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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

"Table B29. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 9. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Total Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,60028,15996,32970,3818,4907 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,5668,1779,2672,484,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5786,1686,3068,428,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,10387,3366,5807,536,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,8060,2264,4974,300,325

2

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

4

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

5

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

6

Commercial Reference Building: Primary School | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary School Primary School Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Primary School for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for the three categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

7

Total Primary Energy Use in the U.S. by Sector, 1998 (chart)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Figure 1. Total Primary Energy Use by Sector [Trends in Building-Related Energy and ...

8

Total Building Air Management: When Dehumidification Counts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry trends toward stringent indoor air quality codes, spearheaded by ASHRAE 62-89: Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, present four challenges to the building industry in hot and humid climates: 1. Infusion of large quantities of make-up air to code based on zone requirements 2. Maintenance of tight wet bulb and dry bulb temperature tolerances within zones based on use 3. Energy management and cost containment 4. Control of mold and mildew and the damage they cause Historically, total air management of sensible and latent heat, filtration and zone pressure was brought about through the implementation of non-integrated, composite systems. Composite systems typically are built up of multi-vendor equipment each of which perform specific, independent functions in the total control of the indoor air environment. Composite systems have a high up-front cost, are difficult to maintain and are costly to operate. Today, emerging technologies allow the implementation of fully integrated system for total building air management. These systems provide a single-vendor solution that is cost effective to purchase, maintain and operate. Operating saving of 23% and ROIs of 2.3 years have been shown. Equipment specification is no longer based primarily on total building load. Maximum benefits of these dynamic systems are realized when systems are designed with a total operating strategy in mind. This strategy takes into consideration every factor of building air management including: 1. Control of sensible heat 2. Balance management of heat rejection 3. Latent heat management 4. Control of process hot water 5. Indoor air quality management 6. Containment of energy consumption 7. Load shedding

Chilton, R. L.; White, C. L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

10

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This table lists total primary energy consumption by country and region in Quadrillion Btu.  Figures in this table...

11

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercTotal SPElectrtyUsePercTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 100.0 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 100.0 +

12

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

13

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Primary Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Weather-Adjusted Primary Energy. 1. by Census Region and Principal. Building Activity, 1992, 1995, and 2003 (Million Btu per Building) Principal ...

14

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Primary Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Using . Weather-Adjusted. Primary Energy. 1. by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992, 1995, and 2003 (Thousand Btu per Square Foot) ...

15

90.1 Prototype Building Models Primary School | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary School Primary School The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

16

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Central Government Buildings. ” Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Total Floorspace of Commercial Buildings - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities >Table 4

18

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Primary ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Primary Energy Consumption by Principal Building Activity and Census Region. ... 3 Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

19

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ElctrtyTotal ElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2ElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.2214478303 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 95.9357541899 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.2496632241 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 65.8830409357 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.2477876106 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 58.7608028994 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 61.5607534672 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 40.3846153846 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.4810818587 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 152.219679634 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 25.5555555556 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 35.8807888323 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 61.3267863536 +

20

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 71.4577086539 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 110.926946534 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 72.9096074806 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 66.0248923654 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 54.8654809632 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 65.291976787 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 65.5403331042 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 41.6418235453 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 56.5413268466 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 150.269021739 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 27.5018481341 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 37.9937990385 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 68.8990371973 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 166.794253904 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 71.0813662687 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 38.5267410327 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" SPPurchasedEngyPerAreaKwhM2Total" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 221.549575215 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 213.701117318 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 195.801526718 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 174.148148148 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 340.088495575 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 211.255924171 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 144.028151521 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 171.282051282 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 140.296360236 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 300.961098398 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 98.1045751634 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 106.609793929 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 175.776187637 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 291.160427408 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 174.193548387 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 145.793794187 +

22

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1400.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 +

23

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyNrmlYrMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4355.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1530.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 872.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4466.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 768.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3031.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3479.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1336.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4876.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 131.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1501.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2405.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3436.6002445 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 389.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 270.0 +

24

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 4228.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1501.1 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 847.1 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 4360.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 727.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 2915.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3385.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 1282.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 4739.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 127.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 1436.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2334.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3323.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 381.66 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 257.0 +

25

Property:Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Electricity, total Pages using the property "Building/SPPurchasedEngyForPeriodMwhYrElctrtyTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1399.0 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 686.9 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 321.8 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1689.9 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 122.6 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 843.1 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1487.0 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 315.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1963.0 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 66.52 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 391.0 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 809.65 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 1199.0 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 227.66 +

26

Table A22. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption)...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1994 "...

27

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

28

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"*",0,"*","*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W","*",22,"W",808,17,54...

29

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"*",0,21,"*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W",61,22,"W",30190,671,...

30

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Table 1.4b Primary Energy Exports by Source and Total Net Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 11 Table 1.4b Primary Energy Exports by Source and Total Net Imports

32

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

33

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

34

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

35

Responses of primary production and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors used the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2, driven by the ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

36

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

37

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

38

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

39

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

40

U.S. Commercial Buildings Primary Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Midwest 2,630 2,623 2,846 3,413 Education 323 264 295 360 Food Sales 90 Q Q 181 Food Service 163 155 210192 Health Care 215 234 226291 Lodging ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Total Facility Control - Applying New Intelligent Technologies to Energy Efficient Green Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency through intelligent control is a core element of any "Green Building". We need smarter, more efficient ways of managing the energy consuming elements within a building. But what we think of as "the building" is only a small piece of the puzzle. We have to think broader in order to gain the greater energy savings and efficiencies that are possible. "Total Facility Control" is a concept that we need to embrace and consider when we design, commission, and retrofit our facilities. Very often a single building is part of a larger campus or collection of buildings under a common management domain. Be it a university, public school district, office complex, or multiuse tenant space, there are often multiple "buildings" plus the connectivity between buildings: walkway lighting, signage, parking structures, and even the irrigation systems. We don't often think about the outdoor lighting, security, or irrigation as part of the building management plan, but it can be a significant contributing factor when looking at places to save on energy and improve operational efficiency. We must change the way we design our buildings, facilities, campuses, and enterprises in order to be more energy efficient and be green. A variety of technologies and design principles are available to ensure we move in a positive direction. We must make our systems and processes more visible and, hence, more accessible. At the core of this is the visibility and control of the systems within these environments. A majority of the building control systems in operation today are extremely limited in their ability to achieve higher efficiencies because there is no intelligent control or communication system available; and the amount of cross system interoperability is even scarcer. What does an interoperable system architecture look like? It's one in which a wide variety of energy consuming, intelligent devices can share their information and be controlled by an energy management system. Newer technologies use open systems, open protocols, and higher levels of interoperability, all of which have been proven to cost effectively provide competitive solutions. Better energy efficiency and improved operational costs start with better visibility and control of the myriad of systems within a facility. They must communicate together in a way that enables greater functionality and lower costs. Total Facility Control must be considered as we look at the entire building envelope as well as the rest of the facility systems. Included in the mix are HVAC, indoor lighting, security, access, sun shading, indoor air quality, sound masking and alarm annunciation, elevators/escalators, appliances, power conditioning, irrigation, energy metering, outdoor/parking lot lighting, street lighting, co-generation stations, and much more. This paper will discuss some of the basic concepts, architectures, and technologies that are being used today to implement a Total Facility Control model.

Bernstein, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

43

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. Thisin the construction and decommissioning of buildings. Thesethe building, and the decommissioning or demolition of the

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction,” Energy and Buildings 20: 205–217. Chau 2007.management in China,” Energy and Buildings (forthcoming).addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle -- Final Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle Final Report G Redmond Wolf J Dohack LD Winges Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation Seattle, Washington Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Washington, D.C. February 2012 DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program Focus Groups with Primary Stakeholders in Seattle Final Report G Redmond Wolf J Dohack LD Winges Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation Seattle, Washington Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Washington, D.C. February 2012 Contents 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 1

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

47

Building Evalution Tools to Assess the Usability of Primary Care Clinics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Primary care clinics play a vital role in the US healthcare system, providing preventative and cost-effective care. New trends in healthcare such as the development of the medical home model for care, the application of electronic medical records (EMRs), the effort to increase access to care, and the need to adhere to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) will have direct impacts on the work flow and spatial delineation of primary care clinics. To ensure the success of primary care practices, the architectural design of primary care clinics needs to address these changes to satisfy both patients and staff, and to improve efficiency and outcomes of care. There is limited literature on the design usability (efficiency, effectiveness, and user satisfaction) of primary care clinics. This study developed a set of building usability evaluation tools to collect, analyze and interpret the “usability” of a primary care facility. The study used previous literature as well as a case study primary care clinic in Maryland as a basis to develop these tools. In the clinic, data were collected through an initial interview with the head nurse, a forty-hour behavioral observation, and a staff survey. A behavioral observation tool and a survey questionnaire were developed for the data collection. For data analysis, JMP Pro 9 software was used to analyze the data collected through behavioral observation and the staff survey. The literature review developed a “Building Usability Framework” specifically for healthcare design. A data analysis tool, the “Usability Matrix” was created to integrate and understand the analyzed data within the Building Usability Framework. Integrating the analyzed data from the case study within the Usability Matrix, a primary care clinic usability evaluation survey was developed at the end of the study. This survey along with the behavioral observation tool and design analysis tools were compiled together to produce the “Building Usability Evaluation Tool-Kit for Primary Care Clinics.” This tool-kit can be used by architects and researchers interested in designing and analyzing “usable” primary care clinics.

Hussain, Tahseen 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

49

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Overview Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and ...

50

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

51

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

52

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

53

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

54

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

55

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

56

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

57

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

58

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

59

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

60

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

62

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

65

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

66

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

67

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

68

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

69

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

70

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

71

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

72

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

73

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

74

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

75

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

76

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cases. In the alternative case, space cooling sees a shiftAlternative Case Table 8 Office Buildings: Space CoolingCooling Tables 4-10 detail the assumptions of technology change for each end use between the reference and alternative

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

78

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total embodied energy was highest for the hotel subsector,School Hotel The total non-operational embodied energy ofEnergy, Reference Case) Million Tonnes CO2 Hospital Hotel

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a unified method of hourly simulation of a building and analysis of performance data. The method is called Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization (PSTAR). In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense, hence, the name PSTAR. PSTAR allows extraction of building characteristics from short-term tests on a small number of data channels. These can be used for long-term performance prediction (''ratings''), diagnostics, and control of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems (HVAC), comparison of design versus actual performance, etc. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI.

Subbarao, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Most Popular Tables PDFXLS 3.1.4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type PDFXLS 1.1.1 U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption PDFXLS...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) end-using the Long-Range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP)Primary Energy Savings by Fuel, Alternative Case, Trillion

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of China’s total energy consumption mix. However,China-specific factors were used to calculate the energy mix

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

84

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

85

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel Purposes by" Nonfuel Purposes by" " Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000 ","Other(d)","Row"

86

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

87

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

88

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

89

Primary and secondary emissions from green building materials : large chamber experiments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Indoor sources of air pollution generate a large fraction of overall human exposure to airborne pollutants. Materials used in buildings have been shown to be… (more)

Gall, Elliott Tyler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

91

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

92

CBECS - Buildings and Energy in the 1980's - Detailed Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980...

93

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

94

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

95

PSTAR: Primary and secondary terms analysis and renormalization: A unified approach to building energy simulations and short-term monitoring: A summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a longer report entitled PSTAR - Primary and Secondary Terms Analysis and Renormalization. A Unified Approach to Building Energy Simulations and Short-Term Monitoring. These reports highlight short-term testing for predicting long-term performance of residential buildings. In the PSTAR method, renormalized parameters are introduced for the primary terms such that the renormalized energy balance equation is best satisfied in the least squares sense; hence, the name PSTAR. Testing and monitoring the energy performance of buildings has several important applications, among them: extrapolation to long-term performance, refinement of design tools through feedback from comparing design versus actual parameters, building-as-a-calorimeter for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) diagnostics, and predictive load control. By combining realistic building models, simple test procedures, and analysis involving linear equations, PSTAR provides a powerful tool for analyzing building energy as well as testing and monitoring. It forms the basis for the Short-Term Energy Monitoring (STEM) project at SERI. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Subbarao, K.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment: Neville Scarfe Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy required for the construction of the building was 192.6 Mega Joules per square foot undergone a series of upgrades and renovations; however, the original cost of the building was $1,103,877. The gross area of the original version of the Scarfe building totaled 70,127 square feet, including

97

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

98

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfaces to Reduce PC Energy Usage. In Proceedings of46.2% of this primary energy usage[9]. Since buildings havecontributors to the total energy usage. Then, we can study

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

100

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Food Sales Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings, though they comprised only 1 percent of commercial floorspace. Their total energy intensity was the third highest of all the building types, and their electricity...

102

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

103

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

104

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

105

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

106

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

107

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

108

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

109

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

110

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

111

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

112

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

113

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

114

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

115

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

116

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

117

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

118

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

119

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

120

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

122

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

123

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

124

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

125

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

126

Building condition monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building sector of the United States currently consumes over 40% of the United States primary energy supply. Estimates suggest that between 5 and 30% of any building's annual energy consumption is unknowingly wasted ...

Samouhos, Stephen V. (Stephen Vincent), 1982-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

128

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

129

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

lit floorspace in commercial buildings. Figure 5. Office, education, and warehouse and storage buildings account for more than half of total lit floorspace in commercial...

131

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the office sub-category information in the detailed tables we make information

132

The Economics of Green Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even among green buildings, increased energy efficiency isof total returns to energy efficient and green constructionof Energy and Indoor Environment Quality in Green Buildings:

Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

134

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

135

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Figure on total residential and commercial primary consumption by type of building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Divider Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. Divider Bar You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report (without tables) - Buildings and Energy in the 80's (file size .93 MB) pages: 104

136

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-1999 (Million Btu per Worker)

137

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8b Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings Primary Energy Intensity

138

The frequency of total use of manual and automatic low-consumption fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 mandated that bathroom plumbing fixtures manufactured in the United States after January 1, 1994 meet standards for maximum water consumption. Manufacturers have developed low-consumption valves to meet these standards. The performance of low-consumption fixtures has become an important issue for facilities managers because the water saving by retrofitting low-consumption fixtures is significant. The fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building A, Texas A&M University were used to conduct this study. An acoustic information retrieval system was utilized to collect the sound signals of each fixture and a speech recognition system was utilized to identify which fixture was in use. The data from this study were analyzed to determine whether location of fixture and type of fixture�manual or automatic�caused a significant difference in frequency of use.

Chung, Woo Sung

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Age (years) Average Hours Open per Week Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) All Commercial Buildings 30.5 62 5,321 69,618 Building...

140

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lessons Learned from Case Studies of Six High-Performance Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings have a significant impact on energy use and the environment. They account for approximately 18% (17.9 quads) of the total primary energy consumption in the United States (DOE 2005). The energy used by the building sector continues to increase, primarily because new buildings are added to the national building stock faster than old buildings are retired. Energy consumption by commercial buildings will continue to increase until buildings can be designed to produce more energy than they consume. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Program has established a goal to create the technology and knowledge base for marketable zero-energy commercial buildings (ZEBs) by 2025.

Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Judkoff, R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lessons Learned from Case Studies of Six High-Performance Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings have a significant impact on energy use and the environment. They account for approximately 18% (17.9 quads) of the total primary energy consumption in the United States (DOE 2005). The energy used by the building sector continues to increase, primarily because new buildings are added to the national building stock faster than old buildings are retired. Energy consumption by commercial buildings will continue to increase until buildings can be designed to produce more energy than they consume. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Technologies Program has established a goal to create the technology and knowledge base for marketable zero-energy commercial buildings (ZEBs) by 2025.

Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Judkoff, R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for building electric and gas usage Overall building energyGas Emissions (CO2) Building total steam consumption (therm/(ft 2 -yr)) and peak demand Metering data for building electric and steam usage

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The responses of net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage for the continental United States to changes in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate, and vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We extrapolated 3 biogeochemistry models (BIOME-BGC, CENTURY, and TEM) across the continental US with the vegetation distributions of 3 biogeography models (BIOME2, DOLY, and MAPSS) for contemporary climate at 355 ppmv CO{sub 2} and each of 3 GCM climate scenarios at 710 ppmv. For contemporary conditions, continental NPP ranges from 3132 to 3854 TgC/yr and total carbon storage ranges from 109 to 125 PgC. The responses of NPP range from no response (BIOME-BGC with DOLY or MAPSS vegetations for UKMO climate) to increases of 53% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for GFDL and OSU climates). The responses of total carbon storage vary from a decrease of 39% (BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation for UKMO climate) to increases of 52% and 56% (TEM with BIOME2 vegetations for OSU and GFDL climates). The UKMO responses of BIOME-BGC with MAPSS vegetation are caused by both decreased forest area (from 44% to 38%) and photosynthetic water stress. The OSU and GFDL responses of TEM with BIOME2 vegetations are caused by forest expansion (from 46% to 67% for OSU and to 75% for GFDL) and increased nitrogen cycling.

McGuire, D.A. [Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

146

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

147

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

148

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

149

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

150

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

151

Statewide Savings Projections from the Adoption of Commercial Building Energy Codes in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. A number of jurisdictions in the state of Illinois are considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as their commercial building energy code. This report builds on the results of a previous study, "Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions," to estimate the total potential impact of adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as a statewide commercial building code in terms of Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) savings, total primary energy savings, and pollution emissions reductions.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

153

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Case Study, The Cambria Department of Environmental Protection Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania (Office) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Open office space (1) File storage area Two small labratories Conference rooms Break room Storage areas Two mechanical rooms Telecom room Shell Windows Material: Triple Pane, low-e with Aluminum Frames and Wood Frames Triple Pane Triple Pane Aluminum Frames Wood Frames U-Factor 0.24 U-Factor 0.26 Wall/Roof Primary Material R-Value Wall : Insulating Concrete Forms 27.0 Roof: Decking and Insulation 33.0 HVAC Total Capacities(thousand Btu/hr) 12 Ground Source Heat Pumps 644 (2) 12 Auxiliary Electric Resistance Heaters 382 (3) Lighting Power Densities(W/SF) Open Office Area: 0.75 Office Area Task Lighting(4): 0.5 Energy/Power PV System: 18.2 kW grid-tie system (5)

154

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

155

Table B27. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

156

Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

157

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 4 Total Square Feet of U.S. Housing Units

158

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

159

Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,1477,116,64783,24735,6604 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,771,"Q",6789,2009,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,259,"Q",6585,1912,"Q"

160

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This report introduces several innovations in energy data reporting that complement the previously published triennial reports of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). (1) Both residential and commercial sector buildings data are presented together in the report. Common units of analysis, the residential or commercial building and floorspace, are used to facilitate comparison.17 (2) Unlike the triennial RECS and CBECS that

162

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

163

Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc" ,,"Total Floorspacea","Heated Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Cooled Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Lit Floorspaceb" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,53812,58474,42420,64085,54696 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,5055,4879,3958,5859,4877 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,5744,6212,4333,7421,5583 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,8196,9530,6195,10358,8251

164

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

165

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

166

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

167

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

's > Overview 's > Overview Overview Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects data on energy consumption, expenditures, and other energy-related topics in the major energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy. The residential and commercial sectors are two major sectors that many energy analysts like to consider together, as energy use is primarily related to the building shell and the stock of energy-consuming goods within the shell in these sectors. EIA conducts separate surveys for the two sectors, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS).1 Prior to the first CBECS, there was a very poor understanding of the complexities of energy use in commercial buildings, or the amount of energy consumed in the commercial sector. This report summarizes and synthesizes energy data that were collected by these two surveys during the 1980Â’s, when major changes in energy policy were implemented following the energy crisis decade of the 1970Â’s.

168

"Table B23. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" 3. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Useda" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,17627,32729,3719,5077 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,1567,3080,482,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,1496,4292,557,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,3035,5320,597,232 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,8565,2866,4416,486,577

169

Description of CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Description of Building Types Description of Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined into these more general building categories, which are consistent with prior CBECS surveys.

170

Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

171

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

172

Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings - Experiences and Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HostPoint of Contact: Peng Xu Within the German funding program "Solar optimized buildings - SolarBau" commercial buildings are subsidized, if the predicted primary energy...

173

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

174

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,49421,23591,23914,1916,15363,1956,3808,9599 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6043,2682,3162,199,746,"Q",206,498 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5827,2858,2791,"Q",758,"Q","Q",620

175

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

176

Category:PrimarySchool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PrimarySchool PrimarySchool Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "PrimarySchool" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVPrimarySchool Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVPrimarySchool Bismar... 70 KB SVPrimarySchool Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVPrimarySchool Cedar ... 60 KB SVPrimarySchool International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVPrimarySchool Intern... 86 KB SVPrimarySchool LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVPrimarySchool LA CA ... 86 KB SVPrimarySchool Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVPrimarySchool Memphi... 65 KB SVPrimarySchool Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png

177

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

178

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

179

Building the case for automated building energy management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings comprises a significant fraction of total worldwide energy consumption and is strongly influenced by occupant behavior. To explore the quantitative effect of particular occupant actions on building energy consumption, ... Keywords: building automation, energy saving behaviors, in-home display

Alan Marchiori; Qi Han; William C. Navidi; Lieko Earle

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Description of CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Description of Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined into these more general building categories, which are consistent with prior CBECS surveys.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Improves Target Coverage and Parotid Gland Sparing When Delivering Total Mucosal Irradiation in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck of Unknown Primary Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with occult primary site represents a controversial clinical problem. Conventional total mucosal irradiation (TMI) maximizes local control, but at the expense of xerostomia. IMRT has been shown to spare salivary tissue in head and cancer patients. This study has been performed to investigate the potential of IMRT to perform nodal and TMI and also allow parotid gland sparing in this patient group. Conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and IMRT plans were produced for six patients to treat the ipsilateral (involved) post-operative neck (PTV1) and the un-operated contralateral neck and mucosal axis (PTV2). Plans were produced with and without the inclusion of nasopharynx in the PTV2. The potential to improve target coverage and spare the parotid glands was investigated for the IMRT plans. There was no significant difference in the mean doses to the PTV1 using CRT and IMRT (59.7 and 60.0 respectively, p = 0.5). The maximum doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were lower for the IMRT technique as compared to CRT (P = 0.008 and P gland contralateral to PTV1 was significantly lower for IMRT (23.21 {+-} 0.7) as compared to CRT (50.5 {+-} 5.8) (P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in parotid dose between plans with and without the inclusion of the nasopharynx. IMRT offers improved dose homogeneity in PTV1 and PTV2 and allows for parotid sparing.

Bhide, Shreerang [Department of Oncology-Head and Neck, Royal Marsden Hopsital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sabhide@yahoo.com; Clark, Catherine; Harrington, Kevin; Nutting, Christopher M. [Department of Oncology-Head and Neck, Royal Marsden Hopsital, London (United Kingdom)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

184

building | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 50% (2 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 25% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 25% (1 vote) Total votes: 4 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

185

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

186

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

187

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

188

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

189

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

190

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results yield national totals for commercial buildings. For more information on CBECS, visit EIA's website. Location Census Division View Map New England West North Central West South Central Middle Atlantic South Atlantic Mountain East North Central East South Central Pacific

191

Residential Building Code Compliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

192

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

193

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

194

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

195

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

196

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Ohio Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects

197

U.S. Residential Housing Primary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7c Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

198

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

199

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7a Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

200

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Intensity

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

202

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions 3.5 Commercial Builders and Construction 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities 3.9 Educational Facilities 3.10 Hotels/Motels 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 3 focuses on energy use in the commercial sector. Section 3.1 covers primary and site energy consumption in commercial buildings, as well as the delivered energy intensities of various building types and end uses. Section 3.2 provides data on various characteristics of the commercial sector, including floorspace, building types, ownership, and lifetimes. Section 3.3 provides data on commercial building expenditures, including energy prices. Section 3.4 covers environmental emissions from the commercial sector. Section 3.5 briefly addresses commercial building construction and retrofits. Sections 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10 provide details on select commercial buildings types, specifically office and retail space, medical facilities, educational facilities, and hotels and motels.

203

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

204

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption 8.4 WaterSense 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter includes data on water use in commercial and residential buildings and the energy needed to supply that water. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In 2005, water use in the buildings sector was estimated at 39.6 billion gallons per day, which is nearly 10% of total water use in the United States. From 1985 to 2005, water use in the residential sector closely tracked population growth, while water use in the commercial sector grew almost twice as fast.

205

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

206

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

207

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

208

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

209

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A6. Building Size, Floorspace for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",71658,6922,7033,12659,9382,10291,10217,7494,7660 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",9874,409,399,931,1756,2690,2167,1420,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",1255,409,356,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

210

Buildings*","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B7. Building Size, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,6789,6585,11535,8668,9057,9064,7176,5908 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",9874,409,399,931,1756,2690,2167,1420,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",1255,409,356,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

211

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

212

Building America  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

214

Prototype Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SDC D buildings, designed for Seattle, Washington, used special moment frames (SMFs) with reduced beam section (RBS) connections. ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: â—Ź total nearly 4.9 million buildings â—Ź comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace â—Ź consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) â—Ź

216

A framework for simulation-based real-time whole building performance assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the building total electric power, is shown in Figure 9. Theon building total electric power and fuel consumption, suchi.e. the separate electric power measurements for lighting,

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

218

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

219

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

220

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building) Building 41, formally known as the Stafford Cripps Building, has been transformed into a new Learning and Teaching Facility. Proposed ground

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

222

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

223

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

224

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

225

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

226

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

227

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

228

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

229

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 FY 2007 Federal Building Energy Use Shares, by Fuel Type and Agency Site Primary | Primary | FY 2007 Fuel Type Percent Percent | Agency Percent | (1015 Btu) Electricity 49.4%...

230

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

231

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

232

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan  

SciTech Connect

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intend to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofit particularly heat supply system reform lags the stated goal by a large amount.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael; Levine, Mark

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

237

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

238

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

239

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

240

Building Momentum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Momentum Building Momentum Building Momentum June 28, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton take a tour of the upgrades of the Transwestern Building in Washington, Dec. 2, 2011. | Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson. President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton take a tour of the upgrades of the Transwestern Building in Washington, Dec. 2, 2011. | Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson. Jeff Zients Acting Director of the Office of Management and Budget Brian Deese Deputy Director of the National Economic Council What does this mean for me? 36 new states, local governments and school districts joined the President's Better Buildings Challenge. This brings the total square footage of buildings enrolled to 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA Energy Efficiency:Table 8c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather-Adjusted Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992, 1995, and 2003

242

EIA Energy Efficiency:Table 7a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-2003

243

EIA Energy Efficiency:Table 8b. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8b. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather-Adjusted Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building ...

244

EIA Energy Efficiency:Table 8a. U.S. Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Weather-Adjusted Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992, ...

245

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

246

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to 2003 9% Total 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Floorspace EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-...

247

Project: Whole Building Energy Modeling and Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... buildings use approximately 22% of the total energy consumed in the US The objective of this project is to increase the energy efficiency of the ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

248

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6b . ... Warehouse and Storage 42: 38 45: Other: 3. 154: 170 163: Vacant 28: 21 21: Total ...

249

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

250

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

251

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

252

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

253

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

254

INL Green Building Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green buildings, also known as sustainable buildings, resource efficient buildings, and high performance buildings, are structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reducing solid waste and pollutants, and limiting the depletion of natural resources. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish the mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate green design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. With this in mind, the recommendations described in this strategy are intended to form the INL foundation for green building standards. The recommendations in this strategy are broken down into three levels: Baseline Minimum, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Certification, and Innovative. Baseline Minimum features should be included in all new occupied buildings no matter what the purpose or size. These features do not require significant research, design, or capital costs and yet they can reduce Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs and produce more environmentally friendly buildings. LEED Certification features are more aggressive than the Baseline Minimums in that they require documentation, studies, and/or additional funding. Combined with the Baseline Minimums, many of the features in this level will need to be implemented to achieve the goal of LEED certification. LEED Silver certification should be the minimum goal for all new buildings (including office buildings, laboratories, cafeterias, and visitor centers) greater than 25,000 square feet or a total cost of $10 million. Innovative features can also contribute to LEED certification, but are less mainstream than those listed in the previous two levels. These features are identified as areas where INL can demonstrate leadership but they could require significant upfront cost, additional studies, and/or development. Appendix A includes a checklist summary of the INL Green Building Strategy that can be used as a tool during the design process when considering which green building features to include. It provides a quick reference for determining which strategies have lower or no increased capital cost, yield lower O&M costs, increase employee productivity, and contribute to LEED certification.

Jennifer Dalton

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

256

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B7. Building Size, Floorspace, 1999" B7. Building Size, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",67338,6774,8238,11153,9311,10112,8271,6851,6628 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",8651,338,444,883,1803,2144,1484,1311,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",994,302,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

257

Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Energy Sources, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Other a " "All Buildings* ...............",64783,63343,63307,43468,15157,5443,2853,7076,1401 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6362,6346,3084,600,"Q","Q",806,199 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6212,6197,3692,716,"Q","Q",725,"Q"

258

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,12208,3939,1090,3754,4050,10078 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,1382,336,122,416,1034,895 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,938,518,"Q",744,722,868 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,1887,1077,"Q",1235,1021,2064 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",8668,1506,301,"Q",930,560,1043

259

Building Technologies Office: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Delicious Rank Building...

260

Building Technologies Office: Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Webmaster on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Delicious Rank Building...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

262

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

263

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting in Denver, Colorado, on...

264

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

265

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Building America Building Science Education Roadmap April 2013 Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3 Background ................................................................................................................................. 4 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 5 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 6 Problem ...................................................................................................................................... 7

266

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Description of CBECS Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the sub-categories were combined into the more general categories that are found in the detailed tables. These categories are consistent with prior years.

267

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

268

Building debris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Building Energy Standards (Vermont) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and fuel bills by an average of 25% in the housing units served; To reduce total fossil fuel consumption across all buildings by an additional 0.5% each year, leading to a total...

270

Building Energy Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuel bills by an average of 25% in the housing units served; * To reduce total fossil fuel consumption across all buildings by an additional 0.5% each year, leading to a total...

271

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

272

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

273

Commissioning : The Total Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, most new buildings have been equipped with increasingly sophisticated heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, energy conservation equipment, lighting systems, security systems, and environmental control devices that rely on electronic control. Very frequently these systems and design features have not performed as expected. This can result in energy-efficiency losses. occupant complaints about comfort, indoor air quality problems. high operating costs, and increased liability for building owners, operators, employers, and design professionals. Building commissioning was developed in response to these concerns. Commissioning involves the examining and testing of building systems to verify aspects of the building design, ensure that the building is constructed in accordance with the contract documents, and verify that the building and its systems function according to the design intent documents. The process helps to integrate and organize the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of a building's systems to produce a healthy, comfortable, and efficient facility.

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Commercial Reference Building: Warehouse | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warehouse Warehouse Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Warehouse for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for three categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

275

The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector  

SciTech Connect

The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM | Green Building Codes A Guide to Creating Effective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM | Green Building Codes A Guide to Creating Effective Green Building Programs for Energy Efficient and Sustainable Communities Going Beyond Code Preface The Going Beyond Code Guide is designed to help state and local governments design and implement successful "beyond code" programs for new commercial and residential buildings. The goal is to help states and localities establish voluntary or mandatory programs that go well beyond traditional minimum code requirements for new buildings. The guide addresses keys to successful adoption and implementation and discusses the primary areas that are typically included in beyond code or green building programs, including energy efficiency materials and resource conservation, water efficiency,

277

High Performance Buildings Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry. The Database, developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The Database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses.

The Database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site. Early partners using the database include:

  • The Federal Energy Management Program
  • The U.S. Green Building Council
  • The American Institute of Architects' Committee on the Environment
  • The Massachusetts Technology Collaborative
  • Efficiency Vermont
    • Copied (then edited) from http://eere.buildinggreen.com/partnering.cfm

278

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9 Lighting electric power comparison between real-for the building total electric power agree well with eachanalysis of the electric power indicated that different

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

LIGHTING EFFICIENCY FEASIBILITY STUDY OF THREE OHIO UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aims to evaluate the lighting efficiency of three Ohio University campus buildings. The primary research question is: What are the short- versus long-term… (more)

Kariyeva, Jahan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. Round 2. Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Large scale total synthesis of apoptolidinone and progress towards the total synthesis of ammocidin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apoptolidin 1.1 was isolated in 1997 by Hayakawa and co-workers from a soil bacterium Nocardiopsis sp. during screening for specific apoptosis inducers. The primary biological test revealed that this polyketide macrolide induced apoptosis in cells transformed with the adenovirus type E1A oncognene, but not normal cells. This dissertation describes the latest studies in understanding of apoptolidin’s biological activity mechanism and previous contributions towards its total synthesis. Synthesizing apoptolidinone 1.26 by an intra-molecular Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons approach featuring a Suzuki coupling, cross metathesis and two diastereoselective aldol reactions is discussed. 15 mg apoptolidinone is prepared via our previously developed intramolecular Suzuking coupling approach. Ammocidin 3.1, which was found to induce apoptosis in Ba/F3-v12 cells in an IL- 3 free medium, is a specific apoptosis inducer discovered by Hayakawa and co-workers in 2001 from Saccharothrix sp. AJ9571. A strategy featuring Suzuki coupling, cross metathesis, Yamaguchi macrolactonization and three asymmetric aldol reactions was applied to the total synthesis of ammocidinone 3.6, the aglycone of ammocidin. The preparation of the key building blocks was discussed in the following chapter: aldehyde 3.8 (C14-C19) was synthesized via Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation; ethyl ketone 3.9’ (C20-C28) was prepared via Kobayashi and Crimmins’s asymmetric aldol methodologies; aldehyde 3.14 (C7-C13) was generated by Brown crotylation and cross metathesis.

Liu, Qingsong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Education Project  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this grant is to educate the public about carbon emissions and the energy-saving and job-related benefits of commercial building energy efficiency. investments in Illinois.

None

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simulation Research for Low Energy Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: David Lorenzetti Buildings consume 40% of primary energy in the U.S. This seminar introduces our research in simulation tools for...

285

Commercial Reference Building: Hospital | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09 09 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278309 Varnish cache server Commercial Reference Building: Hospital Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Hospital for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

286

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools to someone by E-mail Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

287

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

288

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey website.Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings;

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

290

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 7% 25% 4% 64% | 10% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 7% 24% 4% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 7% 26% 3% 65% | 9% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 7% 25% 3% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 6% 25% 3% 65% | 8% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 6% 25% 2% 67% | 8% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 6% 25% 2% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 6% 26% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 5% 25% 4% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 6% 25% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 6% 24%

291

Demonstration of Smart Building Controls to Manage Building Peak Loads: Innovative Non-Wires Technologies  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the non-wires solutions effort, BPA in partnership with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exploring the use of two distributed energy resources (DER) technologies in the City of Richland. In addition to demonstrating the usefulness of the two DER technologies in providing peak demand relief, evaluation of remote direct load control (DLC) is also one of the primary objectives of this demonstration. The concept of DLC, which is used to change the energy use profile during peak hours of the day, is not new. Many utilities have had success in reducing demand at peak times to avoid building new generation. It is not the need for increased generation that is driving the use of direct load control in the Northwest, but the desire to avoid building additional transmission capacity. The peak times at issue total between 50 and 100 hours a year. A transmission solution to the problem would cost tens of millions of dollars . And since a ?non wires? solution is just as effective and yet costs much less, the capital dollars for construction can be used elsewhere on the grid where building new transmission is the only alternative. If by using DLC, the electricity use can be curtailed, shifted to lower use time periods or supplemented through local generation, the existing system can be made more reliable and cost effective.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Hatley, Darrel D.

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar gains with highly insulating windows, which leads to windows with positive heating energy flows offsetting buildingBuilding Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Year Made Number of Buildings (Thousands, 1993) U Factor SHGC Window Window SolarSolar Window Cond Window Infiltration Non-Window Infiltration Other Loads Total Loads Total Loads Window Properties Total Building Heating

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Office Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Office Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in office spaces are poorly understood.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling and simulation of building energy performance for portfolios of public buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the U.S., commercial and residential buildings and their occupants consume more than 40% of total energy and are responsible for 45% of total greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Therefore, saving energy and costs, improving energy efficiency and reducing ...

Young M. Lee; Fei Liu; Lianjun An; Huijing Jiang; Chandra Reddy; Raya Horesh; Paul Nevill; Estepan Meliksetian; Pawan Chowdhary; Nat Mills; Young Tae Chae; Jane Snowdon; Jayant Kalagnanam; Joe Emberson; Al Paskevicous; Elliott Jeyaseelan; Robert Forest; Chris Cuthbert; Tony Cupido; Michael Bobker; Janine Belfast

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

297

Review of Building Energy Saving Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pace of building energy saving in our country is late, compared with developed countries, and the consumption of building energy is much higher. Therefore, it is imperative to open up new building energy saving techniques and heighten energy use efficiency. The approach of realizing energy savings is to exploit greatly and use reproducible new energy while trying to reduce total energy demand quantity in buildings. It can then reduce the utilization of energy that can easily lead to environmental pollution in building areas. Reducing total energy demand quantity in building mainly embarks from the following aspects: building programming and design, round safeguard structure, enhancing energy using efficiency of the end-User and heightening total energy using efficiency. The utilization of new energy plays an important role in the aspects of saving energy and protecting the environment. In contrast with the past, building energy savings put forward a higher requirement for building materials. Building materials play a very important role in building energy savings.

Zeng, X.; Zhu, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Commercial Reference Building: Supermarket | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supermarket Supermarket Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Supermarket for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

299

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

300

48 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

59 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

59 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

302

83 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

83 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

303

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

304

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

305

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Events on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

306

Building Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

307

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings – heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

309

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future...

310

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our...

311

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

312

Building Technologies Program - Funding Profile by Subprogram  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy/ Efficiency and Renewable Energy/ Building Technologies FY 2013 Congressional Budget Building Technologies Program Funding Profile by Subprogram Non-Comparable Structure (Dollars in Thousands) FY 2011 Current a FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Request Building Technologies Program Commercial Buildings Integration 37,308 31,913 61,079 Emerging Technologies 75,694 84,694 108,344 Equipment and Buildings Standards 35,000 58,302 98,250 Residential Buildings Integration 37,308 31,282 35,872 Technology Validation and Market Introduction 22,000 8,500 0 SBIR/STTR 0 4,513 6,455 Total, Building Technologies Program 207,310 219,204 310,000 Comparable Structure (Dollars in Thousands) FY 2011 Current a FY 2012 Enacted FY 2013 Request Building Technologies Program

313

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Commercial Buildings » Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES) Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES) The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES, pronounced "beads" or /bi:ds/) is designed to support analysis of the measured energy performance of commercial, multifamily, and residential buildings, by providing a common data format, definitions, and an exchange protocol for building characteristics, efficiency measures, and energy use. Challenge One of the primary challenges to expanding the building energy efficiency retrofit market is the lack of empirical data on the energy performance and physical and operational characteristics of commercial, multifamily, and residential buildings. This makes it difficult for building-level

314

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by...

315

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Software Tools...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Links This directory provides information on 404 building software tools for evaluating energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability in buildings. The energy tools...

316

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

317

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

318

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for technical information on building products, materials, new technologies, business management, and housing systems. DOE's Residential Building Energy Codes - Resource for...

319

Building Technologies Office: Building America Market Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Building Technologies Office Search Search Help Building Technologies Office HOME...

320

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Building Technologies Office: Building Envelope Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy efficiency. Research in building envelope technologies includes: Foundations Insulation Roofing and Attics Walls Foundations Photo of the concrete foundation of a building...

322

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components “Sustainable Building Design”, “Life Cycle Cost Analysis”, “Green Building Certification” and “Natural Resources Management”. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a building’s life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. “Sustainable Building Design” comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. “Life Cycle Cost Analysis” comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs – such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy – at an early planning stage. “Green Building Certification” is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program “Natural Resources Management” rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu

Kohns, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Step 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption Before beginning the code adoption process, states and jurisdictions should understand the benefits realized through energy code adoption. Description The primary goal of an energy code or standard is to conserve energy. Commercial buildings and residential households in the United States consume nearly 50% of the nation's total primary energy, 70% of the nation's electricity, and account for one-third of the nation's greenhouse emissions.1 A report by the McKinsey Global Institute found that America could reduce energy use in new and existing buildings by more than one quarter by 2020 with measures that pay for themselves within 10 years.2 Energy code adoption enables new and renovated residential and commercial

324

Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Full Service Restaurant Hospital Large Hotel Large Office Medium Office Midrise Apartment Outpatient Primary School Quick Service Restaurant Secondary School Small Hotel Small Office Stand-alone Retail Strip Mall Supermarket Warehouse Subcategories This category has the following 16 subcategories, out of 16 total. F [×] FullServiceRestaurant‎ 1 pages H [×] Hospital‎ L [×] LargeHotel‎ [×] LargeOffice‎ M [×] MediumOffice‎ [×] MidriseApartment‎ O [×] OutPatient‎ P [×] PrimarySchool‎ Q [×] QuickServiceRestaurant‎ S [×] SecondarySchool‎ [×] SmallHotel‎ [×] SmallOffice‎ S cont. [×] StandAloneRetail‎ [×] StripMall‎ [×] Supermarket‎ W [×] Warehouse‎

325

Conservation of Energy and Water Use in State Buildings (North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by 30% for new buildings, and 20% for major renovations. The energy consumption per gross square foot for all State buildings in total must be reduced...

326

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and techniques. The goal is to enable the nation to cut energy use in the commercial buildings sector by 20% by 2020.

327

84 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

84 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: LCEA009449 Keywords:

328

87 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

87 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: STRO000469 Keywords:

329

80 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

80 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

330

75 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

75 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC400003 Keywords:

331

75 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

75 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

332

97 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

97 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

333

78 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

78 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC200470 Keywords:

334

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Response Operations ... Safety Investigation of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ...

335

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structural analysis; structural damage; structural response ...

336

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structures; thermal response; flameproofing; radiative ...

337

Safety of Building Occupants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems have evolved in response to specific ... behavior, needs of emergency responders, or ... behavior during building emergencies, the Building ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems; surface temperature; deflection; insulation; thermometers; structural ... effects of fires in buildings, for use ... the analysis of building response to ...

339

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building materials; thermal conductivity; databases; insulation; building technology; density; fibrous glass; guarded hot plate; heat flow; insulation ...

340

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review The 2013 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office Program Review was held April 2-4, 2013 in Washington, DC. This inaugural review encompassed active work done by the Building Technologies Office (BTO), with a total of 59 individual activities reviewed. Sixty independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these assessments will be used to enhance the management of existing efforts, gauge the effectiveness of projects, and design future programs. The meeting also provided an opportunity to promote collaborations, partnerships, and technology transfers. 2013 Program Peer Review Report | 2013 Program Peer Review Presentations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ventilation measurements in large office buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation rates were measured in nine office buildings using an automated tracer gas measuring system. The buildings range in size from a two-story federal building with a floor area of about 20,000 ft/sup 2/ (1900 m/sup 2/) to a 26-story office building with a floor area of 700,000 ft/sup 2/ (65,000 m/sup 2/). The ventilation rates were measured for about 100 hours in each building over a range of weather conditions. The results are presented and examined for variation with time and weather. In most cases, the ventilation rate of a building is similar for hot and cold weather. In mild weather, outdoor air is used to cool the building and the ventilation rate increases. In the buildings where infiltration is a significant portion of the total ventilation rate, this total rate exhibits a dependence on weather conditions. The measured ventilation rates are discussed in relation to the outdoor air intake strategy in each building. The ventilation rates are also compared to the design rates in the buildings and ventilation rates based on the ASHRAE Standard 62-81. Some of the buildings are at times operated at lower ventilation rates than recommended in Standard 62-81.

Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 r 115.5 r 3,633.6 r 4,471.2 1,704.1 561.3 r 12,406.3 r 648.4 r 703.3 r 20,494.6 r 426.0 r 24,669.7 12,409.5 r 37,079.2

343

Table B16. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings ................",4657,1362,142,67338,26049,7101 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,604,"Q",6774,1706,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,297,"Q",8238,2211,"Q"

344

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

345

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies in Buildings Technology Characterizations for Energy Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use in America's commercial and residential building sectors is large and growing. Over 38 quadrillion Btus (Quads) of primary energy were consumed in 2002, representing 39% of total U.S. energy consumption. While the energy use in buildings is expected to grow to 52 Quads by 2025, a large number of energy-related technologies exist that could curtail this increase. In recent years, improvements in such items as high efficiency refrigerators, compact fluorescent lights, high-SEER air conditioners, and improved building shells have all contributed to reducing energy use. Hundreds of other technology improvements have and will continue to improve the energy use in buildings. While many technologies are well understood and are gradually penetrating the market, more advanced technologies will be introduced in the future. The pace and extent of these advances can be improved through state and federal R&D. This report focuses on the long-term potential for energy-efficiency improvement in buildings. Five promising technologies have been selected for description to give an idea of the wide range of possibilities. They address the major areas of energy use in buildings: space conditioning (33% of building use), water heating (9%), and lighting (16%). Besides describing energy-using technologies (solid-state lighting and geothermal heat pumps), the report also discusses energy-saving building shell improvements (smart roofs) and the integration of multiple energy service technologies (CHP packaged systems and triple function heat pumps) to create synergistic savings. Finally, information technologies that can improve the efficiency of building operations are discussed. The report demonstrates that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The five technology areas alone can potentially result in total primary energy savings of between 2 and 4.2 Quads by 2025, or 3.8% to 8.1% of the total commercial and residential energy use by 2025 (52 Quads). Many other technologies will contribute to additional potential for energy-efficiency improvement, while the technical potential of these five technologies on the long term is even larger.

Hadley, SW

2004-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

348

Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ISOVER Energi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISOVER Energi ISOVER Energi ISOVER Energi logo Calculates: U-value, for constructions with and without thermal bridges; total heat loss for buildings; and energy demand for buildings. ISOVER Energi compares heat loss to the heat loss frame in the Danish Building Regulations. The energy demand is compared to the energy frame in the Danish Building Regulations. Furthermore ISOVER Energi calculates the profitability of activities e.g. retrofit, renewing of windows, to improve the energy performance of existing buildings. The profitability is compared to the criteria in the Danish Building Regulations. Access to databases with characteristics for common building materials and with linear heat losses for typical solutions for connections. The database facility is planned to be enlarged with databases for windows, boilers,

350

Building Efficiency Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States - more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials, components and energy management systems are enabling progress in reducing the nation's energy consumption and consequent greenhouse gas emissions with payback periods as low as 24 months. With responsibility and funding for the nation's largest set of building energy-related research, development and deployment programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) should lead efforts to ensure building energy efficiency is a national priority. One of the most important things DOE can do to reduce the country's energy use and dependence on fossil fuels is to actively lead the national

351

Building Efficiency Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States - more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials, components and energy management systems are enabling progress in reducing the nation's energy consumption and consequent greenhouse gas emissions with payback periods as low as 24 months. With responsibility and funding for the nation's largest set of building energy-related research, development and deployment programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) should lead efforts to ensure building energy efficiency is a national priority. One of the most important things DOE can do to reduce the country's energy use and dependence on fossil fuels is to actively lead the national

352

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BEAVER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAVER BEAVER Logo for BEAVER WINDOWS environment for the ESPII Fortran program which estimates the energy consumption of buildings using the ASHRAE Response Factor Method. BEAVER building energy simulation provides for user friendly input of data, processing and viewing of the results. BEAVER estimates the energy consumption of a building hourly over a given period of time taking into account the site location, the building structure and the type of building services installed to maintain the desired environmental conditions. It enables a designer to investigate alternatives and make energy comparisons quickly and effectively for a very wide range of building configurations and air conditioning systems using actual measured climatic data. A comprehensive range of air handling systems, primary plant and control

353

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: tsbi3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the thermal evaluation. All depending on the complexity of the building and the systems, a total of 200-400 data, which usually are to be taken direct from the project...

354

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

355

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

356

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sumary Comparison Table Sumary Comparison Table Return to: A Look at CBECS Building Activities SUMMARY COMPARISON TABLE Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Average Square Feet per Building (thousand) Total Workers (thousand) Average Square Feet per Worker All Commercial Buildings 4,579 58,772 12.8 76,767 766 Building Activity Retail and Service 1,289 12,728 9.9 13,464 945 -- Retail 704 9,127 13.0 8,675 1,052 --- Strip Mall 130 2,887 22.3 3,529 818 --- Enclosed Mall 12 1,817 Q 1,814 1,001 --- Other Retail 562 4,423 7.9 3,332 1,328 --Service 585 3,601 6.2 4,788 752 Office 705 10,478 14.9 27,053 387 Warehouse 580 8,481 14.6 4,904 1,730 Public Assembly 326 3,948 12.1 2,997 1,317 Education 309 7,740 25.1 10,096 767

357

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 -...

358

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: All Buildings. 167: 481: 436: 88: 1,340: 24: 381: 69: 156: 418: 3,559: ... "Commercial ...

359

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within… (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Market assessment of fuel cell total energy systems summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of the potential market penetration of fuel cell total energy systems (FCTES) into the nonindustrial, single building market is summarized. Nine building types, two types of construction, and the ten Department of Energy (DOE) regions were used to model the market for the time period 1985--2000. Input data developed for the penetration model included size distributions of each building type and performance and cost characteristics of FCTES and competing conventional systems. Two fuel cell systems, fuel cell - heat pump and fuel cell - central boiler and chiller, were assumed to compete with two conventional systems, electric heat pump and central chiller-boiler models. Two fuel cell supply situations were considered: (a) one in which only 40 kW(e) modules were available, and (b) one in which a catalog of 25, 40, 100, and 250 kW(e) modules were available. Data characterizing the economic climate, the intended market, and system cost and performance were used to determine the present value of life-cycle costs for each system in each market segment. Two market models were used to estimate FCTES sales. In the first, the perfect market model, FCTES sales were assumed to occur in all segments in which that system had the lowest present-valued costs. In the second, a market diffusion model was used to obtain a more probable (and lower) sales estimate than that of the perfect market model. Results are presented as FCTES sales for each market segment by FCTES module size and the effect on primary energy use by fuel type.

Mixon, W.R.; Christian, J.E.; Jackson, W.L.; Pine, G.D.; Hagler, H.; Shanker, R.; Koppelman, L.; Greenstein, D.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

362

Home | Better Buildings Workforce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Workforce Home Framework Resources Projects Participate Home Framework Resources Projects Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Buildings Re-tuning Training ANSI Energy Efficiency Standards Collaborative Energy Performance-Based Acquisition Training Participate For a detailed project overview, download the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Fact Sheet Home The Better Buildings Initiative is a broad, multi-strategy initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years. DOE is currently pursuing strategies across five pillars to catalyze change and accelerate private sector investment in energy

363

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Building America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

DOE Commercial Reference Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Version 1.4_7.0 New Construction, ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 Site Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] August 2012 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks Weighted Average Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 47 48 45 44 39 41 41 46 40 41 47 42 52 46 53 67 45 Medium Office 51 51 51 48 41 47 43 51 46 45 52 47 57 51 59 76 50 Small Office 52 51 53 47 41 46 41 51 47 47 54 49 59 54 61 83 51 Warehouse 29 23 24 27 19 24 23 32 29 28 38 34 46 41 53 78 30 Stand-alone Retail 60 63 62 63 46 58 53 74 64 68 84 72 96 87 107 150 72 Strip Mall 57 61 60 65 48 61 57 78 68 74 89 76 103 94 115 164 71 Primary School 57 57 57 55 46 54 52 62 56 55 66 59 75 67 80 103 60 Secondary School 60 61 59 60 44 56 51 71 59 63 78 66 91 79 99 135 67 Supermarket

366

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

367

Table B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" . Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Worker","Median Hours per Week","Median Age of Buildings (years)" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,5,909,50,30.5 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,6774,11125,2.5,667,50,30.5 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,8238,10968,7,1000,50,34.5 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,11153,11378,15,1354,55,28.5

368

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Building Subscribe to Building America Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

369

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Title Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

370

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS for Architects Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) and the American...

371

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FRAMEplus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FRAMEplus FRAMEplus FRAMEplus logo. The FRAMEplus toolkit has three modules: VISION4 (glazing heat transfer and solar optical properties), FRAME4 (heat transfer through building components), and FRAMEplus (combines VISION and FRAME results and reports total building product performance). FRAMEplus checks all VISION and FRAME input files for consistency, combines the building component cross-sections to compute total product properties, and produces a simulation report. The simulation reports are suitable to show compliance with National Fenestration Rating Council and Canadian Standards Association window and door standards. The FRAMEplus Toolkit is a low cost alternative to testing to determine the U-value and solar heat gain coefficient of walls, windows and doors.

372

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and expenditures, and Table A-9, p. 97 for total energy expenditures; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 24.30 318.35 17.06 43.87 16.19 36.64 9.37 1138.21 15.25 419.30 3.62 62.87 Average Fuel Prices Total Expenditures ($/million BTU) ($ million) (2) 23.68

373

Computational tool in infrastructure emergency total evacuation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation has been made in the total evacuation of high profile infrastructures like airport terminal, super-highrise building, racecourse and tunnels. With the recent advancement of computer technologies, a number of evacuation modelling techniques ...

Kelvin H. L. Wong; Mingchun Luo

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Energy Efficiency Standards for Federal Buildings | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulations Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Determinations Federal Buildings Manufactured Housing Resource Center Energy Efficiency Standards...

375

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed In or After 1980 -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed In or After Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed In or After 1980 - Archive Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed In or After 1980 - Archive Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. Archived Reference Buildings Building Type Version 1.2_4.0 updated 3/12/10 Large office (ZIP 2.3 MB) Medium office (ZIP 2.2 MB) Small office (ZIP 1.4 MB) Warehouse (ZIP 980 KB) Stand-alone retail (ZIP 2 MB) Strip mall (ZIP 2.3 MB) Primary school (ZIP 2.7 MB) Secondary school (ZIP 3.9 MB) Supermarket (ZIP 2.2 MB) Quick service restaurant (ZIP 1.1 MB)

376

About the Buildings Performance Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » About the Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » About the Buildings Performance Database About the Buildings Performance Database "Upgrading the energy efficiency of America's buildings is one of the fastest, easiest, and cheapest ways to save money, cut down on harmful pollution, and create good jobs right now." -President Obama Open data has fueled entrepreneurship and transformed fields such as weather, GPS and health. Yet in the energy efficiency market, one of the primary challenges is the lack of empirical data demonstrating the relationship between building characteristics and energy performance. Rigorous performance risk assessments of potential energy efficiency measures could support better decision-making among building owners and

377

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 - Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 - Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 - Archive Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 - Archive Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available. Archived Reference Buildings Building Type Version 1.2_4.0 updated 3/12/10 Large office (ZIP 2.3 MB) Medium office (ZIP 2.2 MB) Small office (ZIP 1.4 MB) Warehouse (ZIP 980 KB) Stand-alone retail (ZIP 2 MB) Strip mall (ZIP 2.3 MB) Primary school (ZIP 2.7 MB) Secondary school (ZIP 3.9 MB) Supermarket (ZIP 2.2 MB) Quick service restaurant (ZIP 1.1 MB) Full service restaurant

378

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 2 Table 2. Photocopiers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Photocopiers (thousand) Photocopiers per Million Square Feet Photocopiers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 4,934 73 60 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 433 50 48 Food Sales 174 994 980 41 42 42 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 Q Q 26 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 401 138 65 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 187 100 56 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 214 204 75 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 78 17 33 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 526 51 46

379

Thick Buildings [Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Occupant Behavior in Buildings, New Directions forSacramento, is a thin building that surrounds an atrium. (Performance of a Green Building," Urban UndQune 1992): 23-

Coffin, Christie Johnson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Energy end-use metering in two modular office buildings at Fort Irwin, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the application of the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) at Fort Irwin for the period 21 December 1989 to 27 January 1992. The purpose of the test was to monitor electrical demands in Buildings 567 and 571 by end use and to monitor the response of the HVAC systems to internal and external loads. Results of two years of monitoring are summarized below. The observed energy-use intensities (EUIs) were 13.7 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 567 and 10.4 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 571. The corresponding numbers for HVAC energy were 5.9 and 5.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr. Lighting used about 35%, primary HVAC 40% (heating 8%, cooling 32%), supply fans 3% and other equipment (mostly plug loads) about 20% of the total. Over 10% of the primary HVAC energy used in Building 567 was the result of simultaneous heating and cooling. Six energy conservation measures were evaluated: (1) delamping and retrofit of T-12 fluorescent fixtures with T-8 systems; (2) installation of two-speed fans with operation at the lower speed (67% of rated airflow) during occupied periods whenever a unit is not heating or cooling; (3) retrofit of heat pump compressors with two-speed compressors; (4) installation of controls that eliminate non-productive simultaneous heating and cooling and provide improved night and weekend setback; (5) coating the existing black roof material with a white reflective material; and (6) adding an economizer system to provide outside air cooling. The estimated energy savings as a percent of whole-building energy use are: Lighting HVAC Savings -- 26%; Two-Speed Fans -- 2%; Two-Speed Compressors -- 11%; Improved HVAC Controls -- 5%; White Roof Coating -- 5%; Economizer Cooling -- 5 %. The total energy savings that can be achieved through the measures is 49%.

Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Technologies Office Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roland Risser Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving Building Performance Research & Development Developing High Impact Technologies Standards & Codes Locking in the Savings Market Stimulation Accelerating Tech-to- Market 3 Building Technologies Office Goal: Reduce building energy use by 50% (compared to a 2010 baseline) 4 Building Technologies Office Working to Overcome Challenges Information Access * Develop building performance tools, techniques, and success stories, such as case studies * Form market partnerships and programs to share best practices * Solution Centers * Certify the workforce to ensure quality work

382

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

383

Buildings Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office building windows, clean room, infrared thermograph, data graphic Buildings Energy Efficiency Researchers, in close cooperation with industry, develop technologies for...

384

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events ICMA 99th Annual Conference September 22-25, 2013 Register Now for the 2013...

385

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was just slightly below the commercial average. Public assembly buildings...

386

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of this building in two challenging North American climates. ... building in its native climate were performed ... were formulated-a single-zone model with ...

387

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Planning for Construction and Building R&D. National Planning for Construction and Building R&D. (576 K) Wright ...

388

Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kristen Taddonio DOEEEREBTOCommercial Program Kristen.Taddonio@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Better Buildings Alliance BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office...

389

Building Technologies Program - Energy  

2 Background And Outline Background Building Technology Program (BTP) focused on a goal of zero-net energy homes (2020) and commercial buildings (2025)

390

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These estimates, and other analyses of energy consumption in office buildings, are based on building energy analysis programs such as DOE-2. ...

391

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... keynote address entitled "Green Buildings - The White House Perspective ... in the areas of building materials, lighting, and indoor air ... Selected Papers. ...

392

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United...

393

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will build an instrument that will provide the building industry with better measurement capabilities to judge the effectiveness of thermal insulation ...

394

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

395

Handbook of energy use for building construction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction industry accounts for over 11.14% of the total energy consumed in the US annually. This represents the equivalent energy value of 1 1/4 billion barrels of oil. Within the construction industry, new building construction accounts for 5.19% of national annual energy consumption. The remaining 5.95% is distributed among new nonbuilding construction (highways, ralroads, dams, bridges, etc.), building maintenance construction, and nonbuilding maintenance construction. The handbook focuses on new building construction; however, some information for the other parts of the construction industry is also included. The handbook provides building designers with information to determine the energy required for buildings construction and evaluates the energy required for alternative materials, assemblies, and methods. The handbook is also applicable to large-scale planning and policy determination in that it provides the means to estimate the energy required to carry out major building programs.

Stein, R.G.; Stein, C.; Buckley, M.; Green, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) consumed 36 percent of energy for space heating and 21 percent for lighting (Figure 2) The CBECS is a national-level sample survey conducted quadrennially of buildings greater than 1,000 square feet in size that devote more than 50

397

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

398

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Building Energy Certification System: Application to a Building in Lisbon and Paths to a Future Enhanced Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency in buildings is of particular importance in the pursuit of international objectives in the area of climate and energy, as it is a sector that represents approximately 40% of the total primary energy demand [1], with strong growth prospects in absolute consumption. In Portugal, the implementation of the Energy Certification System and Indoor Air Quality (SCE) [2] [3] [4] is an important step in the promotion of energy efficiency and achievement of the national targets regarding the emission of greenhouse gases. This work presents the application of the SCE system to a large office building, the Lisbon City Hall. In the context of the energy audit that was performed, different energy optimization scenarios were defined and analyzed in a cost-benefit perspective. Emphasis is placed on the calibration of the building thermal simulation model (EnergyPlus [5]) and its results. Based on this application of an energy certification code, an examination of the principles that underlie these systems is performed, resulting in a qualitative reflection on the limitations of the SCE system and opportunities for its improvement.

Nunes, P.; Carrilho da Graca, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to Nine 16% Unoccupied 3% Ten or More 8% Government Owned 24% Total 100% Federal 3% State 5% Local 15% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 2003, June...

402

A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO- 07 forecasts for total natural gas demand through 2030.Values for Total Natural Gas Demand (All Buildings) Figurefrom Figure 6, the SLBM natural gas demand levels off around

Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

404

Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America 2013 Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research

405

EIA Energy Efficiency:Table 7b. U.S. Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7b. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-2003 (Thousand Btu per Square Foot)

406

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformational Approach to Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics on Digg

409

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping over 40 competitively selected state and local governments develop sustainable programs to upgrade the energy efficiency of more than 100,000 buildings. These leading communities are using innovation and investment in energy efficiency to expand the building improvement industry, test program delivery business models, and create jobs. New Materials and Resources January 2014 Read the January issue of the Better Buildings Network View See the new story about Austin Energy Read the new Focus Series with Chicago's EI2 See the new webcast Read the latest DOE blog posts Get Inspired! Hear why Better Buildings partners are excited to bring the benefits of energy upgrades to their neighborhoods.

410

Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Hall Building City Hall Building Destroyed in the tornado, City Hall was completed in October 2009 and built to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum designation. The 4,700-square-foot building serves as a symbol of Greensburg's vitality and leadership in becoming a sustainable community where social, environmental, and economic concerns are held in balance. It houses the City's administrative offices and council chambers, and serves as a gathering place for town meetings and municipal court sessions. According to energy analysis modeling results, the new City Hall building is 38% more energy efficient than an ASHRAE-compliant building of the same size and shape. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * A well-insulated building envelope with an

411

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meetings Meetings Photo of people watching a presentation on a screen; the foreground shows a person's hands taking notes on a notepad. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program hosts open meetings and webinars for industry partners and stakeholders that provide a forum to exchange information about various aspects of residential building research. Upcoming Meetings Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Webinars Expert Meetings Upcoming Meetings There are no Building America meetings scheduled at this time. Please subscribe to Building America news and updates to receive notification of future meetings. Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting: April 2013 This meeting showcased world-class building science research for high performance homes in a dynamic new format. Researchers from Building America teams and national laboratories presented on key issues that must be resolved to deliver homes that reduce whole house energy use by 30%-50%. View the presentations.

412

Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Incubator Building Business Incubator Building Completed in May 2009, the SunChips ® Business Incubator building not only achieved the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum status with greater than 50% energy savings-it became the first LEED Platinum certified municipal building in Kansas. The 9,580-square-foot building features five street-level retail shops and nine second-level professional service offices. It provides an affordable, temporary home where businesses can grow over a period of several years before moving out on their own to make way for new start-up businesses. The building was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Frito-Lay SunChips division, and actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

413

building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

414

An energy performance index for historic buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports studies conducted on historic buildings from the 1880 to 1900 era. These buildings were recently renovated and many more years of service are expected. Derivation of an energy demand prediction index was the primary study goal. Texas Historic Commission files were a primary data source to probe the second study goal; definition of data base needs for technical studies using state historic office files. A statistically valid prediction equation was produced which covers buildings between 10,000 and 30,000 square feet in floor area. Buildings from Austin and Galveston, Texas were used in the derivation; thus, these findings are limited to climates similar to those locations. The second goal was also achieved since the file data available were sufficient to support the study. The input data file design provides a proven example for development of a final data base specification. Field audits validated method accuracy and reinforced the starting hypothesis, reused historic buildings are examples of sustainability in action. The massive construction of these buildings furnished 30?% of building energy demand. Also infiltration was found to be a minor energy demand factor for these climates. This last finding supports preserving historic windows and doors rather than replacing them with very efficient but historically inaccurate models.

Campbell, Scott

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Commercial Reference Building: Medium Office | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium Office Medium Office Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Medium Office for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for three categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

416

Commercial Reference Building: Small Office | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office Office Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Small Office for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for three categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

417

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.1 ENERGY STAR  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 ENERGY STAR Commercial and Institutional Buildings and Industrial Plants (1) Building Type 1999 Office 2000 K-12 School 2001 Retail 2002 Hospital (General and Surgical) 2003 Supermarket/Grocery 2004 Hotel 2005 Bank/Financial Institution 2006 Warehouse (Unrefrigerated) 2007 Courthouse 2008 Medical Office 2009 Residence Hall/Dormitory 2010 Senior Care Facility 2011 Data Center Total (2) Warehouse (Refrigerated) House of Worship Industrial Plants Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Data as of February 13, 2012. Additional buildings may qualify after applications are reviewed. 2) Totals are less than sum of individual years since some buildings have multiple years listed. Totals include buildings qualified in 2012. EPA, Database of ENERGY STAR Labeled Buildings and Plants, accessed February 13, 2012

419

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",67338,43343,10582,3574,3260,4811,1769 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5358,857,"Q","Q","Q",512 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5952,1630,137,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,7812,1982,784,"Q","Q",296

420

Better Buildings Partners: Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress Progress A line graph with the title Residential Building Upgrades Performed Since Program Launch. It shows that in the fourth quarter of 2010, there were about 3,200 upgrades; the first quarter of 2011 reached 7,800 upgrades; the second quarter of 2011 reached 11,500 upgrades; the third quarter of 2011 reached 15,500 upgrades; and the fourth quarter of 2011 reached 20,000 upgrades. The first quarter of 2012 shows 25,700 upgrades; the second quarter of 2012 reached 33,200 upgrades; the third quarter of 2012 reached 42,500 upgrades; and the fourth quarter reached 54,000 upgrades. The first quarter of 2013 reached 64,200 upgrades; and the second quarter totaled 75,300 upgrades. A line graph with the title Commercial Building Space Upgraded Since Program Launch (sq. ft.). It shows that in the fourth quarter of 2010, there were about 139,000 square feet upgraded; the first quarter of 2011 reached 569,000 square feet upgraded; the second quarter of 2011 reached 1.7 million square feet upgraded; the third quarter of 2011 reached 4.8 million square feet upgraded, and the fourth quarter of 2011 reached 10.8 million square feet upgraded. The first quarter of 2012 shows 17.4 million square feet upgraded; the second quarter of 2012 reached 24.8 million square feet upgraded; the third quarter of 2012 reached 31 million square feet upgraded; and the fourth quarter reached 49.3 million square feet upgraded. The first quarter of 2013 reached 67.3 million square feet upgraded and the second quarter totaled 81.7 square feet upgraded.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

422

Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America America Climate-Specific Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education

423

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on AddThis.com...

424

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Commercial About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database

425

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

426

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Results discussed include whole building air change rates, energy consumption and contaminant concentrations. The ...

427

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... economic analysis; energy conservation; energy economics; life cycle cost analysis; public buildings; renewable energy; water conservation ...

428

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: roofs; building integrated photovoltaics; photovoltaic cells; renewable energy; single-crystalline; solar energy Abstract: ...

429

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building technology; concretes; durability; effective medium theory; electrical conductivity; interfacial zone; mortar; percolation; fluid flow; sand ...

430

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: building technology; brazed plate; compact heat exchanger; evaporator; condenser; gravity Abstract: This study ...

431

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy management systems. GSA Guide to Specifying Interoperable Building Automation and Control Systems Using ...

432

Building Songs 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad building song 3.WAV Length of track 00:03:42 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Sman shad building song 1.WAV Sman shad building song 2.WAV Title of track Building Songs 3 Translation of title...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

Building Songs 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sman shad building song 2.WAV Length of track 00:03:42 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Sman shad building song 1.WAV Sman shad building song 3.WAV Title of track Building Songs 2 Translation of title...

Zla ba sgrol ma

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... thermal insulation; building technology; guarded hot plate; thermal conductivity; thermal resistance; uncertainty; transmission; mathematical models ...

435

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heaters; water heaters; blowing agents; insulation; residential buildings; physical properties; thermal conductivity; polyurethane foams Abstract: ...

436

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... computer simulation; technology utilization; insulation; thermal resistance; evaluation ... to the widespread use of building integrated photovoltaic ...

437

U.S. Primary Energy Use and GDP, 1970-1998 (chart)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Energy Efficiency Page > Figure 2. U.S. primary energy use and GDP [Trends in Building-Related Energy and ...

438

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

439

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

440

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

442

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News to someone by News to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database Financial Opportunities Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Funding Opportunities Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings

443

DOE - Better Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Update July 2013 Inside this edition: Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum Recap: Better Buildings Summit for State & Local Communities Launching the Better Buildings Webinar Series Better Buildings Challenge Implementation Models and Showcase Projects Updated Better Buildings Websites New Members Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum More than 170 people attended the second annual Better Buildings Efficiency Forum for commercial and higher education Partners in May at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado-the nation's largest net-zero energy office building. DOE thanks all Better Buildings Alliance Members and Better Buildings Challenge Partners that participated in the Efficiency Forum.

444

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

445

Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets",,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets" "All Buildings ................",4657,950,658,255,719,67338,25652,19713,8808,19938 "Building Floorspace"

446

Building America System Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America System Building America System Research Eric Werling, DOE Ren Anderson, NREL eric.werling@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-0410 ren.anderson@nrel.gov, 303-384-7443 April 2, 2013 Building America System Innovations: Accelerating Innovation in Home Energy Savings 2 | Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Project Relevance 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Building America Fills Market Need for a High-Performance Homes HUB of Innovation

447

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Type Definitions Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined

448

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Education Science Education Photo of students investigating building enclosure moisture problems at a field testing facility in British Columbia. Students study moisture building enclosure issues at the Coquitlam Field Test facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Credit: John Straube The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to:

449

Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honest Buildings Honest Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Honest Buildings Agency/Company /Organization: Honest Buildings Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.honestbuildings.com/ Web Application Link: www.honestbuildings.com/ Cost: Free Honest Buildings Screenshot References: Honest Buildings[1] Logo: Honest Buildings Honest Buildings is a software platform focused on buildings. It brings together building service providers, occupants, owners, and other stakeholders onto a single portal to exchange information, offerings, and needs. It provides a voice for everyone who occupies buildings, works with buildings, and owns buildings globally to comment, display projects, and

450

Economic model for height determination of high-rise buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, no clear concise method of optimal height determination for high-rise buildings is being practiced. The primary scope of this dissertation is to see if a practical model, decision making process and list of ...

Zafiris, Christopher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the...

452

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

website to download. To help meet Building America's goal to develop market-ready energy solutions that improve efficiency of new and existing homes, the National Renewable...

453

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and others to implement real-world energy saving opportunities. Commercial Building Basics Federal, state, and local governments as well as private companies, own, operate...

454

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial...

455

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

456

Building Technologies Office: About the Buildings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

457

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Green Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

458

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search Most Popular Expert Meeting Report: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation (BSC Report) The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective...

459

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work they are doing to advance energy efficiency. AFC First Alabama Energy Doctors Austin Energy BC Hydro Boulder County, Colorado Building Sustainable Solutions, LLC California...

460

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on AddThis.com...

462

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

463

Religious Worship Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Religious Worship Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Religious Worship Buildings... 93 percent of religious worship buildings were less than 25,000 square feet. The oldest religious worship buildings were found in the Northeast, where the median age was over two and half times older than those in South, where religious worship buildings were the newest. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Top Number of Religious Worship Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of worship buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

464

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

465

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

466

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

467

Assessment of Solar Energy Potential on Existing Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this research project discussed in this report is to assess the solar energy potential incident on Oahu's existing building rooftops. This assessment will provide reliable building-integrated and building-applied solar energy opportunities data for the Hawaiian Electric Company INC (HECO), its district, and the University of Hawaii. The first phase of the project (Phase I), is to provide the opportunity to develop and test the research protocols and establish the procedural methods th...

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Simple procedure for schematic design of passive solar buildings  

SciTech Connect

A simple procedure for use during the schematic phase of passive solar building design is presented in this article. The procedure is quantitative and accurate enough to insure that designs based on the provided starting point values of the primary building parameters will be cost effective.

Wray, W.O.; Kosiewicz, C.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Fan Efficiency Residential Fan Efficiency 2012 IECC Over the past several code cycles, mechanical ventilation requirements have been added to ensure adequate outside air is provided for ventilation whenever residences are occupied. These ventilation requirements can be found in the International Residential Code for homes and the International Mechanical Code for dwelling units in multifamily buildings. As a result of the new ventilation requirements, fans designated for whole-house ventilation will have many more operating hours than bathroom or kitchen exhaust fans that are temporarily operated to remove local humidity or odors. Earlier ventilation practices relied on infiltration or operable windows as the primary source of ventilation air. Homes and

470

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,037 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

471

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,043 ,043 49 141 128 26 393 7 112 20 46 122 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 115 6 13 5 3 28 2 40 2 3 11 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 86 5 11 5 2 28 1 17 2 3 11 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 142 8 16 15 4 54 1 17 3 6 19 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 116 5 18 16 3 41 (*) 11 2 5 14 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 153 8 22 23 4 59 1 10 2 6 17 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 172 7 24 27 3 68 (*) 9 4 10 20 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 112 3 16 16 2 50 (*) 3 2 6 13 Over 500,000 ............................. 147 7 20 20 3 64 1 5 3 7 16 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 109 4 22 24 3 33 (*) 5 1 9 6 Food Sales ................................ 61 2 4 2 Q 14 1 35 1 1 3 Food Service ............................. 63 3 8 7 3 12 4 20 (*) 1 4 Health Care ...............................

472

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,559 3,559 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 392 19 44 18 11 96 7 138 8 12 39 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 293 18 38 18 8 95 4 57 6 10 39 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 485 26 55 52 14 184 3 57 10 20 63 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 397 18 62 55 12 140 2 37 7 17 48 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 523 28 77 78 15 202 3 35 7 20 59 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 587 23 82 91 11 234 1 30 14 33 68 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 381 11 55 56 6 170 2 10 8 20 46 Over 500,000 ............................. 501 23 69 67 12 220 2 19 9 25 56 Principal Building Activity Education .................................. 371 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 Food Sales ................................ 208 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 Food Service .............................

473

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assembly Assembly Characteristics by Activity... Public Assembly Public assembly buildings are those in which people gather for social or recreational activities, whether in private or non-private meeting halls. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Public Assembly Buildings... Most public assembly buildings were not large convention centers or entertainment arenas; about two-fifths fell into the smallest size category. About one-fifth of public assembly buildings were government-owned, mostly by local governments; examples of these types of public assembly buildings are libraries and community recreational facilities. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

474

DOE Building Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview Overview September 2013 Buildings.energy.gov/BPD BuildingsPerformanceDatabase@ee.doe.gov 2 * The BPD statistically analyzes trends in the energy performance and physical & operational characteristics of real commercial and residential buildings. The Buildings Performance Database 3 Design Principles * The BPD contains actual data on existing buildings - not modeled data or anecdotal evidence. * The BPD enables statistical analysis without revealing information about individual buildings. * The BPD cleanses and validates data from many sources and translates it into a standard format. * In addition to the BPD's analysis tools, third parties will be able to create applications using the

475

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Henry C. Foley Henry C. Foley April 3, 2013 Presentation at the U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office Peer Review Meeting Purpose and Objectives * Problem Statement - Building energy efficiency has not increased in recent decades compared to other sectors especially transportation - Building component technologies have become more energy efficient but buildings as a whole have not * Impact of Project - A 20% reduction in commercial building energy use could save the nation four quads of energy annually * Project Focus - This is more than a technological challenge; the technology needed to achieve a 10% reduction in building energy use exists - The Hub approach is to comprehensively and systematically address

476

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

477

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teams Teams Building America research projects are completed by industry consortia (teams) comprised of leading experts from across the country. The research teams design, test, upgrade and build high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Building America research teams are selected through a competitive process initiated by a request for proposals. Team members are experts in the field of residential building science, and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. This page provides a brief description of the teams, areas of focus, and key team members. Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Alliance for Residential Building Innovation

478

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Working with industry representatives and partners is critical to achieving significant improvements in the energy efficiency of new and existing commercial buildings. Here you will learn more about the government-industry partnerships that move us toward that goal. Key alliances and partnerships include: Photo of downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a municipal Better Buildings Challenge partner, at dusk. Credit: iStockphoto Better Buildings Challenge This national leadership initiative calls on corporate officers, university presidents, and local leaders to progess towards the goal of making American buildings 20 percent more energy-efficient by 2020. Photo of Jim McClendon of Walmart speaking during the CBEA Executive Exchange with Commercial Building Stakeholders forum at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, on May 24, 2012.

479

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

480

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,38528,59688,27571,20643,17703 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,2918,5579,1123,312,604 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,3061,5726,1109,686,781 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,6424,10458,2944,1721,1973

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings total primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program October 7, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis When prioritizing building types and sites for evaluating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Federal agencies should first determine which programs contribute the most to their total building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and focus their analysis on those programs. Using the total buildings energy use by program, these emissions profile can be calculated using the Federal Energy Management Program's Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report site. In the example below, Agency ABC should focus on Programs B and C first because together they represent over 80% of building emissions. Agencies

482

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 6 focuses on the U.S. energy supply. Sections 6.1 and 6.2 contain data on electric utilities, including generation capacity, primary fuel consumption, transmission and distribution losses, and electricity prices. Section 6.3 addresses the production, consumption, and storage of natural gas and petroleum. Section 6.4 covers emissions from the utility sector. Section 6.5 provides data on how utilities spend public and system benefit funds. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

483

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: AAMASKY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AAMASKY AAMASKY Analysis of component and total heating, cooling, and lighting energy consumption attributable to skylights in commercial buildings, as well as peak demand impacts. Also provides hourly and monthly patterns of illumination levels from daylighting. The American Architectural Manufacturers Association's AAMASKY (AAMA SKYlight) consists of a Skylight Design Guidelines Handbook containing worksheet-based calculations, as well as a software spreadsheet that allows much more rapid determination of skylight impacts; all required data for analysis in ten U.S. climates is provided. Directly applicable to simple diffusing skylight designs for most types of commercial buildings. Helps achieve compliance with performance-based building codes. With experience, can be used for some

484

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

485

Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America's Top America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America's Top Innovations Advance High Performance Homes on AddThis.com...

486

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building Technologies Office Events and Webinars Updates on Digg

487

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

488

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SIMBAD Building and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox logo. Performs transient simulations of HVAC plants with short time steps. SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox is the...

489

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : SIMBAD Building and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox Back to Tool Screenshot for SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox. Screenshot for SIMBAD Building and HVAC Toolbox...

490

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in...

491

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Policy for Public Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings City of Scottsdale - Green Building Policy for Public Buildings City of Scottsdale - Green Building Policy for...

492

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America Solution Center PNNL set up the framework for the Building America Solution Center, a web tool connecting...

493

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Buildings Incentive Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Applicable Sector State Government Eligible Technologies Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Biomass,...

494

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings (South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Buildings Incentive Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Applicable Sector State Government Eligible Technologies Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Biomass,...

495

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Development to someone by E-mail Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Digg Find More plac