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1

A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW Immobilization facility or other supplemental treatment alternatives as provided in M-62-08.

SCHAUS, P.S.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

MAY TH

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the penetration of molten salt. Out of several refractory tile candidates, only greystone and fused-cast alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS) refractory remained intact and well bonded to the CRB after firing to 1000 C. The deformation of the refractory-tile composite was avoided by prefiring the greystone tile to 800 C. Condensed vapors did not penetrate the tiles, but Re salts condensed on their surface. Refractory corrosion tests indicated that a 0.25-inch-thick greystone tile would not corrode during a BV melt. Tiles can reduce both vapor penetration and molten salt penetration, but vapor deposition above the melt line will occur even on tiles. The Tc/Re transport scenario was outlined as follows. At temperatures below 700 C, molten ionic salt (MIS) that includes all the Tc/Re penetrates, by capillarity, from the feed into the CRB open porosity. At approximately 750 C, the MIS decomposes through the loss of NOx, leaving mainly sulfate and chloride salts. The Na2O formed in the decomposition of the nitrates reacts with insoluble grains in the feed and with the aluminosilicates in the CRB to form more viscous liquids that reduce further liquid penetration into the CRB. At 800 to 1000 C, a continuous glass phase traps the remains of the MIS in the form of inclusions in the bulk glass melt. At 1000 to 1200 C, the salt inclusions in the glass slowly dissolve but also rise to the surface. The Tc/Re salts also evaporate from the free surface of the glass melt that is rapidly renewed by convective currents. The vapors condense on cooler surfaces in the upper portion of the CRB, the box lid, and the off-gas system.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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5

Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

Elliott, D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

STATUS & DIRECTION OF THE BULK VITRIFICATION PROGRAM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is managing a program at the Hanford site that will retrieve and treat more than 200 million liters (53 million gal.) of radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks. The waste was generated over the past 50 years as part of the nation's defense programs. The project baseline calls for the waste to be retrieved from the tanks and partitioned to separate the highly radioactive constituents from the large volumes of chemical waste. These highly radioactive components will be vitrified into glass logs in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), temporarily stored on the Hanford Site, and ultimately disposed of as high-level waste in the offsite national repository. The less radioactive chemical waste, referred to as low-activity waste (LAW), is also planned to be vitrified by the WTP, and then disposed of in approved onsite trenches. However, additional treatment capacity is required in order to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of the tank waste by 2028, which represents a Tri-Party Agreement milestone. To help ensure that the treatment milestones will be met, the Supplemental Treatment Program was undertaken. The program, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., involves several sub-projects each intended to supplement part of the treatment of waste being designed into the WTP. This includes the testing, evaluation, design, and deployment of supplemental LAW treatment and immobilization technologies, retrieval and treatment of mixed TRU waste stored in the Hanford Tanks, and supplemental pre-treatment. Applying one or more supplemental treatment technologies to the LAW has several advantages, including providing additional processing capacity, reducing the planned loading on the WTP, and reducing the need for double-shell tank space for interim storage of LAW. In fiscal year 2003, three potential supplemental treatment technologies were evaluated including grout, steam reforming and bulk vitrification using AMEC's In-Container Vitrification{trademark} process. As an outcome of this work, the hulk vitrification process was recommended for further evaluation. In fiscal year 2004, a follow-on bulk vitrification project was initiated to design, procure, assemble and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low activity tank waste from Hanford tank 241-S-109 under a Research, Development and Demonstration permit. That project is referred to as the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (or DBVS). The DBVS project will provide a full-scale bulk vitrification demonstration facility that can be used to assess the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process under actual operating conditions. The pilot-plant is scheduled to commence operations in late 2005. The Supplemental Treatment Program represents a major element of the ORP's strategy to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of tank wastes by 2028. This paper will provide an overview of the bulk vitrification process and the progress in establishing the pilot-plant.

RAYMOND, R.E.

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

ARD KE

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS & PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns.

SCHAUS, P.S.

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bulk Vitrification Performance Enhancement: Refractory Lining Protection Against Molten Salt Penetration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk vitrification (BV) is a process that heats a feed material that consists of glass-forming solids and dried low-activity waste (LAW) in a disposable refractory-lined metal box using electrical power supplied through carbon electrodes. The feed is heated to the point that the LAW decomposes and combines with the solids to generate a vitreous waste form. This study supports the BV design and operations by exploring various methods aimed at reducing the quantities of soluble Tc in the castable refractory block portion of the refractory lining, which limits the effectiveness of the final waste form.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Evans, Michael B.; Smith, Benjamin T.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Matyas, Josef; Buchmiller, William C.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Fluegel, Alexander

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

11

Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the DBVS process chemistry is critical to success, both in ensuring reliability and in troubleshooting and recovering from process issues. Process sampling and monitoring plans...

12

Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs.

Miller, W.C.; Hamilton, D.W.; Holton, L.K.; Bailey, J.W.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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14

Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Progress Report on the Laboratory Testing of the Bulk Vitrification Cast Refractory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the U. S. strategic defense arsenal by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 single- and double-shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pre-treated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Currently, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is evaluating several options for immobilization of low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. A significant portion of the waste will be converted into immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass with a conventional Joule-heated ceramic melter. In addition to ILAW glass, supplemental treatment technologies are under consideration by the DOE to treat a portion of the low activity waste. The reason for using this alternative treatment technology is to accelerate the overall cleanup mission at the Hanford site. The ORP selected Bulk Vitrification (BV) for further development and testing. Work in FY03 on engineered and large scale tests of the BV process suggested that approximately 0.3 to as much as 3 wt% of the waste stream 99Tc inventory would end up in a soluble form deposited in a vesicular layer located at the top of the BV melt and in the sand used as an insulator after vitrification. In the FY03 risk assessment (RA) (Mann et al., 2003), the soluble Tc salt in the BV waste packages creates a 99Tc concentration peak at early times in the groundwater extracted from a 100-meter down-gradient well. This peak differs from the presently predicted baseline WTP glass performance, which shows an asymptotic rise to a constant release rate. Because of the desire by regulatory agencies to achieve essentially equivalent performance to WTP glass with supplemental treatment technologies, the BV process was modified in FY04 in an attempt to minimize deposition of soluble 99Tc salts by including a castable refractory block (CRB) in place of a portion of the refractory sand layer and using a bottom-up melting technique to eliminate the vesicular glass layer at the top. However, the refractory block is still porous and there is the potential for leachable 99Tc to deposit in the pores of the CRB. The purpose of this progress report is to document the status of a laboratory testing program being conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group in support of the LAW Supplemental Treatment Technologies Demonstration project. The objective of these tests was to provide an initial estimate of the leachable fraction of key contaminants of concern (Cs, Re [chemical analogue for 99Tc], and 99Tc) that could condense within the BV CRB. This information will be used to guide development of additional modifications to the BV process to further reduce the soluble 99Tc levels in the BV waste package.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B PETER.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, J V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE`s needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included.

Bickford, D.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

Howden, G.F.

1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

Hutson, N.D.

1992-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

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21

Controlled environment vitrification system for preparation of liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for preparing specimens in a controlled environment to insure that a liquid or partially liquid specimen is maintained in its original state while it is being prepared, and once prepared the specimen is vitrified or solidified with minimal alteration of its microstructure. The controlled environment is provided within a chamber where humidity and temperature can be controlled precisely while the specimen is prepared. The specimen is mounted on a plunger and a shutter controlled opening is opened substantially simultaneously with release of the plunger so the specimen is propelled through the shutter into an adjacent cryogenic bath. 7 figs.

Bellare, J.R.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E. II; Talmon, Y.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

22

Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical characteristics capable of maintaining optimal joule heating and glass forming properties during the conversion process.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Processing of Oak Ridge B&C pond sludge surrogate in the transportable vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) developed at the Savannah River Site is designed to process low-level and mixed radioactive wastes into a stable glass product. The TVS consists of a feed preparation and delivery system, a joule-heated melter, and an offgas treatment system. Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) B&C pond sludge was treated in a demonstration of the TVS system at Clemson University and at ORR. After initial tests with soda-lime-silica (SLS) feed, three melter volumes of glass were produced from the surrogate feed. A forthcoming report will describe glass characterization; and melter feeding, operation, and glass pouring. Melter operations described will include slurry characterization and feeding, factors affecting feed melt rates, glass pouring and pour rate constraints, and melter operating temperatures. Residence time modeling of the melter will also be discussed. Characterization of glass; including composition, predicted liquidity and viscosity, Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and devitrification will be covered. Devitrification was a concern in glass container tests and was found to be mostly dependent on the cooling rate. Crucible tests indicated that melter shutdown with glass containing Fe and Li was also a devitrification concern, so the melter was flushed with SLS glass before cooldown.

Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Smith, M.E.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

Higley, B.A.

1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States); Grant, D.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Innovative vitrification for soil remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Economic Case for Bulk Energy Storage in Transmission Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Case for Bulk Energy Storage in Transmission Systems with High Percentages to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;The Economic Case for Bulk Energy Storage Economic Case for Bulk Energy Storage in Transmission Sys- tems with High Percentages of Renewable

29

Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommittee onGASRainey STAR Center | DepartmentPaducah,DBVS

30

HWVP pilot-scale vitrification system campaign: LFCM-8 summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to treat the high-level radiative waste (HLW) stored in underground storage tanks as an alkaline sludge. Tank waste will first be retrieved and pretreated to minimize solids requiring vitrification as HLW. The glass product resulting from HWVP operations will be stored onsite in stainless steel canisters until the HLW repository is available for final disposal. The first waste stream scheduled to be processed by the HWVP is the neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) stored in double-shell storage tanks. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by providing research, development, and engineering expertise in defined areas. As a part of this support, pilot-scale testing is being conducted to support closure of HWVP design and development issues. Testing results will verify equipment design performance, establish acceptable and optimum process parameters, and support product qualification activities.

Perez, J.M.; Whitney, L.D.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Daume, J.T.; Whyatt, G.A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Design of Vitrification Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and unreliable process. Moreover, there is a lack of standardization in the methods for preparing cells and biological material for the vitrification process. The purpose of the Vitrification Machine is to greatly simplify the process by making it faster, more...

McDonald, Todd William

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered.

Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vitrification of high sulfate wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is investigating the application of vitrification technology to mixed wastes within the DOE system This work involves identifying waste streams, laboratory testing to identify glass formulations and characterize the vitrified product, and demonstration testing with the actual waste in a pilot-scale system. Part of this program is investigating process limits for various waste components, specifically those components that typically create problems for the application of vitrification, such as sulfate, chloride, and phosphate. This work describes results from vitrification testing for a high-sulfate waste, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste at Hanford. A low melting phosphate glass formulation has been developed for a waste stream high in sodium and sulfate. At melt temperatures in the range of 1,000 C to 1,200 C, sulfate in the waste is decomposed to gaseous oxides and driven off during melting, while the remainder of the oxides stay in the melt. Decomposition of the sulfates eliminates the processing problems typically encountered in vitrification of sulfate-containing wastes, resulting in separation of the sulfate from the remainder of the waste and allowing the sulfate to be collected in the off-gas system and treated as a secondary waste stream. Both the vitreous product and intentionally devitrified samples are durable when compared to reference glasses by TCLP and DI water leach tests. Simple, short tests to evaluate the compatibility of the glasses with potential melter materials found minimal corrosion with most materials.

Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Security-Constrained Adequacy Evaluation of Bulk Power System Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security-Constrained Adequacy Evaluation of Bulk Power System Reliability Fang Yang, Student Member contingency selection, (b) effects analysis, and (c) reliability index computation. Effects analysis and reliability index computations. The methodology is demonstrated with the IEEE reliability test system. Index

35

Engineering report of plasma vitrification of Hanford tank wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an analysis of vendor-derived testing and technology applicability to full scale glass production from Hanford tank wastes using plasma vitrification. The subject vendor testing and concept was applied in support of the Hanford LLW Vitrification Program, Tank Waste Remediation System.

Hendrickson, D.W.

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth System Grid (ESG) community faces the difficult challenge of managing the distribution of massive data sets to thousands of scientists around the world. To move data replicas efficiently, the ESG has developed a data transfer management tool called the Bulk Data Mover (BDM). We describe the performance results of the current system and plans towards extending the techniques developed so far for the up- coming project, in which the ESG will employ advanced networks to move multi-TB datasets with the ulti- mate goal of helping researchers understand climate change and its potential impacts on world ecology and society.

Sim, Alex; Gunter, Dan; Natarajan, Vijaya; Shoshani, Arie; Williams, Dean; Long, Jeff; Hick, Jason; Lee, Jason; Dart, Eli

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Materials performance in a high-level radioactive waste vitrification system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is a Department of Energy Facility designed to vitrify highly radioactive waste. An extensive materials evaluation program has been completed on key components in the DWPF after twelve months of operation using nonradioactive simulated wastes. Results of the visual inspections of the feed preparation system indicate that the system components, which were fabricated from Hastelloy C-276, should achieve their design lives. Significant erosion was observed on agitator blades that process glass frit slurries; however, design modifications should mitigate the erosion. Visual inspections of the DWPF melter top head and off gas components, which were fabricated from Inconel 690, indicated that varying degrees of degradation occurred. Most of the components will perform satisfactorily for their two year design life. The components that suffered significant attack were the borescopes, primary film cooler brush, and feed tubes. Changes in the operation of the film cooler brush and design modifications to the feed tubes and borescopes is expected to extend their service lives to two years. A program to investigate new high temperature engineered materials and alloys with improved oxidation and high temperature corrosion resistance will be initiated.

Imrich, K.J.; Chandler, G.T.

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermodynamic modeling of volatile hazardous metal behavior in the Vortec Vitrification System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermochemical equilibrium calculations indicate that at the temperature of a propane--air flame, some volatilization of uranium, plutonium, technetium, and cesium will occur. The expected concentrations of plutonium, technetium, and cesium in the flame will be very low because of the small maximum concentration of these elements in the projected feed materials for the first 30-day test. The quantities volatilized can generally be decreased by operating the flame in a fuel-rich mode, although this will lead to greater carbon monoxide production, which may be more objectionable. The concentrations of chlorine and fluorine, at least at the maximum levels in the projected Vortec feed, are not projected to greatly influence the vaporization rates. Therefore, blending to reduce the concentrations of those elements would most likely not be effective in reducing metal vaporization. Most of the elements vaporized condense by the time the gas cools to 2000 F. These elements would condense either on surfaces near the front of the heat recuperator or on entrained particulates or homogeneously as relatively pure submicron particles. Cesium would be expected to condense at the lower temperatures near the rear of the recuperator, although the expected maximum concentration in the Vortec feed material is extremely low so it should be greatly diluted by other particulates. The elements that condense on other entrained particles will form enriched surface coatings. Particles larger than 10{micro}m or so will be collected in the scrubber. Smaller particles, especially the submicron particles formed from homogeneous nucleation, should be largely collected in the HEPA filter. Deposits formed in the heat recuperator can normally be handled via sootblowing. To reduce handling problems, we suggest that the recuperator be oriented vertically so that the deposits blown off of the heat exchanger fall directly into the molten glass. The large size of the deposits should help to reduce the rate of revaporization, allowing the volatile elements to be removed with the glass. The volatile elements that do not deposit on system surfaces will be concentrated in the smaller particles. Therefore, the HEPA ash will be greatly enriched in these elements. If the HEPA filter is itself sent to a melter, the elements may revaporize and multiply the problems related to metal vaporization significantly. Therefore, the HEPA filters should be disposed of without high-temperature processing. Also, to reduce the formation of these very small particles, it is helpful to include in the feed larger particles to act as condensation nuclei that can then be collected in the scrubber. This can be accomplished by using feed materials with a fraction consisting of particles small enough that they will not be collected in the cyclone in the melter, but large enough that they will easily be collected by the scrubber. This is one advantage that firing bituminous coal has over gas firing; it provides a source of ash particles of the right size range to serve as nucleation sites, but large enough (depending on the coal) so that they can usually be collected efficiently in the scrubber system.

Nowok, J.W.; Hurley, J.P.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

most state of the art reliability centered maintenance (RCM) approaches, but it also accounts equipment, maintenance, reliability, risk, security, optimization 1.Introduction Maintenance of bulk1 Risk-based Maintenance Allocation and Scheduling for Bulk Electric Power Transmission System

42

Vitrification publication bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was compiled by a group of about 12 graduate students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science at Washington State University and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The literature search resulting in the compilation of this bibliography was designed to be an exhaustive search for research and development work involving the vitrification of mixed wastes, published by domestic and foreign researchers, primarily during 1989-1994. The search techniques were dominated by electronic methods and this bibliography is also available in electronic format, Windows Reference Manager.

Schmieman, E.; Johns, W.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

Direct vitrification of Fermi 2 bead resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants produce large quantities of spent ion exchange resins from primary and secondary side water treatment systems. Detroit Edison`s experience with vitrification of bead resin was conducted at Catholic University with the objective of using the DuraMelter{trademark} vitrification technology to perform both for volume reduction and to create a stable glass waste form. Detroit Edison had been without disposal capability since November 1990, and very minimal progress had been made in Michigan to build a radioactive disposal site. Encouraging results from non-radioactive tests conducted on a DuraMelter{trademark} 10 system in January and February 1995 by Duratek aided in our decision to use this process. Our experience is the subject of this report.

Weber, B.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Evaluation of ANSI compression in a bulk data file transfer system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This report evaluates the use of a newly proposed American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard for data compression in a bulk data transmission system. An… (more)

Chaulklin, Douglas Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Integrating Bulk-Data Transfer into the Aurora Distributed Shared Data System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Bulk-Data Transfer into the Aurora Distributed Shared Data System Paul Lu Dept version, with corrections to JPDC proofs 1 #12;Running Head: Integrating Bulk-Data Transfer into Aurora-1071 Web: http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/~paullu/ Abstract The Aurora distributed shared data system implements

Lu, Paul

48

EV-16 Vitrification Trials with MnO{sub 2} and Surrogate B{ampersand}C Pond Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center has demonstrated the feasibility of using the Transportable Vitrification System for the treatment of Low-Level Mixed Wastes.

Cicero-Herman, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Erich, D.L.; Overcamp, T.J.; Harden, J.M.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment.

Rudisill, T.S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Earth System Grid Alex Sim 1 , Dan Gunter 1 , VijayaUSA Abstract The Earth System Grid (ESG) community faces theIntroduction The Earth System Grid (ESG) [1] community faces

Sim, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Evaluation of a probabilistic model for bulk-power system security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gower system. By use of this program with appropriate modifications the probabilistic model for any bulk-power system may be evaluated. Management and operator criteria may be derived so that the costs associated with the risk are now deterministic. 32..."UCE Nay 'f970 Major Subjeot: Statistics EVALUATION OF A PROBABILISZIC NGDEL FOR BULK-POWER SYSTEM'4 SE"URITY A Thesis by WILLIAM ALOYS SCMIDT Approved as to style and content by: Chairma of teej 7Head of Department) 7 Lember) Nay tc70 ABSTRACT...

Schmidt, William Aloys

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval and Delivery of Hanford Tank Wastes for Vitrification in the Waste Treatment Plant - 13234  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety-conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction of WTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration and Controls, Front-End Design and Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety and Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH and QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant{sup R} Foundation-Configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan. (authors)

Harp, Benton J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Post Office Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Bechtel National, Inc., 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Post Office Box 850, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

One System Integrated Project Team: Retrieval And Delivery Of The Hanford Tank Wastes For Vitrification In The Waste Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The One System Integrated Project Team (IPT) was formed in late 2011 as a way for improving the efficiency of delivery and treatment of highly radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The purpose of the One System IPT is to improve coordination and integration between the Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) contractor and the Tank Operations Contractor (TOC). The vision statement is: One System is a WTP and TOC safety conscious team that, through integrated management and implementation of risk-informed decision and mission-based solutions, will enable the earliest start of safe and efficient treatment of Hanford's tank waste, to protect the Columbia River, environment and public. The IPT is a formal collaboration between Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), which manages design and construction of the WTP for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (DOEORP), and Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), which manages the TOC for ORP. More than fifty-six (56) million gallons of highly radioactive liquid waste are stored in one hundred seventy-seven (177) aging, underground tanks. Most of Hanford's waste tanks - one hundred forty-nine (149) of them - are of an old single-shell tank (SST) design built between 1944 and 1964. More than sixty (60) of these tanks have leaked in the past, releasing an estimated one million gallons of waste into the soil and threatening the nearby Columbia River. There are another twenty-eight (28) new double-shelled tanks (DSTs), built from 1968 to 1986, that provide greater protection to the environment. In 1989, DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) signed a landmark agreement that required Hanford to comply with federal and state environmental standards. It also paved the way for agreements that set deadlines for retrieving the tank wastes and for building and operating the WTP. The tank wastes are the result of Hanford's nearly fifty (50) years of plutonium production. In the intervening years, waste characteristics have been increasingly better understood. However, waste characteristics that are uncertain and will remain as such represent a significant technical challenge in terms of retrieval, transport, and treatment, as well as for design and construction ofWTP. What also is clear is that the longer the waste remains in the tanks, the greater the risk to the environment and the people of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of both projects - tank operations and waste treatment - is to diminish the risks posed by the waste in the tanks at the earliest possible date. About two hundred (200) WTP and TOC employees comprise the IPT. Individual work groups within One System include Technical, Project Integration & Controls, Front-End Design & Project Definition, Commissioning, Nuclear Safety & Engineering Systems Integration, and Environmental Safety and Health and Quality Assurance (ESH&QA). Additional functions and team members will be added as the WTP approaches the operational phase. The team has undertaken several initiatives since its formation to collaborate on issues: (1) alternate scenarios for delivery of wastes from the tank farms to WTP; (2) improvements in managing Interface Control Documents; (3) coordination on various technical issues, including the Defense Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Safety Board's Recommendation 2010-2; (4) deployment of the SmartPlant? Foundation-configuration Management System; and (5) preparation of the joint contract deliverable of the Operational Readiness Support Plan.

Harp, Benton J. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Kacich, Richard M. [Bechtel National, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Skwarek, Raymond J. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Vitrification of ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Workman, Rhonda Jackson (North Augusta, SC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

Ludowise, J.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Tunable, self-powered integrated arc plasma-melter vitrification system for waste treatment and resource recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a relatively compact self-powered, tunable waste conversion system and apparatus which has the advantage of highly robust operation which provides complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The system provides the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or by an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a self-powered or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production.

Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Apparatus for in situ heating and vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for decontaminating ground areas where toxic chemicals are buried includes a plurality of spaced electrodes located in the ground and to which a voltage is applied for bringing about current flow. Power delivered to the ground volatilizes the chemicals that are then collected and directed to a gas treatment system. A preferred form of the invention employs high voltage arc discharge between the electrodes for heating a ground region to relatively high temperatures at relatively low power levels. Electrodes according to the present invention are provided with preferentially active lower portions between which current flows for the purpose of soil heating or for soil melting and vitrification. Promoting current flow below ground level avoids predominantly superficial treatment and increases electrode life. 15 figs.

Buelt, J.L.; Oma, K.H.; Eschbach, E.A.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of a remote bushing for actinide vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) are combining their existing experience in handling highly radioactive, special nuclear materials with commercial glass fiberization technology in order to assemble a small vitrification system for radioactive actinide solutions. The vitrification system or {open_quotes}brushing{close_quotes}, is fabricated from platinum-rhodium alloy and is based on early marble remelt fiberization technology. Advantages of this unique system include its relatively small size, reliable operation, geometrical safety (nuclear criticality), and high temperature capability. The bushing design should be capable of vitrifying a number of the actinide nuclear materials, including solutions of americium/curium, neptunium, and possibly plutonium. State of the art, mathematical and oil model studies are being combined with basic engineering evaluations to verify and improve the thermal and mechanical design concepts.

Schumacher, R.F.; Ramsey, W.G.; Johnson, F.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Impact of Improved Solar Forecasts on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diurnal nature of solar power is made uncertain by variable cloud cover and the influence of atmospheric conditions on irradiance scattering processes. Its forecasting has become increasingly important to the unit commitment and dispatch process for efficient scheduling of generators in power system operations. This presentation is an overview of a study that examines the value of improved solar forecasts on Bulk Power System Operations.

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Florita, A.; Hodge, B.M.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design and performance of a 100-kg/h, direct calcine-fed electric-melter system for nuclear-waste vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the physical characteristics of a ceramic-lined, joule-heated glass melter that is directly connected to the discharge of a spray calciner and is currently being used to study the vitrification of simulated nuclear-waste slurries. Melter performance characteristics and subsequent design improvements are described. The melter contains 0.24 m/sup 3/ of glass with a glass surface area of 0.76 m/sup 2/, and is heated by the flow of an alternating current (ranging from 600 to 1200 amps) between two Inconel-690 slab-type electrodes immersed in the glass at either end of the melter tank. The melter was maintained at operating temperature (900 to 1260/sup 0/C) for 15 months, and produced 62,000 kg of glass. The maximum sustained operating period was 122 h, during which glass was produced at the rate of 70 kg/h.

Dierks, R.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Americium/Curium Vitrification Pilot Tests - Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. These highly radioactive and valuable isotopes have been stored in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of this solution will allow the material to be more safely stored until it is transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation for use in research and medical applications. A previous paper described operation results from the Am-Cm Melter 2A pilot system, a full-scale non-radioactive pilot facility. This paper presents the results from continued testing in the Pilot Facility and also describes efforts taken to look at alternative vitrification process operations and flowsheets designed to address the problems observed during melter 2A pilot testing.

Marra, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baich, M.A.; Fellinger, A.P.; Hardy, B.J.; Herman, D.T.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, C.B.; Miller, D.H.; Snyder, T. K.; Stone, M.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bulk Power Systems Dynamics and Control -IV Restructuring, Santorini, Greece, August 1998 IS MODAL RESONANCE A PRECURSOR TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk Power Systems Dynamics and Control - IV Restructuring, Santorini, Greece, August 1998 IS MODAL RESONANCE A PRECURSOR TO POWER SYSTEM OSCILLATIONS? Ian Dobson Jianfeng Zhang Scott Greene Henrik Engdahl Peter W. Sauer POWER SYSTEMS ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER Electrical and Computer Engineering Department

65

Volume reduction and vitrification of nuclear waste with thermal plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for efficient and safe destruction of organics and vitrification of low/medium level radioactive waste is presented. A transferred arc plasma torch is employed as the heat source. The process handles several types of feed: combustibles, inorganic materials and metals. A non-leaching glassy solid which can be stored without further treatment is obtained as the final product. High volume-reduction factors can be achieved with this process. A wet gas cleaning system leads to extremely clean off-gas.

Hoffelner, W. [Moser-Glaser and Co., Muttenz (Switzerland); Chrubasik, A. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Eschenbach, R.C. [RETECH Inc., Ukiah, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

High-level waste vitrification off-gas cleanup technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief overview is intended to be a basis for discussion of needs and problems existing in the off-gas clean-up technology. A variety of types of waste form and processes are being developed in the United States and abroad. A description of many of the processes can be found in the Technical Alternative Documents (TAD). Concurrently, off-gas processing systems are being developed with most of the processes. An extensive review of methodology as well as decontamination factors can be found in the literature. Since it is generally agreed that the most advanced solidification process is vitrification, discussion here centers about the off-gas problems related to vitrification. With a number of waste soldification facilities around the world in operation, it can be shown that present technology can satisfy the present requirement for off-gas control. However, a number of areas within the technology base show potential for improvement. Fundamental as well as verification studies are needed to obtain the improvements.

Hanson, M.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials.

Marra, J.C.; Congdon, J.W.; Kielpinski, A.L. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Defense waste vitrification studies during FY-1981. Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both simulated alkaline defense wastes and simulated acidic defense wastes (formed by treating alkaline waste with formic acid) were successfully vitrified in direct liquid-fed melter experiments. The vitrification process was improved while using the formate-treated waste. Leach resistance was essentially the same. Off-gas entrainment was the primary mechanism for material exiting the melter. When formate waste was vitrified, the flow behavior of the off gas from the melter changed dramatically from an erratic surging behavior to a more quiet, even flow. Hydrogen and CO were detectable while processing formate feed; however, levels exceeding the flamability limits in air were never approached. Two types of melter operation were tested during the year, one involving boost power. Several boosting methods located within the melter plenum were tested. When lid heating was being used, water spray cooling in the off gas was required. Countercurrent spray cooling was more effective than cocurrent spray cooling. Materials of construction for the off-gas system were examined. Inconel-690 is preferred in the plenum area. Inspection of the pilot-scale melter found that corrosion of the K-3 refractory and Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal. An overheating incident occurred with the LFCM in which glass temperatures up to 1480/sup 0/C were experienced. Lab-scale vitrification tests to study mercury behavior were also completed this year. 53 figures, 63 tables.

Bjorklund, W.J. (comp.)

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August...

72

Bulk single crystal ternary substrates for a thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device and a method for making the device are disclosed. The device includes a substrate formed from a bulk single crystal material having a bandgap (E{sub g}) of 0.4 eV < E{sub g} < 0.7 eV and an emitter fabricated on the substrate formed from one of a p-type or an n-type material. Another thermophotovoltaic energy conversion device includes a host substrate formed from a bulk single crystal material and lattice-matched ternary or quaternary III-V semiconductor active layers. 12 figs.

Charache, G.W.; Baldasaro, P.F.; Nichols, G.J.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Vitrification and solidification remedial treatment and disposal costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m{sup 3} of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes a detailed study done to: compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes, determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted and, determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at the Fernald is warranted.

Gimpel, R.F.

1992-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides data, analyses, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic of America (VSL) to determine the processing rates that are achievable with AZ-101 HLW simulants and corresponding melter feeds on a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) vitrification system. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. Tests conducted during Part B1 (VSL-00R2590-2) on the DM1000 vitrification system installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America showed that, without the use of bubblers, glass production rates with AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 simulants were significantly lower than the Project design basis rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d. Conversely, three-fold increases over the design basis rate were demonstrated with the use of bubblers. Furthermore, an un-bubbled control test using a replica of the melter feed used in cold commissioning tests at West Valley reproduced the rates that were observed with that feed on the WVDP production melter. More recent tests conducted on the DM1200 system, which more closely represents the present RPP-WTP design, are in general agreement with these earlier results. Screening tests conducted on the DM10 system have provided good indications of the larger-scale processing rates with bubblers (for both HL W and LAW feeds) but significantly overestimated the DM1000 un-bubbled rate observed for C-106/AY-102 melter feeds. This behavior is believed to be a consequence of the role of heat transfer in rate attainment and the much greater role of wall effects in heat transfer when the melt pool is not agitated. The DM100 melter used for the present tests has a surface area of 0.108 m{sup 2}, which is approximately 5 times larger than that of the DM10 (0.021 m{sup 2}) and approximately 11 times smaller than that of the DM1000 (1.2 m{sup 2}) (the DM1000 has since been replaced by a pilot-scale prototypical HLW melter, designated the DM1200, which has the same surface area as the DM1000). Testing on smaller melters is the most economical method for obtaining data over a wide range of operating conditions (particularly at extremes) and for guiding the more expensive tests that are performed at pilot-scale. Thus, one objective of these tests was to determine whether the DM100 melters are sufficiently large to reproduce the un-bubbled melt rates observed at the DM1000 scale, or to determine the extent of any off-set. DM100-scale tests can then be used to screen feed chemistry variations that may serve to increase the un-bubbled production rates prior to confirmation at pilot scale. Finally, extensive characterization data obtained on simulated HLW melter feeds formed from various glass forming additives indicated that there may be advantages in terms of feed rheology and stability to the replacement of some of the hydroxides by carbonates. A further objective of the present tests was therefore to identify any deleterious processing effects of such a change before adopting the carbonate feed as the baseline. Data from the WVDP melter using acidified (nitrated) feeds, and without bubbling, showed productions rates that are higher than those observed with the alkaline RPP feeds at the VSL. Therefore, the effect of feed acidification on production rate also was investigated. This work was performed under Test Specification, 'TSP-W375-00-00019, Rev 0, 'HLW-DM10 and DM100 Melter Tests' dated November 13, 2000 and the corresponding Test Plan. It should be noted, however, that the RPP-WTP Project directed a series of changes to the Test Plan as the result

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

Sexton, L.

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, D.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

Bickford, D.F.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Vitrification of organics-containing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

Bickford, Dennis F. (Aiken, SC)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Desired PU Loading During Vitrification  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOE ZeroThree Biorefineries to ProduceNuclearDerrick Ramos

80

Vitrification facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project`s vitrification facilities from the establishment of the West Valley, NY site as a federal and state cooperative project to the completion of all activities necessary to begin solidification of radioactive waste into glass by vitrification. Topics discussed in this report include the Project`s background, high-level radioactive waste consolidation, vitrification process and component testing, facilities design and construction, waste/glass recipe development, integrated facility testing, and readiness activities for radioactive waste processing.

DesCamp, V.A.; McMahon, C.L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Vitrification as a low-level radioactive mixed waste treatment technology at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is developing plans to use vitrification to treat low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) generated onsite. The ultimate objective of this project is to install a full-scale vitrification system at ANL-E capable of processing the annual generation and historic stockpiles of selected LLMW streams. This project is currently in the process of identifying a range of processible glass compositions that can be produced from actual mixed wastes and additives, such as boric acid or borax. During the formulation of these glasses, there has been an emphasis on maximizing the waste content in the glass (70 to 90 wt %), reducing the overall final waste volume, and producing a stabilized low-level radioactive waste glass. Crucible glass studies with actual mixed waste streams have produced alkali borosilicate glasses that pass the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. These same glass compositions, spiked with toxic metals well above the expected levels in actual wastes, also pass the TCLP test. These results provide compelling evidence that the vitrification system and the glass waste form will be robust enough to accommodate expected variations in the LLMW streams from ANL-E. Approximately 40 crucible melts will be studied to establish a compositional envelope for vitrifying ANL-E mixed wastes. Also being determined is the identity of volatilized metals or off-gases that will be generated.

Mazer, J.J.; No, Hyo J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Commercial LFCM vitrification technology. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first in a series of quarterly reports compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program Office at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to document progress on commercial liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the first quarter of FY 1985 is discussed: pretreatment systems, melting process chemistry, glass development and characterization, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, off-gas systems, process/product modeling and control, and supporting studies. 33 figs., 12 tabs.

Burkholder, H.C.; Jarrett, J.H. (comps.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in the paper corresponding to this presentation aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This presentation is an overview of a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass -- Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, Uniform-Format Solid Feedstock Supply System: A Commodity-Scale Design to Produce an Infrastructure-Compatible Bulk Solid from Lignocellulosic Biomass, prepared by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), acknowledges the need and provides supportive designs for an evolutionary progression from present day conventional bale-based supply systems to a uniform-format, bulk solid supply system that transitions incrementally as the industry launches and matures. These designs couple to and build from current state of technology and address science and engineering constraints that have been identified by rigorous sensitivity analyses as having the greatest impact on feedstock supply system efficiencies and costs.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney; Erin M. Searcy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impact of Improved Solar Forecasts on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diurnal nature of solar power is made uncertain by variable cloud cover and the influence of atmospheric conditions on irradiance scattering processes. Its forecasting has become increasingly important to the unit commitment and dispatch process for efficient scheduling of generators in power system operations. This study examines the value of improved solar power forecasting for the Independent System Operator-New England system. The results show how 25% solar power penetration reduces net electricity generation costs by 22.9%.

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 2, APRIL 2007 289 Bulk Micromachined Titanium Microneedles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elastic moduli and hardnesses. Furthermore, some electrodeposited metals such as nickel are known skin ir], polymers [13], [14], and electrodeposited metals [15]­[20]. However, each of these ma- terial systems

88

Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

Hsu, C.L.W.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

Hsu, Chia-lin W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control V, August 26-31, 2001, Onomichi, Japan Strong Resonance Effects in Normal Form Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control V, August 26-31, 2001, Onomichi, Japan Strong Resonance Engineering Department University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 USA dobson@engr.wisc.edu Abstract: Power resonance occurring in the power system linearization. Moreover, the changes in the coefficients when

94

Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 13, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2004 1043 VHF Single-Crystal Silicon Elliptic Bulk-Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- mechanical coupling, elliptic bulk-mode, equivalent electrical circuit, temperature coefficient of frequency-plane vibrations of the disk struc- tures is described using the two-dimensional (2-D) elastic theory. An equivalent mechanical model is extracted from the elliptic bulk-mode shape to predict the dynamic behavior

Ayazi, Farrokh

97

Progress achieved in HLW vitrification techniques at INE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress in the liquid-fed ceramic waste glass melter process for high level waste vitrification is described. The technique has been used in the PAMELA plant in Mol/Belgium from 1985 to 1991. Currently three programs are underway at INE (Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik): a technology program for optimizing the process for noble metals containing high level waste (HLW), a vitrification technology transfer project with China, and a research project on noble metals behavior in an engineering scale melter which is funded by the US Department of Energy with oversight by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, WA. The status of the programs and results available are described.

Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Nucleare Entsorgungstechnik

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece Active network management: planning under  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Such incentives have resulted in the on-going installation of wind and solar power generation resources2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013 In Europe, concern about the environmental impact of the electricity industry is currently driving

Ernst, Damien

100

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VII, August 19-24, 2007, Charleston, South Carolina, USA Dynamics of a Microgrid Supplied by Solid Oxide Fuel Cells1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The results of an example in which two SOFC plants provide power to a microgrid are presented. The simulation1 Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control - VII, August 19-24, 2007, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, but is not concerned with the thermal dynamics. A DC-DC boost converter interfaces the SOFC stack to a DC bus, where

Hiskens, Ian A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NUCLEAR WASTE VITRIFICATION EFFICIENCY COLD CAP REACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost and schedule of nuclear waste treatment and immobilization are greatly affected by the rate of glass production. Various factors influence the performance of a waste-glass melter. One of the most significant, and also one of the least understood, is the process of batch melting. Studies are being conducted to gain fundamental understanding of the batch reactions, particularly those that influence the rate of melting, and models are being developed to link batch makeup and melter operation to the melting rate. Batch melting takes place within the cold cap, i.e., a batch layer floating on the surface of molten glass. The conversion of batch to glass consists of various chemical reactions, phase transitions, and diffusion-controlled processes. These include water evaporation (slurry feed contains as high as 60% water), gas evolution, the melting of salts, the formation of borate melt, reactions of borate melt with molten salts and with amorphous oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), the formation of intermediate crystalline phases, the formation of a continuous glass-forming melt, the growth and collapse of primary foam, and the dissolution of residual solids. To this list we also need to add the formation of secondary foam that originates from molten glass but accumulates on the bottom of the cold cap. This study presents relevant data obtained for a high-level-waste melter feed and introduces a one-dimensional (1D) mathematical model of the cold cap as a step toward an advanced three-dimensional (3D) version for a complete model of the waste glass melter. The 1D model describes the batch-to-glass conversion within the cold cap as it progresses in a vertical direction. With constitutive equations and key parameters based on measured data, and simplified boundary conditions on the cold-cap interfaces with the glass melt and the plenum space of the melter, the model provides sensitivity analysis of the response of the cold cap to the batch makeup and melter conditions. The model demonstrates that batch foaming has a decisive influence on the rate of melting. Understanding the dynamics of the foam layer at the bottom of the cold cap and the heat transfer through it appears crucial for a reliable prediction of the rate of melting as a function of the melter-feed makeup and melter operation parameters. Although the study is focused on a batch for waste vitrification, the authors expect that the outcome will also be relevant for commercial glass melting.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; POKORNY R

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

Bulk Power Transmission Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BULK POWER TRANSMISSION STUDY TOMMY JOH~ P. E. Manager of Resource Recovery Waste Management of North America, Inc. Houston, Texas Texans now have a choice. We can become more efficient and maintain our standard of living, or we can... continue business as usual and watch our standard of living erode from competition from other regions. In the past, except for improving reliability, there was no need for a strong transmission system. When Texas generation was primarily gas fueled...

John, T.

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity waste vitrification Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: -24 The immobilisation of hazardous (toxic and radioac- tive) waste using self sustaining vitrification processes... . However immobilisation of radioactive waste via...

104

Scaling considerations for modeling the in situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scaling relationships for modeling the in situ vitrification waste remediation process are documented based upon similarity considerations derived from fundamental principles. Requirements for maintaining temperature and electric potential field similarity between the model and the prototype are determined as well as requirements for maintaining similarity in off-gas generation rates. A scaling rationale for designing reduced-scale experiments is presented and the results are assessed numerically. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Langerman, M.A.; MacKinnon, R.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Characterization and assessment of novel bulk storage technologies : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a high-level study to assess the technological readiness and technical and economic feasibility of 17 novel bulk energy storage technologies. The novel technologies assessed were variations of either pumped storage hydropower (PSH) or compressed air energy storage (CAES). The report also identifies major technological gaps and barriers to the commercialization of each technology. Recommendations as to where future R&D efforts for the various technologies are also provided based on each technology's technological readiness and the expected time to commercialization (short, medium, or long term). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned this assessment of novel concepts in large-scale energy storage to aid in future program planning of its Energy Storage Program. The intent of the study is to determine if any new but still unproven bulk energy storage concepts merit government support to investigate their technical and economic feasibility or to speed their commercialization. The study focuses on compressed air energy storage (CAES) and pumped storage hydropower (PSH). It identifies relevant applications for bulk storage, defines the associated technical requirements, characterizes and assesses the feasibility of the proposed new concepts to address these requirements, identifies gaps and barriers, and recommends the type of government support and research and development (R&D) needed to accelerate the commercialization of these technologies.

Huff, Georgianne; Tong, Nellie (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Fioravanti, Richard (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Gordon, Paul (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Markel, Larry (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Agrawal, Poonum (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Nourai, Ali (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece A Production Simulation Tool for Systems with an Integrated Concentrated Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Rethymnon, Greece A Production Simulation Tool for Systems with an Integrated Concentrated Solar Plant2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control ­IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013 with Thermal Energy Storage Ti Xu George Gross University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University

Gross, George

107

Method for initiating in-situ vitrification using an impregnated cord  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In-situ vitrification of soil is initiated by placing a cord of dielectric material impregnated with conductive material in thermally-conductive contact with the soil, and energizing the cord with an electric current for heating the cord and starting the vitrification process.

Carter, John G. (Richland, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Review of FY2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Barnes, C.M.; Taylor, D.D.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Review of FY 2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

Taylor, Dean Dalton; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Rotary bulk solids divider  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for the disbursement of a bulk solid sample comprising, a gravity hopper having a top open end and a bottom discharge end, a feeder positioned beneath the gravity hopper so as to receive a bulk solid sample flowing from the bottom discharge end, and a conveyor receiving the bulk solid sample from the feeder and rotating on an axis that allows the bulk solid sample to disperse the sample to a collection station.

Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Technology status report: In situ vitrification applied to buried wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a technical status report on In Situ Vitrification (ISV) as applied to buried waste; the report takes both technical and institutional concerns into perspective. The ISV process involves electrically melting such contaminated solid media as soil, sediment, sludge, and mill tailings. The resultant product is a high-quality glass-and-crystalline waste form that possesses high resistance to corrosion and leaching and is capable of long-term environmental exposure without significant degradation. The process also significantly reduces the volume of the treated solid media due to the removal of pore spaces in the soil.

Thompson, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bates, S.O. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansen, J.E. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Melter performance during surrogate vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results from seven melter campaigns performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. A brief description of the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stirred melter are included for reference. The report discusses each waste stream examined, glass formulations developed and utilized, specifics relating to melter operation, and a synopsis of the results from the campaigns. A `lessons learned` section is included for each melter to emphasize repeated processing problems and identify parameters which are considered extremely important to successful melter operation

Marra, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Overcamp, T.J.

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

Final Vitrification Melter And Vessels Evaluation Documentation |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 TotalFinal Design Review ModuleDecemberDepartment

116

Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D`Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Gass, W.R.; D`Amico, N. [ed.

1994-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

In situ vitrification model development and implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Analysis Package being developed at the INEL to provide analytical support for (ISV) safety analysis and treatment performance predictions. Mathematical models and features which comprise this analysis package are presented and the proposed approach to model development and implementation is outlined. The objective of this document is two fold: to define preliminary design information and modeling objectives so that ISV modeling personnel can effectively modify existing models and formulate new models which are consistent with the objectives of the ISV treatability study and to provide sufficient technical information for internal and external reviewers to detect any shortcomings in model development and implementation plans. 27 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.; Hagrman, D.L.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Comparison of conventional freezing and vitrification for cryopreservation of equine embryos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL FREEZING AND VITRIFICATION FOR CRYOPRESERVATION OF EQUINE EMBRYOS A Thesis by JASON EDWARD BRUEMMER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL FREEZING AND VITRIFICATION FOR CRYOPRESERVATION OF EQUINE EMBRYOS A Thesis by JASON EDWARD BRUEMMER Approved as to style and content by: J...

Bruemmer, Jason Edward

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Processing constraints on high-level nuclear waste glasses for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work presented in this paper is a part of a major technology program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in preparation for the planned operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). Because composition of Hanford waste varies greatly, processability is a major concern for successful vitrification. This paper briefly surveys general aspects of waste glass processability and then discusses their ramifications for specific examples of Hanford waste streams.

Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Cold cap subsidence for in situ vitrification and electrodes therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrode for use in in situ vitrification of soil comprises a molybdenum rod received within a conductive sleeve or collar formed of graphite. Electrodes of this type are placed on either side of a region containing buried waste material and an electric current is passed therebetween for vitrifying the soil between the electrodes. The graphite collar enhances the thermal conductivity of the electrode, bringing heat to the surface, and preventing the formation of a cold cap of material above the ground surface. The annulus between the molybdenum rod electrode and the graphite collar is filled with a conductive ceramic powder of a type that sinters upon the molybdenum rod, protecting the same from oxidation as the graphite material is consumed, or a metal powder which liquifies at operating temperatures. The molybdenum rod in the former case may be coated with an oxidation protectant, e.g. of molybdenum disilicide. As insulative blanket is suitably placed on the surface of the soil during processing to promote subsidence by allowing off-gassing and reducing surface heat loss. In other embodiments, connection to vitrification electrodes is provided below ground level to avoid loss of connection due to electrodes deterioration, or a sacrificial electrode may be employed when operation is started. Outboard electrodes can be utilized to square up the vitrified area. Further, the center of the molybdenum rod can be made hollow and filled with a powdered metal, such as copper, which liquifies at operating temperatures. In one embodiment, the molybdenum rod and the graphite collar are physically joined at the bottom.

Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Carter, John G. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); FitzPatrick, Vincent F. (Richland, WA); Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA); Morgan, William C. (Richland, WA); Oma, Kenton H. (Richland, WA); Timmerman, Craig L. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spectra of optical parameters in bulk and film amorphous alloys of the Se{sub 95}As{sub 5} system containing samarium (Sm) impurities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reflectance spectra of bulk and film amorphous alloys of the Se{sub 95}As{sub 5} system containing samarium (Sm) impurities are studied in the energy range of 1-6 eV. Spectral dependences of optical constants and derivatives of optical dielectric functions are calculated by the Kramers-Kronig method. Changes in spectra of optical parameters depending on the content of impurities introduced into Se{sub 95}As{sub 5} and conditions of their preparation are explained based on the cluster model. According to the latter, changes in the electron density of states depends on changes in atomic configurations in clusters, i.e., short-range order changes.

Djalilov, N. Z.; Damirov, G. M., E-mail: gafil@physics.ab.az [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Large area bulk superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

Miller, Dean J. (Darien, IL); Field, Michael B. (Jersey City, NJ)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VIII, August 1-6, 2010, Buzios, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Impact of Delays on a Consensus-based Primary Frequency Control Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a Multi-Terminal HVDC Grid Jing Dai, Yannick Phulpin Sup´elec, France {jing.dai, yannick systems connected by a multi-terminal HVDC grid. We focus on a control scheme that mod- ifies the power current (HVDC) systems for bulk power transmission over long distances [3] and underground cable cross

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Vitrification of surrogate mixed wastes in a graphite electrode arc melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstration tests for vitrifying mixed wastes and contaminated soils have been conducted using a small (800 kVA), industrial-scale, three-phase AC, graphite electrode furnace located at the Albany Research Center of the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM). The feed mixtures were non-radioactive surrogates of various types of mixed (radioactive and hazardous), transuranic-contaminated wastes stored and buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The feed mixtures were processed with added soil from the INEL. Objectives being evaluated include (1) equipment capability to achieve desired process conditions and vitrification products for different feed compositions, (2) slag and metals tapping capability, (3) partitioning of transuranic elements and toxic metals among the furnace products, (4) slag, fume, and metal products characteristics, and (5) performance of the feed, furnace and air pollution control systems. The tests were successfully completed in mid-April 1995. A very comprehensive process monitoring, sampling and analysis program was included in the test program. Sample analysis, data reduction, and results evaluation are currently underway. Initial results indicate that the furnace readily processed around 20,000 lb of widely ranging feed mixtures at feedrates of up to 1,100 lb/hr. Continuous feeding and slag tapping was achieved. Molten metal was also tapped twice during the test program. Offgas emissions were efficiently controlled as expected by a modified air pollution control system.

Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Ball, L. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Integrating Wind and Solar Energy in the U.S. Bulk Power System: Lessons from Regional Integration Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two recent studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have examined the impacts of integrating high penetrations of wind and solar energy on the Eastern and Western electric grids. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), initiated in 2007, examined the impact on power system operations of reaching 20% to 30% wind energy penetration in the Eastern Interconnection. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the operational implications of adding up to 35% wind and solar energy penetration to the Western Interconnect. Both studies examined the costs of integrating variable renewable energy generation into the grid and transmission and operational changes that might be necessary to address higher penetrations of wind or solar generation. This paper identifies key insights from these regional studies for integrating high penetrations of renewables in the U.S. electric grid. The studies share a number of key findings, although in some instances the results vary due to differences in grid operations and markets, the geographic location of the renewables, and the need for transmission.

Bird, L.; Lew, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Bulk Hydrogen Strategic Directions for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk Hydrogen Storage Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop May 7-8, 2003 Crystal City, Virginia #12;Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage Main Themes/Caveats Bulk Storage = Anything storage is an economic solution to address supply/demand imbalance #12;Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen

129

Process Options Description for Vitrification Flowsheet Model of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical information required for the development of a basic steady-state process simulation of the vitrification treatment train of sodium bearing waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is presented. The objective of the modeling effort is to provide the predictive capability required to optimize an entire treatment train and assess system-wide impacts of local changes at individual unit operations, with the aim of reducing the schedule and cost of future process/facility design efforts. All the information required a priori for engineers to construct and link unit operation modules in a commercial software simulator to represent the alternative treatment trains is presented. The information is of a mid- to high-level nature and consists of the following: (1) a description of twenty-four specific unit operations--their operating conditions and constraints, primary species and key outputs, and the initial modeling approaches that will be used in the first year of the simulation's development; (2) three potential configurations of the unit operations (trains) and their interdependencies via stream connections; and (3) representative stream compositional makeups.

Nichols, T.T.; Taylor, D.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Barnes, C.M.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of defense-waste glass produced by full-scale vitrification equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three full-scale vitrification processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory produced over 67,000 kg of simulated nuclear-waste glass from March 1979 to August 1980. Samples were analyzed to monitor process operation and evaluate the resulting glass product. These processes are: Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter (SC/ICM); Spray Calciner/Calcine-Fed Ceramic Melter (SC/CFCM); and Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM). Waste components in the process feed varied less than +- 10%. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM which use separate waste and frit feed systems showed larger glass compositional variation than the LFCM, which processed only premixed feed during this period. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM product contained significant amounts of acmite crystals, while the LFCM product was largely amorphous. In addition, the lower portion of all SC/ICM-filled canisters contained a zone rich in waste components. A product chemical durability as determined by pH4 and soxhlet leach tests varied considerably. Aside from increased durability under pH4 conditions with decreasing waste content, glass composition, microstructure and melting process did not correlate with glass durability. For all samples analyzed, the weight loss under pH4 conditions ranged from 17.7 to 85.2 wt %. Soxhlet conditions produced weight losses from 1.78 to 3.56 wt %.

Lukacs, J.M.; Petkus, L.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water SamplesNo. 12 Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Optimization Online - Real-Time Dispatchability of Bulk Power ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 16, 2015 ... Real-Time Dispatchability of Bulk Power Systems with Volatile Renewable Generations. Wei Wei (wei-wei04 ***at*** mails.tsinghua.edu.cn)

Wei Wei

2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

NEXT GENERATION MELTER(S) FOR VITRIFICATION OF HANFORD WASTE STATUS AND DIRECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification technology has been selected to treat high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site, the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Savannah River Site (SRS), and low activity waste (LAW) at Hanford. In addition, it may potentially be applied to other defense waste streams such as sodium bearing tank waste or calcine. Joule-heated melters (already in service at SRS) will initially be used at the Hanford Site's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify tank waste fractions. The glass waste content and melt/production rates at WTP are limited by the current melter technology. Significant reductions in glass volumes and mission life are only possible with advancements in melter technology coupled with new glass formulations. The Next Generation Melter (NGM) program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) to develop melters with greater production capacity (absolute glass throughput rate) and the ability to process melts with higher waste fractions. Advanced systems based on Joule-Heated Ceramic Melter (JHCM) and Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technologies will be evaluated for HLW and LAW processing. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), DOE's tank waste contractor, is developing and evaluating these systems in cooperation with EM-31, national and university laboratories, and corporate partners. A primary NGM program goal is to develop the systems (and associated flowsheets) to Technology Readiness Level 6 by 2016. Design and testing are being performed to optimize waste glass process envelopes with melter and balance of plant requirements. A structured decision analysis program will be utilized to assess the performance of the competing melter technologies. Criteria selected for the decision analysis program will include physical process operations, melter performance, system compatibility and other parameters.

RAMSEY WG; GRAY MF; CALMUS RB; EDGE JA; GARRETT BG

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -VI, August 22-27, 2004, Cortina D'Ampezzo, Italy Prediction of Instability Points Using System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on actual measured signals such as generator rotor speed, angle or power through the lines. Prony method, develop equivalent linear models of power systems, and tuning controllers using system measurement [12

Cañizares, Claudio A.

135

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Volume 1, Phase 1: Annual report, September 28, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vortex has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program with the Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and will not leach to the environment--as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC system design. This topical report will present a summary of the activities conducted during Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The report includes the detail technical data generated during the experimental program and the design and cost data for the preliminary Phase 2 plant.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

R and D Programs and Policy within the CEA-AREVA Joint Vitrification Lab (LCV) - 13592  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste management is a key issue for the reprocessing industry; furthermore, vitrification is considered as the reference for nuclear waste management. In order to further improve and strengthen their historical cooperation in high temperature waste management, the CEA, R and D organization, and AREVA, Industrial Operator, decided, in September 2010, to create a Joint Vitrification Laboratory within the framework of a strategic partnership. The main objectives of the CEA-AREVA Joint Vitrification Laboratory (LCV) are (i) support AREVA's activities, notably in its La Hague plants and for new projects, (ii) strengthen the CEA's lead as a reference laboratory in the field of waste conditioning. The LCV is mandated to provide strong, innovative solutions through the performance of R and D on processes and materials for vitrification, fusion and incineration, for high, intermediate and low level waste. The activities carried out in the LCV include academic research on containment matrices (formulation, long-term behaviour), and the improvement of current technologies/development of new ones in lab-scale to full-scale pilot facilities, in non-radioactive and radioactive conditions, including modelling and experimental tools. This paper focuses on the programs and policy managed within the LCV, as well as the means employed by the CEA and AREVA to meet common short-,mid- and long-term challenges, from a scientific and industrial point of view. Among other things, we discuss the technical support provided for the La Hague vitrification facilities on hot melter and CCIM technologies, the start-up of new processes (decommissioning effluents, UMo FP) with CCIM, the preparation of future processes by means of an assessment of new technologies and containment matrices (improved glasses, ceramics, etc.), as well as incineration/vitrification for organic and metallic mixed waste or metallic fusion. The close relationship between the R and D teams and industrial operators enables the LCV to propose attractive waste management solutions, with appropriate schedules and optimized development costs, making allowance for R and D constraints, engineering requirements and the industrial environment. (authors)

Piroux, Jean Christophe [AREVA NC Marcoule LCV (France)] [AREVA NC Marcoule LCV (France); Paradis, Luc; Ladirat, Christian [CEA Marcoule LCV (France)] [CEA Marcoule LCV (France); Brueziere, Jerome; Chauvin, Eric [AREVA NC Paris La Defense (France)] [AREVA NC Paris La Defense (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

STRUCTURAL INTERACTIONS OF HYDROGEN WITH BULK AMORPHOUS MICROSTRUCTURES IN METALLIC SYSTEMS UNDERSTANDING THE ROLE OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLINITY ON PERMEATION AND EMBRITTLEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of metallic glasses in bulk form has led to a resurgence of interest into the utilization of these materials for a variety of applications. A potentially exciting application for these bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials is their use as composite membranes to replace high cost Pd/Pd-alloy membranes for enhanced gas separation processes. One of the major drawbacks to the industrial use of Pd/Pd-alloy membranes is that during cycling above and below a critical temperature an irreversible change takes place in the palladium lattice structure which can result in significant damage to the membrane. Furthermore, the cost associated with Pd-based membranes is a potential detractor for their continued use and BMG alloys offer a potentially attractive alternative. Several BMG alloys have been shown to possess high permeation rates, comparable to those measured for pure Pd metal. In addition, high strength and toughness when either in-situ or ex-situ second phase dispersoids are present. Both of these properties, high permeation and high strength/toughness, potentially make these materials attractive for gas separation membranes that could resist hydrogen 'embrittlement'. However, a fundamental understanding of the relationship between partially crystalline 'structure'/devitrification and permeation/embrittlement in these BMG materials is required in order to determine the operating window for separation membranes and provide additional input to the material synthesis community for improved alloy design. This project aims to fill the knowledge gap regarding the impact of crystallization on the permeation properties of metallic glass materials. The objectives of this study are to (i) determine the crystallization behavior in different gas environments of Fe and Zr based commercially available bulk metallic glass and (ii) quantify the effects of partial crystallinity on the hydrogen permeation properties of these metallic glass membranes.

Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Elise; Korinko, Paul; Adams, Thad

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High temperature materials for radioactive waste incineration and vitrification. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration or vitrification of radioactive waste subjects equipment to alkaline or acidic fluxing, oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and thermal shock. It is necessary to select appropriate materials of construction and control operating conditions to avoid rapid equipment failure. Nickel- and cobalt-based alloys with high chromium or aluminum content and aluminum oxide/chromium oxide refractories with high chromium oxide content have provided the best service in pilot-scale melter tests. Inconel 690 and Monofrax K-3 are being used for waste vitrification. Haynes 188 and high alumina refractory are undergoing pilot scale tests for incineration equipment. Laboratory tests indicate that alloys and refractories containing still higher concentrations of chromium or chromium oxide, such as Inconel 671 and Monofrax E, may provide superior resistance to attack in glass melter environments.

Bickford, D F; Ondrejcin, R S; Salley, L

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Development of the vitrification compositional envelope to support complex-wide application of MAWS technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from a study of the application of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) approach using vitrification as a treatment technology to a variety of waste streams across the DOE complex. This work has involved both experimental vitrification work using actual mixed wastes and surrogate waste streams from several DOE sites (Hanford, Idaho, and Oak Ridge) as well as the development of a computer-based, integrated glass property-composition database. The long-term objective is that this data base will assist glass formulation studies with single waste streams or combinations of waste streams subject to a variety of user-imposed constraints including waste stream usage priorities, process related constraints (e.g., melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.), and waste form performance related constraints (e.g., TCLP and PCT leaching results). 79 refs., 143 figs., 65 tabs.

Mazer, J.J. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.; Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Muller, I.S.; Gan, H.; Buechele, A.C.; Lai, S.T.; Pegg, I.L. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.] [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; [GTS Duratek, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of Vitrification Process and Glass Formulation for Nuclear Waste Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vitrification of high-level waste is the internationally recognized standard to minimize the impact to the environment resulting from waste disposal as well as to minimize the volume of conditioned waste to be disposed of. COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level waste industrially for over 20 years and is currently operating three commercial vitrification facilities based on a hot metal crucible technology, with outstanding records of safety, reliability and product quality. To further increase the performance of vitrification facilities, CEA and COGEMA have been developing the cold crucible melter technology since the beginning of the 1980s. This type of melter is characterized by a virtually unlimited equipment service life and a great flexibility in dealing with various types of waste and allowing development of high temperature matrices. In complement of and in parallel with the vitrification process, a glass formulation methodology has been developed by the CEA in order to tailor matrices for the wastes to be conditioned while providing the best adaptation to the processing technology. The development of a glass formulation is a trade-off between material properties and qualities, technical feasibility, and disposal safety criteria. It involves non-radioactive and radioactive laboratories in order to achieve a comprehensive matrix qualification. Several glasses and glass ceramics have thus been studied by the CEA to be compliant with industrial needs and waste characteristics: glasses or other matrices for a large spectrum of fission products, or for high contents of specifics elements such as sodium, phosphate, iron, molybdenum, or actinides. New glasses or glass-ceramics designed to minimize the final wasteform volume for solutions produced during the reprocessing of high burnup fuels or to treat legacy wastes are now under development and take benefit from the latest CEA hot-laboratories and technology development. The paper presents the CEA state-of-the-art in developing matrices or glasses and provides several examples.

Petitjean, V.; Fillet, C.; Boen, R.; Veyer, C.; Flament, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled `Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification` that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included.

Croff, A.G.

1996-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Mechanical Properties of Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the mechanical properties of monolithic bulk metallic glasses and composite in the La based alloys. La???yAl??(Cu, Ni)y (y=24 to 32) alloy systems was used to cast the ...

Lee, M.L.

147

Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Thermoelectric Bulk Materials from the Explosive Consolidation of Nanopowders Describes technique of explosively...

148

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

149

Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady, Ihab F.; McCormick, Frederick; Fleming, James G.; Fleming leg, Carol

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated bulk wave acoustic bandgap device comprises a periodic two-dimensional array of scatterers embedded within the matrix material membrane, wherein the scatterer material has a density and/or elastic constant that is different than the matrix material and wherein the periodicity of the array causes destructive interference of the acoustic wave within an acoustic bandgap. The membrane can be suspended above a substrate by an air or vacuum gap to provide acoustic isolation from the substrate. The device can be fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Such microfabricated bulk wave phononic bandgap devices are useful for acoustic isolation in the ultrasonic, VHF, or UHF regime (i.e., frequencies of order 1 MHz to 10 GHz and higher, and lattice constants of order 100 .mu.m or less).

Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM); El-Kady, Ihab F. (Albuquerque, NM); McCormick, Frederick (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Fleming, legal representative, Carol (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. (Ebasco Services, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed.

Goles, R.W.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece Effects of Various Uncertainty Sources on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uncertainty arising from renewable-based electricity generation and noise in communication channels on the AGC) must schedule adequate electric supply from traditional generators on AGC to manage larger net system, Rethymnon, Greece Effects of Various Uncertainty Sources on Automatic Generation Control Systems D

Liberzon, Daniel

154

The incandescent disposal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrotechnology device being introduced to the low-level waste market is an Incandescent Disposal System (IDS) for volume reduction and vitrification. The process changes the composition of the waste material, usually long molecular chains, into simple molecules and elements. It renders the volume of low-level wastes to a manageable solid vitrified residue, carbon black, and a water discharge. The solid material, which has been vitrified if silica is introduced into the waste stream, is an ideal inert filler. The carbon black is non-leaching and is readily available for vitrification as it comes out of the IDS.

Smith, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Summary Of Cold Crucible Vitrification Tests Results With Savannah River Site High Level Waste Surrogates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cold crucible inductive melting (CCIM) technology successfully applied for vitrification of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW) at SIA Radon, Russia, was tested to be implemented for vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) stored at Savannah River Site, USA. Mixtures of Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and 4 (SB4) waste surrogates and borosilicate frits as slurries were vitrified in bench- (236 mm inner diameter) and full-scale (418 mm inner diameter) cold crucibles. Various process conditions were tested and major process variables were determined. Melts were poured into 10L canisters and cooled to room temperature in air or in heat-insulated boxes by a regime similar to Canister Centerline Cooling (CCC) used at DWPF. The products with waste loading from ~40 to ~65 wt.% were investigated in details. The products contained 40 to 55 wt.% waste oxides were predominantly amorphous; at higher waste loadings (WL) spinel structure phases and nepheline were present. Normalized release values for Li, B, Na, and Si determined by PCT procedure remain lower than those from EA glass at waste loadings of up to 60 wt.%.

Stefanovsky, Sergey; Marra, James; Lebedev, Vladimir

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

WM '04 Conference, February 29 March 4, 2004, Tucson, AZ WM-4010 VITRIFICATION OF LOW AND INTERMEDIATE LEVEL WASTE: TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (HLW) from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Development of vitrification technologies for low waste from nuclear power plants (NPP) and institutional radioactive waste in borosilicate glass matrices radioactive waste (LILW), may result in significant reduction of transport and disposal costs. Development

Sheffield, University of

157

Cosmic No Hair for Braneworlds with a Bulk Dilaton Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Braneworld cosmology supported by a bulk scalar field with an exponential potential is developed. A general class of separable backgrounds for both single and two-brane systems is derived, where the bulk metric components are given by products of world-volume and bulk coordinates and the world-volumes represent any anisotropic and inhomogeneous solution to an effective four-dimensional Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. We deduce a cosmic no hair theorem for all ever expanding, spatially homogeneous Bianchi world-volumes and find that the spatially flat and isotropic inflationary scaling solution represents a late-time attractor when the bulk potential is sufficiently flat. The dependence of this result on the separable nature of the bulk metric is investigated by applying the techniques of Hamilton-Jacobi theory to five-dimensional Einstein gravity. We employ the spatial gradient expansion method to determine the asymptotic form of the bulk metric up to third-order in spatial gradients. It is found that the condition for the separable form of the metric to represent the attractor of the system is precisely the same as that for the four-dimensional world-volume to isotropize. We also derive the fourth-order contribution to the Hamilton-Jacobi generating functional. Finally, we conclude by placing our results within the context of the holographic approach to braneworld cosmology.

James E. Lidsey; David Seery

2005-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Process Options Description for Vitrification Flowsheet Model of INEEL Sodium Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical information to Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel that is required for the development of a basic steady-state process simulation of the vitrification treatment train of sodium bearing waste (SBW) at Idaho National Engineering and nvironmental Laboratory (INEEL). INEEL considers simulation to have an important role in the integration/optimization of treatment process trains for the High Level Waste (HLW) Program. This project involves a joint Technical Task Plan (TTP ID77WT31, Subtask C) between SRS and INEEL. The work scope of simulation is different at the two sites. This document addresses only the treatment of SBW at INEEL. The simulation model(s) is to be built by SRS for INEEL in FY-2001.

Nichols, Todd Travis; Taylor, Dean Dalton; Lauerhass, Lance; Barnes, Charles Marshall

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

First Commercial US Mixed Waste Vitrification Facility: Permits, Readiness Reviews, and Delisting of Final Wasteform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) contracted GTS Duratek (Duratek) to construct and operate the first commercial vitrification facility to treat an F-006 mixed (radioactive/hazardous) waste in the United States. The permits were prepared and submitted to the South Carolina state regulators by WSRC - based on a detailed design by Duratek. Readiness Assessments were conducted by WSRC and Duratek at each major phase of the operation (sludge transfer, construction, cold and radioactive operations, and a major restart) and approved by the Savannah River Department of Energy prior to proceeding. WSRC prepared the first `Upfront Delisting` petition for a vitrified mixed waste. Lessons learned with respect to the permit strategy, operational assessments, and delisting from this `privatization` project will be discussed.

Pickett, J.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Summary of in situ vitrification modeling and analysis accomplishments for fiscal year 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The in situ vitrification (ISV) modeling activities encompass a variety of both modeling development efforts and analysis applications in support of the ISV project. The model development effort is directed toward modifying or developing a set of computer codes to simulate the ISV process. These codes are used to perform safety and environmental hazards analyses, assist in experimental test planning and design, assist in equipment design and development of operating procedures, and provide enhanced understanding of the ISV process. This report presents a summary description of the accomplishments in Fiscal Year 1991 for both the model development and analysis areas. Brief descriptions of the models that were developed and the more important conclusions from the analytical studies are presented.

Slater, C.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

Soelberg, N.R.; Turner, P.C.; Oden, L.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Techology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Final technical report: Atmospheric emission analysis for the Hanford Waste Vitrification plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of chemical and radiological effluents that are expected to be released to the atmosphere from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The report is divided into two sections. In the first section, the impacts of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides as NO{sub 2} have been estimated for areas within the Hanford Site boundary. A description of the dispersion model used to-estimate CO and NO{sub 2} average concentrations and Hanford Site meteorological data has been included in this section. In the second section, calculations were performed to estimate the potential radiation doses to a maximally exposed off-site individual. The model used to estimate the horizontal and vertical dispersion of radionuclides is also discussed.

Andrews, G.L.; Rhoads, K.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A preliminary study of the controls on melting during in situ vitrification. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ vitrification (ISV), developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and patented for the US Department of Energy, is one method used to stabilize contaminated soils in place. ISV involves inserting four electrodes in a square array into contaminated soil and applying an electrical potential to the electrodes. The soil is heated to above its melting point, and the molten zone expands with time to encompass the contaminated zone. After cooling, the resulting solid material is usually a mixture of glass and crystalline material that has a significantly higher resistance to leaching than did the original soils. Nonvolatile elements (most radionuclides and metals) are dissolved into the melt or encapsulated in glass if their solubility in the melt is low. Organic compounds tends to be pyrolyzed, with the decomposition products diffusing to the surface and combusting on exiting the molten zone. A hood is placed over the vitrification zone to collect off-gas particulates and volatiles into a processing trailer that scrubs contaminants from the off-gas. The current study identified key parameters and processes in the ISV melt cycle and developed an improved understanding of ISV. Analytical approximations for several properties of molten soil were determined from available data. Using a simplified geometrical approximation for melt geometry, an analytical approximation for the rate of melting (depth) vs time was derived that is consistent with data from field experiments. At small times, the depth of melting increases linearly with time. After approximately 10 h in large-scale tests, however, the depth increases as the square root of time. Existing data is also consistent with a relationship that shows the volumetric growth rate of the melt to be directly proportional to time. These conclusions suggest that heat transfer processes controlling the ISV process may be at the transition between weak convection and conduction.

Solomon, A.D.; Nyquist, J.E.; Alexiades, V.; Jacobs, G.K.; Lenhart, S.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Volatility and entrainment of feed components and product glass characteristics during pilot-scale vitrification of simulated Hanford site low-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercially available melter technologies were tested for application to vitrification of Hanford site low-level waste (LLW). Testing was conducted at vendor facilities using a non-radioactive LLW simulant. Technologies tested included four Joule-heated melter types, a carbon electrode melter, a cyclone combustion melter, and a plasma torch-fired melter. A variety of samples were collected during the vendor tests and analyzed to provide data to support evaluation of the technologies. This paper describes the evaluation of melter feed component volatility and entrainment losses and product glass samples produced during the vendor tests. All vendors produced glasses that met minimum leach criteria established for the test glass formulations, although in many cases the waste oxide loading was less than intended. Entrainment was much lower in Joule-heated systems than in the combustion or plasma torch-fired systems. Volatility of alkali metals, halogens, B, Mo, and P were severe for non-Joule-heated systems. While losses of sulfur were significant for all systems, the volatility of other components was greatly reduced for some configurations of Joule-heated melters. Data on approaches to reduce NO{sub x} generation, resulting from high nitrate and nitrite content in the double-shell slurry feed, are also presented.

Shade, J.W.

1996-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

bulk power system | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty is

168

Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

Larson, D.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Evaluation of melter technologies for vitrification of Hanford site low-level tank waste - phase 1 testing summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following negotiation of the fourth amendment to the Tri- Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994 and 1995 for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high-sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes also were tested. The technologies and Phase 1 testing results were evaluated and a preliminary technology down-selection completed. This report describes the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor testing and the tested technologies, and summarizes the testing results and the preliminary technology recommendations.

Wilson, C.N., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Vitrification of M-Area Mixed (Hazardous and Radioactive) F006 Wastes: I. Sludge and Supernate Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert low-level and mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. One of the alternative technologies is vitrification into a borosilicate glass waste form. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive mixed waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both current and future regulatory specifications. Stabilization of low level and hazardous wastes in glass are in accord with the 1988 Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), then the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Professional Planning Committee (PPC) recommendation that high nitrate containing (low-level) wastes be incorporated into a low temperature glass (via a sol-gel technology). The investigation into this new technology was considered timely because of the potential for large waste volume reduction compared to solidification into cement.

Jantzen, C.M.

2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Plant Decontamination as a Precondition of the Remote Dismantling Concept of the Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant VEK - 12206  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification of the high-active liquid waste concentrates (HAWC) was a major milestone in the WAK decommissioning project (StiWAK). From September 2009 to June 2010, about 56 m{sup 3} of HAWC were vitrified at the Karlsruhe vitrification facility (VEK) and filled into 123 canisters. HAWC vitrification was followed by an extensive rinsing and shutdown program, in the course of which both the VEK process installations and the facilities for the storage and evaporation of high-active fission product solutions (LAVA) are prepared specifically for dismantling. Finally the rinsing programme leads to an overall reduction of the remaining contamination in the installations by a factor of approx. 5 - 10. The amount of liquids arisen from this program has been vitrified and another 17 canisters have been filled. In total, 140 canisters were packed into 5 CASTOR casks that were already transported to the Zwischenlager Nord (interim store North) of EWN GmbH (ZLN) in the mid of February 2011. The melter of the VEK was already shut down in the late November 2010. (authors)

Dux, Joachim; Fleisch, Joachim; Latzko, Bernhard; Rohleder, Norbert [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nanofluidics, from bulk to interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofluidics has emerged recently in the footsteps of microfluidics, following the quest of scale reduction inherent to nanotechnologies. By definition, nanofluidics explores transport phenomena of fluids at the nanometer scales. Why is the nanometer scale specific ? What fluid properties are probed at nanometric scales ? In other words, why 'nanofluidics' deserves its own brand name ? In this critical review, we will explore the vast manifold of length scales emerging for the fluid behavior at the nanoscales, as well as the associated mechanisms and corresponding applications. We will in particular explore the interplay between bulk and interface phenomena. The limit of validity of the continuum approaches will be discussed, as well as the numerous surface induced effects occuring at these scales, from hydrodynamic slippage to the various electro-kinetic phenomena originating from the couplings between hydrodynamics and electrostatics. An enlightening analogy between ion transport in nanochannels and transport in doped semi-conductors will be discussed.

Lyderic Bocquet; Elisabeth Charlaix

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Bulk-edge correspondence for two-dimensional topological insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological insulators can be characterized alternatively in terms of bulk or edge properties. We prove the equivalence between the two descriptions for two-dimensional solids in the single-particle picture. We give a new formulation of the $\\mathbb{Z}_{2}$-invariant, which allows for a bulk index not relying on a (two-dimensional) Brillouin zone. When available though, that index is shown to agree with known formulations. The method also applies to integer quantum Hall systems. We discuss a further variant of the correspondence, based on scattering theory.

G. M. Graf; M. Porta

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This...

176

Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Commercialization of Bulk Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Hydrogen Embrittlement of Pipeline Steels: Causes and Remediation Distributed Bio-Oil...

177

Hyperon bulk viscosity in strong magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the bulk viscosity of neutron star matter including $\\Lambda$ hyperons in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields. Relaxation time and bulk viscosity due to both the non-leptonic weak process involving $\\Lambda$ hyperons and direct Urca processes are calculated here. In the presence of a strong magnetic field of $10^{17}$ G, the hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient is reduced whereas bulk viscosity coefficients due to direct Urca processes are enhanced compared with their field free cases when many Landau levels are populated by protons, electrons and muons.

Monika Sinha; Debades Bandyopadhyay

2009-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

Recent Device Developments with Advanced Bulk Thermoelectric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at RTI Reviews work in engineered thin-film nanoscale thermoelectric materials and nano-bulk materials with high ZT undertaken by RTI in collaboration with its research...

179

Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

Materials selection for process equipment in the Hanford waste vitrification plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to vitrify defense liquid high-level wastes and transuranic wastes stored at Hanford. The HWVP Functional Design Criteria (FDC) requires that materials used for fabrication of remote process equipment and piping in the facility be compatible with the expected waste stream compositions and process conditions. To satisfy FDC requirements, corrosion-resistant materials have been evaluated under simulated HWVP-specific conditions and recommendations have been made for HWVP applications. The materials recommendations provide to the project architect/engineer the best available corrosion rate information for the materials under the expected HWVP process conditions. Existing data and sound engineering judgement must be used and a solid technical basis must be developed to define an approach to selecting suitable construction materials for the HWVP. This report contains the strategy, approach, criteria, and technical basis developed for selecting materials of construction. Based on materials testing specific to HWVP and on related outside testing, this report recommends for constructing specific process equipment and identifies future testing needs to complete verification of the performance of the selected materials. 30 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

Elmore, M R; Jensen, G A

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

First-order study of property/composition relationships for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order composition variability study (CVS-I) was conducted for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) program to preliminarily characterize the effects on key glass properties of variations i selected glass (waste and frit) components. The components selected were Si0[sub 2],B[sub 2]O[sub 3],A1[sub 2]O[sub 3], Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3], ZrO[sub 2], Na[sub 2]O,Li[sub 2]O,CaO,MgO, and Others (all remaining waste components). A glass composition region was selected for study based on the expected range of glass compositions and the results of a previous series of scoping and solubility studies. Then, a 23-glass statistically-designed mixture experiment was conducted and data obtained for viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and durability [Materials Characterization Center (MCC-1) 28-day leach test and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT)]. These data were modeled using first-order functions of composition, and the models were used to investigate the effects of the components on glass and melt properties. The CVS-I data and models will also be used to support the second-order composition variability study (CVS-II).

Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.; Bates, S.O.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

First-order study of property/composition relationships for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order composition variability study (CVS-I) was conducted for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) program to preliminarily characterize the effects on key glass properties of variations i selected glass (waste and frit) components. The components selected were Si0{sub 2},B{sub 2}O{sub 3},A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O,Li{sub 2}O,CaO,MgO, and Others (all remaining waste components). A glass composition region was selected for study based on the expected range of glass compositions and the results of a previous series of scoping and solubility studies. Then, a 23-glass statistically-designed mixture experiment was conducted and data obtained for viscosity, electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, thermal expansion, crystallinity, and durability [Materials Characterization Center (MCC-1) 28-day leach test and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT)]. These data were modeled using first-order functions of composition, and the models were used to investigate the effects of the components on glass and melt properties. The CVS-I data and models will also be used to support the second-order composition variability study (CVS-II).

Piepel, G.F.; Hrma, P.R.; Bates, S.O.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes critical system design for High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 Hanford Traffic Safety144&

184

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant completes critical system design for High-Level Waste Vitrification Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200cell 9 Hanford Traffic Safety144&8, 2010

185

Hanford Waste Vitrification Program process development: Melt testing subtask, pilot-scale ceramic melter experiment, run summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Waste Vitrification Program (HWVP) activities for FY 1985 have included engineering and pilot-scale melter experiments HWVP-11/HBCM-85-1 and HWVP-12/PSCM-22. Major objectives designated by HWVP fo these tests were to evaluate the processing characteristics of the current HWVP melter feed during actual melter operation and establish the product quality of HW-39 borosilicate glass. The current melter feed, defined during FY 85, consists of reference feed (HWVP-RF) and glass-forming chemicals added as frit.

Nakaoka, R.K.; Bates, S.O.; Elmore, M.R.; Goles, R.W.; Perez, J.M.; Scott, P.A.; Westsik, J.H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fiscal year 1997 final report for task plan SR-16WT-31 task B, vitrification of ion exchange material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1997, the Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area (TFA) funded the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to develop and demonstrate the vitrification of a CST ion exchange material loaded with radioactive cesium from one of the Melton Valley Storage Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRTC developed a patent-pending glass formulation that can be used to vitrify CST sorbent producing a quality borosilicate glass waste form. SRTC demonstrated this formulation by vitrifying the radioactive CST in the SRTC shielded cells melter.In addition to the formulation developed for vitrification of the `CST-only` glass waste form, SRTC also developed formulations for vitrification of CST coupled with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludges. A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) coupled feed formulation has been developed with up to 10 weight percent CST and 28 weight percent DWPF sludge oxides. A coupled Hanford formulation has also been developed for producing quality glass waste forms with up to 10 weight percent CST and 45 weight percent Hanford sludge oxides. The significant accomplishments of this project were then development of CST-only glass formulations incorporating up to 65 weight-percent CST, development of techniques for delivering a slurry or dry feed to a joule-heated melter, demonstration of a CST-only glass formulation in a continuous melter operation, demonstration of compliance with the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), development of CST-sludge glass formulations incorporating up to 10 weight percent CST and 28 weight percent DWPF sludges oxides, demonstration of CST-sludge glass formulations using radioactive sludge and radioactive CST, development of CST-sludge glass formulations incorporating up to 10 weight percent CST and 45 weight percent. All commitments made to the TFA have been met as indicated by the associated milestones. Milestones and the month in which they were completed: Initiate Immobilization of CST in Glass (completed 8/97); Demonstrate that Sludge-CST Glass Satisfied PC Specs in WAPS (completed 9/97); Determine Process Parameters of Sludge-CST Glass (completed 8/97); Demonstrate that CST-Only Glass Satisfied PC Specs in WAPS (completed 9/97); Determine Process Parameters of CST-Only Glass (completed 9/97). The results for Task B of Task Plan SR-16WT-31 have been documented in reports that have been included as attachments. The following is a summary of the attachments from the CST vitrification project.

Ferrara, D.; Andrews, M.K.; Harbour, J.R.; Fellinger, T.L.; Herman, D.T.; Marshall, K.M.; Workman, P.J.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Bulk Viscosity of a Pion Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the bulk viscosity of a gas of pions at temperatures below the QCD crossover temperature, for the physical value of pion mass, to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory. Bulk viscosity is controlled by number-changing processes which become exponentially slow at low temperatures when the pions become exponentially dilute, leading to an exponentially large bulk viscosity zeta ~ (F_0^8/m_\\pi^5) exp(2m_\\pi/T), where F_0 = 93 MeV is the pion decay constant.

Egang Lu; Guy D. Moore

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Bulk viscosity of N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study the bulk viscosity of strongly coupled, mass deformed SU(N_c) N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, also known as N=2^* gauge theory. For a wide range of masses we confirm the bulk viscosity bound proposed in arXiv:0708.3459. For a certain choice of masses, the theory undergoes a phase transition with divergent specific heat c_V ~ |1-T_c/T|^(-1/2). We show that, although bulk viscosity rapidly grows as T -> T_c, it remains finite in the vicinity of the critical point.

Alex Buchel; Chris Pagnutti

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bulk power risk analysis : ranking infrastructure elements according to their risk significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disruptions in the bulk power grid can result in very diverse consequences that include economic, social, physical, and psychological impacts. In addition, power outages do not affect all end-users of the system in the ...

Koonce, Anthony M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs.

Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Loehr, C.A.; Bates, S.O. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Thompson, L.E.; McGrail, B.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan K.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

192

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan Keith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

194

The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells The influence of molecular orientation on organic bulk heterojunction solar cells Print Monday, 28...

195

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for...

196

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Targets, barriers and...

197

Bulk materials handling equipment roundup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article reports recent product developments in belt conveyors. Flexco Steel Lancing Co. (Flexco) has a range of light, portable maintenance tools and offers training modules on procedures for belt conveyor maintenance on its website www.flexcosafe.com. Siemens recently fitted a 19 km long conveyor belt drive system at a Texan aluminium plant with five 556-kW Simovent Masterdrive VC drives. Voith recently launched the TPKL-T turbo coupling for users who want an alignment-free drive solution. Belt cleaners newly on the market include the RemaClean SGB brush and ASGCO Manufacturing's Razor-Back with Spray bar. Continental Conveyor has introduced a new line of dead-shaft pulleys offering increased bearing protection. 6 photos.

Fiscor, S.

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bulk viscous matter-dominated Universes: asymptotic properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By means of a combined use of the type Ia supernovae and H(z) data tests, together with the study of the asymptotic properties in the equivalent phase space — through the use of the dynamical systems tools — we demonstrate that the bulk viscous matter-dominated scenario is not a good model to explain the accepted cosmological paradigm, at least, under the parametrization of bulk viscosity considered in this paper. The main objection against such scenarios is the absence of conventional radiation and matter-dominated critical points in the phase space of the model. This entails that radiation and matter dominance are not generic solutions of the cosmological equations, so that these stages can be implemented only by means of unique and very specific initial conditions, i. e., of very unstable particular solutions. Such a behavior is in marked contradiction with the accepted cosmological paradigm which requires of an earlier stage dominated by relativistic species, followed by a period of conventional non-relativistic matter domination, during which the cosmic structure we see was formed. Also, we found that the bulk viscosity is positive just until very late times in the cosmic evolution, around z < 1. For earlier epochs it is negative, been in tension with the local second law of thermodynamics.

Avelino, Arturo [Departamento de Física, Campus León, Universidad de Guanajuato, León, Guanajuato (Mexico); García-Salcedo, Ricardo [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada - Legaria del IPN, México D.F. (Mexico); Gonzalez, Tame [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil, División de Ingeniería, Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico); Nucamendi, Ulises [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Ciudad Universitaria, CP. 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Quiros, Israel, E-mail: avelino@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: rigarcias@ipn.mx, E-mail: tamegc72@gmail.com, E-mail: ulises@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: iquiros6403@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemáticas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías (CUCEI), Corregidora 500 S.R., Universidad de Guadalajara, 44420 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

West Valley transfer cart control system design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Vitrification and testing of a Hanford high-level waste sample. Part 1: Glass fabrication, and chemical and radiochemical analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford radioactive tank waste will be separated into low-activity waste and high-level waste that will both be vitrified into borosilicate glasses. To demonstrate the feasibility of vitrification and the durability of the high-level waste glass, a high-level waste sample from Tank AZ-101 was processed to glass in a hot cell and analyzed with respect to chemical composition, radionuclide content, waste loading, and the presence of crystalline phases and then tested for leachability. The glass was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ? energy spectrometry, ? spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting. The WISE Uranium Project calculator was used to calculate the main sources of radioactivity to the year 3115. The observed crystallinity and the results of leachability testing of the glass will be reported in Part 2 of this paper.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Bates, Derrick J.; Bredt, Paul; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, H D.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Apart from identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighed sum of intensities of individual gases linearly proportional with the differential themogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions.

Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Schweiger, Michael J.

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. Foams from the residual gases can significantly alter the melting rate through mass and heat transfers. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TGA-GC-MS) combination to perform quantitative evolved gas analysis (EGA) and developed a simple calibration model which correlates the overall mass loss rate with the evolution rates for individual gases. The model parameters are obtained from the least squares analysis, assuming that the gas-evolving reactions are independent. Thus, the EGA adds the ‘chemical identity’ to the reactions indicated by the ‘phenomenological’ kinetic model.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Chun, Jaehun; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mouth generation at Powder River Basin · How much impact would 25% wind penetration have on price ? 2 What is modeled · spatial & temporal · energy flows · nodal prices (fuel & elec) · SO2, allowance price1 Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks Electrical Engineering Professor Jim Mc

Tesfatsion, Leigh

204

INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER ERCOT (Texas)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 D. The New Wholesale Market and the Move Toward Retail Choice . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 1. The Short-Term Energy Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4INVESTIGATION OF BULK POWER MARKETS ERCOT (Texas) November 1, 2000 The analyses and conclusions

Laughlin, Robert B.

205

Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

JULYK, L.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Bulk Handling of Milk on Texas Dairy Farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas dur- tem of handling milk. ing the spring and summer of 1957 on dairy - farms which have converted their operations to Dairymen interviewed in North Texas had tanks ranging from 150 gallons to 1,000 gallons, , the bulk system of producing... and handling milk. while tanks in the Corous Christi area raneDd Texas dairy farmers are operating larger from 200 gallons to 1,000 gallons. The average units, milking more cows, selling more milk and tank in North Texas had a capacity of 400 gal. generally...

Parker, Cecil A.; Stelly, Randall, Moore, Donald S.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Bulk Energy Storage Webinar Rescheduled for February 9, 2012 | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal6Clean Energyof Energy Bulk Energy Storage

208

Technical Evaluation Summary of the In Situ Vitrification Melt Expulsion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on April 21, 1996, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Technical Evaluation Summary of the In Situ Vitrification Melt Expulsion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on April 21, 1996, was prepared at the request of the Department of Energy as a supporting reference document for the Final Unusual Occurrence Report to fully explore the probable causes that lead to the subject incident. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with the technical information on the performance of the in situ vitrification treatability study operations at ORNL pit 1 up to and including the time of the melt expulsion incident. This document also attempts to diagnose the causes of the melt expulsion event the consequent damages to equipment the radiological impacts of the event, and the equipment design modifications and procedural changes necessary for future safe ISV operations.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Behavior and Effects of the Noble Metals in the DWPF Melter System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Governments worldwide have committed to stabilization of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) by vitrification to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. All of these nuclear wastes contain the fission-product noble metals: ruthenium, rhodium, and palladium. SRS wastes also contain natural silver from iodine scrubbers. Closely associated with the noble metals are the fission products selenium and tellurium which are chemical analogs of sulfur and which combine with noble metals to influence their behavior and properties. Experience has shown that these melt insoluble metals and their compounds tend to settle to the floor of Joule-heated ceramic melters. In fact, almost all of the major research and production facilities have experienced some operational problem which can be associated with the presence of dense accumulations of these relatively conductive metals and/or their compounds. In most cases, these deposits have led to a loss of production capability, in some cases, to the point that melter operation could not continue. HLW nuclear waste vitrification facilities in the United States are the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the planned Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the operating West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. An extensive noble metals testing program was begun in 1990. The objectives of this task were to explore the effects of the noble metals on the DWPF melter feed preparation and waste vitrification processes. This report focuses on the vitrification portion of the test program.

Smith, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bickford, D.F.

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk power system reliability is of critical importance to the electricity sector. Complete and accurate information on events affecting the bulk power system is essential for assessing trends and efforts to maintain or improve reliability. Yet, current sources of this information were not designed with these uses in mind. They were designed, instead, to support real-time emergency notification to industry and government first-responders. This paper reviews information currently collected by both industry and government sources for this purpose and assesses factors that might affect their usefulness in supporting the academic literature that has relied upon them to draw conclusions about the reliability of the US electric power system.

Fisher, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Bulk Parameterization of Giant CCN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), growth by condensation, and growth by coalescence (Beard and Ochs 1993). The long time scale required for conden- sational growth of droplets large enough for collection efficiencies to become significant has been a subject of ongoing investigation.... Bulk microphysical parameterizations traditionally partition the total liquid water into two categories, cloud and rainwater, based on a threshold radius of 20–25 #2;m. The most important effect of GCCN is through their impact on precipitation...

Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling the steady-state ISV (in situ vitrification) process: A 3-D finite element analysis of coupled thermal-electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state modeling considerations for simulating the in situ vitrification (ISV) process are documented based upon the finite element numerical approach. Recommendations regarding boundary condition specifications and mesh discretization are presented. The effects of several parameters on the ISV process response are calculated and the results discussed. The parameters investigated include: (1) electrode depth, (2) ambient temperature, (3) supplied current, (4) electrical conductivity, (5) electrode separation, and (6) soil/waste characterization. 13 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Langerman, M.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen.

Knize, Randall J. (Los Angeles, CA); Cecchi, Joseph L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Hydrogen isotope separation utilizing bulk getters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Tritium and deuterium are separated from a gaseous mixture thereof, derived from a nuclear fusion reactor or some other source, by providing a casing with a bulk getter therein for absorbing the gaseous mixture to produce an initial loading of the getter, partially desorbing the getter to produce a desorbed mixture which is tritium-enriched, pumping the desorbed mixture into a separate container, the remaining gaseous loading in the getter being deuterium-enriched, desorbing the getter to a substantially greater extent to produce a deuterium-enriched gaseous mixture, and removing the deuterium-enriched mixture into another container. The bulk getter may comprise a zirconium-aluminum alloy, or a zirconium-vanadium-iron alloy. The partial desorption may reduce the loading by approximately fifty percent. The basic procedure may be extended to produce a multistage isotope separator, including at least one additional bulk getter into which the tritium-enriched mixture is absorbed. The second getter is then partially desorbed to produce a desorbed mixture which is further tritium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed from the container for the second getter, which is then desorbed to a substantially greater extent to produce a desorbed mixture which is deuterium-enriched. The last-mentioned mixture is then removed so that the cycle can be continued and repeated. The method of isotope separation is also applicable to other hydrogen isotopes, in that the method can be employed for separating either deuterium or tritium from normal hydrogen. 4 figures.

Knize, R.J.; Cecchi, J.L.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Identification of Bacteria in Biofilm and Bulk Water Samples from a Nonchlorinated Model Drinking Water Distribution System: Detection of a Large Nitrite-Oxidizing Population Associated with Nitrospira spp.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

formation in a model drinking water distribution system. J.and activity in drinking water distribution networks underbacterial species from drinking water biofilms and proof of

Martiny, A. C; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Arvin, E.; Molin, S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Vehicle Technologies Office...

218

Towards bulk based preconditioning for quantum dotcomputations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how to accelerate the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) type eigensolvers for the computation of several states around the band gap of colloidal quantum dots. Our new approach uses the Hamiltonian from the bulk materials constituent for the quantum dot to design an efficient preconditioner for the folded spectrum PCG method. The technique described shows promising results when applied to CdSe quantum dot model problems. We show a decrease in the number of iteration steps by at least a factor of 4 compared to the previously used diagonal preconditioner.

Dongarra, Jack; Langou, Julien; Tomov, Stanimire; Channing,Andrew; Marques, Osni; Vomel, Christof; Wang, Lin-Wang

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Role of bulk energy in nuclear multifragmentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of thermal expansion and residual interactions, hot nuclear fragments produced in multifragmentation reactions may have nucleon density lower than the equilibrium density of cold nuclei. In terms of a liquid-drop model this effect can be taken into account by reducing the bulk energy of fragments. We study the influence of this change on fragment yields and isotope distributions within the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model. Similarities and differences with previously discussed modifications of symmetry and surface energies of nuclei are analyzed.

Buyukcizmeci, N.; Ogul, R. [Department of Physics, University of Selcuk, 42079 Konya (Turkey); Botvina, A. S. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, RU-117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Mishustin, I. N. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe University, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kurchatov Institute, Russian Research Center, RU-123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of {sup 235}U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, {sup 235 }U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Langner, D.G.; Miller, M.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

West Valley transfer cart control system design description. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A computational model for viscous fluid flow, heat transfer, and melting in in situ vitrification melt pools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MAGMA is a FORTRAN computer code designed to viscous flow in in situ vitrification melt pools. It models three-dimensional, incompressible, viscous flow and heat transfer. The momentum equation is coupled to the temperature field through the buoyancy force terms arising from the Boussinesq approximation. All fluid properties, except density, are assumed variable. Density is assumed constant except in the buoyancy force terms in the momentum equation. A simple melting model based on the enthalpy method allows the study of the melt front progression and latent heat effects. An indirect addressing scheme used in the numerical solution of the momentum equation voids unnecessary calculations in cells devoid of liquid. Two-dimensional calculations can be performed using either rectangular or cylindrical coordinates, while three-dimensional calculations use rectangular coordinates. All derivatives are approximated by finite differences. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a new fully implicit iterative technique, while the energy equation is differenced explicitly in time. Spatial derivatives are written in conservative form using a uniform, rectangular, staggered mesh based on the marker and cell placement of variables. Convective terms are differenced using a weighted average of centered and donor cell differencing to ensure numerical stability. Complete descriptions of MAGMA governing equations, numerics, code structure, and code verification are provided. 14 refs.

McHugh, P.R.; Ramshaw, J.D.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

978-1-4244-7467-7/10/$26.00 2010 IEEE 2010 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control VIII (IREP), August 1-6, 2010, Buzios, RJ, Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be used to effectively integrate wind power into the grid. By nature, wind power is intermittent are accompanied by the rapid implementation of wind farms which are being integrated into the power grid. A key System with Wind Resources Christophe Guille George Gross Fellow, IEEE Abstract The rising energy

Gross, George

225

2013 IREP Symposium-Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control -IX (IREP), August 25-30, 2013, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy for discharge over periods of hours, such as large-scale battery storage, compressed air energy, Rethymnon, Greece A Comparative Assessment of Demand Response and Energy Storage Resource Economic system operators, policy makers and other grid stakeholders in the expanded utilization of energy storage

Gross, George

226

Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Piscataway, NJ)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

Forrest, Stephen R.; Yang, Fan

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

Blanton, P.

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

230

Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Freeze-out by bulk viscosity driven instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a new scenario (first introduced in [G. Torrieri, B. Tom\\'a\\v{s}ik and I. Mishustin, Phys. Rev. C \\textbf{77}, 034903 (2008)]) for freezeout in heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We argue that bulk viscosity increases as $T$ approaches $T_c$. The fluid {then} becomes unstable against small perturbations, and fragments into clusters of a size much smaller than the total size of the system. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We show that this scenario can explain HBT data and suggest how it can be experimentally tested.

Torrieri, Giorgio; Mishustin, Igor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Climatic features of the Mediterranean Sea detected by the analysis of the longwave radiative bulk formulae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an open ocean with the same amount of net longwave radiation. Furthermore, the twofold climatic regime's climate system is the net radiation budget at the ocean surface. Due to the scarcity of direct radiationClimatic features of the Mediterranean Sea detected by the analysis of the longwave radiative bulk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the process; molten salts may accumulate in container refractory walls; the glass on cooling may precipitate crystalline phases. These problems need targeted exploratory research. Examples of specific problems and their possible solutions are discussed.

KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

MECHANISMS OF PHASE FORMATION IN THE VITRIFICATION OF HIGH-FERROUS SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SB2 HLW SLUDGE SURROGATE - 9300  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase formation mechanisms associated with the vitrification of high-ferrous Savannah River Site (SRS) Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) high level waste surrogate were studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Two mixtures at 50 wt% waste loading with commercially available Frit 320 (Li{sub 2}O - 8 wt %, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8 wt %, Na{sub 2}O - 12 wt %, SiO{sub 2} - 72 wt %) and batch chemicals (LiOH {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}) to represent the frit formulation were prepared as slurries with a water content of {approx}50 wt%. The mixtures were air-dried at a temperature of 115 C and heat-treated at 500, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200, and 1300 C for 1 hr at each temperature. Infrared spectra and XRD patterns of the products produced at each temperature were recorded. In both mixtures prepared using frit and batch chemicals to represent the frit, phase formation reactions were completed within the temperature range between 900 and 1000 C. However, residual quartz was still present in glass produced from the mixture with batch chemicals even at 1100 C. Although, the phase composition and structure of the glassy products obtained from both mixtures at temperatures over 1000 C were similar, the products obtained from the mixture using actual frit were more homogeneous than those from the mixture with batch chemicals. Thus, the use of frit rather than batch chemicals reduced the temperature range of phase formation and provided for production of higher quality glass.

Marra, J

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Strategies for High Thermoelectric zT in Bulk Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Zintl principle in chemistry, complex electronic band structures, and incorporation of nanometer sized particles were used to explore, optimize and improve bulk thermoelectric materials

236

New nano structure approaches for bulk thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in bulk thermoelectric materials", M. Mater. Res. Soc.Thermoelectricity", Materials Reserach Society Symposium,Johnson, D. C. , Eds. Materials Research Society: Boston,

Kim, Jeonghoon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regulatory Roadmapping Pgower's picture Submitted by Pgower(45) Member 7 August, 2014 - 13:19 One-day workshop to review regulatory roadmaps for bulk transmission. Date:...

238

Bulk Hydrogen Storage - Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakout Session - Bulk Hydrogen Storage RD&D Needs Top 6 Categories: Advanced Concepts Advanced Materials Codes & Standards Studies & Analyses Tools & Techniques Demonstration &...

239

Material Profile Influences in Bulk-Heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

he morphology in mixed bulk-heterojunction films are compared using three different quantitative measurement techniques. We compare the vertical composition changes using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with electron tomography and neutron and x-ray reflectometry. The three measurement techniques yield qualita-tively comparable vertical concentration measurements. The presence of a metal cathode during thermal annealing is observed to alter the fullerene concentration throughout the thickness of the film for all measurements. However, the abso-lute vertical concentration of fullerene is quantitatively different for the three measurements. The origin of the quantitative measurement differences is discussed. The authors thank Luna Innovations, Inc. for donating the endohedral fullerenes used in this study and Plextronics for the P3HT. They are gratefully thank the National Science Foundation Energy for Sustainability Program, Award No. 0933435. This work benefited from the use of the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Los Alamos National Laboratory under DOE Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. This research was also supported in part by Laboratory Directed Research & Development program at PNNL. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

Roehling, John D.; Rochester, Christopher W.; Ro, Hyun W.; Wang, Peng; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Batenburg, Kees J.; Arslan, Ilke; Delongchamp, Dean M.; Moule, Adam J.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 ?m is determined as a more realistic setting in the autoconversion parameterization. The saturation adjustment employed in calculating condensation/evaporation in the bulk scheme is identified as the main factor responsible for the large discrepancies in predicting cloud water in the SC case, suggesting that an explicit calculation of diffusion growth with predicted supersaturation is necessary for further improvements of the bulk microphysics scheme. Lastly, a larger rain evaporation rate below cloud is found in the bulk scheme in comparison to the SBM simulation, which could contribute to a lower surface precipitation in the bulk scheme.

Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) VITRIFICATION EXPERIENCE IN THE US: APPLICATION OF GLASS PRODUCT/PROCESS CONTROL TO OTHERHLW AND HAZARDOUS WASTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) actual HLW tank waste has successfully been processed to stringent product and process constraints without any rework into a stable borosilicate glass waste since 1996. A unique 'feed forward' statistical process control (SPC) has been used rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product is sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property models form the basis for the 'feed forward' SPC. The property models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition. The property models are mechanistic and depend on glass bonding/structure, thermodynamics, quasicrystalline melt species, and/or electron transfers. The mechanistic models have been validated over composition regions well outside of the regions for which they were developed because they are mechanistic. Mechanistic models allow accurate extension to radioactive and hazardous waste melts well outside the composition boundaries for which they were developed.

Jantzen, C; James Marra, J

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Role of Cavitation in Bulk Ultrasound Ablation: A Histologic Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of Cavitation in Bulk Ultrasound Ablation: A Histologic Study Chandra Priya Karunakaran, Mark of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio Abstract. The role of cavitation in bulk ultrasound ablation has been evaluated-ablate probe at 31 W/cm2 for 20 minutes under normal and elevated ambient pressures. A 1 MHz passive cavitation

Mast, T. Douglas

243

Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

Menchhofer, Paul A. (Clinton, TN); Montgomery, Frederick C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Baker, Frederick S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

244

Real-Time Dispatchability of Bulk Power Systems with Volatile ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with variable energy resources, which focuses on investigating the impact of ...... the development of sustainable energy strategy and implementation in. China ...

2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Robotic Inspection System for Bulk Liquid Storage Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) requires: drainage of the product; cleaning of the vessel with water or solvents; physical removal, collection and containment of petroleum and chemical waste residues, including the waste streams created by the cleaning...

Hartsell, D. R.; Hakes, K. J.

246

Ensuring a Reliable Bulk Electric System | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department oftoTheseClickDepartment ofFeaturingThanksPowerPoint

247

Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay subsoil by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Running heading: Bulk density of a clayey subsoil Increase in the bulk density of a Grey Clay of the prisms were coated by material similar in composition to the topsoil and separated from as the profile dries over summer leading to widening of cracks between prismatic peds, (2) infilling of cracks

Boyer, Edmond

248

International Round-Robin Testing of Bulk Thermoelectrics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two international round-robin studies were conducted on transport properties measurements of bulk thermoelectric materials. The study discovered current measurement problems. In order to get ZT of a material four separate transport measurements must be taken. The round-robin study showed that among the four properties Seebeck coefficient is the one can be measured consistently. Electrical resistivity has +4-9% scatter. Thermal diffusivity has similar +5-10% scatter. The reliability of the above three properties can be improved by standardizing test procedures and enforcing system calibrations. The worst problem was found in specific heat measurements using DSC. The probability of making measurement error is great due to the fact three separate runs must be taken to determine Cp and the baseline shift is always an issue for commercial DSC. It is suggest the Dulong Petit limit be always used as a guide line for Cp. Procedures have been developed to eliminate operator and system errors. The IEA-AMT annex is developing standard procedures for transport properties testing.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Sharp, Jeff [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Probe for optically monitoring progress of in-situ vitrification of soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector system for sensing the progress of an ISV process along an expected path comprises multiple sensors each having an input port. The input ports are distributed along the expected path of the ISV process between a starting location and an expected ending location. Each sensor generates an electrical signal representative of the temperature in the vicinity of its input port. A signal processor is coupled to the sensors to receive an electrical signal generated by a sensor, and generate a signal which is encoded with information which identifies the sensor and whether the ISV process has reached the sensor's input port. A transmitter propagates the encoded signal. The signal processor and the transmitter are below ground at a location beyond the expected ending location of the ISV process in the direction from the starting location to the expected ending location. A signal receiver and a decoder are located above ground for receiving the encoded signal propagated by the transmitter, decoding the encoded signal and providing a human-perceptible indication of the progress of the ISV process.

Timmerman, Craig L. (Richland, WA); Oma, Kenton H. (Richland, WA); Davis, Karl C. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Probe for optically monitoring progress of in-situ vitrification of soil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector system for sensing the progress of an ISV process along an expected path comprises multiple sensors each having an input port. The input ports are distributed along the expected path of the ISV process between a starting location and an expected ending location. Each sensor generates an electrical signal representative of the temperature in the vicinity of its input port. A signal processor is coupled to the sensors to receive an electrical signal generated by a sensor, and generate a signal which is encoded with information which identifies the sensor and whether the ISV process has reached the sensor's input port. A transmitter propagates the encoded signal. The signal processor and the transmitter are below ground at a location beyond the expected ending location of the ISV process in the direction from the starting location to the expected ending location. A signal receiver and a decoder are located above ground for receiving the encoded signal propagated by the transmitter, decoding the encoded signal and providing a human-perceptible indication of the progress of the ISV process. 7 figs.

Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.; Davis, K.C.

1988-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Bulk-SQUID effect in a discrete superconductor as a consequence of generation frequency locking in constituent josephson junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory of the bulk-SQUID effect in discrete superconductors is constructed for the first time. It is shown that the bulk-SQUID effect emerges in the system of 2D intrinsically stochastic multijunction SQUID (i.e., with random values of critical currents of the junctions, injection currents, and the coupling coefficients between the junction) due to generation frequency locking in all junctions. It is demonstrated that the bulk-SQUID effect occurs in a wide range of random parameters of the system. This domain of variation of the system parameters can be divided into three subdomains. The first one is the subdomain of coherent dynamics of phases at the junctions, the second is the subdomain of incoherent dynamics, in which the phases of the junctions are not locked, but the bulk-SQUID effect persists, and the third is the subdomain of transient dynamics, in which coherent dynamics and the bulk-SQUID effect are observed in parts. A simple mathematical model of noninteracting junctions, which correctly describes basic features of the dynamics of the initial system and makes it possible to calculate some of its statistical characteristics, is proposed and analyzed.

Ginzburg, S. L.; Nakin, A. V.; Savitskaya, N. E., E-mail: savitska@inbox.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Konstantinov Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

A General Theorem Relating the Bulk Topological Number to Edge States in Two-dimensional Insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We prove a general theorem on the relation between the bulk topological quantum number and the edge states in two dimensional insulators. It is shown that whenever there is a topological order in bulk, characterized by a non-vanishing Chern number, even if it is defined for a non-conserved quantity such as spin in the case of the spin Hall effect, one can always infer the existence of gapless edge states under certain twisted boundary conditions that allow tunneling between edges. This relation is robust against disorder and interactions, and it provides a unified topological classification of both the quantum (charge) Hall effect and the quantum spin Hall effect. In addition, it reconciles the apparent conflict between the stability of bulk topological order and the instability of gapless edge states in systems with open boundaries (as known happening in the spin Hall case). The consequences of time reversal invariance for bulk topological order and edge state dynamics are further studied in the present framework.

Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Wu, Yong-Shi; /Utah U.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Tsinghua U., Beijing

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Neutrino mass, bulk majoron and neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new economical model for neutrino masses is proposed in the context of brane bulk scenarios for particle physics, where global B-L symmetry of the standard model is broken spontaneously by a gauge singlet Higgs field in the bulk. This leads to a bulk majoron whose KK excitations may make it visible if neutrinoless double beta decay if the string scale is close to a TeV. It also leads to neutron-anti-neutron oscillation process with transition times which can be in the range accessible to proposed experiments.

R. N. Mohapatra; A. Perez-Lorenzana; C. A. de S. Pires

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Brane-Bulk energy exchange and agegraphic dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the agegraphic models of dark energy in a braneworld scenario with brane-bulk energy exchange. We assume that the adiabatic equation for the dark matter is satisfied while it is violated for the agegraphic dark energy due to the energy exchange between the brane and the bulk. Our study shows that with the brane-bulk interaction, the equation of state parameter of agegraphic dark energy on the brane, $w_D$, can have a transition from normal state where $w_D >-1 $ to the phantom regime where $w_D energy always satisfies $w^{\\mathrm{eff}}_D\\geq-1$.

Ahmad Sheykhi

2010-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Texas Bulk Power Study-- An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be estimated and carefully ana1yzed in future research efforts. Theoretically, increased coordination through joint planning of the bu~k power transmission system can use resources located in some util ity systems to el iminate or defer the need for new... with ERCOT and individual utilities, should be directed to identifying the regions and facilities where potential transmission problems may arise. The potential need for the construction of additional or ~pgraded transmission facilities also raises...

Moore, B.

256

Atomistic calculation of the thermal conductance of large scale bulk-nanowire junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a stable and efficient kernel method to compute thermal transport in open systems, based on the scattering-matrix approach. This method is applied to compute the thermal conductance of a junction between bulk silicon and silicon nanowires with diameter up to 10 nm. We have found that beyond a threshold diameter of 7 nm, transmission spectra and contact conductances scale with the cross section of the contact surface, whereas deviations from this general trend are observed in thinner wires. This result allows us to predict the thermal resistance of bulk-nanowire interfaces with larger cross sections than those tractable with atomistic simulations, and indicate the characteristic size beyond which atomistic systems can in principle be treated accurately by mean-field theories. Our calculations also elucidate how dimensionality reduction and shape affect interfacial heat transport.

Duchemin, Ivan; Donadio, Davide [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Structural and economic analysis of capesize bulk carriers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural failures of bulk carriers continue to account for the loss of many lives every year. Capes are particularly vulnerable to cracking because of their large length, their trade in high density cargos, and the high ...

Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Stresses resulting from compression of bulk cotton lint fibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio and shear modulus of bulk cotton lint fibers were determined. The cotton lint was compressed in an MTS machine to a predetermined density, and the resilient forces induced by the cotton lint after being...

Chimbombi, Ezekiel Maswe

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A bulk-flow model of angled injection Lomakin bearings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A bulk-flow model for determination of the leakage and dynamic force characteristics of angled injection Lomakin bearings is presented. Zeroth- and first-order equations describe the equilibrium flow for a centered bearing and the perturbed flow...

Soulas, Thomas Antoine Theo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Incomplete Exciton Harvesting from Fullerenes in Bulk Heterojunction Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incomplete Exciton Harvesting from Fullerenes in Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells George F. Burkhard generation (absorp- tion), exciton harvesting (the process of excitons migrating to the donor materials decay radiatively, so exciton harvesting is usually evaluated by observing photolumines- cence

McGehee, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Remarks Concerning the Public Utility Commission of Texas Study on Bulk Power Transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMARKS CONCERNING THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION OF TEXAS STUDY ON BULK POWER TRANSMISSION R. T. SWEATMAN Executive Director Electric Reliability Council of Texas The citizens of Texas need reliable electric service. Our economy, our way... amounts of transmission capacity must alwavs be available in the event generation is lost in one area, so that the other utility's power can be transmitted to the utility in need. A pipeline system can suffer equipment outages easily, without loss...

Sweatman, R. T.

262

Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Costs, Savings and Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\ BULLETIN 904 MAY 1958 .t(. :a ,s - / cwdh\\@ Costs, Savi~gs;.itd Financing Bulk Tanks on Texas Dairy Farms . ?. I I 1 i I I ! ,:ravings in hauling - 10 cents I \\ \\ 1 \\ savings in hauling - 15 cents -----------____--- 'savings... in hauling - 20 cents Annual production, 1,000 pounds Estimated number of years required for savings from a bulk tank to equal additional costs at different levels of production and savings in hauling costs. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMEN'T STATION R. D...

Moore, Donald S.; Stelly, Randall; Parker, Cecil A.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas < RAPID‎ | BulkTransmission

265

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas <RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water

266

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Wyoming | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/TexasRAPID/BulkTransmission/Wyoming <

267

Finsler geometric perspective on the bulk flow in the universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomical observations showed that there may exist a bulk flow with peculiar velocities in the universe, which contradicts with the (\\Lambda)CDM model. The bulk flow reveals that the observational universe is anisotropic at large scales. In fact, a more reliable observation on the anisotropy of spacetime comes from the CMB power spectra. The WMAP and Planck satellites both show that there is a hemispherical power asymmetry at large-angular scales. In this paper, we propose a "wind" scenario to the bulk flow (or the anisotropy of spacetime). Under the influence of the "wind", the spacetime metric could become a Finsler structure. By resolving the null geodesic equation, we obtain the modified luminosity distance, which has a dipolar form at the leading order. Thus, the "wind" describes well the bulk flow. In addition, we perform a least-(\\chi^2) fit to the data of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Union2.1 compilation. The peculiar velocity of the bulk flow has an upper limit (v_{bulk}\\lesssim 4000 \\rm{km/s}), which is compatible with all the existing observational values.

Zhe Chang; Ming-Hua Li; Sai Wang

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Baseline milestone HWVP-87-V110202F: Preliminary evaluation of noble metal behavior in the Hanford waste vitrification plant reference glass HW-39  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation and aggregation of ruthenium (Ru), rhodium (RLh) and palladium (Pd) in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) low chromium reference glass HLW-39 were investigated to determine if there is a potential for formation of a noble metal sludge in the HWVP ceramic melter. Significant noble metal accumulations on the floor of the melter will result in the electrical shorting of the electrodes and premature failure of the melter. The purpose of this study was to obtain preliminary information on the characteristics of noble metals in a simulated HWVP glass. Following a preliminary literature view to obtain information concerning the noble metals behavior, a number of variability studies were initiated. The effects of glass redox conditions, melt temperature, melting time and noble metal concentration on the phase characteristics of these noble metals were examined.

Geldart, R.W.; Bates, S.O.; Jette, S.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Feed specification for the double-shell tank/single shell tank waste blend for high-level waste vitrification process and melter testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Program is developing technology for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic waste as glass for permanent disposal. In support of the program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting laboratory-scale melter feed preparation studies and HLW melter testing which require a simulated HLW feed. The simulant HLW feed represents a blend of the waste from 177 single shell and double shell tanks. The waste blend composition is based on normalized track radionuclide components (TRAC), historical tank data, and assumptions on the pretreatment of the waste. The HLW simulant feed specification for the waste blend composition provides direction for the preparation of laboratory-scale and large-scale HLW blend simulant to be used in melter feed preparation studies and melter testing.

Tracey, E.M.; Merz, M.D.; Patello, G.K.; Wiemers, K.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ISU - Randy Larabee) · City of Ames (Ames - Merlin Hove) · MidAmerican Energy (Des Moines - Alan O of emission allowances? 5. What data can be made available to us? 6. Would you be interested in employing one in a description/depiction, a clear articulation of the "other flows" in the US energy system: · Information

Tesfatsion, Leigh

271

Final Vitrification Melter Evaluation  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergyFinal FY 2009 NEUP RDFinal

272

vitrification.PDF  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolationsRio Blanco ResponsibleSuiteFrom:QERAUDIT REPORT

273

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

274

The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling and Rate Capability of Lithium Positive Electrode Materials The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on...

275

Bulk emission of scalars by a rotating black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study in detail the scalar-field Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by a higher-dimensional, rotating black hole. We numerically compute the angular eigenvalues, and solve the radial equation of motion in order to find transmission factors. The latter are found to be enhanced by the angular momentum of the black hole, and to exhibit the well-known effect of superradiance. The corresponding power spectra for scalar fields show an enhancement with the number of dimensions, as in the non-rotating case. We compute the total mass loss rate of the black hole for a variety of black-hole angular momenta and bulk dimensions, and find that, in all cases, the bulk emission remains significantly smaller than the brane emission. The angular-momentum loss rate is also computed and found to have a smaller value in the bulk than on the brane. We present accurate bulk-to-brane emission ratios for a range of scenarios.

M. Casals; S. R. Dolan; P. Kanti; E. Winstanley

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Quasiparticle theory of shear and bulk viscosities of hadronic matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical framework for the calculation of shear and bulk viscosities of hadronic matter at finite temperature is presented. The framework is based on the quasiparticle picture. It allows for an arbitrary number of hadron species with pointlike interactions, and allows for both elastic and inelastic collisions. Detailed balance is ensured. The particles have temperature-dependent masses arising from mean-field or potential effects, which maintains self-consistency between the equation of state and the transport coefficients. As an example, we calculate the shear and bulk viscosity in the linear {sigma} model. The ratio of shear viscosity to entropy density shows a minimum in the vicinity of a rapid crossover transition, whereas the ratio of bulk viscosity to entropy density shows a maximum.

Chakraborty, P.; Kapusta, J. I. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Advance Resource Provisioning in Bulk Data Scheduling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today?s scientific and business applications generate mas- sive data sets that need to be transferred to remote sites for sharing, processing, and long term storage. Because of increasing data volumes and enhancement in current net- work technology that provide on-demand high-speed data access between collaborating institutions, data handling and scheduling problems have reached a new scale. In this paper, we present a new data scheduling model with ad- vance resource provisioning, in which data movement operations are defined with earliest start and latest comple- tion times. We analyze time-dependent resource assign- ment problem, and propose a new methodology to improve the current systems by allowing researchers and higher-level meta-schedulers to use data-placement as-a-service, so they can plan ahead and submit transfer requests in advance. In general, scheduling with time and resource conflicts is NP-hard. We introduce an efficient algorithm to organize multiple requests on the fly, while satisfying users? time and resource constraints. We successfully tested our algorithm in a simple benchmark simulator that we have developed, and demonstrated its performance with initial test results.

Balman, Mehmet

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

2009-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Properties of Bulk Sintered Silver As a Function of Porosity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study where various properties of bulk-sintered silver were investigated over a range of porosity. This work was conducted within the National Transportation Research Center's Power Device Packaging project that is part of the DOE Vehicle Technologies Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Program. Sintered silver, as an interconnect material in power electronics, inherently has porosity in its produced structure because of the way it is made. Therefore, interest existed in this study to examine if that porosity affected electrical properties, thermal properties, and mechanical properties because any dependencies could affect the intended function (e.g., thermal transfer, mechanical stress relief, etc.) or reliability of that interconnect layer and alter how its performance is modeled. Disks of bulk-sintered silver were fabricated using different starting silver pastes and different sintering conditions to promote different amounts of porosity. Test coupons were harvested out of the disks to measure electrical resistivity and electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. The authors fully recognize that the microstructure of processed bulk silver coupons may indeed not be identical to the microstructure produced in thin (20-50 microns) layers of sintered silver. However, measuring these same properties with such a thin actual structure is very difficult, requires very specialized specimen preparation and unique testing instrumentation, is expensive, and has experimental shortfalls of its own, so the authors concluded that the herein measured responses using processed bulk sintered silver coupons would be sufficient to determine acceptable values of those properties. Almost all the investigated properties of bulk sintered silver changed with porosity content within a range of 3-38% porosity. Electrical resistivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress all depended on the porosity content in bulk-sintered silver. The only investigated property that was independent of porosity in that range was coefficient of thermal expansion.

Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Vuono, Daniel J [ORNL; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Liang, Zhenxian [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which ensures the superpositioning of the first peak in the structure factor with twice the Fermi momentum, was used to calculate the interatomic potential of these alloys. The importance of Pd to the stability of the alloys is evidenced by the fact that replacing Ni and Pd places the nearest neighbor distances at more attractive positions in this potential.

Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2?K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3?T at 20?K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

Yamamoto, Akiyasu, E-mail: yamamoto@appchem.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Stress tensor and bulk viscosity in relativistic nuclear collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the influence of different initial conditions for the stress tensor and the effect of bulk viscosity on the expansion and cooling of the fireball created in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In particular, we explore the evolution...however, it does not significantly increase the entropy produced....

Fries, Rainer J.; Mueller, Berndt; Schaefer, Andreas.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

MORPHOLOGY DEPENDENT SHORT CIRCUIT CURRENT IN BULK HETEROJUNCTION SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the coupled exciton/electron/hole flow in the disordered polymer network, but also guarantees to connect kinetics appears complex and final structure is randomly interpenetrating clusters of polymer and fullerene, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA ABSTRACT Polymer based bulk heterostructure (BH) solar cell offers

Alam, Muhammad A.

286

Computing hypersurfaces which minimize surface energy plus bulk energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the energy of an interface surface, where the energy might be just area, or could have a density dependent curvature associated to the energy density ; if 1 so that the surface energy is just area[Page 17] Computing hypersurfaces which minimize surface energy plus bulk energy John M. Sullivan

Sullivan, John M.

287

Forest floor bulk density and depth at Savannah River - Draft Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing the amount of biomass across a landscape is becoming increasingly important to fire managers as new fuel and fire management decision support systems come on line. Fire managers rarely have the time or funding available to sample fuels operationally and often depend upon mean values for critical variables whose variation is often associated with simple stand characteristics such as age, forest type, time since last burn, stocking, or site, and other easily measured variables. This report outlines a study to collect and analyze litter and duff bulk density samples for developing a simple predictive tool to estimate forest floor fuel loading based on simple stand characteristics.

Maier, Brian; Ottmar, Roger; Wright, Clint

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Technical evaluation summary of the in situ vitrification melt expulsion at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on April 21, 1996, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 21, 1996, at 6:12 PM, about 20 tons of molten glass were expelled from a 216-ton body of molten (1600 C) radioactively contaminated soil (containing 2.4 Ci {sup 137}Cs) at an ORNL site. This was caused by pressurized steam venting rapidly through, rather than around, the molten body. During the previous 17 days, an old seepage pit was undergoing in situ vitrification to convert porous, leachable soil into an impermeable waste form. Analyses revealed that 0.13 {mu}Ci of {sup 137}Cs could have been released and would have delivered a hypothetical, unmeasurable dose of 0.02 {mu}rem to the nearest private residence outside the Oak Ridge Reservation. The expelled glass particles, having a uniform specific activity of 1.2E-08 Ci/g, contained no smearable or transferrable activity. Thus, the overall environmental impact was insignificant. Fire damage was completely limited to the off-gas hood. Techniques were identified to minimize the probability of future melt expulsions.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); ; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); ; Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); ; Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); ; Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States);

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating an optoelectronic device comprises: depositing a first layer having protrusions over a first electrode, in which the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer; in which the smallest lateral dimension of the protrusions are between 1 to 5 times the exciton diffusion length of the first organic small molecule material; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction is also provided and comprises: depositing a first layer with protrusions over an electrode by organic vapor phase deposition; depositing a second layer on the first layer where the interface of the first and second layers forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing another electrode over the second layer.

Shtein, Max (Ann Arbor, MI); Yang, Fan (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bulk-Brane Interaction and Holographic Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we consider the bulk-brane interaction to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named $L$. We assumes that the cold dark matter energy density on the brane is conserved, but the holographic dark energy density on the brane is not conserved due to brane-bulk energy exchange. Our calculation show, taking $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0.73$ for the present time, the lower bound of $w_{\\rm \\Lambda}^{eff}$ is -0.9. This implies that one can not generate phantom-like equation of state from an interacting holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe.

M R Setare

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Gravity-related spontaneous collapse in bulk matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the DP-model, gravity-related spontaneous wave function collapses suppress undesirable Schr\\"odinger Cat states. We derive the equations of the model for the hydrodynamic-elastic (acoustic) modes in a bulk. Two particular features are discussed: the universal dominance of spontaneous collapses at large wavelengths, and the reduction of spontaneous heating by a slight refinement of the DP-model.

Lajos Diósi

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Comparison of bulk- and surface-micromachined pressure sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two piezoresistive micromachined pressure sensors were compared: a commercially available bulk-micromachined (BM) pressure sensor and an experimental surface-micromachined (SM) pressure sensor. While the SM parts had significantly smaller die sizes, they were outperformed in most areas by the BM parts. This was due primarily to the smaller piezoresistive gauge factor in the polysilicon piezoresistors in the SM parts compared to the single crystal strain gauge used in the BM parts.

Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Monk, D.J.; O`Brien, G.; Miller, T.F. [Motorola, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Alaska | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County, Kentucky:County,Quogue isRAPID/BulkTransmission/Alaska

296

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii < RAPID‎ |

297

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Idaho | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii < RAPID‎

298

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Access | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii < RAPID‎Land Access

299

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii < RAPID‎Land

300

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Montana | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii <

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii <Nevada < RAPID‎

302

RAPID/BulkTransmission/New Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii <Nevada <

303

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Oregon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii <Nevada

304

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii

305

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Transmission Siting & Interconnection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas < RAPID‎ |

306

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Utah | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas < RAPID‎

307

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Washington | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas <

308

RAPID/BulkTransmission/Water Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/Texas

309

Standard practice for bulk sampling of liquid uranium hexafluoride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice covers methods for withdrawing representative samples of liquid uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from bulk quantities of the material. Such samples are used for determining compliance with the applicable commercial specification, for example Specification C787 and Specification C996. 1.2 It is assumed that the bulk liquid UF6 being sampled comprises a single quality and quantity of material. This practice does not address any special additional arrangements that might be required for taking proportional or composite samples, or when the sampled bulk material is being added to UF6 residues already in a container (“heels recycle”). 1.3 The number of samples to be taken, their nominal sample weight, and their disposition shall be agreed upon between the parties. 1.4 The scope of this practice does not include provisions for preventing criticality incidents. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of th...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Bulk Viscosity and Cavitation in Boost-Invariant Hydrodynamic Expansion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We solve second order relativistic hydrodynamics equations for a boost-invariant 1+1-dimensional expanding fluid with an equation of state taken from lattice calculations of the thermodynamics of strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. We investigate the dependence of the energy density as a function of proper time on the values of the shear viscosity, the bulk viscosity, and second order coefficients, confirming that large changes in the values of the latter have negligible effects. Varying the shear viscosity between zero and a few times s/(4 pi), with s the entropy density, has significant effects, as expected based on other studies. Introducing a nonzero bulk viscosity also has significant effects. In fact, if the bulk viscosity peaks near the crossover temperature Tc to the degree indicated by recent lattice calculations in QCD without quarks, it can make the fluid cavitate -- falling apart into droplets. It is interesting to see a hydrodynamic calculation predicting its own breakdown, via cavitation, at the temperatures where hadronization is thought to occur in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions.

Krishna Rajagopal; Nilesh Tripuraneni

2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states.

Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I., E-mail: shklovsk@physics.spa.umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Fine Theoretical Physics Institute (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

San Andres, Luis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported Alkaline Earth Oxides using Density Functional Theory. Characterization of Surface and Bulk Nitrates of ?-Al2O3-Supported...

314

Analysis and forecast of the capesize bulk carriers shipping market using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investing in the bulk carrier market constitutes a rather risky investment due to the volatility of the bulk carrier freight rates. In this study it is attempted to uncover the benefits of using Artificial Neural Networks ...

Voudris, Athanasios V

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Van der Waals density-functional theory study for bulk solids with BCC, FCC, and diamond structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions in theoretical simulations based on standard density functional theory (DFT) is crucial to describe the physics and chemistry of systems such as organic and layered materials. Many encouraging approaches have been proposed to combine vdW interactions with standard approximate DFT calculations. Despite many vdW studies, there is no consensus on the reliability of vdW methods. To help further development of vdW methods, we have assessed various vdW functionals through the calculation of structural prop- erties at equilibrium, such as lattice constants, bulk moduli, and cohesive energies, for bulk solids, including alkali, alkali-earth, and transition metals, with BCC, FCC, and diamond structures as the ground state structure. These results provide important information for the vdW-related materials research, which is essential for designing and optimizing materials systems for desired physical and chemical properties.

Park, Jinwoo; Hong, Suklyun

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PRECONCEPTUAL CANDIDATE TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of River Protection (ORP) has authorized a study to recommend and select options for interim pretreatment of tank waste and support Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) low activity waste (LAW) operations prior to startup of all the WTP facilities. The Interim Pretreatment System (IPS) is to be a moderately sized system which separates entrained solids and 137Cs from tank waste for an interim time period while WTP high level waste vitrification and pretreatment facilities are completed. This study's objective is to prepare pre-conceptual technology descriptions that expand the technical detail for selected solid and cesium separation technologies. This revision includes information on additional feed tanks.

MAY TH

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to MgZnCa bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion of, and cellular responses to Mg­Zn­Ca bulk metallic glasses Xuenan Gu a , Yufeng Zheng a: Magnesium alloy Bulk metallic glass Mechanical property Corrosion Cytotoxicity a b s t r a c t Mg­Zn­Ca bulk, mechanical testing, corrosion and cytotoxicity tests. It was found that the Mg66Zn30Ca4 sample presents

Zheng, Yufeng

318

Identification of Avalanche Precursors by Acoustic Probing in the Bulk of Tilted Granular Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Avalanche Precursors by Acoustic Probing in the Bulk of Tilted Granular Layers M simultaneously caracterize precursors on the free surface with an optical method and in the bulk with acoustic to probe rearrangements in the bulk of the granular material. A linear method can also be used provided

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiative cooling of bulk silicon by incoherent light pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In contrast to radiative cooling by light up conversion caused exclusively by a low-entropy laser pump and employing thermally assisted fluorescence/luminescence as a power out, we demonstrate light down conversion cooling by incoherent pumps, 0.47–0.94??m light emitting diodes, and employing thermal emission (TE) as a power out. We demonstrate ?3.5?K bulk cooling of Si at 450?K because overall energy of multiple below bandgap TE photons exceeds the energy of a single above bandgap pump photon. We show that using large entropy TE as power out helps avoid careful tuning of an incoherent pump wavelength and cool indirect-bandgap semiconductors.

Malyutenko, V. K., E-mail: malyut@isp.kiev.ua; Bogatyrenko, V. V.; Malyutenko, O. Yu. [V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine)] [V. E. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prevBuilding theINNOVATION &Bulk Hauling

323

Tilting the Primordial Power Spectrum with Bulk Viscosity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the context of the cold dark matter model, current observations suggest that inflationary models which generate a tilted primordial power spectrum with negligible gravitational waves provide the most promising mechanism for explaining large scale clustering. The general form of the inflationary potential which produces such a spectrum is a hyperbolic function and is interpreted physically as a bulk viscous stress contribution to the energy-momentum of a perfect baryotropic fluid. This is equivalent to expanding the equation of state as a truncated Taylor series. Particle physics models which lead to such a potential are discussed.

James E. Lidsey

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated fluidic system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), for biological agents collection, manipulation, and identification using amperometric DNA... , thin-film processing, and bulk substrate...

326

Method of fabricating an optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating an organic optoelectronic device having a bulk heterojunction comprises the steps of: depositing a first layer over a first electrode by organic vapor phase deposition, wherein the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material; depositing a second layer on the first layer such that the second layer is in physical contact with the first layer, wherein the interface of the second layer on the first layer forms a bulk heterojunction; and depositing a second electrode over the second layer to form the optoelectronic device. In another embodiment, a first layer having protrusions is deposited over the first electrode, wherein the first layer comprises a first organic small molecule material. For example, when the first layer is an electron donor layer, the first electrode is an anode, the second layer is an electron acceptor layer, and the second electrode is a cathode. As a further example, when the first layer is an electron acceptor layer, the first electrode is a cathode, the second layer is an electron donor layer, and the second electrode is an anode.

Shtein, Max (Princeton, NJ); Yang, Fan (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

327

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates - Karen Waldrip, SNL.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics (PE) Systems...

328

Classical Tests of General Relativity: Probing Topologically Charged Black Holes on Brane Worlds in f(R) Bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The perihelion precession, the deflection of light, and the radar echo delay are classical tests of General Relativity here used to probe brane world topologically charged black holes in a f(R) bulk and to constrain the parameter that arises from the Shiromizu-Maeda-Sasaki procedure applied to a f(R) bulk as well. The existing Solar system observational data constrain the possible values of the tidal charge parameter and the effective cosmological constant including f(R) brane world effects. We show that the observational/experimental data for both perihelion precession and radar echo delay make the black hole space of parameters to be more strict than the ones for the Dadhich, Maartens, Papadopoulos and Rezania (DMPR) black hole geometry. Furthermore, the deflection of light constrains the tidal charge parameter similarly as the DMPR black holes due to a peculiarity in the equation of motion.

Roldao da Rocha; A. M. Kuerten

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner.

Miller, F.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scanning Tunneling Macroscopy, Black Holes, and AdS/CFT Bulk Locality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We establish resolution bounds on reconstructing a bulk field from boundary data on a timelike hypersurface. If the bulk only supports propagating modes, reconstruction is complete. If the bulk also supports evanescent modes, local reconstruction is not achievable unless one has exponential precision in knowledge of the boundary data. Without exponential precision, for a Minkowski bulk, one can reconstruct a spatially coarse-grained bulk field, but only out to a depth set by the coarse-graining scale. For an asymptotically AdS bulk, reconstruction is limited to a spatial coarse-graining proper distance set by the AdS scale. AdS black holes admit evanescent modes. We study the resolution bound in the large AdS black hole background and provide a dual CFT interpretation. Our results demonstrate that, if there is a black hole of any size in the bulk, then sub-AdS bulk locality is no longer well-encoded in boundary data in terms of local CFT operators. Specifically, in order to probe the bulk on sub-AdS scales using only boundary data in terms of local operators, one must either have such data to exponential precision or make further assumptions about the bulk state.

Soo-Jong Rey; Vladimir Rosenhaus

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

331

GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Angus, G. W., E-mail: hkatz@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu, E-mail: teuben@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bulk Tritium Shipping Package was designed by Savannah River National Laboratory. This package will be used to transport tritium. As part of the requirements for certification, the package must be shown to meet the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). The conditions include a sequential 30-foot drop event, 30-foot dynamic crush event, and a 40-inch puncture event. Finite Element analyses were performed to support and expand upon prototype testing. Cases similar to the tests were evaluated. Additional temperatures and orientations were also examined to determine their impact on the results. The peak stress on the package was shown to be acceptable. In addition, the strain on the outer drum as well as the inner containment boundary was shown to be acceptable. In conjunction with the prototype tests, the package was shown to meet its confinement requirements.

Jordan, J.

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cavitation from bulk viscosity in neutron stars and quark stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bulk viscosity in quark matter is sufficiently high to reduce the effective pressure below the corresponding vapor pressure during density perturbations in neutron stars and strange stars. This leads to mechanical instability where the quark matter breaks apart into fragments comparable to cavitation scenarios discussed for ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Similar phenomena may take place in kaon-condensed stellar cores. Possible applications to compact star phenomenology include a new mechanism for damping oscillations and instabilities, triggering of phase transitions, changes in gravitational wave signatures of binary star inspiral, and astrophysical formation of strangelets. At a more fundamental level it points to the possible inadequacy of a hydrodynamical treatment of these processes in compact stars.

Jes Madsen

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sampling and Analysis at the Vortec Vitrification Facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) facility; to be located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. The primary components of Vortec`s CMS are a counter rotating vortex (CRV) reactor and cyclone melter. In the CMS process, granular glass forming ingredients and other feedstocks are introduced into the CRV reactor where the intense CRV mixing allows the mixture to achieve a stable reaction and rapid heating of the feedstock materials. Organic contaminants in the feedstock are effectively oxidized, and the inert inorganic solids are melted. The University of North Dakota Energy {ampersand} Environmental Research Center (EERC) has been contacted to help in the development of sampling plans and to conduct the sampling at the facility. This document is written in a format that assumes that the EERC will perform the sampling activities and be in charge of sample chain of custody, but that another laboratory will perform required sample analyses.

Laudal, Dennis L.; Lillemoen, Carolyn M.; Hurley, John P.; Ness, Sumitra R.; Stepan, Daniel J.; Thompson, Jeffrey, S.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Thermodynamics of gas-metal-slag equilibria for applications in in situ and ex situ vitrification melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An equilibrium thermodynamic model for melting mixed waste was evaluated using the STEPSOL computer code. STEPSOL uses free energy minimization techniques to predict equilibrium composition from input species and user selected species in the output. The model assumes equilibrium between gas, slag, and metallic phases. Input for the model was developed using compositional data from Pit 9 of the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Thermodynamic data were primarily from compilations published by the US Government. The results of model evaluation indicate that the amount of plutonium chloride or plutonium oxyhydroxide that would be evaporated into the vapor phase would be minor. Relatively more uranium chloride and uranium oxyhydroxide would be vaporized. However, a hazards analysis was not part of the present task. Minor amounts of plutonium and uranium would be reduced to the metallic state, but these amounts should alloy with the iron-chromium-nickel metallic phase. The vast majority of the plutonium and uranium are in the slag phase as oxides. Results of the calculations show that silica and silicates dominate the products and that the system is very reducing. The major gases are carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with lesser amounts of carbon dioxide and water. High vapor pressure metals are considered but were not analyzed using STEPSOL. STEPSOL does not make predictions of distribution of species between phases.

Miller, R.L.; Reimann, G.A.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Simulation of cooling and solidification of three-dimensional bulk borosilicate glass: effect of structural relaxations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract The modeling of the viscoelastic stress evolution and specific volume relaxation of a bulky glass cast is presented in this article and is applied to the experimental cooling process of an inactive nuclear waste vitrification process. The concerned borosilicate glass is solidified and cooled down to ambient temperature in a stainless steel canister, and the thermomechanical response of the package is simulated. There exists a deviant compression of the liquid core due to the large glass package compared to standard tempered glass plates. The stress load development of the glass cast is finally studied for different thermal load scenarios, where the cooling process parameters or the final cooldown rates were changed, and we found a great influence of the studied cooldown rates on the maximum stress buildup at ambient temperature.

Barth, N.; George, D.; Ahzi, Said; Remond, Y.; Joulaee, N.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Bouyer, F.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous bulk sample Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that aqueous processing has shifted some samples to heavier compositions. A lower bulk solar... processes involving aqueous fluids, given the potential solubility of lithium...

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-processed polymer-fullerene bulk Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are currently seen as attractive materials for optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells. Excitonic processes play Summary: phase of bulk...

340

The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ANL) Research Objectives: To develop fundamental understanding of surface chemistry and bulk cation distributions on cycling performance and rate capability To...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Rate Capability of Lithium Positive Electrode Materials The Role of Surface Chemistry and Bulk Properties on the Cycling and Rate Capability of Lithium Positive Electrode...

342

Final Report - High Level Waste Vitrification System Improvements, VSL-07R1010-1, Rev 0, dated 04/16/07  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted to support the development and testing of new glass formulations that extend beyond those that have been previously investigated for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The principal objective was to investigate maximization of the incorporation of several waste components that are expected to limit waste loading and, consequently, high level waste (HLW) processing rates and canister count. The work was performed with four waste compositions specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP); these wastes contain high concentrations of bismuth, chromium, aluminum, and aluminum plus sodium. The tests were designed to identify glass formulations that maximize waste loading while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, increased glass processing temperature, increased crystallinity, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality.

Kruger, Albert A.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Gong, W.; Champman, C. C.; Joseph, I.; Matlack, K. S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bulk matter fields on a GRS-inspired braneworld  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the localization and mass spectra of bulk matter fields on a Gergory-Rubakov-Sibiryakov-inspired braneworld. In this braneworld model, there are one thick brane located at the origin of the extra dimension and two thin branes at two sides. For spin 1/2 fermions coupled with the background scalar ? via ? ?-bar ?{sup p}? with p a positive odd integer, the zero mode of left-hand fermions can be localized on the thick brane for finite distance of the two thin branes, and there exist some massive bound modes and resonance modes. The resonances correspond to the quasi-localized massive fermions. For free massless spin 0 scalars, the zero mode can not be localized on the thick brane when the two thin branes are located finitely. While for a massive scalar ? coupled with itself and the background scalar field ?, in order to get a localized zero mode on the thick brane, a fine-tuning relation should be introduced. Some massive bound modes and resonances also will appear. For spin 1 vectors, there is no bound KK mode because the effective potential felt by vectors vanishes outside the two thin branes. We also investigate the physics when the distance of the two thin branes tends to infinity.

Liu, Yu-Xiao; Fu, Chun-E; Guo, Heng; Wei, Shao-Wen; Zhao, Zhen-Hua, E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: fuche08@lzu.cn, E-mail: guoh06@lzu.cn, E-mail: weishaow06@lzu.cn, E-mail: zhaozhh09@lzu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosion performances in simulated body fluids and cytotoxicity evaluation of Fe-based bulk December 2011 Available online 27 December 2011 Keywords: Bulk metallic glass Corrosion Biocompatibility Electrochemical characterization Biomedical applications The aim of this work is to investigate the corrosion

Zheng, Yufeng

345

Spectroscopic Imaging of Single AtomsWithin a Bulk Solid S. D. Findlay,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identification of single atoms on surfaces, but they cannot probe individual atoms within the bulk environmentSpectroscopic Imaging of Single AtomsWithin a Bulk Solid M.Varela,1 S. D. Findlay,2 A. R. Lupini,1, but their spectroscopic identification, with spatial resolution at the atomic scale. This substan- tial improvement

Pennycook, Steve

346

Equality of bulk and edge Hall conductances for continuous magnetic random Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this note, we prove the equality of the quantum bulk and the edge Hall conductances in mobility edges and in presence of disorder. The bulk and edge perturbations can be either of electric or magnetic nature. The edge conductance is regularized in a suitable way to enable the Fermi level to lie in a region of localized states.

Amal Taarabt

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization Processor MemoryChannel Limited bandwidth High energy Carnegie Mellon University Intel Pittsburgh #12;RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient University Intel Pittsburgh #12;RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization

348

Bulk superconductivity in Type II superconductors near the second critical field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider superconductors of Type II near the transition from the 'bulk superconducting' to the 'surface superconducting' state. We prove a new $L^{\\infty}$ estimate on the order parameter in the bulk, i.e. away from the boundary. This solves an open problem posed by Aftalion and Serfaty.

S. Fournais; B. Helffer

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Single pulse ultrafast laser imprinting of axial dot arrays in bulk glasses C. Mauclair,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single pulse ultrafast laser imprinting of axial dot arrays in bulk glasses C. Mauclair,1, A sam- ples were irradiated with 160 fs pulses from an 800 nm Ti:Sapphire amplified ultrafast laser.mauclair@univ-st-etienne.fr Compiled December 20, 2010 Ultrafast laser processing of bulk transparent materials can significantly gain

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

350

Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Water-induced Bulk Ba(NO3)2 Formation From NO2 Exposed Thermally Aged BaOAl2O3. Abstract: Phase changes in high...

351

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explosive shock processing of Pr2Fe14B/ ­Fe exchange-coupled nanocomposite bulk magnets Z.Q. Jin between neigh- boring magnetic phases.1,2 The prerequisite for effective exchange coupling is a small are usually used to produce single-phase microcrystalline permanent magnets, are not favored in making bulk

Liu, J. Ping

352

1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrostaticcompressionoffoamisofinterestinavarietyofcontextsincluding under-sea applications. Syntactic foam, for instance, consists of hollow glass1Cellular Polymers, Vol. 26, No. 1, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams © Rapra Technology, 2007 On the Bulk Modulus of Open Cell Foams B. Moore, T. Jaglinski, D.S. Stone§ and R.S. Lakes

Lakes, Roderic

353

Plasma vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles.

McLaughlin, David F. (Oakmont, PA); Dighe, Shyam V. (North Huntingdon, PA); Gass, William R. (Plum Boro, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Plasma vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a process wherein hazardous or radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, slurries, or finely divided solids are mixed with finely divided glassformers (silica, alumina, soda, etc.) and injected directly into the plume of a non-transferred arc plasma torch. The extremely high temperatures and heat transfer rates makes it possible to convert the waste-glassformer mixture into a fully vitrified molten glass product in a matter of milliseconds. The molten product may then be collected in a crucible for casting into final wasteform geometry, quenching in water, or further holding time to improve homogeneity and eliminate bubbles. 4 figs.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Dighe, S.V.; Gass, W.R.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Technetium Retention During LAW Vitrification  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommitteeRenewable1234 OFTechnetium Retention During LAW

356

Matter in the Bulk and its Consequences on the Brane: A Possible Source of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The usual brane world scenario with anti de Sitter bulk has been generalized by considering a general form of energy momentum tensor in the bulk. The modified Einstein equation on the brane has been constructed. Two examples have been cited of which, the first one shows the usual brane equations when matter in the bulk is a negative cosmological constant. In the second example, the bulk matter is in the form of perfect fluid and as a result, an effective perfect fluid is obtained in the brane. Also it is noted that the effect of the dust bulk on the brane shows a dark energy behaviour and may be a possible explanation of the dark energy from the present day observational point of view.

Subenoy Chakraborty; Asit Banerjee; Tanwi Bandyopadhyay

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nanostructured High-Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and mechanical) with three characterization systems: - Scanning probe for high-resolution spatial resistance characterization (contact resistance, diffusion of contacts and joints...

358

Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher density of nanometer sized carbides on the boundaries. This project will focus on void swelling but advances in processing of austenitic steels are likely to also improve the radiation response of the mechanical properties.

Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

359

Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 {+-} 0.25 kW/{mu}m{sup 2}. The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish.

Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Clamping of Solid Tungsten Components for the Bulk W Divertor Row in JET – Precautionary Design for a Brittle Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clamping of Solid Tungsten Components for the Bulk W Divertor Row in JET – Precautionary Design for a Brittle Material

362

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

363

Phase behavior of carbon dioxide confined in silica aerogel in the vicinity of the bulk critical point  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The small angle neutron scattering intensities from silica aerogel filled with carbon dioxide at different loading densities of the bulk fluid (0.3-0.65 g/cm{sup 3}) were measured at fixed volume condition as a function of decreasing temperature, from 35 to 25 C, to characterize the phase behavior of the confined CO2 about the critical point of the bulk CO{sub 2}. The data present no evidence of a bulklike phase transition of the confined CO{sub 2} in the explored parameter region. They show that the confined CO{sub 2} may be approximated as a two phase system. The first phase (liquid film) is formed by CO{sub 2} molecules at the silica surface, and the second phase (confined fluid) fills up the rest of the pore volume. The thickness {delta} of the liquid film as well as the scattering-length densities of the two phases were obtained by analyzing the Porod invariants and the oscillations observed in the Porod plots at each loading density and temperature. The resulting {delta} values vary in the range 25-45 {angstrom} depending on the temperature and loading density. The density of the liquid film is 1.5-2 times larger than that of the confined fluid, which in its turn exceeds the density of bulk CO{sub 2} at similar temperature and pressure. At the lowest temperature (25 C), the densities of the liquid film and confined fluid respectively approach 1.25 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} independently of the loading conditions.

Ciccariello, Salvino [Universita di Padova; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Bulk Data Movement for Climate Dataset: Efficient Data Transfer Management with Dynamic Transfer Adjustment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many scientific applications and experiments, such as high energy and nuclear physics, astrophysics, climate observation and modeling, combustion, nano-scale material sciences, and computational biology, generate extreme volumes of data with a large number of files. These data sources are distributed among national and international data repositories, and are shared by large numbers of geographically distributed scientists. A large portion of data is frequently accessed, and a large volume of data is moved from one place to another for analysis and storage. One challenging issue in such efforts is the limited network capacity for moving large datasets to explore and manage. The Bulk Data Mover (BDM), a data transfer management tool in the Earth System Grid (ESG) community, has been managing the massive dataset transfers efficiently with the pre-configured transfer properties in the environment where the network bandwidth is limited. Dynamic transfer adjustment was studied to enhance the BDM to handle significant end-to-end performance changes in the dynamic network environment as well as to control the data transfers for the desired transfer performance. We describe the results from the BDM transfer management for the climate datasets. We also describe the transfer estimation model and results from the dynamic transfer adjustment.

Sim, Alexander; Balman, Mehmet; Williams, Dean; Shoshani, Arie; Natarajan, Vijaya

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ferroelectric field effect of the bulk heterojunction in polymer solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ferroelectric field effect in the bulk heterojunction was found when an external electric field (EEF) was applied on the active layer of polymer solar cells (PSCs) during the annealing process of the active layer spin-coated with poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester. For one direction field, the short circuit current density of PSCs was improved from 7.2 to 8.0?mA/cm{sup 2}, the power conversion efficiency increased from 2.4% to 2.8%, and the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency increased from 42% to 49% corresponding to the different EEF magnitude. For an opposite direction field, the applied EEF brought a minus effect on the performance mentioned above. EEF treatment can orientate molecular ordering of the polymer, and change the morphology of the active layer. The authors suggest a explanation that the ferroelectric field has been built in the active layer, and therefore it plays a key role in PSCs system. A needle-like surface morphology of the active film was also discussed.

Li, Meng; Ma, Heng, E-mail: hengma@henannu.edu.cn; Liu, Hairui; Jiang, Yurong [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Henan Key Laboratory of Photovoltaic Materials, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Niu, Heying; Amat, Adil [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

366

Bulk thermodynamics and charge fluctuations at non-vanishing baryon density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on bulk thermodynamic quantities as well as net baryon number, strangeness and electric charge fluctuations in QCD at non-zero density and temperature obtained from lattice calculations with almost physical quark masses for two values of the lattice cut-off $aT=1/4$ and 1/6 . We show that with our improved p4fa3-action the cut-off effects are under control when using lattices with a temporal extent of 6 or larger and that the contribution to the equation of state, which is due to a finite chemical potential is small for $\\mu_q/T<1$. Moreover, at vanishing chemical potential, i.e. under conditions almost realized at RHIC and the LHC, quartic fluctuations of net baryon number and strangeness are large in a narrow temperature interval characterizing the transition region from the low to high temperature phase. At non-zero baryon number density, strangeness fluctuations are enhanced and correlated to fluctuations of the net baryon number. If strangeness is furthermore forced to vanish, as it may be the case in systems created in heavy ion collisions, strangeness fluctuations are significantly smaller than baryon number fluctuations.

Chuan Miao; Christian Schmidt

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

Kim, Choong Paul (Northridge, CA); Hays, Charles C. (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

368

Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted Resonator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium Titanate DC Electric Field Switchable and Tunable Bulk Acoustic Wave Solidly Mounted Abstract - A voltage switchable/tunable strontium titanate solidly mounted BAW resonator was implemented films, piezoelectric resonators. I. INTRODUCTION Strontium titanate (STO) and barium strontium titanate

York, Robert A.

369

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering rebates of 30% of the installed cost of qualifying new residential bulk-fed, wood-pellet central heating boilers or furnaces. The...

370

Dye-doped polymer nanoparticles for flexible, bulk luminescent solar concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk luminescent solar concentrators (LSC) cannot make use of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) due to necessarily low dye concentrations. In this thesis, we attempt to present a poly-vinylalcohol (PVA) waveguide ...

Rosenberg, Ron, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of a Bulk GaN Growth Technique for Low Defect Density...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

current due to bulk defects GaN is Grown Heteroepitaxially on Sapphire (and Silicon Carbide) Substrates * As grown GaN nucleation layers contain disordered GaN with many...

372

All bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature theories in three dimensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct all the bulk and boundary unitary cubic curvature parity invariant gravity theories in three dimensions in (anti)-de Sitter spaces. For bulk unitarity, our construction is based on the principle that the free theory of the cubic curvature theory reduces to one of the three known unitary theories which are the cosmological Einstein-Hilbert theory, the quadratic theory of the scalar curvature, or the new massive gravity (NMG). Bulk and boundary unitarity in NMG is in conflict; therefore, cubic theories that are unitary both in the bulk and on the boundary have free theories that reduce to the other two alternatives. We also study the unitarity of the Born-Infeld extensions of NMG to all orders in curvature.

Guellue, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Correlation Between Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Bulk High Performance Materials for Energy Conversion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rapid solidified precursor converted into crystalline bulks under pressure produced thermoelectric materials of nano-sized grains with strongly coupled grain boundaries, achieving reduced lattice thermal conductivity and increased power factor

374

High Temperature Deformation Behavior of in-situ Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macroscopic ductility is promoted in bulk metallic glasses by both composite reinforcements (at low temperatures) and by the activation of viscous flow mechanisms (at high temperatures). It is of fundamental interest to ...

Fu, X.L.

375

Near-Bulk Conductivity of Gold Nanowires as Nanoscale Interconnects and the Role of Atomically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-Bulk Conductivity of Gold Nanowires as Nanoscale Interconnects and the Role of Atomically, a significant portion of the chip is composed of interconnects. Besides, the engineering problems associated loss, signal degradation, interconnection delays, and other performance limitations related

Zubarev, Eugene

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic bulk soil Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Redox potentiala (mV) n120 Soil water contentb (% wet weight) n4 Bulk densityb (g cm... ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Gordon W. Holtgrieve Peter K. Jewett Pamela A. ... Source:...

377

Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids in contact with the bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids in contact with the bulk Luzheng Zhang, Ramkumar Balasundaram,a) and Stevin H. Gehrke Department of Chemical Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 Shaoyi Jiangb) Department of Chemical Engineering, University

Zhang, Luzheng

378

Using a surface-sensitive chemical probe and a bulk structure...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

probe and a bulk structure technique to monitor the ?- to ?-Al2O3 phase Abstract: In this work, we investigated the phase transformation of ? Al2O3 to...

379

Using first principles Destiny Functional Theory methods to model the Seebeck coefficient of bulk silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectrics are gaining significant amounts of attention considering their relevance today in the areas of sustainable energy generation and energy efficiency. In this thesis, the thermoelectric properties of bulk ...

Mehra, Saahil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

In vitro Corrosion and Haemocompatibility of Bulk Nanocrystalline 304 Stainless Steel by Severe Rolling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vitro Corrosion and Haemocompatibility of Bulk Nanocrystalline 304 Stainless Steel by Severe@imr.ac.cn Keywords: nanocrystalline 304ss; electrochemical corrosion; ion release; cellular morphology after the severe plastic deformation. The electrochemical corrosion resistance and ion release behavior

Zheng, Yufeng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity-dependent bulk endocytosis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: activity-dependent bulk endocytosis Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 VESICLE RECYCLING AT RIBBON SYNAPSES IN THE FINELY BRANCHED AXON TERMINALS OF MOUSE RETINAL BIPOLAR...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - al bulk crystals Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are homogeneously dispersed in the residual glass of the bulk for Tc... consists of titanite (CaTiSiO5) and anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8) crystals that have nucleated heterogeneously......

383

An analysis of bulk agricultural commodity buying behavior in selected developing economies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYSIS OF BULK AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY BUYING BEHAVIOR IN SELECTED DEVELOPING ECONOMIES A Thesis by Kimberly Renee Moore Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics AN ANALYSIS OF BULK AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY BUYING BEHAVIOR IN SELECTED DEVELOPING ECONOMIES A Thesis by Kimberly Renee Moore Approved as to style and content by: ( i n o Committee...

Moore, Kimberly Renee

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Emergent Universe in Brane World Scenario with Schwarzschild-de Sitter Bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model of an emergent universe is obtained in brane world. Here the bulk energy is in the form of cosmological constant, while the brane consists of a fluid satisfying an equation of state of the form $p_{b}={1/3} \\rho_{b}$, which is effectively a radiation equation of state at high energies. It is shown that with the positive bulk cosmological constant, one of our models represents an emergent universe.

Asit Banerjee; Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

385

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

Yu, K.N.

386

Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

Giorgio Torrieri; Boris Tomasik; Igor Mishustin

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

Bulk Viscosity driven clusterization of quark-gluon plasma and early freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a new scenario for heavy ion collisions that could solve the lingering problems associated with the so-called HBT puzzle. We postulate that the system starts expansion as the perfect quark-gluon fluid but close to freeze-out it splits into clusters, due to a sharp rise of bulk viscosity in the vicinity of the hadronization transition. We then argue that the characteristic cluster size is determined by the viscosity coefficient and the expansion rate. Typically it is much smaller and independent of the total system volume. These clusters maintain the pre-existing outward-going flow, as a spray of droplets, but develop no flow of their own, and hadronize by evaporation. We provide an ansatz for converting the hydrodynamic output into clusters.

Torrieri, G; Mishustin, I

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Small Molecule Solution-Processed Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Laboratory of Polymer and Composite Technology, Lausanne A large source of interest in organic photovoltaics to lateral structures with sizes of about 300 nm. The UV-Vis absorbance spectra of a SQ:PCBM blend film:PCBM blends with varying composition and indicate an eutectic system. This might provide a strategy to obtain

Candea, George

389

Built-in voltage of organic bulk heterojuction p-i-n solar cells measured by electroabsorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the influence of the built-in voltage on the performance of organic bulk heterojuction solar cells that are based on a p-i-n structure. Electrical doping in the hole and the electron transport layer allows to tune their work function and hence to adjust the built-in voltage: Changing the doping concentration from 0.5 to 32 wt% induces a shift of the work function towards the transport levels and increases the built-in voltage. To determine the built-in voltage, we use electroabsorption spectroscopy which is based on an evaluation of the spectra caused by a change in absorption due to an electric field (Stark effect). For a model system with a bulk heterojunction of BF-DPB and C{sub 60}, we show that higher doping concentrations in both the electron and the hole transport layer increase the built-in voltage, leading to an enhanced short circuit current and solar cell performance.

Siebert-Henze, E., E-mail: ellen.siebert@iapp.de; Lyssenko, V. G.; Fischer, J.; Tietze, M.; Brueckner, R.; Schwarze, M.; Vandewal, K.; Ray, D.; Riede, M.; Leo, K. [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Synthesis and Characterization of Bulk, Vitreous Cadmium Germanium Arsenide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is presented to enable fabrication of high-purity, vitreous, crack-free ingots with sizes up to 10 mm diameter are the key function material in several important technological areas such as xerography,1 photovoltaics,2 formation within the CdGexAs2 system has been re- ported for x 5 0.02­1.3.12­18 The basic glass forming

Rockett, Angus

391

Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

Johnston, John

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces | OpenSystemsGrowthOpenEI

393

Simplified Synthesis of Bulk Ammonia Borane - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShiftMethod for Estimating

394

Black holes in extra dimensions can decay on the bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the extra dimensional theories, with TeV scale Plank constant, black holes may be produced in the Large Hadron Collider experiments. We have argued that in the d-dimensional black hole, the intrinsically 4-dimensional brane fields do not see the same geometry at the horizon, as in a 4-dimensional space-time. Kaluza-Klein modes invades the brane and surroundings and the brane fields can be considered as a thermal system at the temperature of the black hole. From energy and entropy consideration, we show that whether or not a six-dimensional black hole will decay by emitting Kaluza-Klein modes or the standard model particles, will depend on the length scale of the extra dimensions as well as on the mass of the black hole. For higher dimensional black holes, Kaluza-Klein modes will dominate the decay.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

A simple grand canonical approach to compute the vapor pressure of bulk and finite size systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article we introduce a simple grand canonical screening (GCS) approach to accurately compute vapor pressures from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. This procedure entails a screening of chemical potentials using a conventional grand canonical scheme, and therefore it is straightforward to implement for any kind of interface. The scheme is validated against data obtained from Gibbs ensemble simulations for water and argon. Then, it is applied to obtain the vapor pressure of the coarse-grained mW water model, and it is shown that the computed value is in excellent accord with the one formally deduced using statistical thermodynamics arguments. Finally, this methodology is used to calculate the vapor pressure of a water nanodroplet of 94 molecules. Interestingly, the result is in perfect agreement with the one predicted by the Kelvin equation for a homogeneous droplet of that size.

Factorovich, Matías H.; Scherlis, Damián A. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física/INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina); Molinero, Valeria [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, 315 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0850 (United States)

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

High-Energy, Low-Frequency Risk to the North American Bulk Power System  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTS Cable Projects HTSSeparationHelping to

398

Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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399

Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlantic RelationsDepartmentJon T.

400

Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Quantum Monte Carlo benchmark of exchange-correlation functionals for bulk water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accurate description of the thermodynamic and dynamical properties of liquid water from first-principles is a very important challenge to the theoretical community. This represents not only a critical test of the predictive capabilities of first-principles methods, but it will also shed light into the microscopic properties of such an important substance. Density Functional Theory, the main workhorse in the field of first-principles methods, has been so far unable to properly describe water and its unusual properties in the liquid state. With the recent introduction of exact exchange and an improved description of dispersion interaction, the possibility of an accurate description of the liquid is finally within reach. Unfortunately, there is still no way to systematically improve exchange-correlation functionals and the number of available functionals is very large. In this article we use highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark a selection of exchange-correlation functionals typically used in Density Functional Theory simulations of bulk water. This allows us to test the predictive capabilities of these functionals in water, giving us a way not only to choose optimal functionals for first-principles simulations, but also giving us a route for the optimization of the functionals for the system at hand. We compare and contrast the importance of different features of functionals, including the hybrid component, the vdW component, and their importance within different aspects of the PES. In addition, we test a recently introduce scheme that combines Density Functional Theory with Coupled Cluster Calculations through a Many-Body expansion of the energy, in order to correct the inaccuracies in the description of short range interactions in the liquid.

Morales, Miguel A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Gergely, John [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; McMinis, Jeremy [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); McMahon, Jeffrey [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Ceperley, David M. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sedimentation stacking diagram of binary colloidal mixtures and bulk phases in the plane of chemical potentials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a full account of a recently proposed theory that explicitly relates the bulk phase diagram of a binary colloidal mixture to its phase stacking phenomenology under gravity [Soft Matter 9, 8636 (2013)]. As we demonstrate, the full set of possible phase stacking sequences in sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium originates from straight lines (sedimentation paths) in the chemical potential representation of the bulk phase diagram. From the analysis of various standard topologies of bulk phase diagrams, we conclude that the corresponding sedimentation stacking diagrams can be very rich, even more so when finite sample height is taken into account. We apply the theory to obtain the stacking diagram of a mixture of nonadsorbing polymers and colloids. We also present a catalog of generic phase diagrams in the plane of chemical potentials in order to facilitate the practical application of our concept, which also generalizes to multi component mixtures.

Daniel de las Heras; Matthias Schmidt

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Towards a Unified Picture of Spin Dependent Transport in and Perpendicular Giant Magnetoresistance and Bulk Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From data on (Fe{sub 1-x}V{sub x}/Cu/Co/Cu){sub N} multilayers, we show that Fe doped with V gains a negative spin asymmetry for bulk scattering ({beta}{lt}0), which, combined with the positive asymmetry of Co, accounts for the inverse current perpendicular to the plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistance (GMR) we observe. More precisely, the competition between positive and negative asymmetries for interface and bulk scatterings in FeV leads to inverse (normal) GMR for layers thicker (thinner) than a compensation thickness. The negative {beta} of FeV is consistent with theoretical predictions and bulk alloy data. The current in the plane (CIP) GMR is not reversed, which illustrates the role of channeling in CIP. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Hsu, S.; Holody, P.; Loloee, R.; Schroeder, P. [Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lasing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lasing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Barthelemy, A.; Fert, A. [UMR CNRS-Thomson CSF, LCR, 91404 Orsay (France)] [UMR CNRS-Thomson CSF, LCR, 91404 Orsay (France)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Bulk Flows and End of the Dark Ages with the SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The early Universe is a precious probe of the birth of primordial objects, first star formation events and consequent production of photons and heavy elements. Higher-order corrections to the cosmological linear perturbation theory predicts the formation of coherent supersonic gaseous streaming motions at decoupling time. These bulk flows impact the gas cooling process and determine a cascade effect on the whole baryon evolution. By analytical estimates and N-body hydrodynamical chemistry numerical simulations including atomic and molecular evolution, gas cooling, star formation, feedback effects and metal spreading for individual species from different stellar populations according to the proper yields and lifetimes, we discuss the role of these primordial bulk flows at the end of the dark ages and their detectable impacts during the first Gyr in view of the upcoming SKA mission. Early bulk flows can inhibit molecular gas cooling capabilities, suppressing star formation, metal spreading and the abundance of ...

Maio, Umberto; Koopmans, Leon V E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Spherically symmetric brane spacetime with bulk $f(\\mathcal{R})$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introducing $f(\\mathcal{R})$ term in the five-dimensional bulk action we derive effective Einstein's equation on the brane using Gauss-Codazzi equation. This effective equation is then solved for different conditions on dark radiation and dark pressure to obtain various spherically symmetric solutions. Some of these static spherically symmetric solutions correspond to black hole solutions, with parameters induced from the bulk. Specially, the dark pressure and dark radiation terms (electric part of Weyl curvature) affect the brane spherically symmetric solutions significantly. We have solved for one parameter group of conformal motions where the dark radiation and dark pressure terms are exactly obtained exploiting the corresponding Lie symmetry. Various thermodynamic features of these spherically symmetric space-times are studied, showing existence of second order phase transition. This phenomenon has its origin in the higher curvature term with $f(\\mathcal{R})$ gravity in the bulk.

Sumanta Chakraborty; Soumitra SenGupta

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Diffusion of Small He Clusters in Bulk and Grain Boundaries in ?-Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffusion properties of He interstitials and He clusters in the bulk and grain boundaries (GBs) of ?-Fe have been studied using molecular dynamics with a newly developed Fe?He potential. The low migration energy barrier for a single He interstitial in the bulk is consistent with that obtained using ab initio methods. Small He clusters can migrate at low temperatures, but at higher temperatures they will kick out a self-interstitial atom (SIA) and become trapped by the vacancy, forming an He-vacancy complex. It is of great interest to note that small Henvacancy clusters (n<5) in the bulk are able to absorb an SIA, and the clusters become mobile again. Trapping and de-trapping of He clusters by emitting and absorbing an SIA represent an important dynamic process that provides a mechanism for the diffusion of He clusters and the nucleation of He bubbles in bulk Fe, particularly under irradiation in which numerous SIAs and vacancies are constantly being produced. A single He interstitial can migrate one-dimensionally or two-dimensionally within GBs, depending on the GB structure. Small interstitial Hen clusters 2 (n ~ 1 - 10) can easily kick out an SIA, and become trapped by the vacancy, while the SIA quickly diffuses away from the clusters, disappearing into the GB, such that de-trapping of the He clusters by absorbing an SIA is less likely to occur. This suggests that small He clusters may be treated as relatively immobile defects in GBs. The different behavior of He clusters in the bulk compared to their behavior in GBs may explain the different He bubble sizes experimentally observed in the bulk and in GBs in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels that have been simultaneously neutron irradiated and He implanted.

Deng, Huiqiu; Hu, W. Y.; Gao, Fei; Heinisch, Howard L.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Kurtz, Richard J.

2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

408

Shubnikov-de Haas Oscillations in the Bulk Rashba Semiconductor BiTeI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk magnetoresistance quantum oscillations are observed in high quality single crystal samples of BiTeI. This compound shows an extremely large internal spin-orbit coupling, associated with the polarity of the alternating Bi, Te, and I layers perpendicular to the c-axis. The corresponding areas of the inner and outer Fermi surfaces around the A-point show good agreement with theoretical calculations, demonstrating that the intrinsic bulk Rashba-type splitting is nearly 360 meV, comparable to the largest spin-orbit coupling generated in heterostructures and at surfaces.

Bell, C.; Bahramy, M.S.; Murakawa, H.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Arita, R.; Kaneko, Y.; Onose, Y.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.; Hwang, H.Y.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

THE EFFECT OF SUBBANDGAP ILLUMINATION ON THE BULK RESISTIVITY OF CDZNTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variation in bulk resistivity during infrared (IR) illumination above 950 nm of state-of-the-art CdZnTe (CZT) crystals grown using the traveling heating method or the modified Bridgman method is documented. The change in steady-state current with and without illumination is also evaluated. The influence of secondary phases (SP) on current?voltage (I?V) characteristics is discussed using IR transmission microscopy to determine the defect concentration within the crystal bulk. SP present within the CZT are connected to the existence of deep, IR-excitable traps within the bandgap.

Wright, J.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT SYSTEM PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) manages the River Protection Project (RPP). The RPP mission is to retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste and close the tank farms to protect the Columbia River. As a result, ORP is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 57 million gallons 1 of radioactive waste contained in the Hanford Site waste tanks and closure2 of all the tanks and associated facilities. The previous revision of the System Plan was issued in May 2008. ORP has made a number of changes to the tank waste treatment strategy and plans since the last revision of this document, and additional changes are under consideration. ORP has contracts in place to implement the strategy for completion of the mission and establish the capability to complete the overall mission. The current strategl involves a number of interrelated activities. ORP will reduce risk to the environment posed by tank wastes by the following: (1) Retrieving the waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) to double-shell tanks (DST) and delivering the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). (2) Constructing and operating the WTP, which will safely treat all of the high-level waste (HLW) fraction contained in the tank farms. About one-third of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction separated from the HLW fraction in the WTP will be immobilized in the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility. (3) Developing and deploying supplemental treatment capability assumed to be a second LAW vitrification facility that can safely treat about two-thirds of the LAW contained in the tank farms. (4) Developing and deploying supplemental pretreatment capability currently assumed to be an Aluminum Removal Facility (ARF) using a lithium hydrotalcite process to mitigate sodium management issues. (5) Developing and deploying treatment and packaging capability for contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) tank waste for possible shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. (6) Deploying interim storage capacity for the immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) pending determination of the final disposal pathway. (7) Closing the SST and DST tank farms, ancillary facilities, and all associated waste management and treatment facilities. (8) Optimizing the overall mission by resolution of technical and programmatic uncertainties, configuring the tank farms to provide a steady, well-balanced feed to the WTP, and performing trade-offs of the required amount and type of supplemental treatment and of the amount of HLW glass versus LAW glass. ORP has made and continues to make modifications to the WTP contract as needed to improve projected plant performance and address known or emerging risks. Key elements needed to implement the strategy described above are included within the scope of the Tank Operations Contract (TOC). Interim stabilization of the SSTs was completed in March 2004. As of April 2009, retrieval of seven SSTs has been completed and retrieval of four additional SSTs has been completed to the limits of technology. Demonstration of supplemental LAW treatment technologies has stopped temporarily pending revision of mission need requirements. Award of a new contract for tank operations (TOC), the ongoing tank waste retrieval experience, HLW disposal issues, and uncertainties in waste feed delivery and waste treatment led to the revision of the Performance Measurement Baseline (PM B), which is currently under review prior to approval. 6 This System Plan is aligned with the current WTP schedule, with hot commissioning beginning in 2018, and full operations beginning in late 2019. Major decisions regarding the use of supplemental treatment and the associated technology, the ultimate needed capacity, and its relationship to the WTP have not yet been finalized. This System Plan assumes that the outcome of these decisions will be to provide a second LAW vitrification facility. No final implementation decisions regarding supplemental technology can be made until the Tank Closure and

CERTA PJ; KIRKBRIDE RA; HOHL TM; EMPEY PA; WELLS MN

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

HAMILTON, D.W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Development of a coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Phase 3 final report, November 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three phase research and development program has resulted in the development and commercialization of a Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}), capable of being fueled by pulverized coal, natural gas, and other solid, gaseous, or liquid fuels, for the vitrification of industrial wastes. The Phase 3 research effort focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added glass products from the vitrification of boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project was to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential for successful commercialization. The demonstration test consisted of one test run with a duration of 105 hours, approximately one-half (46 hours) performed with coal as the primary fuel source (70% to 100%), the other half with natural gas. Approximately 50 hours of melting operation were performed vitrifying approximately 50,000 lbs of coal-fired utility boiler flyash/dolomite mixture, producing a fully-reacted vitrified product.

NONE

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

415

Surface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas-flow physiological saline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,9 was about an early failure owing to insufficient strength caused by hydrogen embrittlement or agingSurface chemistry of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron and electrochemistry study in gas. The contact angle test with water and glycerol droplets shows a smaller angle (though >90 ) of NC-Fe than

Zheng, Yufeng

416

Complexity of shear localization in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191, China The compressive behaviour of a Zr. A significant advance occurred when compositions and copper mold casting method allowing for bulk material the consequence of) macroscopic shear banding remains unclear. It is therefore important to carry out in situ

417

Complexity of shear localization in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191, China The compressive behaviour of a Zr. A significant advance occurred when compositions and copper mold casting method allowing for bulk material unclear. It is therefore important to carry out in situ observations of plastic deformation processes

418

Stress-corrosion fatiguecrack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress-corrosion fatigue­crack growth in a Zr-based bulk amorphous metal V. Schroeder 1 , R metallic glass; Amorphous metal; Fatigue; Stress corrosion; Crack growth 1. Introduction In recent years­crack growth resistance [1­5], its corresponding properties in the presence of a corrosive environment have

Ritchie, Robert

419

CORD: Energy-efficient Reliable Bulk Data Dissemination in Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and outdoor sensor network testbed and via extensive simulations. Our results show that in comparisonCORD: Energy-efficient Reliable Bulk Data Dissemination in Sensor Networks Leijun Huang Sanjeev is to minimize energy consumption. To achieve its goals CORD employs a two phase approach in which the object

Setia, Sanjeev

420

The efficiency of bulk and fine/flavor cocoa markets: the case of Trinidad and Tobago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-series methods are used to study the dynamics of bulk and fine/flavor (FF) cocoa bean prices among the markets. The study focuses on establishing where cocoa bean prices are discovered and whether FF cocoa price for Trinidad and Tobago (T...

Kalloo, Margaret Surujdai

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Bulk-Flow analysis for force and moment coefficients of a shrouded centrifugal compressor impeller  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis is developed for a compressible bulk-flow model of the leakage path between a centrifugal compressor's impeller shroud and housing along the front and back side of the impeller. This is an extension of analysis performed first by Childs...

Gupta, Manoj Kumar

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TiN surface dynamics: role of surface and bulk mass transport processes J. Bareñoa , S. Kodambakab, USA Abstract. Transition-metal nitrides, such as TiN, have a wide variety of applications as hard/decay kinetics of two- and three-dimensional TiN(111) islands and the effect of surface-terminated dislocations

Khare, Sanjay V.

423

Mechanical Properties of Bulk Nanocrystalline Austenitic Stainless Steels Produced by Equal Channel Angular Pressing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk nanocrystalline 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels (SS) were produced by equal channel angular pressing(ECAP) at elevated temperature. The average grain size achieved in 316L and 304 L SS is ~ 100 nm, and grain refinement occurs more...

Gonzalez, Jeremy

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Ponca City, OK); Goodwin, Jr., James G. (Clemson, SC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Cary, NC)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding.pichelin@b .ch Context: Wood can be welded using linear vibration welding tech- niques similar to the ones in plastic and metal industry[1] . Wood welding allows bonding strength similar to glued joints. However, due

Dalang, Robert C.

426

On the Conversion of Bulk Polycrystalline Y2O3 into the Nanocrystalline State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Conversion of Bulk Polycrystalline Y2O3 into the Nanocrystalline State Bernard H. Kear. Voronov Diamond Materials Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 Christopher S. Nordahl Raytheon IDS, Andover polycrystalline Y2O3 directly into the nanocrystalline state. The process involves a forward transfor- mation from

Tse, Stephen D.

427

Excitonic recombinations in hBN: from bulk to exfoliated layers A. Pierret,1, 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitonic recombinations in hBN: from bulk to exfoliated layers A. Pierret,1, 2 J. Loayza,1, 3 B mechanically exfoliated from them. First the link between the presence of structural defects-BN thickness was reduced down to six atomic layers, using mechanical exfoliation, as evidenced by atomic force

428

Spatio-Temporal Ultrafast Laser Tailoring for Bulk Functionalization of Transparent Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of bulk photowriting of light guides, the con- trol of the irradiation outcome and the machining of more that the domain of photowriting can be extended to deep focusing despite of the associated optical distortions optimization loop based on the evaluation of the irradiation outcome in fused silica and borosilicate Crown

429

Observation of second-phase particles in bulk zirconium alloys using synchrotron radiation q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of second-phase precipitates present in the bulk alloys as a function of the heat treatment and irradiation composition, thermo- mechanical treatment, and irradiation dose. For exam- ple, a beta-quench heat treatment depending on the beam optics) and energy- tunable capability. The increased ¯ux density allows www

Motta, Arthur T.

430

metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat horizon in each core. Substantially older radiocarbon ages from organic-rich gytjja (mineral peat- lands throughout the WSL, for a total of 29,350 measurements digitized. (ii) Our own field data

Gillespie, Rosemary

431

The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power Transmission Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power Transmission Network by Tim Mount, these are precisely the prices that must be determined correctly to measure the economic value of equipment the economic value of improved reliability. The objective of this paper is to extend the co

432

The Economic Value of Improving the Reliability of Supply on a Bulk Power Transmission Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Value of Improving the Reliability of Supply on a Bulk Power Transmission Network Economics and Management and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Cornell University Abstract, there is no established way of measuring the economic value of reliability, and as a result, regulators have adopted

433

Neutrino emissivity and bulk viscosity of iso-CSL quark matter in neutron stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for neutrino emissivities and bulk viscosities of a two-flavor color superconducting quark matter phase with isotropic color-spin-locked (iso-CSL) single-flavor pairing which fulfill the constraints on quark matter derived from cooling and rotational evolution of compact stars. We compare with results for the phenomenologically successful, but yet heuristic 2SC+X phase.

David B. Blaschke; Jens Berdermann

2007-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

Influence of Time-Varying External Magnetic Fields on Trapped Fields in Bulk Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large, single-grain bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTS) can trap magnetic fields over 17 T below 30 K and up to 3 T at 77 K, and have significant potential to replace permanent magnets, the fields from which are limited to significantly less...

Zou, Jin; Ainslie, Mark D.; Hu, Di; Cardwell, David A.

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Mechanically flexible thin-film transistors that use ultrathin ribbons of silicon derived from bulk wafers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and on/off ratios were 103 . These results may represent important steps toward a low-cost approach thicknesses derived from low-cost bulk Si 111 wafers. We begin with a description of the procedures for fabricating these structures and transfer printing them onto plastic sub- strates via elastomeric stamps. We

Rogers, John A.

436

Bulk nanocomposite magnets produced by dynamic shock compaction K. H. Chen and Z. Q. Jin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single-phaselike behavior, indicating effective exchange coupling between hard and soft magnetic phases. © 2004 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1760834 The figure of merit for a permanent magnet of bulk exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets still remains a great challenge. Shock compaction employs

Wang, Zhong L.

437

Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Design of Bulk Railway Terminals for the Shale Oil and Gas Industry C. Tyler Dick1 , P.E., M: Railway transportation is playing a key role in the development of many new shale oil and gas reserves in North America. In the rush to develop new shale oil and gas plays, sites for railway transload terminals

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

438

A GIS-based Hydraulic Bulking Factor Map for New Mexico Gallegos, J.B.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A GIS-based Hydraulic Bulking Factor Map for New Mexico Gallegos, J.B.1 ; Richardson, C and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM, 87801, joeyg@nmt.edu 2 Clinton P. Richardson, P.E., BCEE, Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy

Cal, Mark P.

439

System and method for controlling microgrid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for controlling a microgrid includes microgrid assets and a tieline for coupling the microgrid to a bulk grid; and a tieline controller coupled to the tieline. At least one of the microgrid assets comprises a different type of asset than another one of the microgrid assets. The tieline controller is configured for providing tieline control signals to adjust active and reactive power in respective microgrid assets in response to commands from the bulk grid operating entity, microgrid system conditions, bulk grid conditions, or combinations thereof.

Bose, Sumit (Niskayuna, NY); Achilles, Alfredo Sebastian (Bavaria, DE); Liu, Yan (Ballston Lake, NY); Ahmed, Emad Ezzat (Munich, DE); Garces, Luis Jose (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic June 2010 The corrosion properties of two Zr-based bulk metallic glass, Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 LM1 and Zr potential, LM1b showed superior corrosion resistance to LM1. Under identical sample preparation and testing

Zheng, Yufeng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water in a Crowd In many situations, form biology to geology, water occurs not as the pure bulk species, and interacting with large organic molecules. In such situations, water does not behave in the same manner as it does in the pure bulk liquid. Water dynamics are fundamental to many processes

Fayer, Michael D.

442

Abstract--Temperature, current density and magnetic field distributions in YBCO bulk superconductor during a pulsed-field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- bulk YBaCuO, stored magnetic energy, thermal coupling, magnetization, modelling. I. INTRODUCTION HE as cryo-permanent magnets [1], [2]. To magnetize the HTS, pulsed field magnetization (PFM) process1 Abstract-- Temperature, current density and magnetic field distributions in YBCO bulk

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

443

Photocatalytic Activity of Bulk TiO{sub 2} Anatase and Rutile Single Crystals Using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic study on the photocatalytic activity of well-defined, macroscopic bulk single-crystal TiO{sub 2} anatase and rutile samples has been carried out, which allows us to link photoreactions at surfaces of well-defined oxide semiconductors to an important bulk property with regard to photochemistry, the life time of e-h pairs generated in the bulk of the oxides by photon absorption. The anatase (101) surface shows a substantially higher activity, by an order of magnitude, for CO photo-oxidation to CO{sub 2} than the rutile (110) surface. This surprisingly large difference in activity tracks the bulk e-h pair lifetime difference for the two TiO{sub 2} modifications as determined by contactless transient photoconductance measurements on the corresponding bulk materials.

Xu Mingchun; Gao Youkun [Department of Physical Chemistry I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Moreno, Elias Martinez; Kunst, Marinus [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-1000 Berlin 39 (Germany); Muhler, Martin [Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Wang Yuemin [Department of Physical Chemistry I, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Idriss, Hicham [Department of Chemistry, University of Aberdeen and School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, AB24 3EU Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom); Woell, Christof [Institute of Functional Interfaces (IFG), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Bulk Power System Dynamics and Control V, August 26-31, 2001, Onomichi, Japan Inverse Problems in Power Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

within power electronic circuits. On the other hand, event-driven discrete behaviour is nor- mally or a FACTS device encounters its maxi- mum/minimum firing angle. To illustrate continuous the fault and decide on the appropriate response. Trip signals are sent to circuit breakers, which

Hiskens, Ian A.

445

Proc. Bulk Power Systems Dynamics and Control{V, Onomichi, Japan, August 2001. Pricing System Security in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pro- posed techniques. Keywords|Electricity markets, locational marginal prices (LMP), security of the presented techniques, a methodology to deter- mine \

Cañizares, Claudio A.

446

Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

Synthesis and characterization of bulk and coatings of hydroxyapatite using methanol precursor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydroxyapatite, an important bioceramic was synthesized in the bulk form and developed as a coating by a sol-gel route using alcoholic precursor. The bioactive coating was developed on bio-inert {alpha}-alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia substrates. The apatite phase began to form after the heat treatment of the precursor at 500 deg. C for 10 min. The complete crystallization of the apatite was obtained at 800 deg. C heat treatment for 10 min. The phase composition of the bulk and the coatings was identified by FT-IR spectroscopic and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Surface morphology was determined by scanning electron microscopy. The study indicates different surface textures for the powder and for the coatings on {alpha}-alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia substrates.

Khongwar, Jasper K. [Chemistry Division, School of Science and Humanities, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Kannan, K.R. [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Buvaneswari, G. [Chemistry Division, School of Science and Humanities, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)], E-mail: gopalbhu@yahoo.com

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Intense femtosecond photoexcitation of bulk and monolayer MoS2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on bulk and single-layer MoS2 on silicon oxide is studied. Optical, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Raman microscopies were used to quantify the damage. The intensity of A1g and E2g1 vibrational modes was recorded as a function of the number of irradiation pulses. The observed behavior was attributed to laser-induced bond breaking and subsequent atoms removal due to electronic excitations. The single-pulse optical damage threshold was determined for the monolayer and bulk under 800nm and 1030nm pulsed laser irradiation and the role of two-photon versus one photon absorption effects is discussed.

Paradisanos, I; Fotakis, C; Kioseoglou, G; Stratakis, E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Bulk Gold-Catalyzed Reactions of Isocyanides, Amines, and Amine N-Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bulk gold powder (5–50 ?m particles) catalyzes the reactions of isocyanides with amines and amine N-oxides to produce ureas. The reaction of n-butyl isocyanide (nBu–N?C) with di-n-propylamine and N-methylmorpholine N-oxide in acetonitrile, which was studied in the greatest detail, produced 3-butyl-1,1-dipropylurea (O?C(NHnBu)(NnPr2)) in 99% yield at 60 °C within 2 h. Sterically and electronically different isocyanides, amines, and amine N-oxides react successfully under these conditions. Detailed studies support a two-step mechanism that involves a gold-catalyzed reaction of adsorbed isocyanide with the amine N-oxide to form an isocyanate (RN?C?O), which rapidly reacts with the amine to give the urea product. These investigations show that bulk gold, despite its reputation for poor catalytic activity, is capable of catalyzing these reactions.

Klobukowski, Erik; Angelici, Robert; Woo, Keith L.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Task 16 -- Sampling and analysis at the Vortec vitrification facility in Paducah, Kentucky. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{reg_sign}) facility, to be located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, is designed to treat soil contaminated with low levels of heavy metals and radioactive elements, as well as organic waste. To assure that costs of sampling and analysis are contained, Vortec and the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) have decided that initially the primary focus of the sampling activities will be on meeting permitting requirements of the state of Kentucky. Therefore, sampling will be limited to the feedstock entering the system, and the glass, flue gas, and water leaving the system. The authors provide suggestions for optional sampling points and procedures in case there is later interest in operations or mass balance data. The permits do not require speciation of the materials in the effluents, only opacity, total radioactivity, total particulate, and total HCl emissions for the gaseous emissions and total radioactivity in the water and solid products. In case future testing to support operations or mass balances is required, the authors include in this document additional information on the analyses of some species of interest. They include heavy metals (RCRA [Resource Conservation and Recovery Act] and Cu and Ni), radionuclides (Th{sub 230}, U{sub 235}, Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and Pu{sup 239}), and dioxins/furans.

Laudal, D.L.; Lilemoen, C.M.; Hurley, J.P.; Ness, S.R.; Stepan, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Simultaneous probing of bulk liquid phase and catalytic gas-liquid-solid interface under working conditions using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design and performance of a reactor set-up for attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy suitable for simultaneous reaction monitoring of bulk liquid and catalytic solid-liquid-gas interfaces under working conditions are presented. As advancement of in situ spectroscopy an operando methodology for gas-liquid-solid reaction monitoring was developed that simultaneously combines catalytic activity and molecular level detection at the catalytically active site of the same sample. Semi-batch reactor conditions are achieved with the analytical set-up by implementing the ATR-IR flow-through cell in a recycle reactor system and integrating a specifically designed gas feeding system coupled with a bubble trap. By the use of only one spectrometer the design of the new ATR-IR reactor cell allows for simultaneous detection of the bulk liquid and the catalytic interface during the working reaction. Holding two internal reflection elements (IRE) the sample compartments of the horizontally movable cell are consecutively flushed with reaction solution and pneumatically actuated, rapid switching of the cell (<1 s) enables to quasi simultaneously follow the heterogeneously catalysed reaction at the catalytic interface on a catalyst-coated IRE and in the bulk liquid on a blank IRE. For a complex heterogeneous reaction, the asymmetric hydrogenation of 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone on chirally modified Pt catalyst the elucidation of catalytic activity/enantioselectivity coupled with simultaneous monitoring of the catalytic solid-liquid-gas interface is shown. Both catalytic activity and enantioselectivity are strongly dependent on the experimental conditions. The opportunity to gain improved understanding by coupling measurements of catalytic performance and spectroscopic detection is presented. In addition, the applicability of modulation excitation spectroscopy and phase-sensitive detection are demonstrated.

Meemken, Fabian; Müller, Philipp; Hungerbühler, Konrad; Baiker, Alfons, E-mail: baiker@chem.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zürich, Hönggerberg, HCI, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries: Surface conductivity vs. bulk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries: Surface conductivity vs. bulk ion cathode materials for high capacity lithium-ion batteries. Owing to their inherently low electronic-ion batteries. Lithium transition metal phosphates such as LiFePO4,1 LiMnPO4,2 Li3V2(PO4)3 3 and LiVPO4F4 have

Ryan, Dominic

454

Surface Science Letters Bulk-defect dependent adsorption on a metal oxide surface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-6028(01)01067-6 #12;Titanium dioxide is a wide-band gap semicon- ductor (Egap 3 eV) that can easily be reducedSurface Science Letters Bulk-defect dependent adsorption on a metal oxide surface: S/TiO2(1 1 0) E Abstract The adsorption of molecular sulfur on TiO2(1 1 0)(1 Ã? 1) has been studied with scanning tunneling

Diebold, Ulrike

455

Oxygen impurity and microalloying effect in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen impurity and microalloying effect in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass alloy C.T. Liu*, M composition Zr­10 at.%Al­5% Ti­17.9% Cu­14.6% Ni (BAM-11) was used to study the effects of oxygen impurities and microalloying on the microstructure and mechanical properties. Oxygen impurity at a level of 3000 appm

Pennycook, Steve

456

Bulk optical damage thresholds for doped and undoped, crystalline and ceramic yttrium aluminum garnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measured the bulk optical damage thresholds of pure and Nd-doped ceramic yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), and of pure, Nd-doped, Cr-doped, and Yb-doped crystalline YAG. We used 9.9 ns, 1064 nm, single-longitudinal mode, TEM00 pulses, to determine that the breakdown thresholds are deterministic, with multiple-pulse thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 2.2 kJ/cm{sup 2}.

Do, Binh T.; Smith, Arlee V.

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Bulk Migration of Ni/NiO in Ni-YSZ during Reducing Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the migration of Ni/NiO in Ni-YSZ can potentially help to design a better solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode. We have observed that extensive hydrogen reduction and methane steam reforming of Ni-YSZ caused bulk migration of Ni/NiO to at least ~ 5 µm deeper from the Ni-YSZ surface. No significant bulk migration effects were detected after simple thermal treatments in non-reducing/non-reforming environment. Surface analysis of a single zirconia grain in the first 10-20 nm region from annealed, hydrogen reduced and methane steam reformed Ni-YSZ shows Ni-enriched surface supporting earlier claims of Ni exsolution. 3D-EBSD analysis of thermally treated sample before exposing it to reducing and reforming environment indicated mixed NiO/YSZ phase with some porosity and random grain orientation. The surface analysis and mapping were carried out using ToF-SIMS and AES whereas EDS maps on FIB sliced areas on Ni-YSZ were utilized for the bulk analysis. The results provide additional information related to complex reactions occurring in SOFC during internal reforming conditions.

Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Baer, Donald R.; Lea, Alan S.; Zhu, Zihua; Strohm, James J.; Sitzman, S. D.; King, David L.

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

458

Laser Measurement of SAM Bulk and Surface Wave Amplitudes for Material Microstructure Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM) at ultra high frequencies has proven to be a useful tool for investigating materials on the scale of individual grains. This technique is normally performed in a reflection mode from one side of a sample surface. Information about the generation and transmission of bulk acoustic waves into the material is inferred from the reflection signal amplitude. We present an adaptation to the SAM method whereby the acoustic bulk waves are directly visualized through laser acoustic detection. Ultrasonic waves were emitted from a nominal 200 MHz point focus acoustic lens into a thin silicon plate (thickness 75ìm) coupled with distilled water. A scanned laser beam detected the bulk and surface acoustic waves at the opposite surface of the thin silicon plate. Distinct amplitude patterns exhibiting the expected symmetry for Silicon were observed that alter in predictable ways as the acoustic focal point was moved throughout the plate. Predictions of the acoustic wave fields generated by the acoustic lens within and at the surface of the Silicon are being investigated through the angular spectrum of plane waves approach. Results shall be presented for plates with (100) and (111) orientations followed by discussion of applications of the technique for material microstructure analysis.

Ken L. Telschow; Chiaki Miyasaka; David L. Cottle

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effect of bulk viscosity in low density, hypersonic blunt body flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational fluids dynamics scheme is presented to solve the unsteady Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations over a blunt body at high altitude, high Mach number atmospheric reentry flow conditions. This continuum approach is directed to low density hypersonic flows by accounting for non-zero bulk viscosity effects in near frozen flow conditions. The TLNS equations are solved over an axisymmetric body at zero incidence relative to the free stream. The time dependent axisymmetric governing equations are transformed into a computational plane, then cast into weak conservative form and solved using a first-order fully implicit scheme in time with second-order flux vector splitting for spatial derivatives. The physical domain is defined over representative sphere and sphere/cone geometries using a body-fitted clustered algebraic grid within a fixed domain (i.e., shock capturing). At the present time, nonequilibrium thermo-chemistry effects are not modeled. Catalytic wall, ionization and radiation effects are also excluded from the current analysis. However, the significant difference from previous studies is the inclusion of the capability to model non-zero bulk viscosity effects. The importance of bulk viscosity is reviewed and blunt body flow field solutions are presented to illustrate the potential contribution of this phenomena at high altitude hypersonic conditions. The current technique is compared with experimental data and other approximate continuum solutions. A variety of test cases are also presented for a wide range of free stream Mach conditions. 18 refs., 42 figs.

Rutledge, W.H. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hoffmann, K.A. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Low-energy effective theory for a Randall-Sundrum scenario with a moving bulk brane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive the low-energy effective theory of gravity for a generalized Randall-Sundrum scenario, allowing for a third self-gravitating brane to live in the 5D bulk spacetime. At zero order the 5D spacetime is composed of two slices of anti-de Sitter spacetime, each with a different curvature scale, and the 5D Weyl tensor vanishes. Two boundary branes are at the fixed points of the orbifold whereas the third brane is free to move in the bulk. At first order, the third brane breaks the otherwise continuous evolution of the projection of the Weyl tensor normal to the branes. We derive a junction condition for the projected Weyl tensor across the bulk brane, and combining this constraint with the junction condition for the extrinsic curvature tensor, allows us to derive the first-order field equations on the middle brane. The effective theory is a generalized Brans-Dicke theory with two scalar fields. This is conformally equivalent to Einstein gravity and two scalar fields, minimally coupled to the geometry, but nonminimally coupled to matter on the three branes.

Cotta-Ramusino, Ludovica [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, P01 2EG (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Computation and Visualization in Mathematics and Mechanics, EPFL FSB IMB, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 (Switzerland); Wands, David [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, P01 2EG (United Kingdom)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bulk vitrification system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Probing bulk viscous matter-dominated models with Gamma-ray bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we extend the range of consistency of a constant bulk viscosity model to redshifts up to $z\\sim 8.1$. In this model the dark sector of the cosmic substratum is a viscous fluid with pressure $p= -\\zeta \\theta$, where $\\theta$ is the fluid-expansion scalar and $\\zeta$ is the coefficient of bulk viscosity. Using the sample of 59 high-redshift GRBs reported by Wei (2010), we calibrate GRBs at low redshifts with the Union 2 sample of SNe Ia, avoiding then the circularity problem. Testing the constant bulk viscosity model with GRBs we found the best fit for the viscosity parameter $\\tilde{\\zeta}$ in the range $0<\\tilde{\\zeta}<3$, being so consistent with previous probes; we also determined the deceleration parameter $q_0$ and the redshift of transition to accelerated expansion. Besides we present an updated analysis of the model with CMB5-year data and CMB7-year data, as well as with the baryon acoustic peak BAO. From the statistics with CMB it turns out that the model does not describe in a feasible way the far far epoch of recombination of the universe, but is in very good concordance for epochs as far as $z\\sim 8.1$ till present.

A. Montiel; N. Bretón

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ultraviolet laser-induced poling inhibition produces bulk domains in MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the realization of high-resolution bulk domains achieved using a shallow, structured, domain inverted surface template obtained by UV laser-induced poling inhibition in MgO-doped lithium niobate. The quality of the obtained bulk domains is compared to those of the template and their application for second harmonic generation is demonstrated. The present method enables domain structures with a period length as small as 3??m to be achieved. Furthermore, we propose a potential physical mechanism that leads to the transformation of the surface template into bulk domains.

Boes, Andreas, E-mail: s3363819@student.rmit.edu.au; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Sivan, Vijay; Mitchell, Arnan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); ARC Center for Ultra-high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Yudistira, Didit [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Wade, Scott [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Mailis, Sakellaris [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Soergel, Elisabeth [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Brane world solutions of perfect fluid in the background of a bulk containing dust or cosmological constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents some solutions to the five dimensional Einstein equations due to a perfect fluid on the brane with pure dust filling the entire bulk in one case and a cosmological constant (or vacuum) in the bulk for the second case. In the first case, there is a linear relationship between isotropic pressure, energy density and the brane tension, while in the second case, the perfect fluid is assumed to be in the form of chaplygin gas. Cosmological solutions are found both for brane and bulk scenarios and some interesting features are obtained for the chaplygin gas on the brane which are distinctly different from the standard cosmology in four dimensions.

Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty; Asit Banerjee

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

464

In vitro corrosion, cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In vitro corrosion, cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron:10.1088/1748-6041/5/6/065015 In vitro corrosion, cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of bulk and electrochemical corrosion in simulated body fluid, cellular responses and hemocompatibility were investigated

Zheng, Yufeng

465

Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R. [Geltech Inc., Alachua, FL (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Markets to Facilitate Wind and Solar Energy Integration in the Bulk Power Supply: An IEA Task 25 Collaboration; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind and solar power will give rise to challenges in electricity markets regarding flexibility, capacity adequacy, and the participation of wind and solar generators to markets. Large amounts of wind power will have impacts on bulk power system markets and electricity prices. If the markets respond to increased wind power by increasing investments in low-capital, high-cost or marginal-cost power, the average price may remain in the same range. However, experiences so far from Denmark, Germany, Spain, and Ireland are such that the average market prices have decreased because of wind power. This reduction may result in additional revenue insufficiency, which may be corrected with a capacity market, yet capacity markets are difficult to design. However, the flexibility attributes of the capacity also need to be considered. Markets facilitating wind and solar integration will include possibilities for trading close to delivery (either by shorter gate closure times or intraday markets). Time steps chosen for markets can enable more flexibility to be assessed. Experience from 5- and 10-minute markets has been encouraging.

Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Soder, L.; Clark, C.; Pineda, I.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Dynamics of Johari-Goldstein ? relaxation and its universal relation to ? relaxation in bulk metallic glasses by mechanical spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Johari–Goldstein (JG) ? relaxation and the ? relaxation in bulk metallic glasses (MGs) has been investigated by using mechanical spectroscopy combined with the Coupling Model. The ? relaxations of MGs exhibit different behaviors such as peaks, humps, and excess wings due to the different fluctuations of the chemical interactions among the constituting atoms. A universal correlation between the ? relaxation and the ? relaxation is generally found by their activation energies and relaxation times as well as the non-exponentiality parameter of the ? relaxation, which can be predicted quantitatively from the Coupling Model. Based on the quasi-point defects theory, a correlation factor ? shows a broad peak along with the ? relaxation, suggesting that the concentration and the correlation degree of the string-like configurations involved in the ? relaxation vary with increasing temperature, which challenges the previous view that the system is in an iso-configuration state below T{sub g} and may shed new light on the nature of the JG ? relaxation in metallic glasses.

Wu, Xuebang, E-mail: xbwu@issp.ac.cn; Guo, Lijun; Liu, C. S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei, Anhui (China)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

468