bull trout in all four streams. These data show that while in the presence of the putative competitors, bull trout prefer the same habitat as in the absence of the putative competitors. Juvenile bull trout preferred mayflies and stoneflies in Mill Creek, while in the presence of the competitor species they preferred caddisflies, stoneflies, and Oligochaeta. It is felt that this difference is due to the differences in food items available and not species interactions, bull trout consume what is present. Adult bull trout were difficult to capture, and therefore it was difficult to determine the migratory habits in the Tucannon River. It is recommended that future studies use radio telemetry to determine the migratory habitat of these fish. The age, condition, and growth rates of bull trout differed only minimally between streams, indicating that if competitive interactions are occurring between these species it is not reflected by: (1) the length at age of bull trout; (2) the length-weight relationship of bull trout; or (3) the rate of growth of bull trout. The spawning habits of bull trout and spring chinook salmon are similar in the Tucannon River, however it was found that they spawn in different river locations. The salmon spawn below river kilometer 83, while 82% of bull trout spawn above that point. The peak of spawning for salmon occurred 10 days before the peak of bull trout spawning, indicating that very little competition for spawning locations occurs between these species in the Tucannon River. Future species interactions study recommendations include the use of electrofishing to enumerate bull trout populations, snorkeling to identify micro-habitat utilization, seasonal diet analysis, and radio transmitters to identify seasonal migration patterns of bull trout.

Martin, Steven W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation of Bull Trout Movements in the Tucannon and Lower Snake Rivers, 2002-2006 Project Completion Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River Distinct Population Segment of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1998. One of the identified major threats to the species is fragmentation resulting from dams on over-wintering habitats of migratory subpopulations. A migratory subgroup in the Tucannon River appeared to utilize the Snake River reservoirs for adult rearing on a seasonal basis. As a result, a radio telemetry study was conducted on this subgroup from 2002-2006, to help meet Reasonable and Prudent Measures, and Conservation Recommendations associated with the lower Snake River dams in the FCRPS Biological Opinion, and to increase understanding of bull trout movements within the Tucannon River drainage. We sampled 1,109 bull trout in the Tucannon River; 124 of these were surgically implanted with radio tags and PIT tagged, and 681 were only PIT tagged. The remaining 304 fish were either recaptures, or released unmarked. Bull trout seasonal movements within the Tucannon River were similar to those described for other migratory bull trout populations. Bull trout migrated upstream in spring and early summer to the spawning areas in upper portions of the Tucannon River watershed. They quickly moved off the spawning areas in the fall, and either held or continued a slower migration downstream through the winter until early the following spring. During late fall and winter, bull trout were distributed in the lower half of the Tucannon River basin, down to and including the mainstem Snake River below Little Goose Dam. We were unable to adequately radio track bull trout in the Snake River and evaluate their movements or interactions with the federal hydroelectric dams for the following reasons: (1) none of our radio-tagged fish were detected attempting to pass a Snake River dam, (2) our radio tags had poor transmission capability at depths greater than 12.2 m, and (3) the sample size of fish that actually entered the Snake River was small (n=6). In spite of this project's shortcomings, bull trout continue to be observed in low numbers at Snake River dam fish facilities. It is highly possible that bull trout observed at the Snake River dam fish facilities are originating from sources other than the Tucannon River. We suggest that these fish might come from upstream sources like the Clearwater or Salmon rivers in Idaho, and are simply following the outmigration of juvenile anadromous fish (a food supply) as they emigrate toward the Pacific Ocean. Based on our study results, we recommend abandoning radio telemetry as a tool to monitor bull trout movements in the mainstem Snake River. We do recommend continuing PIT tagging and tag interrogation activities to help determine the origin of bull trout using the Snake River hydropower facilities. As a complementary approach, we also suggest the use of genetic assignment tests to help determine the origin of these fish. Lastly, several recommendations are included in the report to help manage and recover bull trout in the Tucannon subbasin.

Faler, Michael P. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Mendel, Glen; Fulton, Carl [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Bull Trout Distribution and Abundance in the Waters on and Bordering the Warm Springs Reservation : 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The range of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Deschutes River basin has decreased from historic levels due to many factors including dam construction, habitat degradation, brook trout introduction and eradication efforts. While the bull trout population appears to be healthy in the Metolius River-Lake Billy Chinook system they have been largely extirpated from the upper Deschutes River (Buchanan et al. 1997). Little was known about bull trout in the lower Deschutes basin until BPA funded project No.9405400 began during 1998. In this progress report we describe the findings to date from this multi-year study aimed at determining the life history, habitat needs and limiting factors of bull trout in the lower Deschutes subbasin. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) relative abundance has been assessed in the Warm Springs River and Shitike Creek since 1999. In the Warm Springs R. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .003 fish/m{sup 2} and .001 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. These densities were the lowest recorded in the Warm Springs River during the period of study. In Shitike Cr. the relative densities of juvenile bull trout and brook trout were .025 fish/m{sup 2} and .01 fish/m{sup 2} respectively during 2002. The utility of using index reaches to monitor trends in juvenile bull trout and brook trout relative abundance in the Warm Springs R. has been assessed since 1999. During 2002 the mean relative densities of juvenile bull trout within the 2.4 km study area was higher than what was observed in four index reaches. However, the mean relative densities of brook trout was slightly higher in the index reaches than what was observed in the 2.4 km study area. Habitat use by both juvenile bull trout and brook trout was determined in the Warm Springs R. Juvenile bull trout and brook trout were most abundant in pools and glides. However pools and glides comprised less than 20% of the available habitat in the study area during 2002. Multiple-pass spawning ground surveys were conducted during late August through October in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. during 2002. One-hundred and thirteen (113) redds were enumerated in the Warm Springs R. and 204 redds were found in Shitike Cr. The number of redds enumerated in both the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. were the most redds observed since surveys began in 1998. Spatial and temporal distribution in spawning within the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. is discussed. Juvenile emigration has been monitored in Shitike Creek since 1996. A total of 312 juveniles were estimated to have emigrated from Shitike Cr. during the spring, 2002. Adult escapement was monitored in the Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. Thirty adults were recorded at the Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery weir during 2002. This was the highest number of spawning adults recorded to date. A weir equipped with an underwater video camera near the spawning grounds was operated in the Warm Springs R. Thirty-one adults were recorded at the weir in day counts. The adult trap in Shitike Cr. was unsuccessful in capturing adult bull trout during 2002 due to damage from a spring high water event. Thermographs were placed throughout Warm Springs R. and Shitike Cr. to monitor water temperatures during bull trout migration, holding and spawning/rearing periods. During 1999-2002 water temperatures ranged from 11.8-15.4 C near the mouths during adult migration; 11.4-14.6 C during pre-spawning holding; and 6.5-8.4 C during adult spawning and juvenile rearing.

Brun, Christopher V.; Dodson, Rebekah

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Investigations of Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus), Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus Mykiss), and Spring Chinook Salmon (O. Tshawytscha) Interactions in Southeast Washington Streams. Final Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this two year study was to determine if supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) negatively impacted wild native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) through competitive interactions. Four streams with varying levels of fish supplementation activity were sampled in Southeast Washington. Tasks performed during this study were population density, relative abundance, microhabitat utilization, habitat availability, diet analysis, bull trout spawning ground surveys, radio telemetry of adult bull trout, and growth analysis. Results indicate that bull trout overlapped geographically with the supplemented species in each of the study streams suggesting competition among species was possible. Within a stream, bull trout and the supplemented species utilized dissimilar microhabitats and microhabitat utilization by each species was the same among streams suggesting that there was no shifts in microhabitat utilization among streams. The diet of bull trout and O. mykiss significantly overlapped in each of the study streams. The stream most intensely supplemented contained bull trout with the slowest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained bull trout with the fastest growth. Conversely, the stream most intensely supplemented contain steelhead with the fastest growth and the non-supplemented stream contained steelhead with the slowest growth. Growth indicated that bull trout may have been negatively impacted from supplementation, although other factors may have contributed. At current population levels, and current habitat quantity and quality, no impacts to bull trout as a result of supplementation with hatchery reared steelhead trout and spring chinook salmon were detected. Project limitations and future research recommendations are discussed.

Underwood, Keith D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ASSOCIATION AMONG FLUID, GRAIN INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN IN HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine water intake. Forty-four Holstein bull calves were evaluated to investigate the effects of starter intake, body weight, temperature and time to predict water intake. A model was developed using PROC GLM in SAS. Least square means separation were used to identify significant effects. Starter intake was a significant variable (P water intake of a calf, especially after day 21 when starter intake and water intake were both increasing. Water intake was increased by calves with fecal scores of 1 and 2. However, water intake was significantly different for calves with fecal scores of 3 or 4 with a (P water intake. The interaction between scours and fecal score were not significant. Water intakes significantly differ in calves that had scour and in calves not experimented scours.

Gonzalez Ferreira, Marcelo A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Bull Trout (Salvelinus Confluentus) Population and Habitat Surveys in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Basins, 2000 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior to 1978, Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were classified into an anadromous and interior form. Cavender (1978) classified the interior form as a distinct species, Salvelinus confluentus, the bull trout. Bull trout are large char weighing up to 18 kg and growing to over one meter in length (Goetz 1989). They are distinguished by a broad flat head, large downward curving maxillaries that extend beyond the eye, a well developed fleshy knob and a notch in the lower terminus of the snout, and light colored spots normally smaller than the pupil of the eye (Cavender 1978). Bull trout are found throughout northwestern North America from lat. 41{sup o}N to lat. 60{sup o}N. In Oregon, bull trout were once distributed throughout 12 basins in the Klamath and Columbia River systems including the Clackamas, Santiam, McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette sub-basins west of the Cascades (Buchanan et al. 1997). However, it is believed bull trout have been extirpated from west of the Cascades with the exception of the McKenzie sub-basin. Before 1963, bull trout in the McKenzie sub-basin were a contiguous population from the mouth to Tamolitch Falls. Following the construction of Cougar and Trail Bridge Reservoirs there are three isolated populations: (1) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries from the mouth to Trail Bridge Reservoir. (2) mainstem McKenzie and tributaries above Trail Bridge Reservoir to Tamolitch Falls. (3) South Fork McKenzie and tributaries above Cougar Reservoir. The study area includes the three aforementioned McKenzie populations, and the Middle Fork Willamette and tributaries above Hills Creek Reservoir. We monitored bull trout populations in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins using a combination of sampling techniques including: spawning surveys, standard pool counts, juvenile trapping, radio tracking, electronic fish counters, and a modified Hankin and Reeves protocol to estimate juvenile abundance and density. In addition, we continued to reintroduce bull trout fry from Anderson Creek (McKenzie Basin) to the Middle Fork Willamette above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to rehabilitate the bull trout population in the Middle Fork Willamette Basin. By monitoring population trends and determining life history characteristics of bull trout in McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette basins we can make informed management decisions that will help maintain long term and sustainable bull trout populations in the Upper Willamette Basin.

Taylor, Greg

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The influence of tropical adaptation and breedtype on adrenal and testicular function in beef bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulls of various breedtypes including Angus (Bos taurus), Bonsmara (Sanga X Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), Romosinuano (Criollo), Tuli (Sanga) and Wagyu (Japanese Bos taurus) were utilized to evaluate the influence of tropical adaptation on adrenal and testicular function. The objectives were to determine if tropical adaptation influenced: a) response to management stressors, b) organ and gland weights, adrenal and testis StAR and P450 content and total adrenal, medullary and cortical areas, c) basal and hCG-induced testosterone and d) testis and epididymal sperm concentrations. Blood samples were obtained within 5 min before and after transportation and during restraint every 15 min for 6 h to evaluate cortical response. Angus, Brahman and Romosinuano bulls were slaughtered following sexual maturity. Cortical responses to transportation and restraint were not influenced by tropical adaptation. Response to these stressors could be categorized into high responders (Angus, Brahman), intermediate responders (Romosinuano, Tuli) and low responders (Wagyu, Bonsmara). Tropically-adapted breedtypes were not categorized into a single group; therefore, cortical responses to management stressors were influenced by breedtype, but not by tropical adaptation. Most organ and gland weights (actual weight and weight corrected for BW) and the steroid precursors, StAR and P450, were not influenced by tropical adaptation, but were by breedtype. Paired adrenal gland weight, total adrenal area, medullary and cortical areas were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had lighter glands and smaller areas than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes. All breedtypes except Wagyu had similar basal concentrations of plasma testosterone prior to hCG administration; therefore, basal testosterone was not influenced by tropical adaptation, but only by breedtype. Wagyu had greater basal concentrations of testosterone than other breedtypes. Testosterone concentrations following hCG administration was similar between adaptation groups and breedtypes. As expected, testis and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Tropically-adapted breedtypes had greater testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations than the temperate Bos taurus breedtypes during the summer months. In summary, adrenal weight and area and testicular and epididymal sperm concentrations were influenced by tropical adaptation. Cortical response to management stressors, basal testosterone and StAR and P450 content were influenced by breedtype, not tropical adaptation.

Koch, Jeffrey William

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Born-Oppenheimer and Extended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Bull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2003, Vol. 24, No. 6 1 Ab Initio Molecular February 25, 2003 In ab initio molecular dynamics, whenever information about the potential energy surface advances for both approaches are discussed. Key Words : Ab initio molecular dynamics, Direct classical

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

53

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Moose Pass, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pass, Alaska: Energy Resources Pass, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 60.4875°, -149.3688889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":60.4875,"lon":-149.3688889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Moose Creek, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska: Energy Resources Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 64.7099999°, -147.143611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7099999,"lon":-147.143611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Moose Wilson Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.5252053°, -110.844655° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5252053,"lon":-110.844655,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Effects of Heat Stress and Increased Protein Fed in Milk Replacers on the Health and Growth Parameters of Neonatal Holstein Bull Calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives of the study were to evaluate if calves fed 6 L of high protein milk replacer (HPMR; 1135 g/d, 28% crude protein (CP), 20% fat) had improved performance and health as compared to calves fed 4 L of a conventional milk replacer (CMR; 454 g/d, 20% CP, 20% fat) in heat stress and non heat stress environments. Holstein bull calves (n=52) Water consumption (WC) in mL and starter intake (SI) in grams was measured daily. Feed conversion (FC) was also calculated for each nutritional treatment and environment. Fecal scores (FS) of 1 to 4 (1=hard, firm, 2=soft, firm, 3=no form, and 4=watery) were recorded daily. Calves with a FS of >3 were considered to have diarrhea and required treatment. Respiration rates (RR) were recorded at 0630 (AM) and 1830 (PM) to monitor respiratory challenges while rectal temperatures (RT) were also measured using a digital thermometer daily in AM and PM to monitor febrile events. If RT was greater than 39.2 degrees C for NHS calves and 39.7 degrees C for HS calves, they were treated for febrile events (FE). Data was analyzed using PROC MIXED (SAS 9.2). HPMR had a greater (P < 0.01) WH, HG, BL, HH, ADG, WC, and FS than the CMR (0.15 vs. 0.11, 0.37 vs. 0.28, 0.27 vs. 0.22, 0.21 vs. 0.14, 0.82 vs. 0.58, 4235 vs. 2656, and 2.05 vs. 1.73, respectively). HS had a greater (P < 0.01) WC than NHS (4365 vs. 2526, respectively). CMR had a greater SI and FC (P < 0.05) than HPMR (0.942 vs. 0.437, and 1.99 vs. 1.78, respectively). HS had a higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM (P<0.01) than NHS (38.87 vs. 38.77, 39.03 vs. 38.79, 35.79 vs. 32.77, and 55.73 vs. 38.57, respectively. Calves in NHS had a higher FE (P<0.01) than the HS calves (6.24 vs. 2.33). There was no significant difference in growth parameters in HS or NHS in calves of like feeding strategies. The results show calves in HS experienced higher RT AM, RT PM, RR AM, and RR PM. The increased protein and energy fed to the HPMR calves resulted in greater FS and increased growth.

Krenek, Andrew

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Leg ulcer in Werner syndrome (adult progeria): A case report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8p12). It codes a DNA-helicase, whose defects cause genomicEscherichia coli RecQ DNA helicase, therefore named RECQL2

Fumo, Giuseppe; Pau, Monica; Patta, Federico; Aste, Nicola; Atzori, Laura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Selected Bibliography of Publications by, and about, Werner Heisenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Version 1.21 Title word cross-reference (k1 ? kn) [Tem91]. + [BKBS93]. 1/2 [BHX96, Man91]. $12.00 [Kra07, Lan08]. 2 [Hen93]. $27.50 [Cas93a]. $29.95 [Hay90].

Nelson H. F. Beebe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design specifications for the air mobility operations simulation environment (Air MOOSE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Forces (CF) air mobility community is facing a period of considerable transition over the next decade or so as its fixed wing airlift capability, represented primarily by the aging C-130 fleet of E- and H-model Hercules and a fleet of five ... Keywords: Canadian Forces, air mobility, airlift operations, discrete event simulation

David W. Mason

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Neutron Interferometry: Lessons in Experimental Quantum Mechanics Helmut Rauch and Samuel A. Werner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Of Richmond - Department of Physics Software We simulated the neutron detection efficiency physics program. Specifically, we are simulating the neutron detection efficiency of the forward TOFSimulating the Neutron Detection Efficiency of the CLAS12 Detector M. Moog and G. Gilfoyle

Lynn, Jeffrey W.

62

California Households Willingness to Pay for Green Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

231-247. Werner, C. , & Makela, E. (1998). Motivations andOskamp (1994) or Werner & Makela (1998), for example, detect

Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele; Shapiro, Andrew A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

Yaqi Wang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bull Run Fossil Plant Online Coal Flow Adjustable Riffler Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler optimization at fossil-fired power plants would be enhanced if the flow of coal and air in individual pulverizer fuel delivery lines could be balanced. The static splitter devices currently in service do not adequately maintain coal balance, especially when plant conditions change. This report summarizes the results of a test program to demonstrate the feasibility of using a novel riffler to make online adjustments to a stream of pneumatically conveyed pulverized coal at a working plant. The demon...

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

Bulls, Bears and Excess Volatility: can currency intervention help?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in G.M. Constantinides, M. Harris and R. Stulz (eds), Handbook of the Eco- nomics of Finance, Elsevier Science. [4] Bergsten, C. F. (1997), The Dollar and the Euro , Foreign Affairs, 76(40), 83-93. [5] Corrado, L., Miller, M. H. and L. Zhang (2002... ): Exchange Rate Monitoring Band: Theory and Policy, CEPR DP 3337. [6] Corsetti G., A. Dasgupta, S. Morris and H. S. Shin (2004), Does One Soros Make a Difference? A Theory of Currency Crises with Large and Small Traders, Review of Economic Studies, 71...

Corrado, Luisa; Miller, Marcus; Zhang, Lei

66

Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WHISKEY JOE WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING VALLEY ARNEGARD STAFFORD RICHBURG PRESCOTT BULL MOOSE S PASSPORT PHELPS BAY STAMPEDE BIG GULCH BLACKTAIL WESTHOPE WESTBERG DRY CREEK BEARS TAIL MINNESOTA ANTELOPE CREEK BLUE RIDGE NEWBURG E GRASSLAND NORTHGATE PLEASANT S SANDROCKS EAGLE NEST BEAR BUTTE DOLLAR JOE BIG MEADOW BARTA CHARLIE BOB HEART BUTTE RPD_MCKENZIECO_2 VALLEY ROAD GREAT NORTHERN

67

Optical Rotatory and Circular Dichroic Scattering Werner Kaminsky,* Morten Andreas Geday, Javier Herreros-Cedres, and Bart Kahr*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Herreros-Cedre´s, and Bart Kahr* Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, UniVersity of Washington, Seattle

Kaminsky, Werner

68

The Werner Syndrome Helicase Is a Cofactor for HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat Transactivation and Retroviral Replication*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Carolyn K. Harrod , Elizabeth F. Matlock , Saiqa Khan , Louisa Xu , Stephanie Chan , Helen Yang , Charu K. Thammavaram , Randall A. Rasor , Dennis K. Burns§ , Daniel J. Skiest¶ , Carine Van Lint 2 , Anne-Marie Girard protein and RecQ DNA helicases in transcription. Balajee et al. (1) have demonstrated that WRN contributes

Monnat, Ray

69

HOUSEHOLD WILLINGNESS TO RECYCLE ELECTRONIC WASTE - An Application to California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16(4), Werner, C. , & Makela, E. (1998). Motivations andVerdugo (1997), Werner and Makela (1998), Cheung, Chan and1994) and Werner and Makela (1998) detect no relationship

Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Shapiro, Andrew A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

INCITE Proposal Writing Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Werner-Washburne, M., & Himmel, M. E. (2008). Fungal Genome Sequencing and Bioenergy. Fungal Biology

71

Intera'ting +it, -roa'tive 0o11unit3 4isp7a3s Nicolas Villar, Albrecht Schmidt, Gerd Kortuem, Hans-Werner Gellersen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing: Reaping the best of both worlds. In O."0E "G Z.: F(&=E T4#$E "( R,-.-?=, !"#$%&,.1 LFTR! [\\\\N

Kortuem, Gerd

72

Appendix 69 Bull Trout Draft Recovery Plan. Chapter 3: Clark Fork Recovery Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S., Schwartz, M.K., McKelvey, K.S., Foresman, K.R., Pilgrim, K.L., Giddings, B.J., and Lofroth, E.C. 2006. When

73

Wilson Bull., 95(4), 1983, pp, 628-635 GENERAL NOTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of young hatched during the preceding breeding season (Ketterson and Nolan 1976; Auk %:532-536, 1979; Auk about 31 December by inspection of

74

Appendix 67 A Review of Bull Trout Life-History and Habitat Use in Relation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Tui System", Univ. of British Columbia, 1996. [11] Pradeep K. Sinha, "Distributed operating systems;Pipeline input task T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7 bitvector to indicate supported PE Types Light Medium Heavy Pipeline Pipeline output task 1 1 0 01 0 0 0 1 0 0 01 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 Type 3RHType 2 Type 1

75

4.1 Bull Trout (Salvelinus confluentus) 4.1.1 Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, energy, climate change, and disasters before turning our attention to the role of gender in climate) November 13 ­ Gender, Energy and Climate Change · Mark D. Smith (2007). Chapter 4: Mitigation of Climate Kelkar (2007). Appropriate Gender-Analysis for Unpacking the Gender-Energy-Poverty Nexus. Gender

76

Another Bull Market Consolidation or Have Oil Prices Headed South for the Winter?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation was given at the New York Energy Forum on September 5, 2006. It explores the reasons behind rising oil prices over the last few years and discusses whether the drop in oil prices seen in late August and early September 2005 is the start of a long-running trend or is only a temporary decline.

Information Center

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

I. Bulls and Bears One of the timeliest and most prescient books  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Antonio shouts: "Hang, cur! Hang, you whoreson, insolent noise-maker! We are less afraid to be drowned a look of destiny about him and that the fate of someone so insolent as this cannot be an anonymous consulted for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Hart's primary research interests are early

Hemmers, Oliver

78

The influence of energy and protein level on the carcase and lean quality in young bulls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tallow, and meat which is light in colour. To furfil these requirements it is necessary to know how, is more or less the same, irrespective of the slaughter weight or energy level. The percentage of tallow

Recanati, Catherine

79

Bull Valcanol (1987) 49:765-775 Voliaology Springer-Verlag 1987 Variation in peperite textures associated with differing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

masses of the basaltic intrusions up to 1 m in size were dispersed for distances up to 3 m into host pipes in tuff breccia above the lower sill provides evidence for meter-scale fluidization of the host. The contact zone between the basaltic magma and the shelly micrite host resembles a mixture of two viscous

Busby, Cathy

80

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine foundations (Patrick and Henderson) was commissioned to design a foundation. More detailHull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The Rio Bravo fault, a major late Oligocene left-lateral shear zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

splays classified by age (courtesy of PEMEX modified). Thin lines is gravimetric contouring of figure 7 des reservoirs pétroliers classés par âge (courtoisie de PEMEX, figure modifiée). Le contourage en base provided mainly by PEMEX. We have used both 2D and 3D seismic interpretations to built

Husson, Laurent

82

MOUVEMENT D'UNE BULLE DANS UN LIQUIDE APPLICATIONS DE L'EFFET FUSE (FONCTIONNEMENT DES POMPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dans l'écoulement d'une émulsion à l'intérieur d'une pompe centrifuge, dans l'érosion de cavitation électroérosion, dans la formation des aérosols et dans quelques autres cas possibles. Abstract. 2014 A gas relative to the flow of emulsions in centrifugal pumps, to cavitation erosion, to some problems

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Influence of fat supplementation in diets for bull-calves on growth rate and skeletal muscle metabolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was to investigate the influence of addition of tallow, sunflower oil or rapeseed oil to the diet of 30-180 day % of tallow, sunflower oil or rapeseed oil respectively, on the dry matter basis. Once a month as well

Recanati, Catherine

84

Original articleWildl. Biol. 17: 1-12 (2011) DOI: 10.2981/10-010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.wildlifebiology.com Browse biomass removal and nutritional condition of Alaska moose Alces alces C. Tom Seaton, Thomas F estimated the biomass of CAG and biomass removed by moose based on bite diameters and diameter for the maximum benefit to the public (Alaska Statutes 2009). //Xinet/production/w/wbio/live_jobs/wbio-17-01/wbio

Ruess, Roger W.

85

Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Significance. NRC Bull. No. 109. Washington: NRC, 1943.NRC Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on NutritionTheir Techniques and Value. NRC Bull. No. 17. Washington:

Renner, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

LCC-0087 final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UCRL-ID-148940 July 2002 NLC Polarized Positron Photon Beam Target Thermal Structural Modeling Werner Stein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John C. Sheppard...

87

LCC-0088 final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 UCRL-ID-148936 July 2002 Thermal Stress Analyses for the NLC Positron Target Werner Stein, Anne Sunwoo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John C. Sheppard,...

88

Small RNAs, DNA methylation and transposable elements in wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reinhardtii by a DEAH-Box RNA helicase. Science 2000, 290:homolog of Werner syndrome helicase and RNaseD. Cell 1999,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Anode Quality and Bake Furnace Performance of EMAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Raja Javed Akhtar, Markus W. Meier, Peter O. Sulger, Werner K. Fischer, Ralph Friedrich, Thomas Janousch. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Markus W.

90

Young Scientist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 14, 2012... Schmidt1; Mathis Ruppert1; Patrick Kndler1; Heinz Werner Hppel1; Mathias Gken1; 1Friedrich-Alexander-Universitt Erlangen-Nrnberg

91

Technical Program, Thursday Morning Sessions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Step-Free InAs Quantum Well Selectively Grown on GaAs (111)B Substrate: ... Jonas Johansson, Lars Samuelson and Werner Seifert, Solid State Physics, Lund ...

92

Significant Improvement of Energy Efficiency at Alunorte's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Significant Improvement of Energy Efficiency at Alunorte's Calcination Facility. Author(s), Michael Missalla, Hans-Werner Schmidt, Joaquim ...

93

"Future Life How?": The Making of Deaf Sociality and Aspiration in Urban India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Promotion of Employment for Disabled People. Brueggemann,Patrick. 1995. Why Disabled? The Cultural Understanding ofPress. Werner, David. 1994. Disabled Village Children. New

Friedner, Michele Ilana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Resource Limits and Conversion Efficiency with Implications for Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Zittel, Dr. Werner, Crude Oil The Supply Outlook, Energyefficiency of an average crude oil refining process. Theof a conventional crude oil refinery. We then calculate the

Croft, Gregory Donald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Corporate Design PowerPoint-Templates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Werner von Siemens 1879 Today we use the term sustainability to describe this attitude. ... Use of: Fossil energy Electrical energy Water ...

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Nobel Prize in Physics 1911  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laws governing the radiation of heat" Wilhelm Carl Werner Otto Fritz Franz Wien Button Germany Button born 1864, died 1928 Button CA - University of Munich, Munich, Germany Button...

97

A Generalized Pyrolysis Model for Simulating Charring, Intumescent, Smoldering, and Noncharring Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Nonflaming Transient Gasification of PMMA and PE duringT. , & Werner, K. , Wood Gasification at Fire Level HeatConcentration on Nonflaming Gasification Rates and Evolved

Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Isolation and Propterties of Curium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corresponding states of plutonium. are relatively solubleL. B. Werner(4) for isolating plutonium and using chemicalof thorium, iron, and plutonium. For the americium-lanthanum

Werner, L.B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ein Krieg auf Tuchfhlung. Hans Magnus Enzensbergers (unwillkrliche) Annherungen an den Jugoslawienkonflikt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ironie ist unsterblich. Hrsg. von Rainer Wieland. FrankfurtWrterbuch der Rhetorik. Hrsg. von Gert Ueding. Band 1.Zweite Auflage. Band 3. Hrsg. von Werner Kohlschmidt und

Grozdanic, Gordana-Dana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spreadsheets for Geothermal Water and Gas Geochemistry | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and plots four common ternaries, three3 "YT" gas geothermometer grids and two gas ratio geothermometer grids, mainly derived from the work of Werner Giggenbach. Typical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

at-meeting program as a pdf file  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 31, 1998 ... Hong K. Choi1; Gregory W. Charache2; 1MIT Lincoln Laboratory, .... O. Kosogov2 ; Peter Werner2; 1Technische Universitt Berlin, Institut.

102

EMC-99 Advance Mailer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 29, 1999 ... Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 ... Technology. Lincoln Laboratory. John M. ..... 1.4 m: Frank Heinrichsdorff1; Nikolai Zakharov2; Peter Werner2;.

103

Population Structure, Status and Life Histories of Upper Columbia Steelhead, Spring and Summer/fall Chinook, Sockeye, Coho Salmon, Bull Trout, Westslope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the state of Washington's effort to identify larger groups of populations (or stocks), Busack and Marshall, Edson 1958), just as they are irregularly distributed now in the Hanford Reach (Swan et al. 1988 from the Hanford Reach and downstream from Chief Joseph Dam except in the Okanogan River. Summer

104

Bull. Disas. Prey. Res. Inst., Kyoto Univ., Vol. 45, Part 2, 3 No. 389, February, 1996 27 Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active Rift System in the Okinawa Trough and Its Northeastern Continuation By Masaaki KIMURA (Manuscript investigations have revealed that the present central rift system of the Okinawa Trough which is an active Okinawa Trough can be distinguished. The crustal thinning and thus eastward drifting of the Ryukyu Arc may

Takada, Shoji

106

G-quadruplex recognition and isolation with small molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane TSS transcription start site U.K. United Kingdom UTR untranslated region UV ultra-violet V volt WRN Werners syndrome helicase xiv Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 G-quadruplex nucleic acids Nucleic acids play fundamental roles...

Mller, Sebastian

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Other Members of the Maple Clan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

found together in the north woods: the Striped Maple, which has green bark with white stripes, and the Mountain Maple. They are valuable as browse for deer and moose, and the buds...

108

SHORT COMMUNICATIONS Jours a! of Wild1 fe Diseases, 32(1). 1996, pp. 105-108  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

available for inspection. Skeletal samples and an autopsy data- base comprise data from over 2400 moose. Throughout the study, lower mandibles and any bones with lesions were collected. Since 1979, all skulls found

109

Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steve Moose from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Tackling the Triple-Threat Genome of Miscanthus x giganteus" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Moose, Steve

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Alongshore advection and marine reserves: consequences for modeling and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the 2 systems (Hockey & Branch 1994, Simberloffworld fisheries. Bull Mar Sci Hockey PAR, Branch GM (1994)

Kaplan, David M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CERN Program Library Long Writeup W5013 GEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANTGEANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, divorce, sex, therapy, or about objects such as the furniture, drinks, their wedding photo, the brass bull (referring to) the brass bull (a gift from Trip's lover), the current Italy beat goal will immediately stop mid-performance, and the brass bull global mix-in will begin performing, at whichever tier that hot

112

TMS Professional Honors and Awards: Light Metals Award  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

J.-P. Martin G. Dube D. Frayce R. Guthrie. 1988. Ch. Vivs B. Forest J.P. Riquet J.L. Meyer. 1987. H. Yu D.K. Ai. 1986. Werner K. Fischer Raymond C.

113

LCC-0090 final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 UCRL-ID-148938 July 2002 Thermal Stress Analyses for a Multislug Beam NLC Positron Target Werner Stein, Anne Sunwoo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John C....

114

N: 2009 ENAM XXXX Rue Claude Daunesse, 06904 Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arryx, Inc. Rüdiger Iden BASF Werner Kaufmann Ciba Specialty Chemicals Charles Brandenburg DuPont GaryInk, Inc. BASF NanoIntegris, Inc. Baxter Healthcare Corporation Nanomics Biosciences, Inc. Becton Dickinson

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

115

WRN Exonuclease Structure, Molecular Mechanism, and DNA End Processing Role  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16, Moser, M.J. et al. WRN helicase expression in WernerCoordinate action of the helicase and 3' to 5' exonucleasestructure of the E.coli RecQ helicase catalytic core. EMBO

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Identification and Mechanism of Small Molecule Inhibitors of RNA Interference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009). An RIG-I-Like RNA helicase mediates antiviral RNAi2009). An RIG-I-Like RNA helicase mediates antiviral RNAihomolog of Werner syndrome helicase and RNaseD. Cell 99(2):

Elkashef, Samer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

BNL | Carl W. Anderson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors), several DNA repair proteins including XRCC4, the Werner syndrome helicase WRN1, Artemis, and itself. The human DNA-PKcs gene (PRKDC or XRCC7) maps to a locus...

118

TiO2: Fundamentals, Applications, and Perspectives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TiO2: Fundamentals, Applications, and Perspectives Speaker(s): Werner Hofer Date: November 18, 2011 (All day) Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Robert Kostecki I...

119

Trialkylammonio-Dodecaborates: Anions for Ionic Liquids with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trialkylammonio-Dodecaborates: Anions for Ionic Liquids with Potassium, Lithium and Proton as Cations E. Justus, K. Rischka, J. F. Wishart, K. Werner and D. Gabel Chem. Eur. J. 14,...

120

RHIC II Science Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop November 2004 If you have problems reading any of the PDF files, see this troubleshooting page. The Workshop agenda is available here in MS Word format. Werner Vogelsang,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Isolation and Properties of Curium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ . , and J. ! ~. Dr.m, Plutonium Project Record ChaptorAnalyzer llPparatus n ) Plutonium Project Rocord, ChapterL. B. Werner(4) for isolating plutonium and using chemical

Werner, Louis B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electronic Packaging and Interconnection Materials Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Materials: Organized by Andre Lee; Fay Hua; Tae-Kyu Lee; John Elmer; Yan Li ; Robert Kao; Fan-yi Ouyang; Chang-Woo Lee; Won Sik Hong; Heugel Werner.

123

DOI: 10.1002/cbic.201100033 Chemical Synthesis and Expression of the HIV-1 Rev  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the sequence). Met1 was replaced with Nle to avoid oxidation during synthesis and handling. a) NCL, b) Thz, rat anti- Rev Ab (1:50, kindly donated by Dr. Brack-Werner, German Re- search Center for Environmental

Lebendiker, Mario

124

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faculty: Conrad L. Dudek Mentors: Jack Kay, Walter Kraft, Wayne Shackelford, Gary K. Trietsch, Thomas, James Wright, Thomas Werner; (back row) Wayne Shackelford, Walter Kraft, Gary Trietsch #12;Preface Page

125

SHARP/PRONGHORN Interoperability: Mesh Generation  

SciTech Connect

Progress toward collaboration between the SHARP and MOOSE computational frameworks has been demonstrated through sharing of mesh generation and ensuring mesh compatibility of both tools with MeshKit. MeshKit was used to build a three-dimensional, full-core very high temperature reactor (VHTR) reactor geometry with 120-degree symmetry, which was used to solve a neutron diffusion critical eigenvalue problem in PRONGHORN. PRONGHORN is an application of MOOSE that is capable of solving coupled neutron diffusion, heat conduction, and homogenized flow problems. The results were compared to a solution found on a 120-degree, reflected, three-dimensional VHTR mesh geometry generated by PRONGHORN. The ability to exchange compatible mesh geometries between the two codes is instrumental for future collaboration and interoperability. The results were found to be in good agreement between the two meshes, thus demonstrating the compatibility of the SHARP and MOOSE frameworks. This outcome makes future collaboration possible.

Avery Bingham; Javier Ortensi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 35, No. 5, October 2012, pp. 767772. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Anti-tumor activity of self-charged (Eu,Ca):WO3 and Eu:CaWO4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beijing, Beijing 100083, China Peking University Health Science Centre, Beijing 100191, China School of Applied Science, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China #Department. In recent years, studies of anti-tumor drugs mainly focused on nanomaterials. Seve- ral nanomaterials

Volinsky, Alex A.

127

Detectability and Sampling (Chapter 16) To this point, all sampling methods considered have assumed that the variable is interest is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- p) A2p . Example (Problem 1 on page 216 (p. 197, 2nd ed.)): In an aerial survey in Alaska, 82 moose in the estimate of p. · If p is estimated within the same study, by, for example, ground-truthing the aerial

Bardsley, John

128

Transport Dependence on Safety Factor Profile in DIII-D Steady-state Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618305

Holcomb, C.T.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modeling Steady-State DIII-D Plasmas for Tearing Stability Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617155

Turco, F.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimization of the Internal Magnetic Configuration for High Bootstrap Current Fraction and High Beta for Steady-state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616775

Ferron, J.R.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Effect of Peeling Ballooning Stability on Steady-State ELM-Free  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 291 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613275

Osborne, T.H.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer in Current Mode on DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 380 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618665

Zhu, Y.B.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

High q_min Steady State Scenario Development Using Off-Axis Neutral Beam Injection on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 97 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618967

Holcomb, C.T.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

134

Development of State-Space Model-Based Kalman Filter for n?1 Resistive Wall Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 165 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614365

In, Y.

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

Steady-State High-Performance Operation of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 110 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613105

Politzer, P.A.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

136

Developing Depleted Uranium and Gold Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 339 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613300

Wilkens, H.L.

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fueling ITER - Pellet Launch From the Transformer Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 131 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611820

Perkins, F.W.

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

138

Investigating the structure of the core-mantle boundary region using S and P diffracted waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure in the central aleutian islands. J. Geo- physicalevents in the central aleutian islands. Bull Seism. Soc.particularly in the Aleutians. Introduction Earthquake

Manners, Ursula J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., and McDowell, F. W., 1978. Subduction of the Kula Ridge at the Aleutian Trench. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull., 89

140

Finite Orbit Monte Carlo Simulation with Full Wave Fields for ICRF Wave Heating Experiments in DIII-D, NSTX, KSTAR and ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 62 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618200

Choi, M.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Development of Off-Normal and Fault Event Detection and Response Techniques for ITER and DEMO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 164 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617180

Walker, M.L.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Progress in Developing ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 305 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616745

Doyle, E.J.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

143

ITER Current Channel Control Under Disturbances and Disruptions with Implications from DIII-D Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618320

Humphreys, D.A.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modeling Tokamak Discharges During Startup in DIII-D and Predictions for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 166 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616675

Budny, R.V.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Demonstration of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615385

Doyle, E.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

ITER Vertical Stability Guidance from Multi-machine Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 84 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615495

Humphreys, D.A.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Error Field Measurement Techniques for ITER Using Plasma Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 375 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618575

Strait, E.J.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

QH-Mode in Low Rotation, ITER-Similar Plasmas Using Static Non-Axisymmetric Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 97 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618958

Garofalo, A.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Simulation of the ITER Rampdown Scenario on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 304 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617060

Politzer, P.A.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

ITER MSE Calibration System Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 261 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615595

Mezzacappa, A.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

151

Experimental and Model Validation of ITER Operational Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 202 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615345

Casper, T.A.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Iterated Finite Orbit Monte Carlo Simulation with Full Wave Fields for Tokamak ICRF Wave Heating Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 254 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616715

Choi, M.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demonstration of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 84 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615675

Politzer, P.A.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

Assessment of Collateral Effects to Tokamak Systems During Planned Air Baking of DIII-D to Simulate ITER Tritium Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 257 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615415

Fitzpatrick, B.W.N.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Scaled Experiment of ITER Operational Scenarios on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617035

Park, J.M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Operating ITER Robustly Without Disruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 189 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618969

Humphreys, D.A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

157

Plans for ECE Diagnostic Components for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 189 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618929

Austin, M.E.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Spectral Effects on Plasma Performance in ITER Similar DIII-D RMP H-modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 142 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615400

Evans, T.E.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Progress in Demonstration of the ITER Baseline Scenario on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 344 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618235

Doyle, E.J.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Metrics to Quantify Magnetic Field Stochasticity for DIII-D and ITER Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 294 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618993

Orlov, D.M.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SOL Width Studies for ITER Ramp-up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 185 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617090

Rudakov, D.L.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

Transport Stiffness of TGLF and Its Impact on ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 282 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618975

Kinsey, J.E.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Influence of Rotation and Error Field on Tearing Stability in Low Torque ITER-like Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 200 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615335

Buttery, R.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

L-H Transition Studies on DIII-D to Determine H-mode Access for Operational Scenarios in ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618275

Gohil, P.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Experimental Investigation of ITER Startup and Rampdown Scenarios in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615515

Jackson, G.L.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Predictions of ITER Steady State Scenario Using Scaled Experimental Edge Profiles in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 165 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616975

Murakami, M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Overview of Recent DIII-D Results in Support of ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 200 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615455

Greenfield, C.M.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

ELM Control Coils for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 143 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615705

Schaffer, M.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Equilibrium and Braking of Fully Avalanched Runaway Electron Currents: a New Disruption Mitigation Strategy for ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 334 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618465

Parks, P.B.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Numerical Analysis of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations ELM Control in ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 376 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618450

Orlov, D.M.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

DIII-D Research in Support of ITER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615765

Strait, E.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Tracking of Current and Rotation Profile Evolution in the DIII-D Tokamak via System Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 132 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618635

Wehner, W.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

173

Developing a Commercial Production Process for 500,000 Targets Per Day - a Key Challenge for Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 308 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612090

Goodin, D.T.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fusion Development Facility Divertor Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615435

Garofalo, A.M.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fusion Blanket Development in FDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 260 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615840

Wong, C.P.C.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fusion Development Facility Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615760

Stambaugh, R.D.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fusion Development Facility - Mission and Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 221 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614610

Stambaugh, R.D.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fusion Development Facility Machine Design Aspects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 259 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615735

Smith, J.P.

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

Realizing Steady State Tokamak Operation for Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 19 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616940

Luce, T.C.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Distribution of Particulate Sizes Observed in DIII-D During Normal Plasma Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 151 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611985

Burkart, J.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

Conservation Tillage:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hosford, R.M. Jr. 1976. Fungal Leaf Spot Diseases of Wheat in North Dakota. N.D. Agric. Exp. Sta. Bull.

Today Andtomorrow Southern; Southern Region; No-till Conference; Thomas J. Gerik; Thomas J. Gerik; Bill L. Harris; Bill L. Harris

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Confinement Trends in DIII-D High Performance Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 161 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616995

Neff, A.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gyrokinetic Energy Moment Equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43, 1723 (1998)40th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics New Orleans Louisiana, US, 1998933010745

Hinton, F.L.

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Electron Thermal Transport and Multi-scale Turbulence in Low Collisionality H-mode Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 346 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618515

Schmitz, L.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal Ion Orbit Loss and Intrinsic Toroidal Velocity Near the Last Closed Flux Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618225

deGrassie, J.S.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal Ion Loss From Confined QH-Mode Plasma in the Presence of Alfven Eigenmodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 78 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612200

Lasnier, C.J.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

STAR Power, an Interactive Educational Fusion CD With a Dynamic, Shaped Tokamak Power Plant Simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 183 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974822817

Leuer, J.A.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Physics Optimization of the ARIES-RS Fusion Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 79 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999945102922

Chan, V.S.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Long-Term Reduction of Divertor Carbon Sources in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 171 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999948925415

Whyte, D.G.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sources for Carbon Production in the DIII-D Divertors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 222 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974748335

Isler, R.C.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reduction of Tile Heating, Particle, and Carbon Sources With the New DIII-D Divertor-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 222 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000974749120

Lasnier, C.J.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

Divertor Impurity Sources and Core Content During ELM Controlled Regimes in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 113 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612870

Fenstermacher, M.E.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

Carbon Sources and Fluxes in the DIII-D Divertor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 171 (1999)41st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Seattle Washington, US, 1999944764286

Isler, R.C.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fueling Sources, ELMs, and Optimizing Density Control in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 184 (2003)45th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Albuquerque New Mexico, US, 2003999609465

Watkins, J.G.

2003-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Carbon Sources and Core Plasma Carbon Content on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43, 1851 (1998)40th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics New Orleans Louisiana, US, 1998997296119

West, W.P.

1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

196

Commissioning of the Off-Axis Neutral Beamline on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619005

Scoville, J.T.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

197

Commissioning of the 110 GHz ECH System on DIII-D for Physics Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 220 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000997290589

Lohr, J.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Magnetic and Thermal Energy Flow During Disruptions in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41, 1433 (1996)38th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 1996933011219

Hyatt, A.W.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Restoring Transmission of Irradiated Image Fiber Bundles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 344 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618943

Chrobak, C.P.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

IMFIT Integrated Modeling Applications Supporting Experimental Analysis: Multiple Time-Slice Kinetic EFIT Reconstructions, MHD Stability Limits, and Energy and Momentum Flux Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 129 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618215

Collier, A.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Confinement Improved with Neon Injection in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 42, 1923 (1997)39th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, US, 1997933003369

Staebler, G.M.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of an IMFIT Energy Transport Module and Modeling of DIII-D Energy Transport with and without MHD Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 254 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615530

Jeon, Y.M.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Target Fabrication in Support of Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Physics Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 354 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614070

Back, C.A.

2007-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

Pitch and Energy Resolved Fast Ion Losses in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 348 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618675

Pace, D.C.

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Scaling of Type-I ELM Divertor Energy, Heat Flux, and Profile Width in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 257 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616920

Lasnier, C.J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Energy and Particle Transport in Long-Pulse High-Performance Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45, 150 (2000)42nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Quebec City Quebec, CA, 2000996510275

Politzer, P.A.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

207

Particle and Energy Transport in the SOL of DIII-D and NSTX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 237 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612805

Boedo, J.A.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

Real-Time Control of Plasma Rotation and Stored Energy in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 267 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612895

Gohil, P.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Scaling of Energy Confinement With Rotation for Advanced Inductive Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 239 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618998

Politzer, P.A.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Improving Diamagnetic Flux Temporal Resolution to Measure ELM Energy Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 130 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618525

Sieck, P.E.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

ELM Energy Transport in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46, 225 (2001)43rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Long Beach CA, US, 2001999606765

Leonard, A.W.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Gas Balance in Ohmic Discharges on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 140 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615835

West, W.P.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Momentum Model of Gas Jet Penetration in Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 80 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612285

Parks, P.B.

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

Local Gas Puff Effects on Fast Wave Antenna Loading in H-mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 167 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616985

Nagy, A.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

Massive Gas Injection System for Disruption Mitigation on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 80 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612160

Jernigan, T.C.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fast Plasma Shutdowns by Massive Hydrogen, Noble and Mixed-Gas Injection in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 141 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615830

Wesley, J.C.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

DIII-D Studies of Massive Gas Injection for Disruption Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 271 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612925

Hollmann, E.M.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Rapid Shutdown Methods for Runaway Electron Suppression by Large Shattered Pellets and Massive Gas Injection in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618345

Jernigan, T.C.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Theoretical Progress on Runaway Electron Suppression by Massive Gas Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 171 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614500

Parks, P.B.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

The role of siderophores in algal-bacterial interactions in the marine environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

66 3.3.2. Catecholformation of borate with catechol and L-dopa, Bull. Chem.A. (1999) Purification of catechol siderophores by boronate

Amin, Shady Ahmed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Solenoid-free Startup of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 59 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616930

Leuer, J.A.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

A New Approach to Quantitative NIF GXD Image Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 117 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618315

Huang, H.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

223

Measuring Dopant Concentration in Graded NIF Targets Through Quantitative Contact X-Radiography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 107 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612135

Huang, H.

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dilation X-ray Imager (DIXI) - A Sub-10ps X-ray Framing Camera for the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 261 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618966

Hilsabeck, T.J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sigma Xi DC Area Current Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Sigma Xi Year-End Banquet. The 35th Annual Banquet of Sigma Xi (NIST Chapter) will be held at The Golden Bull on June 10th. ...

226

Dust Production by Impulsive ELM Heating During Plasma Discharges at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 141 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615325

Bray, B.D.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ContAddr 2600 Bull Street + IncentiveContDept South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control + IncentiveContDiv Ocean & Coastal Resource Management + Incentive...

228

Coastal Tidelands and Wetlands (South Carolina) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

permitting program. Policy Contact Department South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Division Ocean & Coastal Resource Management Address 2600 Bull...

229

Mode Content and Transmission Measurements on Components of the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 162 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619001

Richenderfer, A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

Alignment of RF Beams to the Waveguide Transmission Lines at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618280

Gorelov, Y.A.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to compute land subsidence, 11 Bull. Intl. Assn.geothermal production and subsidence history of the Wairakei5. Geertsma, J. , 1973, Land subsidence above compacting oil

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Penning Gauge Sensitivity and Spectra for Use in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 132 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615730

Sheffield, T.Y.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

Upgraded Two-Color Heterodyne Interferometer System on DIII-D and Its Use as a Fluctuation Diagnostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 158 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611905

Van Zeeland, M.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

An Isolated Divertor for Reactor Scale Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 297 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618982

Leonard, A.W.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

235

Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity fro Non-Axisymmetric Magnetic Fields Allows ELM-free, Quiescnt H-mode Operation in DIII-D Under Reactor-relevant Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 358 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618937

Burrell, K.H.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Radiosonde measurements of turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Cranwell, Lincolnshire, W. H. Pick and G. A. Bull, 1926. 3 Talk structure * Geomagnetic sensors to measure orientation * Orientation variability as a turbulence measure *...

237

Shock-Clump Interaction Studies in the Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 27 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615315

Blue, B.E.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

238

Plasma Response and Transport Associated with RMP ELM Suppression on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 186 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619025

Wade, M.R.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

239

Pedestal Plasma Control With Small 3D Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 293 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618952

Evans, T.E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

240

Plasma Response to Complex External Magnetic Perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618210

Chu, M.S.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plasma Equilibrium Response to Slowly Rotating 3D Magnetic Perturbations in DIII0D RMP Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 295 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618979

Lao, L.L.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Linear Plasma Response Model Based on the Solution to a Perturbed Grad-Shafranov Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 350 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618640

Welander, A.S.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

Experiments and ELM-Suppression in Double-Null DIII-D Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 295 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618981

Lazarus, E.A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

244

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rock District, Southwestern Division Steps to Implementation * Lakeside facility modification at Norfork is complete. Bull Shoals lakeside facility modification is in progress....

245

Carbon Transport Studies in the Edge and Divertor of DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 106 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611890

Stangeby, P.C.

2004-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Carbon Source Studies in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 266 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611660

Elder, J.D.

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Carbon Sources, Scrape-Off layer Transport and Deposition in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 177 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613260

Groth, M.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility Design Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 105 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617140

Stambaugh, R.D.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

selectivity 2. Design and develop bulls-eye energy harvesting structures Need for new sensing technologies to meet the requirements for zero emission energy sources Why do...

250

Temporal Variation in Fish Communities off Santa Cruz Island, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blacksmith, Chromis punctipinnis, a planktivorous reef fish.U.S. Fish Bull Brooks AJ, Schmitt RJ, Holbrook SJ.2002. Declines in regional fish populations: have species

Graves, Michelle R.; Larson, Ralph J.; Alevizon, William S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigation of Ion Cyclotron Emissions on DIII-D During Neutral Bem Injection and Fast Wave Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616640

Axley, A.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Beams, Brightness and Background - Using Active Spectroscopy Techniques for Precision Measurements in Fusion Plasma Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 58 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619019

Thomas, D.M.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Multifluid interpenetration mixing in directly driven inertial confinement fusion capsule implosionsa...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An alternative to a Paper BI2 4, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 48, 21 2003 . b Invited speaker. Electronic mail: dcw

254

Effect of Test Blanket Module on Triton Burn-up in DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 348 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618670

Zhu, Y.B.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Test of a Model for Limits to Pedestal Pressure Gradient in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 271 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616805

Groebner, R.J.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Experimental Test of the Neoclassical Theory of Poloidal Rotation in Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 179 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612355

Solomon, W.M.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) Error Field Experiments in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 185 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617095

Schaffer, M.J.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Test of a Pedestal Height Model in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615460

Groebner, R.J.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 23 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618510

Schaffer, M.J.

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Physics of Edge Stochastic Magnetic Fields in Hot Tokamak Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 102 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612065

Evans, T.E.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enhancing Physics Operations and Increasing Physics Productivity at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 145 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615500

Hyatt, A.W.

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

262

Physics Issues at the Initial Phase of Robust RWM Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 162 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617000

Okabayashi, M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

263

New Physics Capabilities for the DIII-D National Fusion Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 75 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611965

Boivin, R.L.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

Physics-Based Performance Projections for Fusion Development Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 222 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614120

Chan, V.S.

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Physics Modeling of ARIES-AT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 340 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619015

St John, H.E.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Physics Issues for Extending the Pulse Length of High f_NI DIII-D Discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 344 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618265

Ferron, J.R.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

420.ps - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 14, 2001... uses BCP, a state of the art Branch-Cut-Price framework designed ...... Lagrangian relaxation and cutting-planes, COAL Bull, 21 (1992),. pp.

268

Closed-Loop Simulation of Model-Based Current Profile Control with the DIII-D Plasma Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618145

Barton, J.E.

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

The DIII-D Plasma Control System as a Scientific Research Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 111 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999612935

Hyatt, A.W.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

New Plasma Discharge Development Tools for the DIII-D Plasma Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619032

Welander, A.S.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

Diamond Windows on the 110 GHz Gyrotrons at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 49, 161 (2004)46th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Savannah Georgia, US, 2004999611700

Gorelov, I.A.

2004-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Performance of Diamond Gyrotron Windows at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 268 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612095

Gorelov, I.A.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District, Teller County, Colorado," U.S. Geol. Survey Bull.Jamestown District, Colorado," Econ. Geol. , v. 68, pp 1247-Rocks at Powderhorn, Colorado; Economic Geology, Vol. 60,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effect of Hydrogen Minority on the Power Balance for Fast Wave Heating in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 340 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618999

Prater, R.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

An Interpretation of 'Puff & Pump' Radiative Divertor Experiments in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 351 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617120

Stacey, W.M.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of a DNB for ITER-Based on Common Long-Pulse Positive Ion Source Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 219 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614645

Thomas, D.M.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Co-Deposition Studies in DIII-D L- and H-Mode Plasmas and Implications to the ITER Tritium Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 27 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999612245

McLean, A.G.

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Studies in DIII-D of High Beta Discharge Scenarios Appropriate for Steady-State Tokamak Operation with Burning Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 201 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615410

Ferron, J.R.

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

REWAS 2008: Conference Organizers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subodh K. Das (Fifth International Symposium on Recycling of Engineered Materials) Director University of Kentucky Center for Aluminum Technology 1505 Bull...

280

Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of ambient aerosol particles, EnvironmentalParticle Measurement of Ambient Aerosol Particles Containingfor quantifying direct aerosol forcing of climate, Bull. Am.

Moffet, Ryan Christopher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improved Efficiency of the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618190

Cengher, M.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Performance Measurements for the ECH Transmission Lines on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 341 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618940

Cengher, M.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of Pedestal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 270 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616690

Callen, J.D.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transport Analysis of Bat-eared T_e Profile Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618135

Austin, M.E.

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Impact of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) on Turbulence Drive, Damping, and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 63 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618415

Moyer, R.A.

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Magnetic Transport Barriers in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616890

Kessler, J.

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

TGLF Transport Modeling With PTRANSP/GCNMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 117 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617150

St John, H.E.

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Particle Transport Analysis Using Modulated Gas Puff Technique in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 345 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618655

Zeng, L.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

289

Heat Transport in Off-Axis EC-Heated Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 59 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616630

Austin, M.E.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Turbulent SOL Transport in Limited Versus Diverted L-mode Discharges in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 297 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619003

Rudakov, D.L.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

How Accurate is Analytic Theory of Neoclassical Ion Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 131 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618645

Wong, S.K.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effect of Self-consistent Poloidal Electric Field on Neoclassical Angular Momentum Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 267 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617205

Wong, S.K.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

Discoveries From the Exploration of Gyrokinetic Momentum Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 55, 238 (2010)52nd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Chicago Illinois, US, 2010999618545

Staebler, G.M.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Documentation and Search for Missing Near Edge L-Mode Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 343 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619027

Waltz, R.E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

Energetic Particle Transport by Microturbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 344 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617230

Zhang, W.L.

2009-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of an IMFIT Particle Transport Module and Modeling of Tokamak Particle Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 255 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615645

Pan, C.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fast Ion Transport during Sawteeth in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 160 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616980

Muscatello, C.M.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Gyrokinetic Simulation Tests of Tracer and Quasilinear Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 253 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615815

Waltz, R.E.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transport of Energetic Ions Due to Interaction With Microturbulence in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 269 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999617030

Pace, D.C.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

300

Particle Transport Modification Due to Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 56 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618988

Mordijck, S.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Sensitivity of Transport and Stability to the Current Profile in Steady-State Scenario Plasmas in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 359 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619021

Turco, F.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

Predictions of the Confinement in DIII-D Hybrids Using the TGLF Transport Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 169 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616900

Kinsey, J.E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Laser Welding Micro-Holes in Beryllium Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, 107 (2005)47th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Denver Colorado, US, 2005999611935

Alexander, N.B.

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dependence of Laser Energy Coupling and Fast Electron Source Characteristics on the Buried Cone Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 146 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619014

Stephens, R.B.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Laser Heating of Solid Matter by Light Pressure-Driven Shocks as Ultra-Relativistic Intensities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 147 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614060

Akli, K.U.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Robust Control of the Spatial Current Profile in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618930

Barton, J.E.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Robust Control of Resistive Wall Mode in DIII-D Based on Eigenmode Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, 165 (2007)49th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Orlando Florida, US, 2007999614140

Dalessio, J.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Backstepping Control of the Current Profile in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618933

Boyer, M.D.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

Robust Control of the Toroidal Rotation and Safety Factor Profiles in the DIII-D Tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 300 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999619007

Shi, W.

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Particle Control and Carbon Transport Experiments on DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54, 57 (2009)51st American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Atlanta Georgia, US, 2009999616625

Allen, S.L.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

Density Control Using the New Divertor Pumping Configuration in DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 61 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613085

Petrie, T.W.

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Control of Current Profile Evolution During the Ramp-Up Phase at DIII-D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53, 144 (2008)50th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Dallas Texas, US, 2008999615635

Ou, Y.

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Not-So-Precious: Stripping Gold From AFM Probes Allows ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... AB Churnside, RMA Sullan, DM Nguyen, SO Case, MS Bull, GM King and TT Perkins. Routine and timely sub-piconewton ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improved Error Field Correction in High Performance Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 56, 299 (2011)53rd American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Salt Lake City Utah, US, 2011999618970

In, Y.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluate the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur Subbasin, Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has the following chapters: (1) Synopsis of 2000-2008 Stream Temperature Monitoring with Implications for Bull Trout Recovery in the Upper Malheur Logan Valley Wildlife Mitigation Property, 2008; (2) Bull Trout Spawning Survey Report, 2008; (3) 2008 Efforts to Trap and Haul Entrained Bull Trout Salvelinus confluentus over Agency Valley Dam on the North Fork Malheur River, Oregon; (4) Distribution and Abundance of Redband Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Malheur River Basin, 2008; and (5) Spatial Patterns of Hybridization between Bull Trout, Salvelinus confluentus, and Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis in an Oregon Stream Network.

Abel, Chad; Brown, Daniel; Schwabe, Lawrence [Burns Paiute Tribe Natural Resources Department Fisheries Division

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reproductive Potential of the Protogynous Teleost, California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) at Nine Populations across Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fishes on a southern California artificial reef. Bull MarFIGURES FIGURE Page 1. California sheephead collection sites2. Size frequency of California sheephead at nine southern

Loke, Kerri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environment-Assisted Error Correction of Single-Qubit Phase Damping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open quantum system dynamics of random unitary type may in principle be fully undone. Closely following the scheme of environment-assisted error correction proposed by Gregoratti and Werner [M. Gregoratti and R. F. Werner, J. Mod. Opt. 50(6), 915-933 (2003)], we explicitly carry out all steps needed to invert a phase-damping error on a single qubit. Furthermore, we extend the scheme to a mixed-state environment. Surprisingly, we find cases for which the uncorrected state is closer to the desired state than any of the corrected ones.

Benjamin Trendelkamp-Schroer; Julius Helm; Walter T. Strunz

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

318

The design and evaluation of a mobile sensor/actuator network for autonomous animal control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates a mobile, wireless sensor/actuator network application for use in the cattle breeding industry. Our goal is to prevent fighting between bulls in on-farm breeding paddocks by autonomously applying appropriate stimuli when one bull ... Keywords: application, autonomous animal control, sensor/actuator networks

Tim Wark; Chris Crossman; Wen Hu; Ying Guo; Philip Valencia; Pavan Sikka; Peter Corke; Caroline Lee; John Henshall; Kishore Prayaga; Julian O'Grady; Matt Reed; Andrew Fisher

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

was improved by us down to the submicro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. [3] see homepage (http://www.chemie.hu-berlin.de/ wmoritz/index.html) for literature on the different-30-2093­5559 E-Mail: werner.moritz@ chemie.hu-berlin.de www.chemie.hu-berlin.de/ wmoritz/index.html Fig. 6 Scan

Moritz, Werner

320

scripps institution of oceanography, university of california, san diego Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics & Planetary Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Parker fiberoptics, Zumberge fluid mechanics, Ireley geodesy, Agnew, Fang, Fialko, Sasagawa geodynamics landscape systems, Werner lidar, Kent lunar magnetism and seismology, Johnson marine electromagnetic-PBO instruments with opera- tion supported as part of PBO. The first PBO instrument was a second system at DHL

Constable, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Session 3280 Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guillen entitled "Five Equations that Changed the World 31 " and a play by David Frayn entitled of the students. The second option for the assignment was linked to the model represented in Guillen's book or Werner Heisenberg. In his book, Guillen builds each chapter around the life story of the scientist

Larkin, Teresa L.

322

Realism and reference ontologies: Considerations, reflections and problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Ontological realism: Methodology or misdirection? I offered a detailed critique of the position referred to as realism taken by Barry Smith and Werner Ceusters. This position is claimed to serve as the basis for a realist ... Keywords: Reference ontology, application ontology, empiricism, metaphysics, ontological methodology, realism

Gary H. Merrill

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Rank three bipartite entangled states are distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the bipartite entangled state of rank three is distillable. So there is no rank three bipartite bound entangled state. By using this fact, We present some families of rank four states that are distillable. We also analyze the relation between the low rank state and the Werner state.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Universitatsbibliothek Heidelberg Plock 107-109 Postfach 105749  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Wilfried: Didaktik des Englischen : ein Kerncurriculum in zwölf Vorlesungen / Wilfried Brusch. Hrsg. von-englisch / hrsg. von d. Dudenred. u. Oxford Univ. Press. Red. Leitung: Werner Scholze-Stubenrecht ; John Sykes : theoretische Grundlagen - Ansätze - Perspektiven / hrsg. von Ansgar Nünning .... - Stuttgart ; Weimar : Metzler

Heermann, Dieter W.

325

Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitt Universittsarchiv  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Organische Chemie 5.1. 1930, 75. Todestag Eduard Study, Mathematik 5.1. 1880, 125. Todestag August Wilhelm, Einweihung des Instituts für Phy- sikalische Chemie 31.1. 1905, 100. Geburtstag Werner Niese, Straf. Geburtstag Erich Röhr, Deutsche Volkskunde 22.2. 1880: 125. Geburtstag Kurt Müller, Klassische Archäologie 25

Bartels, Soeren

326

Attribution Bias, Market Condition, and Trading Behavior of Individual Investors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theory predicts that attribution bias creates overconfident traders and thus causes excessive trading in the market. This paper tests this prediction by comparing the trading behavior of individual investors in different market conditions. In a bull market, investors suffer more from attribution bias and therefore should be more overconfident and trade more excessively. Using the trading records of Chinese individual investors from January 2005 to November 2008, we find that individual investors trade more excessively in a bull market than in a bear market, where excessive trading is measured following Odean (1999) and Barber and Odean (2001). Specifically, we find that in the bull market the securities bought by individual investors significantly underperform those sold in the subsequent periods of one and three months. In the bear market, however, individual investors do not make the similar suboptimal trading decisions as they do in the bull market. In addition, the poor trading decisions made in the bull market are due to poor security selection, and not due to poor market timing. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individual investors turn their portfolios more frequently and their performance measured by market abnormal returns is significantly worse in the bull market than in the bear market. Overall, these results provide strong evidence that attribution bias creates overconfident traders and thus causes excessive trading in the market. Key words: Attribution bias, individual trading behavior, bull market, and bear market.

Zhen Shi A; Na Wang B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Assessment of PCMI Simulation Using the Multidimensional Multiphysics BISON Fuel Performance Code  

SciTech Connect

Since 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a next-generation nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. BISON is built using INLs Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment, or MOOSE. MOOSE is a massively parallel, finite element-based framework to solve systems of coupled non-linear partial differential equations using the Jacobian-FreeNewton Krylov (JFNK) method. MOOSE supports the use of complex two- and three-dimensional meshes and uses implicit time integration, which is important for the widely varied time scales in nuclear fuel simulation. MOOSEs object-oriented architecture minimizes the programming required to add new physics models. BISON has been applied to various nuclear fuel problems to assess the accuracy of its 2D and 3D capabilities. The benchmark results used in this assessment range from simulation results from other fuel performance codes to measurements from well-known and documented reactor experiments. An example of a well-documented experiment used in this assessment is the Third Ris Fission Gas Project, referred to as Bump Test GE7, which was performed on rod ZX115. This experiment was chosen because it allows for an evaluation of several aspects of the code, including fully coupled thermo-mechanics, contact, and several nonlinear material models. Bump Test GE7 consists of a base-irradiation period of a full-length rod in the Quad-Cities-1 BWR for nearly 7 years to a burnup of 4.17% FIMA. The base irradiation test is followed by a bump test of a sub-section of the original rod. The bump test takes place in the test reactor DR3 at Ris in a water-cooled HP1 rig under BWR conditions where the power level is increased by about 50% over base irradiation levels in the span of several hours. During base irradiation, the axial power profile is flat. During the bump test, the axial power profile changes so that the bottom half of the rod is at approximately 50% higher power than at the base irradiation level, while the power at the top of the rod is at about 20% of the base irradiation power level. 2D BISON simulations of the Bump Test GE7 were run using both discrete and smeared pellet geometry. Comparisons between these calculations and experimental measurements are presented for clad diameter and elongation after the base irradiation and clad profile along the length of the test section after the bump test. Preliminary comparisons between calculations and measurements are favorable, supporting the use of BISON as an accurate multiphysics fuel simulation tool.

Stephen R. Novascone; Jason D. Hales; Benjamin W. Spencer; Richard L. Williamson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bovine Vision Bovine Vision Name: Peggy Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: Spring 2010 Question: How is a cows vision, I mean do they see in black and white or color? Replies: Peggy A common misconception about cattle (particularly bulls) is that they are enraged by the color red (something provocative is often said to be "like a red flag to a bull"). This is incorrect, as cattle are red-green color-blind.[31][32] The myth arose from the use of red capes in the sport of bullfighting; in fact, two different capes are used. Please refer to the following URL for the rest of the story. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle It is not the color of the cape that angers the bull, but rather the movement of the fabric that irritates the bull and incites it to charge.

329

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT STATUS * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May (May 2009) 2009) 2009) 2009) * * TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed * * TMDL for Lake TMDL for Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo was approved by the EPA was approved by the EPA TMDL for Lake TMDL for Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo was approved by the EPA was approved by the EPA for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division DISTRICT POSITION * * Full Full understanding of understanding of the sources the sources

330

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2010 (final).pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division CURRENT ISSUES * * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork Norfork (May 2009) (May 2009) * * TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake TMDL's for Dardanelle and Lake Taneycomo Taneycomo are still being developed are still being developed Little Rock District, Southwestern Division DISTRICT POSITION * * Full Full understanding of understanding of the sources the sources contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not contributing to the low DO have not been identified. been identified. * * Options identified are costly

331

Mercury, Cadmium and Lead Biogeochemistry in the SoilPlantInsect System in Huludao City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

YE, Ketris MP (2005a) Mercury in coal: a review part 1of total and methyl mercury by arthropods. Bull Environ259 DOI 10.1007/s00128-009-9688-6 Mercury, Cadmium and Lead

Zhang, Zhong-Sheng; Lu, Xian-Guo; Wang, Qi-Chao; Zheng, Dong-Mei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Standard Reference Materials: SRM 1453, Expanded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The distribution of thicknesses is random as shown by the tight cluster (bull's-eye) of data points in the center of the lag ... Ambient gas Cold plate 2 ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

333

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Antone (Tony) L. Brooks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A.L. and Couch, L.A. 2002 Workshop: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Brooks, A.L., Bull, R.J., and...

334

Recent breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapy use: the California Teachers Study cohort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breast cancer incidence trends according to hormone therapyA, Ward E, Thun MJ: Recent trends in breast cancer incidencein France: a paradoxical trend. Bull Cancer 10. Katalinic A,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

DayRec: United States Record-Maximum/Minimum Daily Temperatures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Subcommittee on Global Change Research, 11-33. Peterson, T. C., P. A. Stott and S. Herring, Editors, 2012: Explaining extreme events of 2011 from a climate perspective. Bull....

336

Combustion Synthesis of Nanoparticulate LiMgxMn1-xPO4 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2) Carbon Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. J. Exarhos: Glycine-nitrate Combustion Synthesis of Oxideby the Nitrate-Citrate Combustion Method. Mat. Res. Bull.Combustion Synthesis of Nanoparticulate LiMg x Mn 1-x PO 4 (

Doeff, Marca M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Sea Off Southern California, A Modern Habitat Of Petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minerals, Division of Petroleum, vols. 1-3, 3017 pp. Burst,N. P. , 1956, Origin of petroleum-A review: Bull. A mer.1942, Source Beds of Petroleum: Amer. Assoc. Petrol.

Emery, K O

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the central California coast. Fish Bull 89:523-533and abundance of pelagic juvenile fish in the Santa BarbaraWashburn. 2003. Linking Early Fish Growth and Transport to

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and New Mexico. USDA For. Serv. Bull. 101. 2005 NRC Canadasettlement. Ecol. Monogr. 2005 NRC Canada Covington, W.W.precision. Ecol. Appl. 9: 2005 NRC Canada Savage and Mast

Savage, M; Mast, J N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microsoft Word - Hydropower Council Agenda 2007.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Bull Shoals Little Rock District Unit 1 return to service) 1:40 p.m. FY 08 COE Appropriations Southwestern 1:50 p.m. Presentation of Proposed FY 08 COE Districts Work Packages...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

01-02253B_OR_Knox_map.ai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INN BULL RUN STEAM PLANT (TVA) COMFORT INN JAMESON INN BENEFITS OFFICE OF TECH. TRANSFER SNS PROJECT OFFICE COMMERCE PARK OAK RIDGEKNOXVILLE ROUTE MAP A B C D E F G H I J K L M N...

342

Sulfur stable isotopes separate producers in marine food-web analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fry B (1983) Fish and shrimp migrations in the northern Gulf of. Mexico analysed using stable C, N and S isotope ratios. Fish. Bull 81:789801. Fry B (1988)...

343

Turn of the century refueling: A review of innovations in early gasoline refueling methods and analogies for hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glory Days of the Gas Station. Bull?nch Press, Boston.M.K. , 1993. The American Gas Station. Motorbooks Interna-History of Americas Gas Stations. Macmillan Publishing Co,

Melaina, Marc W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microsoft Word - tb47_TOC.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRS Bull. 26, 19-23 (2001). S. R. Stock, K. Ignatiev, W.- K. Lee, K. Fezzaa, G. R. Davis, J. C. Elliott, "Comparison of Crack Geometry Determined with Phase Contrast...

345

The Sparsity Challenges - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan Math. J., vol. 21, pp. 289?295, 1974. [10] P. Bateman, ?Note on the coefficients of the cyclotomic polynomial,?. Bull. AMS, vol. 55, pp. 1180?1181, 1949.

346

AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEO-FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geothermal investigations in Idaho Part 3, An evaluation ofthermal water in the Weiser A r e a , Idaho: USGSand Idaho Dept. of Water Res. (IDWR Bull. No. 3 . . IV- 5

Grimsrud, G. Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America February 1, 2013 - 1:51pm Addthis Tech-ies mingled during a networking session after the White House Tech Inclusion Summit on January 31, 2013. (Photo credit: John Werner) Tech-ies mingled during a networking session after the White House Tech Inclusion Summit on January 31, 2013. (Photo credit: John Werner) Valerie Jarrett Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama Editor's Note: This blog was orginially published on whitehouse.gov Yesterday, I had the pleasure of speaking at the Technology Inclusion Summit, hosted by Chief Technology Officer Todd Park, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Level Playing Field Institute. It was an amazing gathering of private and public partners who are united in their

348

Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Deployment Model: Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy Mary Werner Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-49230 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Integrated Deployment Model: A Comprehensive Approach to Transforming the Energy Economy Mary Werner Prepared under Task No. IDPS.9010 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-49230 November 2010 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

349

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kahn, Kalju (Kalju Kahn) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at Santa Barbara Kais, Sabre (Sabre Kais) - Birck Nanotechnology Center & Department of Chemistry, Purdue University Kaiser, Ralf I. (Ralf I. Kaiser) - Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa Kalodimos, Charalampos "Babis" (Charalampos "Babis" Kalodimos) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University Kambhampati, Patanjali (Patanjali Kambhampati) - Department of Chemistry, McGill University Kaminsky, Werner (Werner Kaminsky) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Kan, Lou-sing (Lou-sing Kan) - Institute of Chemistry, Academia

350

Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America Working Toward a Tech Sector that Reflects America February 1, 2013 - 1:51pm Addthis Tech-ies mingled during a networking session after the White House Tech Inclusion Summit on January 31, 2013. (Photo credit: John Werner) Tech-ies mingled during a networking session after the White House Tech Inclusion Summit on January 31, 2013. (Photo credit: John Werner) Valerie Jarrett Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama Editor's Note: This blog was orginially published on whitehouse.gov Yesterday, I had the pleasure of speaking at the Technology Inclusion Summit, hosted by Chief Technology Officer Todd Park, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Level Playing Field Institute. It was an amazing gathering of private and public partners who are united in their

351

Nonlocality of quantum correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that only those composite quantum systems possessing nonvanishing quantum correlations have the property that any nontrivial local unitary evolution changes their global state. This type of nonlocality occurs also for states that do not violate a Bell inequality, such as, for instance, Werner states with a low degree of entanglement. We derive the exact relation between the global state change induced by local unitary evolutions and the amount of quantum correlations. We prove that the minimal change coincides with the geometric measure of discord, thus providing the latter with an operational interpretation in terms of the capability of a local unitary dynamics to modify a global state. We establish rigorously that Werner states are the maximally quantum correlated two-qubit states, and thus are the ones that maximize this novel type of nonlocality.

Streltsov, A; Roga, W; Bru, D; Illuminati, F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Energy Storage,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ebeling, Werner (Werner Ebeling) - Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Ebert, Ute (Ute Ebert) - Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Eckmann, Jean-Pierre (Jean-Pierre Eckmann) - Département de Physique Théorique & Section de Mathématiques, Université de Genève Edelmann, Heinz (Heinz Edelmann) - Astronomical Institute, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg Edén, Patrik (Patrik Edén) - Department of Theoretical Physics, Lunds Universitet Eerola, Paula (Paula Eerola) - Division of Experimental High Energy Physics, Fysiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet Eggers, Jens (Jens Eggers) - Department of Mathematics, University of Bristol

353

Dynamics of quantum discord in the purification process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dynamics of quantum discord during the purification process. In the case of Werner states, it is shown that quantum discord is increased after a round of purification protocol. We call this process quantum correlation purification in analogy with entanglement purification. Furthermore, quantum mutual information and classical correlation is also increased during this process. We also give an analytic expression for a class of higher dimensional states which have additive quantum discord.

Wei Song; Lin Chen; Ming Yang; Zhuo-Liang Cao

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

Establishing an EU-China consortium on traditional Chinese medicine research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ltd Estonia Ms. Janne ksti Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices Germany Dr. Werner Knss University of Dsseldorf Germany Prof. Peter Proksch University of Munich Germany Prof. Angelika Vollmar University of Bonn Germany Prof. Gabriele... UK Prof. Elizabeth Williamson Guys & St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust UK Prof. Debbie Shaw University of Nottingham UK Prof. Sue Watson University of Warwick UK Prof. Kenneth Muir University of Westminster UK Dr. Volker Scheid University of Lincoln UK...

Uzuner, Halil; Fan, Tai-Ping; Dias, Alberto; Guo, De-an; El-Nezami, Hani S; Xu, Qihe

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Generalized distillability conjecture and generalizations of Cauchy-Bunyakovsky-Schwarz inequality and Lagrange identity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let rho_k, k=1,2,...,m, be the critical Werner state in a bipartite d_k by d_k quantum system, i.e., the one that separates the 1-distillable Werner states from those that are 1-indistillable. We propose a new conjecture (GDC) asserting that the tensor product of rho_k is 1-indistillable. This is much stronger than the familiar conjecture saying that a single critical Werner state is indistillable. We prove that GDC is true for arbitrary m provided that d_k is bigger than 2 for at most one index k. We reformulate GDC as an intriguing inequality for four arbitrary complex hypermatrices of type d_1 x ... x d_m. This hypermatrix inequality is just the special case n=2 of a more general conjecture (CBS conjecture) for 2n arbitrary complex hypermatrices of the same type. Surprisingly, the case n=1 turns out to be quite interesting as it provides hypermatrix generalization of the classical Lagrange identity. We also formulate the integral version of the CBS conjecture and derive the integral version of the hypermatrix Lagrange identity.

Dragomir Z. Djokovic

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsoft Word - CX-CircuitBreakerReplacementsMultipleSubstationsFY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2012 12, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Michael Gilchrist Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Power Circuit Breaker Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): Appendix B4.6, Additions and modifications to transmission facilities. Location: Tumwater, Thurston County, WA; Ravensdale, King County, WA; Silver Creek, Lewis County, WA; Shelton, Mason County, WA; Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA; Bandon, Coos County, OR; Toledo, Lincoln County, OR; Wilsonville, Washington County, OR; Gold Beach, Curry County, OR; Stayton, Marion County, OR; Swan Valley, Bonneville County, ID; Moose, Teton County, WY (ID); Gold Creek, Powell County, MT.

357

Microsoft PowerPoint - SWL HPConf2009 (final).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * * ADEQ completed public review of draft ADEQ completed public review of draft TMDL for Bull Shoals and Norfork Dec TMDL for Bull Shoals and Norfork Dec 2008. 2008. CURRENT ISSUES Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * * Full listing of the sources contributing Full listing of the sources contributing to the low DO have not been identified. to the low DO have not been identified. * * Options identified are costly. Options identified are costly. * * Consider re Consider re - - evaluation of state evaluation of state standard or designated use of stream. standard or designated use of stream. DISTRICT POSITION

358

Microsoft PowerPoint - Subregion 3 Presentation 5-12-09.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Pool Power Pool Sub-Regional Planning Meeting Sub-Regional Area 3 David Sargent May 12, 2009 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 2 Southwestern Power Administration Slide 3 Five Year Construction Plan 2009 Bull Shoals Dam Bus Upgrade - from 600 to 1200/2000 amps The bus is a limiting element for the line going from Bull Shoals toward Harrison. New Madrid 161/69 kV Autotransformer Replacement New Madrid-Malden-Piggott-Kennett 69 kV Line Rebuild - 55 miles of line collapsed during an ice storm. We are completely rebuilding the line and doubling its capacity. Southwestern Power Administration Slide 4 2009 Projects Southwestern Power Administration Slide 5 Five Year Construction Plan 2010 Bull Shoals Dam Pothead/Cable Replacement - Potheads on cable from GSUs to substation are old and leaking. Potential for outage of

359

Microsoft PowerPoint - HPConf2008 08-06-10.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2008 10, 2008 LITTLE ROCK DISTRICT STUDIES AFFECTING FEDERAL HYDROPOWER Hydropower Conference June 10, 2008 US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation * Arkansas Dept of Environmental Quality has 303(d) listed (on their 2004 List of Impaired Water Bodies): - the first 2.0 miles below Dardanelle - the first 3.0 miles below Bull Shoals - the first 4.2 miles below Norfork * Impairment is dissolved oxygen

360

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ranking criteria were developed to rate 19 tributaries on the Coeur d`Alene Indiana Reservation for potential of habitat enhancement for westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, and bull trout, Salvelinus malma. Cutthroat and bull trout habitat requirements, derived from an extensive literature review of each species, were compared to the physical and biological parameters of each stream observed during an aerial -- helicopter survey. Ten tributaries were selected for further study, using the ranking criteria that were derived. The most favorable ratings were awarded to streams that were located completely on the reservation, displayed highest potential for improvement and enhancement, had no barriers to fish migration, good road access, and a gradient acceptable to cutthroat and bull trout habitation. The ten streams selected for study were Bellgrove, Fighting, Lake, Squaw, Plummer, Little Plummer, Benewah, Alder, Hell`s Gulch and Evans creeks.

Graves, Suzy

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Initial Integration Plan  

SciTech Connect

Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronicthermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled 3-D spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analyis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAP's current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing that will be used to produce an integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the PCU system. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a 3-D core model. Initially, the two systems will be loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration will be tested with the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Initial Coupling of the RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Applications  

SciTech Connect

Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronic- thermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled higher dimensionality spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analysis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAPs current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing results from the integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the power conversion unit. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a full core model. The two systems are loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration is tested on a simplified version of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

MASSIVE HYBRID PARALLELISM FOR FULLY IMPLICIT MULTIPHYSICS  

SciTech Connect

As hardware advances continue to modify the supercomputing landscape, traditional scientific software development practices will become more outdated, ineffective, and inefficient. The process of rewriting/retooling existing software for new architectures is a Sisyphean task, and results in substantial hours of development time, effort, and money. Software libraries which provide an abstraction of the resources provided by such architectures are therefore essential if the computational engineering and science communities are to continue to flourish in this modern computing environment. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework enables complex multiphysics analysis tools to be built rapidly by scientists, engineers, and domain specialists, while also allowing them to both take advantage of current HPC architectures, and efficiently prepare for future supercomputer designs. MOOSE employs a hybrid shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel model and provides a complete and consistent interface for creating multiphysics analysis tools. In this paper, a brief discussion of the mathematical algorithms underlying the framework and the internal object-oriented hybrid parallel design are given. Representative massively parallel results from several applications areas are presented, and a brief discussion of future areas of research for the framework are provided.

Cody J. Permann; David Andrs; John W. Peterson; Derek R. Gaston

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendix A: Cross Cutting Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Appendix A: Cross Cutting Information A.1 Presentation: Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg ................. 2 A.2 Summary: Financial Incentives for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ................................................................................... 12 A.3 Presentation: Renewable Energy Screening, Town of Greensburg, Kansas ................................................................... 25 2 A.1 Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg Mary Werner National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Resource Availability in Greensburg g Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) June 8, 2007 3 4 5 Biofuels / Biomass 6 7 County Corn* Corn Ethanol (Gal)* Soybeans** Biodiesel (Gal) Cellulosic

365

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1, Number 3 * October 2011 1, Number 3 * October 2011 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Comments Questions or comments regarding the Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly should be directed to Terri.Batuyong@nnsa.doe.gov Technical Editor: Chris Werner, Publication Editor: Millicent Mischo Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 3 Inside this Issue 2 Simulation: A Window into the Detonation of High Explosives 3 Modeling of High-Explosive Detonation Performance 5 The Detonation Sandwich 6 Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program-High Explosives 9 New Faces at the Office of Stockpile Stewardship

366

Mixed state sensitivity of several quantum information benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate an imbalance between the sensitivity of the common state measures--fidelity, trace distance, concurrence, tangle, von Neumann entropy and linear entropy--when acted on by a depolarizing channel. Further, in this context we explore two classes of two-qubit entangled mixed states. Specifically, we illustrate a sensitivity imbalance between three of these measures for depolarized (i.e., Werner-state like) nonmaximally entangled and maximally entangled mixed states, noting that the size of the imbalance depends on the state's tangle and linear entropy.

Nicholas A. Peters; Tzu-Chieh Wei; Paul G. Kwiat

2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Bell pair in a generic random matrix environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two non-interacting qubits are coupled to an environment. Both coupling and environment are represented by random matrix ensembles. The initial state of the pair is a Bell state, though we also consider arbitrary pure states. Decoherence of the pair is evaluated analytically in terms of purity; Monte Carlo calculations confirm these results and also yield the concurrence of the pair. Entanglement within the pair accelerates decoherence. Numerics display the relation between concurrence and purity known for Werner states, allowing us to give a formula for concurrence decay.

Carlos Pineda; Thomas H. Seligman

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

LCC-0058 text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

58 58 April 2001 SLAC EDX/Auger of Cornell Nb Breakdown Test Plate B2† R. E. KIRBY AND F. MARCELJA, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, California G. Werner Laboratory of Nuclear Studies Cornell University Ithaca, New York Abstract: Residues located in the breakdown craters of a Nb cathode plate used for DC breakdown tests were successfully identified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. These residues were from deliberately seeded particles of nickel as well as adventitious silica debris. In addition, splashes of tantalum were found, apparently generated from the anode 1 LCC-0058 April, 2001 SLAC EDX/Auger of Cornell Nb Breakdown Test Plate B2†

369

Genizah MS T-S AS 155.48  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 155.48 *t Bible commentary *s 11.6 x 18.3; 11 lines (recto); 10 lines (verso) *m Paper; 1 leaf; torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic (?) *c Possibly a commentary on Job; mentions Job and 'seven bulls and seven...

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

370

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks 490 North Meridian Road  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fish and Wildlife Office, Boise, Idaho, Pacific Region, Portland, Oregon. USWS.. 1999. Status review Department of the Interior IDAHO FISH AND WILDLIFE OFFICE 1387 S. Vinnell Way, Room 368 Boise, Idaho 83709 Inspector General Report disclosing irregularities in development of its 2005 bull trout final critical

371

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KFKI­ATKI, Hungary Kaw, Institute Plasma Research, India P.J. Pathak, Librarian, Insitute Plasma, South Korea Dennis Bruggink, Fusion Library, University of Wisconsin, Institute Plasma Research. Parker, Phys. (2000). B. Cohen, Dimits, Nevins, Bull. Soc. (2000).01/09/01 External Distribution Plasma

372

Performance Optimization of VLSI Interconnect Layout Jason Cong, Lei He, Cheng-Kok Koh and Patrick H. Madden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 780 Creston Hatchery Road, Kalispell, Montana 59901 D.W. Garfield 3489 Trails End Road, Missoula decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley

He, Lei

373

SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF THE ARIES COMPACT STELLARATOR DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 780 Creston Hatchery Road, Kalispell, Montana 59901 D.W. Garfield 3489 Trails End Road, Missoula decline (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley and Shepard 1989; Spencer et for adult lake trout and bull trout (Jeppson and Platts 1959; Bjornn 1961; Martin and Olver 1980; Fraley

California at San Diego, University of

374

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS -1 -Publications in Refereed Journals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.: "On the relation between coronal free energy and solar flare occurrence", Hvar Obs. Bull., 2005 period observed in solar flares?", A&A, 2005, 433, p.707. · Temmer, M., Veronig A., Rybák, J., Brajsa, R. & Hanslmeier A.: "On the 24-day period observed in H-alpha flares", Solar Phys., 2004, 221, p.325 · Veronig A

Temmer Manuela

375

Comments on Lateral Dispersion from Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few minor errors in a paper by Hanna are noted and several questions are raised about apparent inconsistencies. One question is why substantial enhancement of ?y, by buoyancy was noted for the Bull Run data but was unmentioned for the Kincaid ...

Gary A. Briggs

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Lateral Dispersion from Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly ground-level concentrations of SF6 at downwind distances ranging from 0.5 to 50 km were observed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) on dense monitoring networks around power plants at Kincaid, Illinois, and Bull Run, ...

Steven R. Hanna

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A M a g a z i n e f o r A l u m n i a n d F r i e n d s FALL 2012 Olympic Glory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in reproduction and de- velopment. Biol. Bull. 208: 81­91. Byrne, M. 2006. Life history diversity and evolution. 1997. Molecular phyloge- netic analysis of life history evolution in asterinid starfish. Evolution 51. The impact of the "Sea Empress" oil spill. Aquat. Living Resour. 17: 389­394. Li, Y. C., A. B. Korol, T

378

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wilson Bull., 11l(l), 1999, pp. 100-104 EFFECTS OF WIND TURBINES ON UPLAND NESTING BIRDS in southwestern Minnesota to determine the relative influence of wind turbines on overall densities of upland transects that were placed along wind turbine strings within three CRP fields and in three CRP fields

379

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Middle East: stratigraphic evolution and oil habitat: discussion  

SciTech Connect

The paper, Middle East: Stratigraphic Evolution and Oil Habitat, by R.J. Murris (AAPG Bull. v. 64, p. 597-618) is discussed. Problems with the time-stratigraphic units used in the article are pointed out, along with the source rocks of the petroleum deposits, the depositional cyclicity, subsidence and sea level fluctuation, and the Middle East geosyncline. (JMT)

Ibrahim, M.W.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Registration required This lecture is free and open to the public  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

followed by refreshments Jessica Jewell International Energy Agency, Paris Hedley Bull Lecture Theatre University, Canberra In spite of the increasing policy importance of both climate change and energy security energy. Others argue there could be negative consequences for the climate if energy security is achieved

Botea, Adi

382

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coordination in wireless sensor-actuator networks: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Sensor-Actuator Networks (WSANs) have a myriad of applications, ranging from pacifying bulls to controlling light intensity in homes automatically. An important aspect of WSANs is coordination. Unlike conventional Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), ... Keywords: Actuators, Coordination, Energy efficiency, Wireless sensor and actuator networks

Hamidreza Salarian; Kwan-Wu Chin; Fazel Naghdy

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Kootenai River Fisheries Investigations: Salmonid Studies Project Progress Report, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research report addresses bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and Redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss redd surveys, population monitoring, trout distribution, and abundance surveys in the Kootenai River drainage of Idaho. The bull trout is one of several sport fish native to the Kootenai River, Idaho that no longer supports a fishery. Because bull trout are listed under the Endangered Species Act, population data will be vital to monitoring status relative to recovery goals. Thirty-three bull trout redds were found in North and South Callahan creeks and Boulder Creek in 2007. This is a decrease from 2006 and 2005 and less than the high count in 2003. However, because redd numbers have only been monitored since 2002, the data series is too short to determine bull trout population trends based on redd counts. Redband trout still provide an important Kootenai River sport fishery, but densities are low, at least partly due to limited recruitment. The redband trout proportional stock density (PSD) in 2007 increased from 2006 for a second year after a two-year decline in 2004 and 2005. This may indicate increased recruitment to or survival in the 201-305 mm length group due to the minimum 406 mm (16 inches) length limit initiated in 2002. We conducted 13 redd surveys and counted 44 redband trout redds from May 7 to June 3, 2007 in a 3.8 km survey reach on Twentymile Creek. We surveyed streams in the Kootenai River valley to look for barriers to trout migration. Man-made barriers, for at least part of the year, were found on Caboose, Debt, Fisher, and Twenty Mile creeks. Removing these barriers would increase spawning and rearing habitat for trout and help to restore trout fisheries in the Kootenai River.

Paragamian, Vaughn L.; Walters, Jody; Maiolie, Melo [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

Uncertainty Principle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Werner Heisenberg stellte im Jahre 1927 fest, dass es unmöglich ist, die Werner Heisenberg stellte im Jahre 1927 fest, dass es unmöglich ist, die Position und den Impuls eines Teilchens gleichzeitig mit beliebiger Genauigkeit zu messen. Je genauer wir die eine Grösse bestimmen, desto weniger genau kennen wir die andere. Man nennt diese grundlegende Eigenschaft der Quantenmechanik Heisenberg'sche Unschärfebeziehung, Die genaue Formulierung heisst: Die Konstante ist die Planck'sche Konstante, dividiert durch 2. Das Symbol für die Planck'sche Konstante ist , oder "h-quer", mit dem Zahlenwert von 1.05 x 10-34 joule-sekunden, oder 6.58 x 10-22 MeV-sekunden. Eine Messung des Impulses wird also die Information über den Ort des Teilchens beeinflussen - und vice-versa. Die Aussage lässt sich auch in der Form von Energie und Zeit hinschreiben.

386

The Molecular Hydrogen Deficit in Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analysis of five gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra reveal the absence of molecular hydrogen absorption lines, a surprising result in light of their large neutral hydrogen column densities and the detection of H$_2$ in similar, more local star-forming regions like 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Observational evidence further indicates that the bulk of the neutral hydrogen column in these sight lines lies 100 pc beyond the progenitor and that H$_2$ was absent prior to the burst, suggesting that direct flux from the star, FUV background fields, or both suppressed its formation. We present one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical models of GRB host galaxy environments, including self-consistent radiative transfer of both ionizing and Lyman-Werner photons, nine-species primordial chemistry with dust formation of H$_2$, and dust extinction of UV photons. We find that a single GRB progenitor is sufficient to ionize neutral hydrogen to distances of 50 - 100 pc but that a galactic Lyman-Werner background is required to dissociate the molecular hydrogen in the ambient ISM. Intensities of 0.1 - 100 times the Galactic mean are necessary to destroy H$_2$ in the cloud, depending on its density and metallicity. The minimum radii at which neutral hydrogen will be found in afterglow spectra is insensitive to the mass of the progenitor or the initial mass function (IMF) of its cluster, if present.

Daniel Whalen; Jason X. Prochaska; Alexander Heger; Jason Tumlinson

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Manhattan Project: Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION Werner Heisenberg, the leader of the German atomic weapons program. ATOMIC RIVALS AND THE ALSOS MISSION (Germany and Japan, 1938-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 For most of the Second World War, scientists and administrators of the Manhattan Project firmly believed that they were in a race with Germany to develop the atomic bomb. As it turns out, the German atomic program did not come close to developing a useable weapon. Allied planners were only able to confirm this, however, through the ALSOS intelligence mission to Europe toward the end of the war. Atomic research was also conducted in Japan, but as was suspected by the Allies, it did not get very far.

388

RELAP-7 Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RELAP-7 Development RELAP-7 Development RELAP-7 Development January 29, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis During the second quarter, the Reactor team drafted software development guidance documents and a software quality assurance plan and developed component models for pipe flows, pipe junctions, and basic reactor core channels using the Moose code development framework. These components are now being tested for inclusion in a simplified reactor model. Addthis Related Articles Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Velocity magnitude in MATiS-H spacer grid with swirl-type vanes. Nek5000 Ready to Use after Simulations of Important Pipe Flow Benchmark

389

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, 2011 1, 2011 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Thursday, Aug. 11 2:30 p.m. Theoretical Physics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Elizabeth Simmons, Michigan State University Title: The Phenomenology of the Top Triangle Moose Model 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over THERE WILL BE NO ACCELERATOR PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR TODAY Friday, Aug. 12 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speakers: Maaike Limper, University of Iowa Title: Latest Physics Results from ATLAS Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information. Upcoming conferences Campaigns Take Five Weather Weather Sunny 80°/59°

390

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 22750 of 31,917 results. 41 - 22750 of 31,917 results. Download CX-000550: Categorical Exclusion Determination Equipment Upgrades to Bull Shoals Dam Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/19/2009 Location(s): Bull Shoals Dam, Arkansas Office(s): Southwestern Power Administration http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000550-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006239: Categorical Exclusion Determination Structure Replacement, Guernsey Rural Substation to Limestone Substation, Platte County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 10/02/2009 Location(s): Platte County, Wyoming Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006239-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000786: Categorical Exclusion Determination Facility Upgrades at 222-S Laboratory Complex

391

EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-67: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to provide cost share for a program that will protect ESA-listed salmonid species in the Walla Walla River Basin through the installation of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) approved fish screens on up to 197 irrigation diversions in the basin. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) (10/4/01) - Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin More Documents & Publications

392

DOE/EIS-0342; Wanapa Energy Center Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WILDLIFE SURVEY AND ASSESSMENTS A-1 Biological Assessment for Anadromous Fish Species The following are excerpts from the Biological Assessment conducted by NMFS. Section numbering reflects the format of the original document. 1.4 Analysis Summary The NMFS and USFWS provided a list of threatened, endangered, and proposed candidate species that may occur within the Wanapa Energy Center study area in letters dated July 23, 2003. The list included bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), and seven anadromous fish species. This BA addresses potential impacts on the Pacific salmon and steelhead species. NMFS is responsible for endangered, threatened, and candidate anadromous fish species under NOAA Fisheries' jurisdiction in Oregon. Bull trout and the bald eagle are addressed in a

393

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 11 Little Rock District, Southwestern Division Impaired Waterbody Listing 303 (d) Dardanelle, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Taneycomo Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * TMDL's completed for Bull Shoals and Norfork (May 2009) * TMDL for Dardanelle is still being developed * TMDL for Lake Taneycomo was approved by the EPA for low dissolved oxygen on 30 December 2010 CURRENT ISSUES Little Rock District, Southwestern Division * Full understanding of the sources contributing to the low DO have not been identified. * Hydropower is a conduit and not a source. * Options identified to improve DO are costly. * Recommend re-evaluation of state standard or designated use of stream. DISTRICT POSITION Little Rock District, Southwestern Division WHITE RIVER MINIMUM FLOWS STUDY

394

NAWIG News: The Quarterly Newsletter of the Native American Wind Interest Group; Summer 2005  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Weather Dancer Harnesses the Power in the Wind Weather Dancer Harnesses the Power in the Wind "There was always power in the wind before there was wind power," said William Big Bull, energy manager of the Piikani Utilities Corporation in Alberta, Canada. "Now that we have harnessed this resource, we have to use it wisely and respectfully on our course of co-existence." Piikani Utilities Corporation harnessed the

395

2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI held the 2006 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) on October 31 November 2, 2006 at the Dearborn Inn in Dearborn, Michigan and at DTE Energy's Monroe Station. Post-Combustion NOX Control Program members, invited speakers, and EPRI staff participated in this two and a half day event. The workshop agenda was comprised of twenty-seven presentations, two panel discussions, and a plant tour. Operating experience reports on SCR systems at Baldwin, Bowen, Bull Run, Crist, Cumberland, Gaston, Go...

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

SLIDESHOW: Highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SLIDESHOW: Highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium SLIDESHOW: Highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium SLIDESHOW: Highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium September 26, 2013 - 10:20am Addthis The hallmark of the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium was the Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) awards ceremony, recognizing six women for their leadership and mentorship in clean energy fields. C3E award recipients (left to right): Kristen Graf, Kirstin Gunderson, Milo Werner, Rebecca Stanfield, Maxine Savitz (C3E 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient), Erica Mackie. Not pictured: Katherine Lucey. | Photo by Justin Knight. The hallmark of the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium was the Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) awards ceremony, recognizing six

398

LCC-0089 final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 UCRL-ID-148939 July 2002 Structural Modeling of Tesla TDR Positron Target Werner Stein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Menlo Park, California Abstract: The Tesla positron target is a 0.4 radiation length thick titanium target that is rotating with a speed of 50 m/s at its periphery. Energy deposition from one pulse occurs over 1 millisecond and results in heating of the target over a 5 cm arc of material. The 22.2 MeV photon beam has a spot size of 0.75 mm and results in a maximum temperature jump of 440 °C. Stresses are induced in the material from thermal expansion of the hotter material. Peak effective stresses reach 38 Ksi (2.7x10

399

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the US DOE Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, by the US DOE Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, via the SBIR & SciDAC programs; and also by ASCR, Nuclear Physics & Basic Energy Sciences via the SBIR program; used NERSC supercomputing center. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics (An HEP/ASCR/NERSC Workshop) Rockville, MD, November 12, 2009 Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Electromagnetic Modeling Efforts of the ComPASS SciDAC (and related SBIR) Projects J.R. Cary, 1,2 K. Amyx, 1 T. Austin, 1 D. Bruhwiler, 1 B. Cowan, 1 P. Messmer, 1 P. Mullowney, 1 K. Paul, 1 P. Stoltz, 1 D. Smithe, 1 S. Veitzer 1 & G. Werner 1,2 1. Tech-X Corp. 2. University of Colorado Motivating Science & Applications * Scientific objectives for the next 3-5 years: rapid high-fidelity simulation &

400

LCC-0102 text.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 UCRL- ID-150018 September 2002 Thermal Stress Analyses for an NLC Positron Target with a 3-mm Spot Radius Beam Werner Stein, Anne Sunwoo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John Sheppard, Vinod Bharadwaj, David Schultz Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford, CA 94309, USA Abstract: The power deposition of an incident electron beam in a tungsten-rhenium target and the resultant thermal shock stresses in the material have been modeled with a transient, dynamic, structural response finite element code. The Next Linear Collider electron beam is assumed split into three parts, with each part impinging on a 4 radiation lengths thick target. Three targets are required to avoid excessive thermal stresses in the targets. Energy deposition from each beam pulse occurs over 265

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Fuel Cell Research at DLR-Latest Results and current Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Research at DLR-Latest Results and current Projects Fuel Cell Research at DLR-Latest Results and current Projects Speaker(s): Werner Schnurnberger Date: March 27, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Galen Barbose Fuel cell R&D at the German Aerospace Center is focussing on both Membrane Fuel Cells (PEFC and DMFC) and high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). The status of advanced DLR Manufacturing Technologies based on dry powder coating of membranes and plasma spray concepts for metal supported SOFC will be reported shortly. Fundamental research activities actually are focussed on in situ diagnostics using segmented cells and short stacks. Some latest results will be given for locally resolved current density distribution and temperature for both PEFC and SOFC. In addition,

402

Solar Boston Program Press Event | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boston Program Press Event Boston Program Press Event Solar Boston Program Press Event April 9, 2008 - 10:50am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you, Mayor Menino. And thank you for the leadership you've provided to expand the availability and use of renewable energy - and solar, in particular - throughout this city. It's a thrill to be here at Fenway Park [- especially after such a terrific home opener yesterday]. I've been a Red Sox fan for about four decades now and I want to thank Tom Werner and the Red Sox organization for hosting this event and for the big step toward clean, sustainable energy use that you're making today. On a personal level, I couldn't be more pleased to be back in Boston. Though I was born in Chicago, I lived here for nearly 40 years. I came

403

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storm Peak Lab Cloud Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX) Operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy, the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) begins its inaugural deployment November 2010 in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment, or STORMVEX. For six months, the comprehensive suite of AMF2 instruments will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties at various sites below the heavily instrumented Storm Peak Lab, located on Mount Werner at an elevation of 3220 meters. The correlative data sets that will be created from AMF2 and Storm Peak Lab will equate to between 200 and 300 in situ aircraft flight hours in liquid, mixed phase, and precipitating

404

Microsoft PowerPoint - 9-05 Lutze LUTZE - Atlanta Nov 2010.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DuraLith Geopolymer Low DuraLith Geopolymer Low Temperature Waste Forms Werner Lutze, Weiliang Gong, and Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Atlanta , , Nov. 16 - 18, 2010 Print Close 2 DuraLith Geopolymer Low Temperature Waste Forms A Geopolymer is .... .... an inorganic solid formed by poly-condensation: NaOH n{-O-Si-OH + HO-Al-O-}  {-O-Si-O-Al-O-} n + nH 2 O General formula: (Na,K) n [(SiO 2 ) z -AlO 2 ] n ·wH 2 O 'w' << 1 1≤ z ≤ 3 Print Close 3 DuraLith Geopolymer Low Temperature Waste Forms Geopolymers ....  ... can be made at room temperature from any reactive aluminosilicate with alkali hydroxide or alkali polysilicates  ... contain very little water after complete hardening  ... are resistant to acids

405

PI Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Policy and International Affairs » PI Blog Archive Office of Policy and International Affairs » PI Blog Archive PI Blog Archive RSS September 26, 2013 The hallmark of the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium was the Clean Energy Education and Empowerment (C3E) awards ceremony, recognizing six women for their leadership and mentorship in clean energy fields. C3E award recipients (left to right): Kristen Graf, Kirstin Gunderson, Milo Werner, Rebecca Stanfield, Maxine Savitz (C3E 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient), Erica Mackie. Not pictured: Katherine Lucey. | Photo by Justin Knight. SLIDESHOW: Highlights from the 2013 Women in Clean Energy Symposium Thought-leaders from across the country convened in Boston last week. Their goal: Find strategic ways to substantially increase women's participation

406

CaseStudyTemplate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.1. Electromagnetic 1.1. Electromagnetic M odeling o f A ccelerator S tructures Prepared by: David Bruhwiler, TechX Corp. Contributors: J.R. Cary, K. Amyx, T. Austin, B. Cowan, P. Messmer, P. Mullowney, K. Paul, P. Stoltz, D. Smithe and S. Veitzer, Tech-X Corp.; G. Werner, U. of Colorado Supports the following HEP funded NERSC repositories: "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (m778)," Principal Investigator: P. Spentzouris "Particle simulation of laser wakefield particle acceleration," Principal Investigator: C.G.R. Geddes "Simulation of photonic crystal structures for laser driven particle acceleration," Principal Investigator: B. Cowan 1.1.1.1. Scientific Objectives The overarching scientific objective for the next three

407

Off-Criticality and the Massive Brownian Loop Soup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brownian loop soup is a conformally invariant Poissonian ensemble of loops in the plane recently introduced by Lawler and Werner. It has attracted significant attention for its connection to the Schramm-Loewner Evolution and Conformal Loop Ensembles and its consequent ability to describe the critical scaling limit of two-dimensional statistical mechanical models. In this paper, we introduce a natural "massive" (non-scale-invariant) version of the Brownian loop soup as a candidate to describe near-critical scaling limits, and study some of its properties, such as conformal covariance, exponential decay of correlations, and Hausdorff dimension. We also show that the massive Brownian loop soup arises as the near-critical scaling limit of a "gas" of random walk loops which is closely related to the discrete Gaussian free field.

Federico Camia

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Quantifying nonclassicality: global impact of local unitary evolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that only those composite quantum systems possessing nonvanishing quantum correlations have the property that any nontrivial local unitary evolution changes their global state. We derive the exact relation between the global state change induced by local unitary evolutions and the amount of quantum correlations. We prove that the minimal change coincides with the geometric measure of discord (defined via the Hilbert- Schmidt norm), thus providing the latter with an operational interpretation in terms of the capability of a local unitary dynamics to modify a global state. We establish that two-qubit Werner states are maximally quantum correlated, and are thus the ones that maximize this type of global quantum effect. Finally, we show that similar results hold when replacing the Hilbert-Schmidt norm with the trace norm.

S. M. Giampaolo; A. Streltsov; W. Roga; D. Bru; F. Illuminati

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

409

Getting even with Heisenberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Werner Heisenberg (1901-1976) is probably best known for his discovery of the uncertainty relations in quantum mechanics and their physical interpretation (1927). En route to quantum mechanics itself, he had earlier had the decisive insight that quantum-mechanical variables do not commute (1925). This formed the basis for the creation of matrix mechanics immediately afterwards by Born and Jordan, appearing in mature form in the `Dreimannerarbeit' with Heisenberg. 2 This was one of the two paths along which modern quantum mechanics was discovered. Some of his other achievements in theoretical physics deserve to be mentioned. Barely 20, and well before the introduction of electron spin, Heisenberg made the revolutionary proposal to allow half-integral quantum numbers in the context of the Zeeman eect (1921). He made various other signicant contributions in the period 1920-1925 that led to the establishment of quantum mechanics, and once the new

N.P. Landsman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

International scientific cooperation during the 1930s. Bruno Rossi and the development of the status of cosmic rays into a branch of physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the 1920s and 1930s strong relationships established between Italy and other European countries such as Germany, Great Britain and France, as well as with some physicists of the U.S. scientific community. Bruno Rossi, a leading personality in the study of cosmic rays and the pioneer of this research field in Italy since the early 1930s, is a prominent example in this sense. During those turbulent years in European history, when physics underwent major changes and the traditional internationalism of physics assumed a more institutionalised character, his early work was crucial in transforming the field in a branch of modern physics. His friendly relationship with eminent scientists -notably Enrico Fermi, Walther Bothe, Werner Heisenberg, Hans Bethe, Homi Bhabha- was instrumental for the exchange of knowledge about experimental practises and for theoretical discussions, as well as in attracting the attention of physicists such as Arthur Compton, Louis Leprince-Ringuet, Pierre Auger and Patrick Blackett o...

Bonolis, Luisa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Calculation of the performance of activated carbon at high relative humidities  

SciTech Connect

The Dubinin-Radushkevich potential theory was extended to include a term giving the effect of relative humidity on the uptake of adsorbate. This extended equation permit the adsorptive capacity of the activated charcoal in a respirator cartridge to be estimated for any combination of temperature, relative humidity, and concentration of contaminant. Application of this theory to previously published data of Werner showed a good correlation between theory and experiment. This equation is consistent with the experimental observations that 1) below a certain value, the relative humidity has little effect on the uptake of adsorbate, and 2) the effect of relative humidity, if observed, is more severe for lower than for higher concentration of contaminant.

Underhill, D.W.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Manhattan Project: Solvay Physics Conference  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOLVAY PHYSICS CONFERENCE SOLVAY PHYSICS CONFERENCE Brussels, Belgium (October 1933) Resources > Photo Gallery Solvay Physics Conference, Brussels, 1933 The Solvay Physics Conference, held in Brussels, Belgium, October 22-29, 1933. Attendees included two future key Manhattan Project scientists (Fermi and Lawrence), the future head of the Nazi atomic bomb program (Heisenberg), and numerous leading pre-war physicists. A partial list of those attending: Niels Bohr (seated, third from left) James Chadwick (seated, farthest right) J. B. Cockroft (middle row, third from right) Marie Curie (seated, fifth from left) Enrico Fermi (middle row, fifth from left) Werner Heisenberg (middle row, fourth from left) Ernest O. Lawrence (back row, second from right) Lise Meitner (seated, second from right)

413

Evidence cross-validation and Bayesian inference of MAST plasma equilibria  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, current profiles for plasma discharges on the mega-ampere spherical tokamak are directly calculated from pickup coil, flux loop, and motional-Stark effect observations via methods based in the statistical theory of Bayesian analysis. By representing toroidal plasma current as a series of axisymmetric current beams with rectangular cross-section and inferring the current for each one of these beams, flux-surface geometry and q-profiles are subsequently calculated by elementary application of Biot-Savart's law. The use of this plasma model in the context of Bayesian analysis was pioneered by Svensson and Werner on the joint-European tokamak [Svensson and Werner,Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50(8), 085002 (2008)]. In this framework, linear forward models are used to generate diagnostic predictions, and the probability distribution for the currents in the collection of plasma beams was subsequently calculated directly via application of Bayes' formula. In this work, we introduce a new diagnostic technique to identify and remove outlier observations associated with diagnostics falling out of calibration or suffering from an unidentified malfunction. These modifications enable a good agreement between Bayesian inference of the last-closed flux-surface with other corroborating data, such as that from force balance considerations using EFIT++[Appel et al., ''A unified approach to equilibrium reconstruction'' Proceedings of the 33rd EPS Conference on Plasma Physics (Rome, Italy, 2006)]. In addition, this analysis also yields errors on the plasma current profile and flux-surface geometry as well as directly predicting the Shafranov shift of the plasma core.

Nessi, G. T. von; Hole, M. J. [Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Svensson, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Appel, L. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Conference 8 Conference 2006 Conference 2007 Hydropower Conference The 2007 Regional Hydropower Council and Conference was hosted by the Vicksburg District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Click the links below to view materials from the council and conference. June 12, 2007, Council Skip Navigation Links Bull Shoals Switchyard Feeder Repair Hydropower Council Agenda Preliminary FY 2009 Projects Proposed FY 2008 Projects June 13, 2007, Conference Skip Navigation Links Corps Budget Process Hydraulic Steel Structures Hydropower Conference Agenda Hydropower Customer Drought Perspective Kansas City Projects Impacting Hydropower Little Rock Projects Impacting Hydropower NERC Reliability Standards and Mandatory Compliance NERC Requirements Matrix Ozark Major Rehabilitation

415

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rod Shank- SWT Project Manager Rod Shank- SWT Project Manager Joe Lapeyre- HDC Product Coordinator 12 June 2013 SWPA Engineering Analysis Program Turbine Replacement and Generator Rewind BUILDING STRONG ® * Total Analysis Budget for 5 plants- $2,358,000 * Bull Shoals- $455,000 * Norfork- $504,000 * Table Rock- $504,000 * Keystone- $391,000 * Kerr- $504,000 Turbine And Generator Engineering Analysis Budget Cost Summary BUILDING STRONG ® Each plant analysis will include- * Turbine And Generator Condition Assessment * Turbine Performance Testing as needed * Generator Uprate Limit Analysis * Development of Feasible Replacement Alternatives * Economic Analysis of Alternatives * Development of Project Budget Costs * Project Priority Ranking

416

WEC Model Development at Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2C 2C Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop - Broomfield, CO July 9 th , 2012 Wave Energy Converter Model Development at Sandia Outline  Overview of SNL's WEC Modeling Activities * Wave Energy Development Roadmap * MHK Reference Models - Diana Bull * WEC Model Tool Development - Kelley Ruehl Reference Models and SNL Array Modeling presented in next session Wave Energy Development Roadmap Overall Goal and Motivation  Goal: Develop a suggested path for WEC development from design to commercialization.  Motivation: Guide industry towards successful design optimizations, prototype deployments, and utility scale commercialization by providing a roadmap incorporating numerical modeling and experimentation.

417

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Meeting 8 Meeting 2006 Meeting 2007 Hydropower Meeting The 2007 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting were hosted by the Vicksburg District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Click the links below to view materials from the council and Meeting. June 12, 2007, Council Skip Navigation Links Bull Shoals Switchyard Feeder Repair Hydropower Council Agenda Preliminary FY 2009 Projects Proposed FY 2008 Projects June 13, 2007, Meeting Skip Navigation Links Corps Budget Process Hydraulic Steel Structures Hydropower Meeting Agenda Hydropower Customer Drought Perspective Kansas City Projects Impacting Hydropower Little Rock Projects Impacting Hydropower NERC Reliability Standards and Mandatory Compliance NERC Requirements Matrix Ozark Major Rehabilitation

418

Highways of hope  

SciTech Connect

It is hoped that through public-private partnerships between Alpha Natural Resources and Pioneer Group and Virginia Department of Transportation, and between one of these coal companies and Buchanan County, Virginia, Industrial Development Authority a four-lane 'highway of hope' between Lovers Gap and Poplar Gap will be paved and a ridge top connector route will eventually be completed to Bull Gap where it will intersect with the Coalfields Expressway and US 460. The town of Grundy is also looking into strip mining coal from beneath the small mountaintop airport at Lovers Gap and turning it into a regional airport. The article discusses these plans. 4 photos.

NONE

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Extending gear life in a coal pulverizer gearbox  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coal-fired power plant in the Western United States experienced short gearbox life in the 13 coal pulverizers operating at the plant. Wear on the bronze bull gear faces was suspected to have been caused by high particulate loading of coal dust and dirt in the gear oil, catalytic reaction between gear oil additives and some of the particulates generated, and high levels of copper in the gear oil. By addressing particulate ingress, adding filtration and switching to a synthetic gear oil, significant benefits were made to the power plant and gear oil life was extended. 2 photos., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cattle Management Systems in Humid Subtropical Areas of Western Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charges were five to six kgs of butter or 40 dre (a standard dre contains 1.68 kg rice) locally grown milled rice per season. Some herders were also reported to be paying cash (Nu.900) for a seasons access. During migration, cattle are allowed... while 39 percent of herders fed only Jourrnal of Bhutan Sstudies 110 the calves. Breeding bulls were given special care and periodically fed with raw eggs, butter and milk, in addition to supplementary feed. Feeds given were mostly wheat flour...

Tamang, N B; Perkins, J M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Analysis of polymorphisms in 16 genes in type 1 diabetes that have been associated with other immune-mediated diseases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Whittaker J, Meeks J, Powell RJ, Isenberg DA, Walport MJ, Vyse TJ: Polymorphism at the C-reactive protein locus influences gene expression and predisposes to systemic lupus ery- thematosus. Hum Mol Genet 2004, 13:137-147. 15. Szalai AJ, McCrory MA, Cooper... , Chow C, Cohen A, Lan- gelier D, Lapointe G, Gaudet D, Faith J, Branco N, Bull SB, McLeod RS, Griffiths AM, Bitton A, Greenberg GR, Lander ES, Siminovitch KA, Hudson TJ: Genetic variation in the 5q31 cytokine gene clus- ter confers susceptibility...

Smyth, Deborah J; Howson, Joanna M M; Payne, Felicity; Maier, Lisa M; Bailey, Rebecca; Holland, Kieran; Lowe, Christopher E; Cooper, Jason D; Hulme, John S; Vella, Adrian; Dalhman, Ingrid; Lam, Alex C; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Twells, Rebecca C J; Todd, John A

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 35 DNA-dependent helicase, 35 exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of XPG as well as the C-terminal region of WRN. The physical interaction between XPG and WRN links NER, (made evident by the disease XP) with DSBR, which imparts additional knowledge of the overlapping nature of these two proteins and the previously distinct DNA repair pathways they are associated with. Since genomic integrity is constantly threatened by both endogenous and exogenous (internal and external) damage, understanding the roles of these proteins in coordinating DNA repair processes with replication will signifi cantly further understanding how defects instigate physiological consequences in response to various DNA damaging sources. This ultimately contributes to our understanding of cancer and premature aging.

Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Kalispell (i.e. Kalispel) Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996 the Kalispell Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). A habitat and population assessment was conducted on Browns Creek a tributary of Cee Cee Ah Creek, one of the priority tributaries outlined in the 1995 annual report. The assessment was used to determine the type and quality of habitat that was limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high amounts of sediment in the stream, low bank cover, and a lack of winter habitat. Data collected from this assessment was used to prescribe habitat enhancement measures for Browns Creek. Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1995 annual report, were conducted during field season 1996. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and in stream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. The construction of the largemouth bass hatchery was started in October of 1995. The KNRD, Contractors Northwest Inc. and associated subcontractors are in the process of constructing the hatchery. The projected date of hatchery completion is summer 1997.

Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 April 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

Smith River Rancheria's Development of an Energy Organization Investigation  

SciTech Connect

Smith River Rancheria (SRR), for some time, has had a strong commitment to attaining energy selfsufficiency, to reduce overall energy costs and concurrently initiate economic development within the community. Early on it was recognized that the development of an energy organization was important and for this reason was made part of the SRR's strategic review not only for economic development but also the reduction of energy costs. Towards this end, SRR retained Werner G. Buehler of W.G. Buehler & Associates to investigate the many phases or steps required to establish such an energy organization and determine, if in fact, it could benefit the Tribe. The basic phases are delineated as: (1) Identify potential sources of wholesale power and transmission paths; (2) Evaluating the various forms of energy organizations; (3) Determining the benefits (and disadvantages) of each form of organization; (4) Gathering costs to organize and operate the selected form or energy organization; (5) Performing an economic analysis of forming and operating an energy organization; and (6) Develop an implementation plan.

W.G Buehler & Associates

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Langevin equation description of dynamic nuclear deformation  

SciTech Connect

A model of dynamic nuclear deformation is developed in which the collective degrees of freedom of a nucleus are coupled to subcollective degrees of freedom by means of friction and fluctuation forces in the equations of motion for the collective degrees of freedom. The Langevin equation is a stochastic differential equation that includes friction and fluctuation terms, so it is used as the equation of motion in this model. The necessary inertia and friction parameters are obtained using the Werner-Wheeler approximation, and the fluctuation parameter is obtained by applying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown that a second order Runge-Kutta method for numerical solution of the Langevin equation is much better than the commonly employed Euler method. Poor random number generators are shown to have serious negative effects in a Langevin simulation. Several case studies are described, including a model employing the (c, h, [alpha]) shape parameterization with h set equal to zero to reduce it to two dimensions. This parameterization allows scission into fragments of varying relative sizes, providing a suitable model for study for mass distributions, transient times, and the importance of dynamics on distributions and scission rates.

Roeth, N.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

NMR Quantum Information Processing with Para-Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problems of initialization and separability in liquid state NMR based quantum information processors. We prepare pure quantum states lying above the entanglement threshold. Our pure state quantum computer derives its purity from the highly polarized nuclear spin states in the para-hydrogen molecule. The thesis begins with a critique of conventional NMR based quantum information processing outlining the major strengths and weaknesses of the technology. We describe the enhanced magnetic ordering of the nuclear spin states in para-hydrogen and an initialization experiment exploiting this effect to achieve pure, entangled states. These states can indeed be used as initial states in implementing quantum algorithms: we describe mplementations of the Deutsch and the Grover quantum algorithms. The "twirl" operation converts a completely arbitrary input state to a Werner singlet. The NMR implementation of this operation is taken up. We also analyze the possibility of sharing the purity of some highly polarized qubits in a quantum computer onto quantum subspaces of arbitrary dimensions, and whether these sharing operations increase or decrease the likelihood of entanglement.

M. S. Anwar

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Molecular Hydrogen Emission Lines in Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer Observations of Mira B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) observations of Mira A's wind-accreting companion star, Mira B. We find that the strongest lines in the FUSE spectrum are H2 lines fluoresced by H I Lyman-alpha. A previously analyzed Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrum also shows numerous Lyman-alpha fluoresced H2 lines. The HST lines are all Lyman band lines, while the FUSE H2 lines are mostly Werner band lines, many of them never before identified in an astrophysical spectrum. We combine the FUSE and HST data to refine estimates of the physical properties of the emitting H2 gas. We find that the emission can be reproduced by an H2 layer with a temperature and column density of T=3900 K and log N(H2)=17.1, respectively. Another similarity between the HST and FUSE data, besides the prevalence of H2 emission, is the surprising weakness of the continuum and high temperature emission lines, suggesting that accretion onto Mira B has weakened dramatically. The UV fluxes observed by HST on 1999 August 2 were previously reported to be over an order of magnitude lower than those observed by HST and the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) from 1979--1995. Analysis of the FUSE data reveals that Mira B was still in a similarly low state on 2001 November 22.

Brian E. Wood; Margarita Karovska

2003-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

WRN Exonuclease Structure, Molecular Mechanism, and DNA EndProcessing Role  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WRN is unique among the five human RecQ DNA helicases by having a functional exonuclease domain (WRN-exo) and being defective in the premature aging and cancer-related disorder Werner syndrome. Here, we characterize WRN-exo crystal structures, biochemical activity and participation in DNA end-joining. Metal ion complex structures, active site mutations and activity assays reveal a two-metal-ion mediated nuclease mechanism. The DNA end-binding Ku70/80 complex specifically stimulates WRN-exo activity, and structure-based mutational inactivation of WRN-exo alters DNA end-joining in human cells. We furthermore establish structural and biochemical similarities of WRN-exo to DnaQ family replicative proofreading exonucleases, with WRN-specific adaptations consistent with dsDNA specificity and functionally important conformational changes. These results indicate WRN-exo is a human DnaQ family member and support analogous proof-reading activities that are stimulated by Ku70/80 with implications for WRN functions in age related pathologies and maintenance of genomic integrity.

Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Yannone, Steven M.; Holden, Lauren G.; Hitomi, Chiharu; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Han, Seungil; Cooper, PriscillaK.; Chen, David J.; Tainer, John A.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Rothmund-Thomson gene product RECQL4 localizes to the nucleolus in response to oxidative stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutations in the RECQL4 helicase gene have been linked to Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS), which is characterized by poikiloderma, growth deficiency, and a predisposition to cancer. Examination of RECQL4 subcellular localization in live cells demonstrated a nucleoplasmic pattern and, to a lesser degree, staining in nucleoli. Analysis of RECQL4-GFP deletion mutants revealed two nuclear localization regions in the N-terminal region of RECQL4 and a nucleolar localization signal at amino acids 376-386. RECQL4 localization did not change after treatment with the DNA-damaging agents bleomycin, etoposide, UV irradiation and {gamma} irradiation, in contrast to the Bloom and Werner syndrome helicases that relocate to distinct nuclear foci after damage. However, in a significant number of cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide or streptonigrin, RECQL4 accumulated in nucleoli. Using a T7 phage display screen, we determined that RECQL4 interacts with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme that promotes genomic integrity through its involvement in DNA repair and signaling pathways. The RECQL4 nucleolar localization was inhibited by pretreatment with a PARP-1 inhibitor. The C-terminal portion of RECQL4 was found to be an in vitro substrate for PARP-1. These results demonstrate changes in the intracellular localization of RECQL4 in response to oxidative stress and identify an interaction between RECQL4 and PARP-1.

Woo, Leslie L. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Ave., MC1089, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Futami, Kazunobu [Department of Target Discovery, GeneCare Research Institute, 200 Kajiwara, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-0063 (Japan); Shimamoto, Akira [Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Furuichi, Yasuhiro [Department of Target Discovery, GeneCare Research Institute, 200 Kajiwara, Kamakura, Kanagawa 247-0063 (Japan); Frank, Karen M. [Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Ave., MC1089, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)]. E-mail: kfrank@uchicago.edu

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

A comparison of the point kinetics equations with the QUANDRY analytic nodal diffusion method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The point kinetics equations were incorporated into QUANDRY, a nuclear reactor analysis computer program which uses the analytic nodal method to solve the neutron diffusion equation. Both the point kinetics equations, solved using the IMSL MATH/LIBRARY subroutine DIVPAG, and the analytic nodal method were coupled to the WIGL thermal-hydraulic model. The Langenbuch-Maurer-Werner (LMW) model was adapted for use as a test core. The QUANDRY model was used to generate point kinetics parameters. equations. The two neutronics methods were then compared for a range of typical transients encountered in a light water nuclear reactor core. The temperature reactivity coefficients found for the modified LMW core and used with point kinetics were shown to be grossly inaccurate, but the rod worth curve generated using QUANDRY only slightly overestimated the amount of reactivity inserted by rod movement. While the small rod worth errors caused point kinetics to give poor approximations for high rates of reactivity insertions of over one dollar, these large amounts and insertion rates are well above those found during most operational transients in commercial reactors.

Velasquez, Arthur

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Safe testing nuclear rockets economically  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several studies over the past few decades have recognized the need for advanced propulsion to explore the solar system. As early as the 1960s, Werner Von Braun and others recognized the need for a nuclear rocket for sending humans to Mars. The great distances, the intense radiation levels, and the physiological response to zero-gravity all supported the concept of using a nuclear rocket to decrease mission time. These same needs have been recognized in later studies, especially in the Space Exploration Initiative in 1989. One of the key questions that has arisen in later studies, however, is the ability to test a nuclear rocket engine in the current societal environment. Unlike the RoverMERVA programs in the 1960s, the rocket exhaust can no longer be vented to the open atmosphere. As a consequence, previous studies have examined the feasibility of building a large-scale version of the Nuclear Furnace Scrubber that was demonstrated in 1971. We have investigated an alternative that would deposit the rocket exhaust along with any entrained fission products directly into the ground. The Subsurface Active Filtering of Exhaust, or SAFE, concept would allow variable sized engines to be tested for long times at a modest expense. A system overview, results of preliminary calculations, and cost estimates of proof of concept demonstrations are presented. The results indicate that a nuclear rocket could be tested at the Nevada Test Site for under $20 M.

Howe, S. D. (Steven D.); Travis, B. J. (Bryan J.); Zerkle, D. K. (David K.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Validation of Broadly Filtered Diagonalization Method for Extracting Frequencies and Modes from High-Performance Computations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments have shown that one can get around the difficulties of finding the eigenvalues and eigenmodes of the large systems studied with high performance computation by using broadly filtered diagonalization [G. R. Werner and J. R. Cary, J. Compo Phys. 227, 5200 (2008)]. This method can be used in conjunction with any time-domain computation, in particular those that scale very well up to 10000s of processors and beyond. Here we present results that show that this method accurately obtains both modes and frequencies of electromagnetic cavities, even when frequencies are nearly degenerate. The application was to a well-characterized Kaon separator cavity, the A15. The computations are shown to have a precision to a few parts in 10{sup 5}. Because the computed frequency differed from the measured frequency by more than this amount, a careful validation study to determine all sources of difference was undertaken. Ultimately, more precise measurements of the cavity showed that the computations were correct, with remaining differences accounted for by uncertainties in cavity dimensions and atmospheric and thermal conditions. Thus, not only was the method validated, but it was shown to have the ability to predict differences in cavity dimensions from fabrication specifications.

Austin, T.M.; Cary, J.R.; /Colorado U.; Werner, G.R.; /Colorado U.; Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Stapp`s quantum dualism: The James/Heisenberg model of consciousness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Henry Stapp attempts to resolve the Cartesian dilemma by introducing what the author would characterize as an ontological dualism between mind and matter. His model for mind comes from William James` description of conscious events and for matter from Werner Heisenberg`s ontological model for quantum events (wave function collapse). His demonstration of the isomorphism between the two types of events is successful, but in the author`s opinion fails to establish a monistic, scientific theory. The author traces Stapp`s failure to his adamant rejection of arbitrariness, or `randomness`. This makes it impossible for him (or for Bohr and Pauli before him) to understand the power of Darwin`s explanation of biology, let along the triumphs of modern `neo-Darwinism`. The author notes that the point at issue is a modern version of the unresolved opposition between Leucippus and Democritus on one side and Epicurus on the other. Stapp`s views are contrasted with recent discussions of consciousness by two eminent biologists: Crick and Edelman. They locate the problem firmly in the context of natural selection on the surface of the earth. Their approaches provide a sound basis for further scientific work. The author briefly examines the connection between this scientific (rather than ontological) framework and the new fundamental theory based on bit-strings and the combinatorial hierarchy.

Noyes, H.P.

1994-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Absorption-Line Spectroscopy of Planetary Nebulae with FUSE: Probing the Molecular, Atomic, and Ionized Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central stars of planetary nebulae (PNe) are natural targets for FUSE due to their UV brightness. The FUSE spectra of many PNe show absorption features due to circumstellar material in species ranging from H_2 and neutrals in the photodissociation region (PDR) to ions resident in the H II region. We report results from a program designed to search for nebular components in the H_2 Lyman and Werner resonance lines that are responsible for the fluorescent excitation of H_2 in strong FUV radiation fields. Our failure to detect H_2 in absorption in several PNe with strong near-infrared H_2 emission indicates that the molecular material has an asymmetrical or clumpy distribution. We also detect enrichments in the s-process product Ge, find that Fe is not depleted into dust along at least one line of sight through a PN, and show that starlight fluorescence can affect the populations of the excited fine-structure levels of O I.

Dinerstein, H L; Bowers, C W; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Bowers, Charles W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Absorption-Line Spectroscopy of Planetary Nebulae with FUSE: Probing the Molecular, Atomic, and Ionized Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The central stars of planetary nebulae (PNe) are natural targets for FUSE due to their UV brightness. The FUSE spectra of many PNe show absorption features due to circumstellar material in species ranging from H_2 and neutrals in the photodissociation region (PDR) to ions resident in the H II region. We report results from a program designed to search for nebular components in the H_2 Lyman and Werner resonance lines that are responsible for the fluorescent excitation of H_2 in strong FUV radiation fields. Our failure to detect H_2 in absorption in several PNe with strong near-infrared H_2 emission indicates that the molecular material has an asymmetrical or clumpy distribution. We also detect enrichments in the s-process product Ge, find that Fe is not depleted into dust along at least one line of sight through a PN, and show that starlight fluorescence can affect the populations of the excited fine-structure levels of O I.

Harriet L. Dinerstein; N. C. Sterling; Charles W. Bowers

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

440

Glenn T. Seaborg - Patents - 1954 through 1958  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

54 – 1958) 54 – 1958) Seaborg Page · Resources with Additional Information · Patents (1959, 1960–1961, 1962–1965) US 2,698,290 (The Isotope of Curium Having a Mass Number of 238) G.T. Seaborg, K. Street Jr.; Dec 28, 1954. A method of producing Cm238 by bombarding Pu239 with 80-Mev alpha particles from a cyclotron and chemically separating the curium from the complex mixture of products including several curium isotopes, the original target material, and a variety of rare earth fission products are described. The Cm238 is identified by means of an alpha particle pulse analysis. US 2,776,185 (Method of Concentrating Fissionable Material) G.T. Seaborg, L.B. Werner, B.A. Fries; Jan 1, 1957. A process is described for concentrating dilute solutions of Pu. The process consists of alternately using La salt precipitate and Nb2O5 precipitates as carriers for the Pu, and of redissolving each precipitate in a substantially smaller volume of solvent than it was precipitated from. This cycle is repeated a sufficient number of times to obtain the desired degree of concentration.

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441

Stratigraphy, petrology, and depositional environments of upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Sabbath Creek section, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 9387-ft (2816-m) section of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary strata is exposed along Sabbath Creek in the northern ANWR of north-eastern Alaska and represents a regressive depositional sequence. The entire section is divided into four lithologic units (A-D), each characterized by distinct depositional assemblages. Unit A, at the base of the section, consists of several coarsening-upward sequences of alternating thick organic-rich siltstones an fine-grained litharenites, representing deposition in subaqueous to lower delta-plain environments. Unit B stratigraphically overlies Unit A and is characterized by multiple, mutually erosive, fining-upward sequences of fine to coarse pebble litharenites typical of point-bar sequences in a meandering stream environment (lower to upper delta plain). Unit C consists of multiple, poorly developed fining-upward sequences of dominantly clast- and matrix-supported pebble conglomerate interpreted as braided stream deposits. At the top of the section, Unit D is characterized by multiple fining- and a few coarsening-upward sequences of organic-rich shale with minor amounts of medium to coarse litharenite and pebble conglomerate representing meandering stream deposition. The Sabbath Creek section is lithologically dissimilar to coeval units to the west. The Sagavanirktok Formation and Colville Group contain pyroclastic material and thick coal beds not seen in the Sabbath Creek section. Instead, this section is lithologically similar to the Moose Channel formation - a regressive, fluvial, deltaic sequence exposed in the MacKenzie delta area of northwestern Canada. Consequently , detailed interpretation of the sabbath Creek section has important implications concerning the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and offshore beaufort Sea.

Buckingham, M.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of off-gas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data is obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data and parameters were input into the adsorption model to develop models specific for krypton adsorption. The same can be done for iodine, xenon, and tritium. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Customers will be given access to OSPREY to used and evaluate the model.

Veronica J. Rutledge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

Veronica J Rutledge

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

McHenry County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

42.3039993,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]} 42.3039993,"lon":-88.4016041,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]} Display map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. McHenry County is a county in Illinois. Its FIPS County Code is 111. It is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in McHenry County, Illinois Algonquin, Illinois Barrington Hills, Illinois Bull Valley, Illinois Cary, Illinois Crystal Lake, Illinois Fox Lake, Illinois Fox River Grove, Illinois Greenwood, Illinois Harvard, Illinois Hebron, Illinois Holiday Hills, Illinois Huntley, Illinois Island Lake, Illinois Johnsburg, Illinois

446

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) (10/4/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-67) Jay Marcotte Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Install Fish Screens to Protect ESA Listed Steelhead and Bull Trout in the Walla Walla Basin. Project No: 2001-039-00 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways. Location: Various Walla Walla River Basin Irrigation Diversions, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Walla Walla County Conservation District. Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to provide cost share for a program that

447

TO: J. R. Novak From: H. J. Moe Industrial Hygiene & Safety  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

R. Novak R. Novak From: H. J. Moe Industrial Hygiene & Safety Industrial Hygiene & S&&y Subject:' Report on Decontamination of Great Lakes Carbon Corporation F0lloui.q Completion of Treat Fuel Fabrication Clean-up operations of Great Lakes Carbon Corporation were started by Reclzunation personnel on ~nday, September 8 end comp~&~ on Friday, September E. An initial soar survey of the bull- prior to the start of the fabrication pmject had indicated alpha activity of O-3 dpm/ft2 and beta activity of O-541 dpm/ft2 on the floorofthebullding. Horizontal mttiaces showed from O-53 dpm/ft2 alpha and 0-583 dpm/ft2 beta. This contamination was due to previous work with nolmal urenim and thorium. A smear~lnslde the ovenwhichwouldbe usedto bake the fabrlcated

448

MSD Information - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2+00:00 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source 2+00:00 Joomla! 1.6 - Open Source Content Management Quantum spins mimic refrigerator magnets 2012-10-16T21:07:14+00:00 2012-10-16T21:07:14+00:00 http://www.msd.anl.gov/highlights/quantum-spins Tim Kendall tkendall@anl.gov Quantum spins mimic refrigerator magnets By Joseph Bernstein &bull; October 11, 2012

The behavior of magnetic moments in metal

449

CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Categorical Exclusion Determination 22: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003622: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fiscal Year 2010 Secure and Restore Fish and Wildlife Habitat CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/16/2010 Location(s): Sanders County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of 35 acres of property along the Jocko River by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the entire property as a condition of funding the acquisition. The property is being acquired because of the opportunity it provides to protect and enhance the habitat for important resident fish species. The Jocko River is part of a watershed designated as critical habitat for bull trout, resident

450

CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007364: Categorical Exclusion Determination Provision of Funds to the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho to Purchase the Upper Twin Rivers Conservation Easement CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 11/17/2011 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the acquisition of 87 acres in the Kootenai River watershed for wildlife habitat mitigation. The acquisition parcel was selected for protection in part due to the potential to restore altered riparian habitats for wildlife, resident fish species (i.e., rainbow trout, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee) and the Kootenai River White Sturgeon, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The Kootenai River watershed

451

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

452

EIS-0265-SA-101: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Supplement Analysis 1: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-101: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program BPA proposes to fund a project to enhance fish habitat on Hawley Creek, tributary to the Lemhi River in Idaho, by leasing 7 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water per year for twenty years. The water will be dedicated to instream flow through an agreement with the water right holders and all junior water users. Due partially to irrigation withdrawals, Hawley Creek is often hydrologically disconnected from the Lemhi River. The goal of the proposed project is to leave water instream, to reconnect Hawley Creek to the Lemhi River, to improve habitat and provide passage for chinook salmon, steelhead, and bull trout, and other aquatic species. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS, DOE/EIS-0265

453

DOE/EIS-0312; Bonneville Power Administration, Fish and Wildlife Implementation Plan Draft EIS (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia River Basin Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area NZ20027a April 02, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area than 10 micrometers ) Maintenance Moderate Serious Maintenance Moderate Serious Maintenance Federal Class I Area Coal Oil Gas Biomass* Nuclear Municipal Solid Waste Black Liquor Raw Sulfur Biogas / Methane Multiple types Solar Wind Gas Solar Wind Geothermal * Some biomass can be considered renewable. * Locations of proposed plants are approximate and not intended represent legal or claimed locations. NZ20027b April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Flow Limited Temperature Limited Flow and Temperature Limited NZ20027j April 03, 2001 Columbia River Basin BPA Service Area Anadromous Fish Extinct Listed Anadromous Fish Species Listed Resident Fish - Bull Trout

454

Frontiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontiers Frontiers of Discovery Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S 06 Energy Frontier 08 CDF 09 DZero 10 CMS 11 LHC Remote Operations 12 SRF Technology 12 ILC 13 Muon Collider 14 Intensity Frontier 16 NOνA 17 MINOS 18 MicroBooNE 18 MiniBooNE 19 MINERνA 20 SRF Test Accelerator 21 Project X 22 LBNE 22 Liquid Argon 23 Mu2e 24 Cosmic Frontier 26 Pierre Auger 27 Dark Energy Survey 28 DAMIC 29 CDMS 30 COUPP 31 Holometer Robert Wilson, Fermilab's founding director, introduced the first American bison, a bull and four cows, to the Fermilab site in 1969. The bison symbolize the laboratory's historic connection to the great Midwestern prairie and Fermilab's role at the frontiers of research in particle physics. Frontiers of discovery What is the nature of the universe? What are matter and

455

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Authors: Antone L.Brooks, Richard J. Bull, Lezlie A. Couch. Institutions: Washington State University Tri-Cities The purpose of this project is to provide scientific, technical, and organizational support to optimize the impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. This project will serve as a focal point for collection and dissemination of scientific information from the scientists funded in the Program to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the regulatory agencies, and the public. The project will be responsible for analysis of the scientific information in the broader context of biomedical research and will provide this information to the Office of Biological Research

456

Microsoft PowerPoint - 090402_cops_backup.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goal: Goal: Advance the quality of forecasts of orographically-induced convective precipitation by 4D observations and modeling of its life cycle precipitation by 4D observations and modeling of its life cycle Volker Wulfmeyer Institute of Physics and Meteorology (IPM) f y gy ( ) University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany and the COPS International Science Steering Committee Motivation and strategy Set up and performance Set up and performance First highlights Ongoing and future projects Wulfmeyer et al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. 89(10), 1477-1486, 2008, Ongoing and future projects 1 April 2, 2009 19 th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting, Louisville, USA DOI:10.1175/2008BAMS2367.1. The Importance of Orography for Weather d Cli t R h and Climate Research Global population density 1995 1 k h i t l E

457

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED ACTION:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) proposes to modify and/or construct several Arkansas, Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) proposes to modify and/or construct several Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri communication tower facilities to facilitate the spectrum relocation of Federal communications systems in conjunction with the Commercial Spectrum Enhancement Act (CSEA, Title II of P.L. 108-494). Communication tower facility modifications and construction activities include 13 tower replacements, 16 tower removals, and 6 communication site dispositions. The 35 tower project locations, identified by state, include: ~ Arkansas- Hardy, Melbourne, Paragould, Piggott, Bethel, Bull Shoals, Norfork, Piggott, Poteau Mountain, Decatur, Sulphur Rock, Van Buren, Winesburg, and Humphrey ~ Oklahoma- Broken Bow Project Office, Broken Bow Powerhouse, Gore Substation, Lamar, Weleetka,

458

CX-002438: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

438: Categorical Exclusion Determination 438: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002438: Categorical Exclusion Determination Rocky Reach-Maple Valley Number-1 Transmission Line Bridge Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/03/2010 Location(s): Kittitas County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has a need to construct a bridge across Cold Creek. Although a bridge once stood at this location, currently the only access to mile 47 of BPA?s Rocky Reach-Maple Valley Number- 1 transmission line is through an existing ford. Cold Creek provides habitat for Middle Columbia River Basin bull trout, a listed threatened species. As a result, future access to mile 47 of the Rocky Reach-Maple Valley transmission line may be greatly restricted or eliminated. Abandoning the

459

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2006 8, 2006 LITTLE ROCK DISTRICT STUDIES AFFECTING FEDERAL HYDROPOWER Hydropower Conference June 8, 2006 US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving The Army and the Nation Current Studies/Projects Current Studies/Projects * 303(d) Listing - Bull Shoals, Norfork, Dardanelle - Districts Position *Table Rock Auxiliary Spillway * White River Minimum Flows * Arkansas River Navigation * White River Basin Comprehensive Study * Norfork Stilling Basin Aeration * Water Supply Storage Reallocations US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers of Engineers ® ® One Corps Serving

460

Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the sixth chapter of The Hanford Story video series to the public today. "Plutonium Finishing Plant" provides viewers with a look at the history and cleanup of the highest hazard facility remaining at the Hanford Site. The plant produced nearly two-thirds of the nation's supply of plutonium for the nuclear weapons program and was once the center of the bulls-eye of

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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461

TVA Contribution...How should Criteria be Applied in the Designation of NIETCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTRIBUTION - CONTRIBUTION - PANEL 3 How Should Criteria be Applied in the Designation of NIETCs David Till TVA 1 DOE Congestion Study Technical Conference, Chicago March 29 2006 How should NIETC's be defined? 1: A solution to significant congestion which cannot be justified by conventional planning/economic criteria 2: A solution to significant congestion which can be conventionally justified, but which is not progressing NIETCs may be inter- or intra-State, inter- or intra-utility and must solve a root cause rather than a symptom 2 NIETC 1: Without conventional justification TVA's Bull Run - Volunteer 500-kV line: Adequate capacity to supply native load reliably Severe constraint to market transfers across TVA 3 10,000 MW transfer capability increase 4 Cumberland- Montgomery Paradise-

462

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ND-TRIBE-STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE ND-TRIBE-STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE Location: Tribe ND-TRIBE- STANDING ROCK SIOUX TRIBE ND American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Descriptio The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe of North Dakota proposes to install a 10 kW wind turbine that would be connected on the Sitting Bull College Finance Center on the campus of the Tribe's college in Fort Yates, North Dakota. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

463

CX-006574: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Categorical Exclusion Determination 74: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006574: Categorical Exclusion Determination Purchase of the Diamond B Conservation Easement CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/16/2011 Location(s): Flathead County, Montana Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to acquire a conservation easement of 192-acres along the mainstream Flathead River. The Diamond B property conservation easement will help protect one mile of important migratory habitat for bull trout, which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, as well as resident west slope cutthroat trout, which are considered a species of concern by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. BPA will be granted a perpetual conservation easement over the 192-acres. Funding this conservation easement will provide BPA with credits

464

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

465

Final Participant List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Participant List Participant List Chris Aardahl PNNL Andy Abele Quantum Technologies, Inc. Salvador Aceves Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab Arlene Anderson US DOE HFCIT Anthony Androsky US Fuel Cell Council S. O. Bade Shrestha Western Michigan University Renee Bagwell Praxair, Inc. Jeff Bentley Fideris Inc. Gene Berry Engineer LLNL Stanley Bull NREL Joseph Carpenter U.S. DOE David Caulk General Motors R&D Center Gerald Ceasar DOC NIST ATP William Charron Ford Motor Company Max J. Clausen Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kevin Collins CP Industries Vince Contini Battelle Memorial Institute James Dayton UTC Fuel Cells Daniel Dedrick Sandia National Labs Peter Devlin U.S. DOE M. Alkan Donmez NIST David Dornfeld University of California

466

PRESENTATION TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern Regional Southwestern Regional Hydropower Conference Michael Biggs, PE Chief, Reservoir Control Section Hydraulics & Technical Services Branch Little Rock District 16 June 2011 BUILDING STRONG ® White River Operations BUILDING STRONG ® Typical River Basin BUILDING STRONG ® Typical Multi Purpose Project BUILDING STRONG ® Typical River Section BUILDING STRONG ® Typical Regulating Station BUILDING STRONG ® White River Basin and Projects BUILDING STRONG ® White River System  Operated as a SYSTEM of reservoirs ► Beaver, Table Rock, Bull Shoals, Norfork are a 4-lake subsystem ► Greers Ferry ► Clearwater  "Comprehensive" system of water control regulation ► encompasses the entire White River basin ► 1 water control plan  Operation of the system is VERY COMPLEX

467

Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date 1997 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine a major lithospheric boundary Notes Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Isotope ratios from the Coso field form a bull's-eye pattern with very low 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033) centered just south of the geothermal area. The

468

Property:Incentive/Cont3Addr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cont3Addr Cont3Addr Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/Cont3Addr Property Type String Pages using the property "Incentive/Cont3Addr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP (Central and North) - CitySmart Program (Texas) + 4301 Westbank Dr., Bldg A Ste. 250 + AEP (Central, North and SWEPCO) - Commercial Solutions Program (Texas) + 4301 Westbank Dr., Bldg A Ste. 250 + AEP Public Service Company of Oklahoma - Non-Residential Efficiency Rebate Program (Oklahoma) + 7160 N. Dallas Parkway + AEP Texas - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Texas) + 539 N. Carancahua + Atomic Energy and Radiation Control Act (South Carolina) + 2600 Bull Street + B Belle Fourche River Compact (South Dakota) + 1837 5th Ave +

469

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

470

OR_Knox_area_2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knoxville Knoxville Nashville Oak Ridge via State Route 162 North STAYBRIDGE SUITES THE VISTA INN and THE SUPER 8 MOTEL NATIONAL ENERGY SECURITY CENTER NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER ETTP OBSERVATION CENTER MELTON HILL DAM HAMPTON INN BULL RUN STEAM PLANT (TVA) COMFORT INN BENEFITS JAMESON INN U.S. ITER PROJECT OFFICE COMMERCE PARK OAK RIDGE/KNOXVILLE DETAILED ROUTE MAP A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V ORAU / ORISE / POLLARD AUDITORIUM U.S. POST OFFICE METHODIST MEDICAL CENTER UT ARBORETUM W X Y Z CIVIC COLISEUM KNOXVILLE CONVENTION CENTER UT MAIN CAMPUS UT AGRICULTURAL CAMPUS KNOXVILLE LEGEND OAK RIDGE LEGEND To Chattanooga (I-75S) To Nashville (I-40W) Kingston Exit 356 Oliver Springs Clinton Lake City To Cincinnati (I-75N) Norris Lovell Road Exit 374 Melton Hill Dam Exit 364 I-140 and I-40/I-75 Interchange

471

Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford Sixth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Covers History and Cleanup of Most Hazardous Facility at Hanford April 18, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the sixth chapter of The Hanford Story video series to the public today. "Plutonium Finishing Plant" provides viewers with a look at the history and cleanup of the highest hazard facility remaining at the Hanford Site. The plant produced nearly two-thirds of the nation's supply of plutonium for the nuclear weapons program and was once the center of the bulls-eye of

472

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

473

Slide 0  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

US EIA/SAIS 2010 Energy Conference US EIA/SAIS 2010 Energy Conference Short-term Stressses, Long-Term Change Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most? April 6, 2010 Edward L. Morse Head of Global Commodities Research +1 212 325 1013 edward.morse@credit-suisse.com ANALYST CERTIFICATIONS AND IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES ARE IN THE DISCLOSURE APPENDIX. FOR OTHER IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES, PLEASE REFER TO https://firesearchdisclosure.credit-suisse.com. 1 What have we learned about commodities? 2 Structural commodity bull market looks like it is here to stay...but with a difference  A nearly decade-long global commodity boom cycle, interrupted by 2008, - Was propelled initially by a rapid nearly simultaneous reduction in energy, base metals, agricultural and bulk commodity inventories and by production supply

474

Microsoft Word - Ostrander Line Swap CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2011 March 10, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Erich Orth Project Manager - TEP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Ostrander Line Swap Budget Information: WO #'s 00261551, 00261552, & 00261553 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.11 "Construction of electric power substations... or relocation of existing electric powerlines..." Location: Clackamas County, Oregon  Township 2 South, Range 3 East, Sections 26 & 35 of the Redland Quadrangle  Township 2 South, Range 4 East, Sections 16, 17, 20, & 21 of the Sandy Quadrangle  Township 1 South, Range 5 East, Sections 31 & 32 of the Bull Run Quadrangle Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)

475

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha sub-basins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Oregon Screens Project was to implement 20 replacement screens projects in the John Day sub-basin and any projects identified in the Umatilla and Walla Walla sub-basins. A secondary goal is to complete a passage project, if one is identified, in any of the above sub-basins. Mid-Columbia ESU listed steelhead and USF&W listed bull trout inhabit these sub-basins and are present at most locations, along with a variety of resident fish species. We also provide assistance to our Enterprise Screen Shop, in the Grande Ronde/Imnaha subbasins, if needed. All projects were designed and implemented under current National Marine Fisheries Service screening and passage criteria.

Allen, Steve (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, John Day, OR)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Walla Walla River Basin Screening, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to meet the need for protective fish screening, the Walla Walla County Conservation District (WWCCD) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) formed a partnership to implement the WDFW Cooperative Compliance Review and Cost-Share Program. The program provides technical and financial assistance to irrigators in order to bring existing surface water diversions into compliance with state and federal juvenile fish screen criteria. The Walla Walla basin has two priority salmonid species currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the Bull Trout and Mid-Columbia Basin Steelhead. Other partners in this effort include the Washington Department of Ecology, National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Walla Walla Community College Irrigation Department. A Screening Oversight Committee of representatives from these agencies sets policy and resolves issues.

Ahmann, Audrey; Jones, Rick

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Self locking drive system for rotating plug of a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes a self locking drive system for rotating the plugs on the head of a nuclear reactor which is able to restrain plug motion if a seismic event should occur during reactor refueling. A servomotor is engaged via a gear train and a bull gear to the plug. Connected to the gear train is a feedback control system which allows the motor to rotate the plug to predetermined locations for refueling of the reactor. The gear train contains a self locking double enveloping worm gear set. The worm gear set is utilized for its self locking nature to prevent unwanted rotation of the plugs as the result of an earthquake. The double enveloping type is used because its unique contour spreads the load across several teeth providing added strength and allowing the use of a conventional size worm.

Brubaker, James E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Microsoft Word - S08266_App_A-3.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 2011 Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity Data Summaries This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Report Appendix A-3, 2011 Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity Data Summaries Doc. No. S08266 May 2012 Page A-3-1 Wetland Mitigation Monitoring 2011 Dates of Sampling Events 15-Mar-11 12-May-11 Amphibian Funnel Trap Data Summary 17-Jun-11 BAPW2 Species Common Name CofC Count Total # x CofC Lithobates catesbeiana American Bull Frog 2 3 6 Unknown tadpoles Unknown 1 2 2 5 8 A= Total # of Individual Amphibians 5 B= Total # of Individuals of Sensitive Species (CofC = 6-10) 0 C= Total # of Individuals of Tolerant Species (CofC = 1-3) 5 D= Σ Total # of Individuals x CofC 8

480

MCS: LANS:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Home Argonne Home CELS Home MCS Home LANS ANL logo ANL mathematics and computer science Home About People Research Publications News & Events LANS Its only half bull MINOTAUR: A toolkit for MINLP MINOTAUR is an open-source toolkit for solving Mixed Integer Nonlinear Optimization Problems. It provides different solvers that implement state-of-the-art algorithms for MINLP. The Minotaur library can also be used to customize algorithms to exploit on specific problem structures. [more info] Zoomed Region Near the Bi BioMesh: An All-Hex Meshing Strategy Bifurcation is very common in all natural flow carriers (example arteries, veins etc.). Most of the numerical flow simulation using Navier-Stokes equations require a high quality discretization of computational domain into 2D (Triangles, Quadrilaterals or Polygons) or 3D simplexes (

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bull moose werner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NREL: Awards and Honors - Scientific and Technical Society Honors and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientific and Technical Society Honors and Awards Scientific and Technical Society Honors and Awards American Association for the Advancement of Science 2011 Fellow - Stanley Bull 2003 Fellow - Dr. Art Nozik 2000 Fellow - Dr. Michael Seibert 1995 Fellow - Helena Chum 1991 Fellow - Robert Thresher American Chemical Society - Fuels & Energy Division 2010 Glenn Award for Best Paper - Casey McAlpin, Teresa Alleman, and Robert McCormick 2006 Special Festschrift Journal of Physical Chemistry B Publication - Arthur J. Nozik 2000 Glenn Award - Maria Ghirardi and Dr. Michael Seibert American Chemical Society - Northeastern Section 2011 Gustavus John Esselen Award - Dr. Arthur J. Nozik 2005 Fellow - Helena Chum American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 2011 Finegan Standards Leadership Medal - Richard DeBlasio

482

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Evaluation of the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of in vivo and in vitro approaches were followed to assess the inter-relationships of temperament, stress responsiveness and immune function in beef bulls and steers. In experiment one, Brahman bull calves were weaned at approximately six months of age when pen score and exit velocity were measured to sort calves into groups with extremes in temperament (calm n = 10 and temperamental n = 10). The calves were vaccinated on day 0 and 42 of the study with serial blood samples colleted for 11 weeks. Calm calves tended to have higher primary and secondary immune responses as indicated by increased serum concentrations of immunoglobulin G following Clostridial vaccination. In vitro lymphocyte cultures were performed on day 0 and 42 to measure proliferation and IgM production. Calm calves had significantly higher proliferative responses on both day 0 and 42. Lymphocyte IgM production was significantly higher in calm calves on day 0 and tended to be higher on day 42 than temperamental calves. In experiment two, weaned and yearling steers were arrayed by pen score and exit velocity, to assign steers to groups with extremes in temperament (trial 1: calm n = 7 and temperamental n = 5; trial 2: calm n = 5 and temperamental n = 5). In both trials, temperamental steers had higher proliferative responses than calm steers. Immunoglobulin M production did not differ in either trial. The effects of stress responsiveness on animal performance and health are considerable because they affect the profitability of the cattle industry. Investigations into animal temperament can help cattle producers identify animals that may be more susceptible to decreased performance and immunosuppression. The effectiveness of vaccines given to calves is important in conferring immunity to common diseases at times when they are at a higher risk for infection. If we can identify temperamental animals that will not perform as well as their cohorts, management procedures can be altered to reduce the risks associated with decreased performance and morbidity.

Oliphint, Ryan Allan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

PP//-80-077 ORO//-250A-309 MEASURB>ENT OF ULTRACOLD NEUTRONS PRODUCED BY USING DOPPLER-  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PP//-80-077 ORO//-250A-309 MEASURB>ENT OF ULTRACOLD NEUTRONS PRODUCED BY USING DOPPLER- SHIFTED BRAGG REFLECTION AT A PULSED-NEUTRON SOURCE T.O. Brim, J.M. C a r p e n t e r , V.E. Krohn, and G.R. Ringo Afgonne N a t i o n a l L a b o r a t o r y , Argonne, I l l i n o i s 60439 and J.W. Cronin U n i v e r s i t y of Chicago, Chicago, I l l i n o i s 60637 and T.W. Dombeck, and J.W. Lynn U n i v e r s i t y of Maryland, C o l l e g e P a r k , Maryland 20742 and S.A. Werner U n i v e r s i t y of M i s s o i i r i , Columbia, Missoiiri 65201 U l t r a c o l d n e u t r o n s (UCN) have been produced a t t h e Argonne p u l s e d - n e u t r o n s o u r c e by t h e Doppler s h i f t of 400-m/s n e u t r o n s Bragg r e f l e c t e d from a moving c r y s t a l . The peak d e n s i t y of UCN produced a t t h e c r y s t a l exceeds 0 . 1 n/cm . -DISCLAIMER * Th's book was D'epaiad as an »ccounl of w c k sponsored Dy an s^encv o

487

A Symposium Associated with the Opening of the Play Copenhagen in Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 2, 2002 a special all day symposium was held in conjunction with the opening of the play Copenhagen in Washington. The play Copenhagen reenacts the 1941 visit of Werner Heisenberg, who was then in charge of the Nazi nuclear power program, to Niels Bohr, his mentor, and collaborator in creating quantum mechanics, complementarity, and the uncertainty principle, in German-occupied Denmark. The symposium entitled: THE COPENHAGEN INTERPRETATION: SCIENCE AND HISTORY ON STAGE was presented at the Baird Auditorium, in the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution. The program consisted of three two-hour sessions: (1) The Science of Copenhagen and its Influence of the 20th Century. (2) Bohr and Heisenberg: A strong Interaction. (3) Theater as Science ??? Science as Theater. The speakers included: Robert C. Card, Under Secretary of Energy; Ulrik Federspiel, Danish Ambassador to the US; John Marburger, III, Science Advisor President Bush; Jerome I. Friedman, MIT; Lene Vestergaard Hau, Harvard University; Richard Rhodes, Author; Rita Colwell, Director, NSF; Jeremy Bernstein, Author; Jochen H. Heisenberg, University of New Hampshire; Finn Aaserud, Director of the Niels Bohr Archive; Vilhelm A. Bohr, NIH; Thomas Powers, Author; Paul Lawrence Rose, Penn State University; Steven Barfield, University of Westminster, Jennifer Uphoff Gray, Associate Director, Copenhagen; Elizabeth Ireland McCann, Producer, Copenhagen; Lloyd Rose, Washington Post. Details of he program and useful information on the play Copenhagen are available on the web site http://web.gc.cuny.edu/ashp/nml/artsci/copenhagen.shtml . The complete symposium was video recorded and the set of 3 two-hour tapes can be obtained through the web site. The symposium was organized by Brian Schwartz, The Graduate Center, CUNY, Harry Lustig, Provost Emeritus at the City College of New York and Arthur Molella, Director, Lemelson Center, Smithsonian Institution. For further information contact Brian Schwartz bschwartz@gc.cuny.edu .

Schwartz, Brian

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER, RHIC SPIN COLLABORATION MEETING VI, VOLUME 36.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sixth meeting of the RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC) took place on October 1, 2001 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. RHIC is now in its second year of operation for physics production and the first polarized proton collision run at {radical}s=200 GeV is expected to start in eight weeks. The RSC has developed a plan for this coming run through two previous meetings, RHIC Spin Physics III (August 3, 2000) and IV (October 13-14, 2000). We requested the following: two weeks of polarized proton studies in AGS, three weeks of polarized collider commissioning, and five weeks of polarized proton physics run. As a result, we have obtained all we asked and the above plans are implemented in the current operation schedule. The focus of the present meeting was to bring all involved in the RHIC Spin activities up-to-date on the progress of machine development, theory issues, and experimental issues. This meeting was right after the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting and it started with the comments on the PAC discussion by Gerry Bunce, who was informed about the PAC deliberations by Tom Kirk. The PAC was fully supportive to complete the proposed spin program within the currently available budget for RHIC run 2 operations. Gerry further explained the expected luminosity to be {integral} Ldt = 0.5 pb{sup -1} per week, reflecting the current machine status. The introductory session also had a talk from Werner Vogelsang that reviewed the progress in perturbative QCD theory focused on spin effects.

BLAND,L.; SAITO,N.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

490

NEAMS update quarterly report for January - March 2012.  

SciTech Connect

Quarterly highlights are: (1) The integration of Denovo and AMP was demonstrated in an AMP simulation of the thermo-mechanics of a complete fuel assembly; (2) Bison was enhanced with a mechanistic fuel cracking model; (3) Mechanistic algorithms were incorporated into various lower-length-scale models to represent fission gases and dislocations in UO2 fuels; (4) Marmot was improved to allow faster testing of mesoscale models using larger problem domains; (5) Component models of reactor piping were developed for use in Relap-7; (6) The mesh generator of Proteus was updated to accept a mesh specification from Moose and equations were formulated for the intermediate-fidelity Proteus-2D1D module; (7) A new pressure solver was implemented in Nek5000 and demonstrated to work 2.5 times faster than the previous solver; (8) Work continued on volume-holdup models for two fuel reprocessing operations: voloxidation and dissolution; (9) Progress was made on a pyroprocessing model and the characterization of pyroprocessing emission signatures; (10) A new 1D groundwater waste transport code was delivered to the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign; (11) Efforts on waste form modeling included empirical simulation of sodium-borosilicate glass compositions; (12) The Waste team developed three prototypes for modeling hydride reorientation in fuel cladding during very long-term fuel storage; (13) A benchmark demonstration problem (fission gas bubble growth) was modeled to evaluate the capabilities of different meso-scale numerical methods; (14) Work continued on a hierarchical up-scaling framework to model structural materials by directly coupling dislocation dynamics and crystal plasticity; (15) New 'importance sampling' methods were developed and demonstrated to reduce the computational cost of rare-event inference; (16) The survey and evaluation of existing data and knowledge bases was updated for NE-KAMS; (17) The NEAMS Early User Program was launched; (18) The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Regulatory Research was introduced to the NEAMS program; (19) The NEAMS overall software quality assurance plan (SQAP) was revised to version 1.5; and (20) Work continued on NiCE and its plug-ins and other utilities, such as Cubit and VisIt.

Bradley, K.S.; Hayes, S.; Pointer, D.; Summers, R.; Sadasivan, P.; Sun, X.; Bernholdt, D.; Miller, M.; Stewart, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL); (INL); (LLNL); (ORNL); (SNL); (PNNL)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

491

Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan Executive Summary : A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the Draft Rainwater Wildlife Area Management Plan. The comprehensive plan can be viewed on the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) website at: www.umatilla.nsn.us or requested in hard copy from the CTUIR at the address below. The wildlife area was established in September 1998 when the CTUIR purchased the Rainwater Ranch through Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for purposes of fish and wildlife mitigation for the McNary and John Day dams. The Management Plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by BPA for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus management actions and prioritize funding during the 2002-2006 planning period. Since acquisition of the property in late 1998, the CTUIR has conducted an extensive baseline resource assessment in preparation for the management plan, initiated habitat restoration in the Griffin Fork drainage to address road-related resource damage caused by roads constructed for forest practices and an extensive flood event in 1996, and initiated infrastructure developments associated with the Access and Travel Management Plan (i.e., installed parking areas, gates, and public information signs). In addition to these efforts, the CTUIR has worked to set up a long-term funding mechanism with BPA through the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. The CTUIR has also continued to coordinate closely with local and state government organizations to ensure consistency with local land use laws and maintain open lines of communication regarding important issues such as big game hunting, tribal member exercise of treaty rights, and public access. During the past two years, non-Indian public concern over big game hunting issues has at times overwhelmed other issues related to the wildlife area. In 2001, the CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee closed the wildlife area to tribal branch antlered bull elk harvest in response to harvest data that indicated harvest rates were greater than expected. In addition, illegal harvest of mature bull elk in southeastern Washington during the 2001 season exceeded the legal tribal and nontribal harvest combined which has created a potential significant regression in the bull;cow ratio in the Blue Mountain Elk herd. CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and staff and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Regional Director and staff have been coordinating regularly to develop strategies to address harvest rates and ensure protection of viable big game herds in southeastern Washington. The CTUIR Fish and Wildlife Committee and WDFW has jointly agreed to continue close coordination on this and other issues and continue working together to ensure the long-term vigor of the elk herd on the Rainwater Wildlife Area. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

494

Development of an extender protocol to enhance the viability of frozen-thawed bovine spermatozoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of an extender protocol which will enhance the viability of frozenthawed bovine spermatozoa will allow producers to obtain higher conception rates due to the increased survival rate of the spermatozoa. Ejaculates of six Brangus bulls (age=18 months) were evaluated for spermatozoal motility, acrosomal integrity, and morphological characteristics (collectively called spermatozoal viability) in two experiments to test our hypotheses that (1) the treatment combination of a 4 hr cooling duration and a 2 hr equilibration with glycerol will result in optimum spermatozoal characteristics after freezing and thawing and (2) rank of three selected extenders relative to their effects on spermatozoal viability after freezing and thawing will be egg yolk-citrate (EC), egg yolk-tris (IMV), and skim milk (milk). In experiment 1, an ejaculate from each bull was partially extended and cooled to 4 ºC for either 2 or 4 hr and then allowed to equilibrate with the glycerolated extender for 2, 4, or 6 hr. Spermatozoal viability was assessed at 0, 3, 6, and 9 hr after thawing. In experiment 1, 4 hr of cooling resulted in a higher percentage of motile spermatozoa than did 2 hr of cooling. The 2 hr equilibration with glycerol yielded lower percentages of motile spermatozoa, acrosomal integrity, and morphologically normal spermatozoa than 4 and 6 hr equilibration durations with glycerol. In experiment 2, we observed a decrease in spermatozoal viability for all three extenders upon freezing and thawing. Viability of frozen-thawed spermatozoa extended in the milk was reduced for all incubation durations, and the IMV extender had a higher percentage of motile spermatozoa than the EC extender at 6 hr of incubation. A higher percentage of intact acrosomes was observed with the IMV extender; however, the EC extender had a higher percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa than the IMV extender. Our results indicate that at cooling duration of 4 hr and a 4 hr equilibration with glycerol provide the highest level of spermatozoal viability post-thaw of the treatments evaluated and that the IMV extender enhances the percentage of spermatozoa with an intact acrosome for frozenthawed spermatozoa over the EC and skim milk extenders.

Griffin, Erin Michelle

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Kalispel Non-Native Fish Suppression Project 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-native salmonids are impacting native salmonid populations throughout the Pend Oreille Subbasin. Competition, hybridization, and predation by non-native fish have been identified as primary factors in the decline of some native bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) populations. In 2007, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Kalispel Nonnative Fish Suppression Project. The goal of this project is to implement actions to suppress or eradicate non-native fish in areas where native populations are declining or have been extirpated. These projects have previously been identified as critical to recovering native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout (WCT). Lower Graham Creek was invaded by non-native rainbow (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) after a small dam failed in 1991. By 2003, no genetically pure WCT remained in the lower 700 m of Graham Creek. Further invasion upstream is currently precluded by a relatively short section of steep, cascade-pool stepped channel section that will likely be breached in the near future. In 2008, a fish management structure (barrier) was constructed at the mouth of Graham Creek to preclude further invasion of non-native fish into Graham Creek. The construction of the barrier was preceded by intensive electrofishing in the lower 700 m to remove and relocate all captured fish. Westslope cutthroat trout have recently been extirpated in Cee Cee Ah Creek due to displacement by brook trout. We propose treating Cee Cee Ah Creek with a piscicide to eradicate brook trout. Once eradication is complete, cutthroat trout will be translocated from nearby watersheds. In 2004, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) proposed an antimycin treatment within the subbasin; the project encountered significant public opposition and was eventually abandoned. However, over the course of planning this 2004 project, little public involvement or education was conducted prior to the planned implementation. Therefore, in 2007 we implemented an extensive process to provide public education, address public concerns and provide opportunity for public involvement in implementing piscicides and other native fish recovery actions in the subbasin.

Wingert, Michele; Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

496

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

497

Predicting Forage Nutritive Value Using an In Vitro Gas Production Technique and Dry Matter Intake of Grazing Animals Using n-Alkanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first experiment, forage samples (n = 39) were collected during 4 years (2006 ? 2009) from pastures grazed by Santa Gertrudis cattle at the King Ranch, TX. The in vitro gas production technique (IVGP) was performed to understand the pattern of fermentation parameters of the forage and obtain fractional digestion rate (kd) values to predict total digestible nutrients (TDN). The best nonlinear model to describe the IVGP values of the forages was the two-pool logistic equation. The passage rate (kp) of 4%/h was used.. The kp predicted by the Large Nutrient Ruminant System (LNRS) model was 3.66%/h. The average TDN was 55.9% compared to 53.8% using a theoretical equation. In the second experiment, Brahman bulls (n = 16) grazed Coastal bermudagrass pastures [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] and stocked at a moderate to low grazing pressure. Three periods of fecal collections were made within each period. Bulls were individually fed at 0700 and 1900 h of 400 g of corn gluten pellets containing C32 n-alkanes. Each period was divided in 2 sub periods in which fecal samples were collected 4 times a day (0700, 1100, 1500 and 1900 h). N-alkanes in the forage and feces were determined using gas chromatography. In the third experiment, four methods were used to estimate dry matter intake (DMI): C31 or C33 with or without adjustment for forage C32 (C31_0 and C33_0, respectively). There was a difference between morning (0700 and 1100 h) and afternoon fecal collections (1500 and 1900 h) on the predicted DMI using C31 (P = 0.0010), C33 (P = 0.0001), C31_0 (P = 0.0010), or C33_0 (P efficiency under confinement conditions does not guarantee (P < 0.0001) similar ranking under grazing conditions when using the alkane technique to determine forage DMI. In order to estimate DMI at least 5 d of fecal collection and 2 times a day of collection (0700 and 1500h) are needed to decrease the variability.

Aguiar, Andre D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded with a shift in species and zooplankton biomass was more favorable for kokanee. With more productive lower trophic levels, the kokanee population increased in abundance and biomass, resulting in improved conditions for bull trout, one of ALR's piscivorous species.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Final report on SNAC 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details how the $5,000 DOE grant to support the workshop titled Sterile Neutrinos at the Crossroads (or SNAC11) was allocated and spent. The SNAC11 workshop covered three days during which there were 28 talks, multiple discussion sessions, a poster session with 9 posters delivered, and an impromptu public lecture on the OPERA superluminal neutrino result by the former project manager of OPERA (this was the first official OPERA talk on the subject in North America). The workshop scientific agenda can be viewed at http://www.cpe.vt.edu/snac/program.html. Emerging out of the workshop discussions, was the idea to write a comprehensive white paper describing the current state of the light sterile neutrino. This effort soon became an international collaboration. The final document, titled Light Sterile Neutrinos: A White Paper has nearly 200 authors, is 267 pages long, and cites 730 unique references. It has been posted the preprint archive as arXiv:1204.5379 [hep-ph]. Workshop local organizing committee co-chairs, Patrick Huber and Jonathan Link, are the white papers head editors. The white papers sections and section editors are as follows: 1. Theory and Motivation (Gabriela Barenboim, Valencia and Werner Rodejohann, MPI Heidelberg) 2. Astrophysical Evidence (Kev Abazajian, UC Irvine and Yvonne Wong, Aachen) 3. Evidence from Oscillation Experiments (Joachim Kopp, FNAL and Bill Louis, LANL) 4. Global Picture (Thierry Lasserre, CEA Saclay and Thomas Schwetz, MPI Heidelberg) 5. Requirements for Future Measurements (Bonnie Fleming, Yale and Joe Formaggio, MIT) 6. Appendix: Possible Future Experiments (Patrick Huber, Virginia Tech and Jon Link, Virginia Tech) In all 56 people participated in the workshop, of these 11 were young scientists. The workshop was covered in a feature article in Science (Science, 334, (2011), 304-306.). The DOE award was spent, as budgeted, as contractual services to VT CPE, which is the unit within the University which organizes conferences. Specifically, the travel cost of the speakers P. Langacker, K. Schreckenbach and P. Vogel was covered as well as bus transportation to KURF and to/from the airport.

Huber, Patrick [Virginia Tech

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

500

The Musk Ox  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Musk Ox Musk Ox Nature Bulletin No. 740 January 25, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE MUSK OX Why are bones of the arctic musk ox found here in Illinois? The evidence shows that these remains date back to the Ice Age when mile- deep ice sheets covered Canada and large parts of the United States, Europe and Asia. At that time the musk ox was one of the few hardy animals that thrived along the edges of these ice sheets. Then, for thousands of years, as the climate warmed and the glaciers melted, the musk oxen followed the retreating glaciers northward. Today, they survive only on the bleak tundras of Alaska, northern Canada and the coast of Greenland . The musk ox looks somewhat like a small, unusually shaggy buffalo. It is built and upholstered for life in the most rugged climate on earth, where blizzards howl and temperatures 50 degrees below zero are common. Adult bulls weigh 500 pounds or more but appear heavier because of their thick padding of hair and wool. Cows are smaller. The dark brown to black hair -- two feet or longer on the neck, chest, sides and hind quarters -- hangs like an ankle-length skirt. The horns of both sexes are sharp, vicious weapons.