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1

EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables provide estimates of commercial sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1992, 1995, 1999 and 2003 based on the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). They also provide estimates of energy consumption and intensities adjusted for the effect of weather on heating, cooling, and ventilation energy use. Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF bullet By Principal Building Activity (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. pdf table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Principal Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b.

2

Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC Tom Leckey, EIA Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency...

3

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

4

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings - Commercial Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Technical report User Interface: Website Website: web.anl.gov/renewables/research/building_agent_based_model.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Language: English References: Building Efficiency: Development of an Agent-based Model of the US Commercial Buildings Sector[1] Model the market-participants, dynamics, and constraints-help decide whether to adopt energy-efficient technologies to meet commercial building

5

Methodology for Modeling Building Energy Performance across the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report uses EnergyPlus simulations of each building in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to document and demonstrate bottom-up methods of modeling the entire U.S. commercial buildings sector (EIA 2006). The ability to use a whole-building simulation tool to model the entire sector is of interest because the energy models enable us to answer subsequent 'what-if' questions that involve technologies and practices related to energy. This report documents how the whole-building models were generated from the building characteristics in 2003 CBECS and compares the simulation results to the survey data for energy use.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

user interface valueType text user interface valueType text sector valueType text abstract valueType text website valueType text openei tool keyword valueType text openei tool uri valueType text items label Calculator user interface Spreadsheet Website sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial Buildings Residential Economic Development Gateway Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Multi model Integration Multi sector Impact Evaluation Gateway Solar Wind energy website https www gov uk pathways analysis openei tool keyword calculator greenhouse gas emissions GHG low carbon energy planning energy data emissions data openei tool uri http calculator tool decc gov uk pathways primary energy chart uri http en openei org w index php title Calculator type Tools label AGI

7

Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The Netherlands and Finland (11W/m²). Heating and hot water consumption represent 2/3 of energy demand in buildings in China. The thermal performance and heating system efficiency need to be improved dramatically in order to contain the soaring... Efficiency Standard for New Residential Buildings in 1995, the average energy consumption for heating in China is about 90~100kWh/m²a 3 which is still almost twice of that in Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands and Finland (40~50KWh/m²a). Furthermore...

Li, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and expenditures, and Table A-9, p. 97 for total energy expenditures; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 24.30 318.35 17.06 43.87 16.19 36.64 9.37 1138.21 15.25 419.30 3.62 62.87 Average Fuel Prices Total Expenditures ($/million BTU) ($ million) (2) 23.68

9

U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Title U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1096E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Brown, Richard E., Sam Borgeson, Jonathan G. Koomey, and Peter J. Biermayer Date Published 09/2008 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ISBN Number LBNL-1096E Abstract This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 ¢/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu (2.4 to 6.6 $/GJ). This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

10

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Commercial Building Median Lifetimes (Years) Building Type Median (1) 66% Survival (2) 33% Survival (2) Assembly 55 40 75 Education 62 45 86 Food Sales 55 41 74 Food Service 50 35 71 Health Care 55 42 73 Large Office 65 46 92 Mercantile & Service 50 36 69 Small Office 58 41 82 Warehouse 58 41 82 Lodging 53 38 74 Other 60 44 81 Note(s): Source(s): 1) PNNL estimates the median lifetime of commercial buildings is 70-75 years. 2) Number of years after which the building survives. For example, a third of the large office buildings constructed today will survive 92 years later. EIA, Assumptions for the Annual Energy Outlook 2011, July 2011, Table 5.2, p. 40; EIA, Model Documentation Report: Commercial Sector 'Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System, May 2010, p. 30-35; and PNNL, Memorandum: New Construction in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003, Apr. 24,

11

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Avg. Avg. (3) 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 37.22 7.70 13.06 18.52 17.99 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 39.06 8.29 14.78 20.56 19.68 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 40.15 9.40 13.28 21.21 20.48 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 39.51 10.43 12.53 21.55 21.23 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 38.68 10.00 12.04 21.14 20.58 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 38.29 9.60 11.68 21.41 20.63 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 37.09 8.69 7.85 20.17 19.70 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 34.93 7.93 8.16 19.14 18.90 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 33.60 7.45 7.47 18.24 18.11 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 33.06 7.34 8.13 18.29 18.07 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 32.49 7.20 9.31 18.62 18.63 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31

12

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Total Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (3) Total Expenditures 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 70.9 20.5 17.2 108.6 267.2 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 79.4 21.4 16.5 117.3 281.3 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 83.4 25.1 13.7 122.2 294.5 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 83.6 26.1 14.6 124.3 300.4 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 87.6 25.9 14.7 128.2 306.7 1985 105.4 48.8 22.6 176.8 90.0 24.0 12.6 126.6 303.4 1986 106.9 44.2 18.1 169.2 90.5 20.7 9.1 120.2 289.4 1987 108.2 40.9 18.0 167.1 88.7 19.8 9.2 117.7 284.7 1988 110.3 41.8 18.0 170.1 89.9 20.4 8.2 118.5 288.7 1989 110.2 42.9 19.7 172.8 91.5 20.5 8.4 120.4 293.2 1990 110.9 39.0 18.2 168.2 92.9 19.4 9.2 121.5 289.7 1991 113.7 39.2 17.0 169.9 93.9 19.5 7.7 121.1 291.0

13

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 63.4 13.0 1.6 7.7 0.8 23.1 0.2 20.6 107.2 20.9% Water Heating 23.8 2.2 1.2 3.4 35.8 63.0 12.3% Space Cooling 0.4 55.7 56.1 10.9% Lighting 47.8 47.8 9.3% Electronics (4) 27.2 27.2 5.3% Refrigeration (5) 27.0 27.0 5.3% Computers 14.8 14.8 2.9% Cooking 5.8 0.8 0.8 5.4 12.1 2.3% Wet Clean (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 2.2% Ventilation (7) 2.4 2.4 0.5% Other (8) 9.3 0.4 12.6 2.0 15.0 88.8 113.2 22.0% Adjust to SEDS (9) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 6.2% Total 108.2 21.0 1.6 22.3 2.8 47.6 0.2 357.8 513.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.8 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 4) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($3.0

14

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 11.0 11.6 2.7% Other (8) 2.7 0.3 7.7 1.2 9.2 27.3 39.2 9.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 6.2 5.2 5.2 11.9 23.4 5.4% Total 86.0 22.3 0.9 18.5 1.8 43.5 0.1 301.6 431.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.6 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($11.0

15

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (3) 49.5 15.9 1.3 8.1 0.7 25.9 0.2 18.7 94.3 22.7% Space Cooling 0.3 48.0 48.3 11.6% Lighting 45.9 45.9 11.0% Water Heating 17.6 2.6 1.5 4.1 18.3 40.0 9.6% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 6.0% Electronics (5) 19.8 19.8 4.7% Ventilation (6) 15.1 15.1 3.6% Computers 11.6 11.6 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.8 11.4 2.7% Cooking 3.9 0.9 0.9 4.4 9.1 2.2% Other (8) 2.9 0.3 8.9 1.4 10.6 54.1 67.6 16.3% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 6.7% Total 80.6 23.3 1.3 19.4 2.1 46.1 0.2 289.3 416.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): Petroleum Electricity 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.6 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9

16

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 56.7 14.3 1.5 7.8 0.7 24.3 0.2 19.5 100.7 22.0% Space Cooling 0.3 50.5 50.9 11.1% Lighting 45.2 45.2 9.9% Water Heating 21.3 2.3 1.3 3.6 19.6 44.4 9.7% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 5.4% Electronics (5) 23.2 23.2 5.1% Computers 13.2 13.2 2.9% Wet Clean (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 2.3% Cooking 4.8 0.8 0.8 4.9 10.5 2.3% Ventilation (7) 16.6 16.6 3.6% Other (8) 4.8 0.4 10.6 1.7 12.7 69.8 87.4 19.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 6.6% Total 94.6 21.9 1.5 20.6 2.5 46.4 0.2 316.3 457.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.3 billion) and freezers ($2.6 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12.0

17

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) (cents/therm) (cents/gal) ($/gal) 1980 12.42 83.51 1.53 2.24 12.70 77.01 1.43 2.05 1981 13.14 88.83 1.47 2.51 13.33 82.90 1.63 2.32 1982 13.70 100.83 1.54 2.30 13.70 93.95 1.40 2.11 1983 13.79 113.04 1.51 2.14 13.48 104.33 1.30 1.75 1984 13.24 110.16 1.46 2.10 13.20 100.01 1.37 1.68 1985 13.28 106.80 1.37 1.96 13.06 95.96 1.21 1.56 1986 13.05 99.76 1.25 1.54 12.66 86.86 0.71 1.01 1987 12.72 92.16 1.22 1.42 11.92 79.32 0.79 1.05 1988 12.36 87.96 1.15 1.39 11.46 74.52 0.62 0.95 1989 12.17 87.08 1.39 1.48 11.28 73.39 0.70 1.07 1990 12.01 86.28 1.40 1.69 11.08 72.04 0.78 1.26 1991 11.90 83.77 1.34 1.56 10.97 69.49 0.58 1.11 1992 11.87 82.80 1.24 1.40 10.93 68.64 0.58 1.01 1993 11.78 84.73 1.19 1.33 10.81 71.91 0.58 0.96 1994 11.62 86.30 1.25 1.27 10.57 74.09 0.60 0.90 1995 11.41 79.96 1.22 1.22 10.32 66.99 0.64 0.88 1996 11.13 82.07 1.36 1.37

18

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

19

Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Technical assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assessment is to characterize the economic energy efficiency potential and investment requirements for space heating and hot water provided by district heat in the stock of state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The assessment involves three activities. The first is a survey of state and municipal institutions to characterize the stock of institutional buildings. The second is to develop an estimate of the cost-effective efficiency potential. The third is to estimate the investment requirements to acquire the efficiency resource. Institutional buildings are defined as nonresidential buildings owned and occupied by state and municipal organizations. General categories of institutional buildings are education, healthcare, and cultural. The characterization activity provides information about the number of buildings, building floorspace, and consumption of space heating and hot water energy provided by the district system.

Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Popelka, A. [Tysak Engineering, Acton, MA (United States); Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V. [Agency for Rational Energy Use and Ecology, Kyiv (Ukraine)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Commercial Floorspace and Number of Buildings, by Year 1980 50.9 (1) N.A. 3.1 (3) 1990 64.3 N.A. 4.5 (3) 2000 (4) 68.5 N.A. 4.7 (5) 2008 78.8 15% N.A. 2010 81.1 26% N.A. 2015 84.1 34% N.A. 2020 89.2 43% N.A. 2025 93.9 52% N.A. 2030 98.2 60% N.A. 2035 103.0 68% N.A. Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127-128 for 2000 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A5, p. 11-12 for 2008-2035 floorspace; EIA Commercial Building Characteristics 1989, June 1991, Table A4, p. 17 for 1990 number of buildings; EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 1999, Aug. 2002, Table 3 for 1999 number of buildings and floorspace; and EIA, Buildings and Energy in the 1980s, June 1995, Table 2.1, p. 23 for number of buildings in 1980.

22

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

23

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

24

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2003 Average Commercial Building Floorspace, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Building Type 1959 or Prior 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Education 27.5 26.9 21.7 25.6 Food Sales N.A. N.A. N.A. 5.6 Food Service 6.4 4.4 5.0 5.6 Health Care 18.5 37.1 N.A. 24.5 Inpatient N.A. 243.6 N.A. 238.1 Outpatient N.A. 11.3 11.6 10.4 Lodging 9.9 36.1 36.0 35.9 Retail (Other Than Mall) 6.2 9.3 17.5 9.7 Office 12.4 16.4 14.2 14.8 Public Assembly 13.0 13.8 17.3 14.2 Public Order and Safety N.A. N.A. N.A. 15.4 Religious Worship 8.7 9.6 15.6 10.1 Service 6.1 6.5 6.8 6.5 Warehouse and Storage 19.7 17.2 15.4 16.9 Other N.A. N.A. N.A. 22.0 Vacant N.A. N.A. N.A. 14.1 Source(s): Average Floorspace/Building (thousand SF) EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B8, p. 63-69, and Table B9, p. 70-76

25

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption March 2012 8.1.2 Average Energy Intensity of Public Water Supplies by Location (kWh per Million Gallons) Location United States (2) 627 437 1,363 United States (3) 65 (6) 1,649 Northern California Indoor 111 1,272 1,911 Northern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Southern California Indoor (5) 111 1,272 1,911 Southern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Iowa (6) 380 1,570 Massachusetts (6) (6) 1,750 Wisconsin Class AB (4) - - Wisconsin Class C (4) - - Wisconsin Class D (4) - - Wisconsin Total (4) - - Note(s): Source(s): 836 3,263 Sourcing Treatment (1) Distribution Wastewater Total 2,230 2,295 2,117 5,411 2,117 3,500 - not included 1,850 9,727 13,021 9,727 11,110 2390 4,340 1,500 3,250 - not included 1,510 1) Treatment before delivery to customer. 2) Source: Electric Policy Research Institute (EPRI) 2009. Wastewater estimated based on EPRI

26

Life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) of buildings and the building sector: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This review summarizes and organizes the literature on life cycle assessment (LCA), life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) and life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) studies carried out for environmental evaluation of buildings and building related industry and sector (including construction products, construction systems, buildings, and civil engineering constructions). The review shows that most LCA and LCEA are carried out in what is shown as “exemplary buildings”, that is, buildings that have been designed and constructed as low energy buildings, but there are very few studies on “traditional buildings”, that is, buildings such as those mostly found in our cities. Similarly, most studies are carried out in urban areas, while rural areas are not well represented in the literature. Finally, studies are not equally distributed around the world.

Luisa F. Cabeza; Lídia Rincón; Virginia Vilariño; Gabriel Pérez; Albert Castell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (of conserved energy values from the CEF and New York stateEnergy Efficiency Resource Development Potential In New York.

Brown, Rich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercial Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale

29

U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption from Energy Star monitor savings calculator (USconsumption and savings percentage from Energy Star restaurant guide (USEnergy Star restaurant guide (US EPA 2007b). E15) Baseline consumption

Brown, Rich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product: Commercial Steam Cookers. Washington, DC: USEPA. 2004. ENERGY STAR Gas Steam Cooker Savings Calculator [source: Energy Star gas steam cooker savings calculator (US

Brown, Rich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

32

Buildings Sector Working Group  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

heating, cooking, lighting, and refrigeration * Hurdle rates - Update using latest Johnson Controls reports regarding commercial investment decisions * ENERGY STAR buildings -...

33

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

34

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

35

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

36

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

37

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

38

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

39

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy (USDOE/EERE). 2009. U. S. Buildings EnergyRenewable Energy (USDOE/EERE), 2010. States activities andin the manufacturing sector (USDOE/EERE, 2010). Industry (“

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

42

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A. 279 2.7 2000 106 N.A. 282 2.7 2001 107 2% 285 2.7 2002 105 3% 288 2.7 2003 106 5% 290 2.8 2004 107 7% 293 2.7 2005 109 9% 296 2.7 2006 110 11% 299 2.7 2007 110 12% 302 2.7 2008 111 13% 304 2.8 2009 111 13% 307 2.8 2010 114 14% 310 2.7 2011 115 14% 313 2.7 2012 116 15% 316 2.7 2013 117 16% 319 2.7 2014 118 17% 322 2.7 2015 119 18% 326 2.7 2016 120 19% 329 2.7 2017 122 21% 332 2.7 2018 123 22% 335 2.7 2019 125 23% 338 2.7 2020 126 25% 341 2.7 2021 127 26% 345

43

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Household, by Year ($2010) Year 1980 1,991 1981 1,981 1982 2,058 1983 2,082 1984 2,067 1985 2,012 1986 1,898 1987 1,846 1988 1,849 1989 1,848 1990 1,785 1991 1,784 1992 1,729 1993 1,797 1994 1,772 1995 1,727 1996 1,800 1997 1,761 1998 1,676 1999 1,659 2000 1,824 2001 1,900 2002 1,830 2003 1,978 2004 2,018 2005 2,175 2006 2,184 2007 2,230 2008 2,347 2009 2,173 2010 2,201 2011 2,185 2012 2,123 2013 2,056 2014 2,032 2015 2,030 2016 2,007 2017 1,992 2018 1,982 2019 1,973 2020 1,963 2021 1,961 2022 1,964 2023 1,962 2024 1,959 2025 1,957 2026 1,959 2027 1,960 2028 1,953 2029 1,938 2030 1,932 2031 1,937 2032 1,946 2033 1,956 2034 1,967 2035 1,978 Source(s): Average Expenditure EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2, p. 3-

44

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

45

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

47

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

48

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

49

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

50

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

51

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

52

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

53

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

54

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

55

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

56

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Share of Total U.S. Households, by Census Region, Division, and Vintage, as of 2005 Prior to 1950 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Region 1950 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Northeast 6.7% 5.2% 2.4% 2.1% 1.3% 0.8% 18.5% New England 2.1% 1.2% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 4.9% Middle Atlantic 4.6% 4.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.0% 0.5% 13.6% Midwest 5.7% 5.8% 3.6% 2.5% 3.7% 1.7% 23.0% East North Central 4.3% 3.9% 2.7% 1.8% 2.1% 1.1% 16.0% West North Central 1.4% 1.9% 0.9% 0.7% 1.6% 0.6% 7.1% South 4.0% 6.9% 6.4% 7.5% 7.5% 4.3% 36.6% South Atlantic 2.0% 3.4% 3.5% 4.2% 4.3% 2.2% 17.4% East South Central 0.9% 1.3% 0.9% 1.0% 1.3% 0.7% 6.2% West South Central 1.2% 2.3% 4.7% 2.2% 1.8% 1.4% 13.6% West 3.4% 4.6% 4.5% 4.6% 3.1% 1.5% 21.8% Mountain 0.7% 1.2% 1.3% 1.5% 1.3% 0.9% 6.8% Pacific 2.8% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 1.8% 0.6% 15.0% United States 19.9% 22.5% 17.0% 16.7% 15.6% 8.3% 100% Source(s): All Vintages EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC10

58

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

59

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Share of U.S. Primary Energy Consumption (Percent) Total Consumption Total Industry Transportation Total (quads) 1980(1) 20.1% 13.5% | 33.7% 41.1% 25.2% 100% | 78.1 1981 20.0% 13.9% | 33.9% 40.4% 25.6% 100% | 76.1 1982 21.2% 14.8% | 36.0% 37.9% 26.1% 100% | 73.1 1983 21.1% 15.0% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.3% 100% | 72.9 1984 20.8% 14.9% | 35.7% 38.7% 25.7% 100% | 76.6 1985 21.0% 15.0% | 35.9% 37.8% 26.3% 100% | 76.5 1986 20.8% 15.1% | 35.9% 37.0% 27.1% 100% | 76.6 1987 20.5% 15.1% | 35.6% 37.2% 27.2% 100% | 79.0 1988 20.7% 15.2% | 35.9% 37.2% 27.0% 100% | 82.8 1989 20.9% 15.5% | 36.5% 37.0% 26.5% 100% | 84.8 1990 20.0% 15.7% | 35.8% 37.7% 26.5% 100% | 84.5 1991 20.6% 16.0% | 36.5% 37.3% 26.2% 100% | 84.4 1992 20.2% 15.6% | 35.8% 38.0% 26.1% 100% | 85.8 1993 20.8% 15.8% | 36.6% 37.4% 26.0% 100% | 87.5 1994 20.3% 15.8% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.2% 100% | 89.1 1995 20.3% 16.1% | 36.4% 37.4% 26.2% 100% | 91.1 1996 20.7%

60

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.10 0.68 0.26 0.09 0.55 0.59 7.27 35.9% | 1.77 8.45 21.5% Lighting 1.52 1.52 7.5% | 4.65 4.65 11.8% Space Cooling 0.04 0.54 0.57 2.8% | 4.60 4.63 11.8% Water Heating 1.79 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.57 2.55 12.6% | 1.71 3.70 9.4% Refrigeration (6) 0.81 0.81 4.0% | 2.43 2.43 6.2% Electronics (7) 1.54 1.54 7.6% | 1.94 1.94 4.9% Ventilation (8) 0.14 0.14 0.7% | 1.62 1.62 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.14 1.14 2.9% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.64 0.70 3.5% | 0.98 1.04 2.7% Cooking 0.41 0.03 0.33 0.76 3.8% | 0.41 0.85 2.2% Other (10) 0.33 0.01 0.31 0.05 0.06 1.76 2.52 12.4% | 5.30 6.06 15.4% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 7.4% | 1.90 2.77 7.1% Total 8.40 0.98 0.65 0.14

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61

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.96 0.57 0.24 0.09 0.57 0.63 7.05 33.2% | 1.89 8.31 19.6% Space Cooling 0.03 1.64 1.67 7.9% | 4.94 4.97 11.7% Lighting 1.55 1.55 7.3% | 4.68 4.68 11.0% Water Heating 1.84 0.08 0.04 0.05 0.62 2.63 12.4% | 1.86 3.88 9.1% Refrigeration (6) 0.82 0.82 3.9% | 2.47 2.47 5.8% Electronics (7) 0.78 0.78 3.7% | 2.34 2.34 5.5% Ventilation (8) 0.60 0.60 2.8% | 1.80 1.80 4.2% Computers 0.44 0.44 2.0% | 1.31 1.31 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.30 0.37 1.7% | 0.91 0.98 2.3% Cooking 0.43 0.03 0.15 0.61 2.9% | 0.46 0.92 2.2% Other (10) 0.48 0.01 0.34 0.05 0.08 2.32 3.28 15.5% | 7.00 7.96 18.7% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 6.9% | 2.09 2.85 6.7% Total 8.39 0.84 0.65 0.15

62

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 7.42 28.2% 3.04 11.5% 0.15 0.6% 0.87 3.3% 4.35 10.47 14.82 56.4% 26.29 100% - 1981 7.11 27.5% 2.63 10.2% 0.17 0.6% 0.89 3.5% 4.50 10.54 15.03 58.2% 25.84 100% - 1982 7.32 27.8% 2.45 9.3% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.57 10.80 15.37 58.4% 26.31 100% - 1983 6.93 26.4% 2.50 9.5% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.68 11.01 15.68 59.6% 26.30 100% - 1984 7.20 26.4% 2.74 10.0% 0.21 0.8% 1.00 3.7% 4.93 11.24 16.17 59.2% 27.31 100% - 1985 6.98 25.4% 2.62 9.5% 0.18 0.6% 1.03 3.8% 5.06 11.59 16.65 60.6% 27.47 100% - 1986 6.74 24.5% 2.68 9.7% 0.18 0.6% 0.95 3.4% 5.23 11.75 16.98 61.7% 27.52 100% - 1987 6.87 24.4% 2.73 9.7% 0.17 0.6% 0.88 3.1% 5.44 12.04 17.48 62.2% 28.13 100% - 1988 7.44 25.0%

63

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Fuel Other Renw. Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.14 0.76 0.30 0.10 0.54 0.72 7.56 37.0% | 2.24 9.07 22.5% Space Cooling 0.04 1.92 1.96 9.6% | 5.94 5.98 14.8% Lighting 1.88 1.88 9.2% | 5.82 5.82 14.4% Water Heating 1.73 0.13 0.07 0.04 0.54 2.51 12.3% | 1.67 3.63 9.0% Refrigeration (6) 0.84 0.84 4.1% | 2.62 2.62 6.5% Electronics (7) 0.81 0.81 3.9% | 2.49 2.49 6.2% Ventilation (8) 0.54 0.54 2.6% | 1.66 1.66 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.19 1.19 2.9% Cooking 0.39 0.03 0.21 0.63 3.1% | 0.64 1.06 2.6% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.33 0.38 1.9% | 1.01 1.06 2.6% Other (10) 0.30 0.01 0.30 0.05 0.02 0.89 1.58 7.7% | 2.76 3.45 8.6% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.25 0.44 1.37 6.7% | 1.35 2.28 5.7% Total 8.35 1.14 0.70 0.15 0.59 9.49 20.43

64

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.84 0.49 0.22 0.09 0.57 0.66 6.87 30.5% | 1.93 8.15 17.9% Space Cooling 0.03 1.79 1.82 8.1% | 5.27 5.30 11.7% Lighting 1.63 1.63 7.3% | 4.81 4.81 10.6% Water Heating 1.81 0.07 0.03 0.06 0.63 2.60 11.6% | 1.86 3.83 8.4% Electronics (6) 0.90 0.90 4.0% | 2.66 2.66 5.8% Refrigeration (7) 0.88 0.88 3.9% | 2.60 2.60 5.7% Ventilation (8) 0.65 0.65 2.9% | 1.91 1.91 4.2% Computers 0.49 0.49 2.2% | 1.43 1.43 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.07 0.32 0.39 1.7% | 0.95 1.01 2.2% Cooking 0.45 0.02 0.17 0.65 2.9% | 0.50 0.98 2.2% Other (10) 0.81 0.01 0.38 0.06 0.08 2.94 4.28 19.0% | 8.65 9.99 21.9% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 6.0% | 2.28 2.86 6.3% Total 8.41 0.75 0.66 0.15

65

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 U.S. Buildings Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GSHP (4) Total 2010-Year 1980 0.867 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.867 - 1981 0.894 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.894 - 1982 0.993 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.993 - 1983 0.992 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.992 - 1984 1.002 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.002 - 1985 1.034 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.034 - 1986 0.947 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.947 - 1987 0.882 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.882 - 1988 0.942 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.942 - 1989 1.018 0.052 N.A. 0.008 1.078 - 1990 0.675 0.056 N.A. 0.008 0.739 - 1991 0.705 0.057 N.A. 0.009 0.771 - 1992 0.744 0.059 N.A. 0.010 0.813 - 1993 0.657 0.061 N.A. 0.010 0.728 - 1994 0.626 0.063 N.A. 0.010 0.700 - 1995 0.633 0.064 N.A. 0.011 0.708 - 1996 0.669 0.065 N.A. 0.012 0.746 - 1997 0.559 0.064 N.A. 0.013 0.636 - 1998 0.498 0.064 N.A. 0.015 0.577 - 1999 0.521 0.063 N.A. 0.016 0.599 - 2000 0.549 0.060 N.A. 0.016 0.625 - 2001

66

The composition of a quad of buildings sector energy: Physical, economic, and environmental quantities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an analysis conducted for the US Department of Energy Office of Building Technologies (OBT), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined the fuel type composition of energy consumed in the US buildings sector. Numerical estimates were developed for the physical quantities of fuel consumed, as well as of the fossil fuel emissions (carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) and nuclear spent fuel byproducts associated with that consumption. Electric generating requirements and the economic values associated with energy consumption also were quantified. These variables were quantified for a generic quad (1 quadrillion Btu) of primary energy for the years 1987 and 2010, to illustrate the impacts of a fuel-neutral reduction in buildings sector energy use, and for specific fuel types, to enable meaningful comparisons of benefits achievable through various OBT research projects or technology developments. Two examples are provided to illustrate how these conversion factors may be used to quantify the impacts of energy savings potentially achievable through OBT building energy conservation efforts. 18 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

Secrest, T.J.; Nicholls, A.K.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on available data and commercial percentage in 1995. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1990, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1081, 1993; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1995, U.S. Geological

68

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation 1980 37% 41% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 36% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 40% 39% 18% 3% | 51% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 40% 39% 17% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 39% 40% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 39% 40% 18% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 41% 40% 16% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 39% 41% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 40% 42% 15% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 39% 41% 16% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 36% 43% 17% 3% | 47% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 38% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 36% 42% 18% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 35% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 36% 43% 18% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 34% 43% 20% 3% | 47% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 35% 41% 21% 3% | 49% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 35% 40% 22% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 23.66 2001

69

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 7% 25% 4% 64% | 10% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 7% 24% 4% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 7% 26% 3% 65% | 9% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 7% 25% 3% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 6% 25% 3% 65% | 8% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 6% 25% 2% 67% | 8% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 6% 25% 2% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 6% 26% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 5% 25% 4% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 6% 25% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 6% 24%

70

Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming the commercial buildings market to become "net-zero-energy-capable" will require dramatically lower levels of energy use sector wide. A comprehensive and concerted industry effort, partnering with utilities and government, must...

Harris, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Million Barrels per Day) Buildings Residential Commercial Total Industry Transportation Total 1980 2.62 2.01 l 4.63 10.55 19.01 34.19 1981 2.26 1.73 l 3.98 9.13 18.81 31.93 1982 1.96 1.49 l 3.45 8.35 18.42 30.23 1983 1.87 1.61 l 3.48 7.97 18.60 30.05 1984 1.95 1.60 l 3.55 8.48 19.02 31.05 1985 1.92 1.40 l 3.32 8.13 19.47 30.92 1986 2.03 1.60 l 3.62 8.39 20.18 32.20 1987 2.04 1.51 l 3.54 8.50 20.82 32.86 1988 2.20 1.57 l 3.77 8.88 21.57 34.22 1989 2.23 1.56 l 3.79 8.71 21.71 34.21 1990 1.81 1.38 l 3.20 8.73 21.63 33.55 1991 1.77 1.30 l 3.07 8.40 21.38 32.85 1992 1.73 1.19 l 2.92 8.93 21.68 33.52 1993 1.81 1.16 l 2.97 8.80 22.07 33.84 1994 1.75 1.15 l 2.90 9.16 22.61 34.67 1995 1.61 1.00 l 2.62 8.87 23.07 34.56 1996 1.74 1.04 l 2.78 9.33 23.65 35.76 1997 1.71 1.04 l 2.75 9.60 23.92 36.27 1998 1.73 1.13 l 2.86 9.54 24.54 36.93 1999 1.85 1.10 l 2.96 9.78 25.22 37.96

72

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption (Percent) Total Industry Transportation Total | (quads) 1980 34% 27% | 61% 39% 0% 100% | 7.15 1981 34% 28% | 61% 38% 0% 100% | 7.33 1982 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.12 1983 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.34 1984 34% 29% | 63% 37% 0% 100% | 7.80 1985 34% 30% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.93 1986 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.08 1987 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.38 1988 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.80 1989 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.03 1990 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.26 1991 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.42 1992 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.43 1993 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.76 1994 34% 31% | 65% 34% 0% 100% | 10.01 1995 35% 32% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 10.28 1996 35% 32% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.58 1997 34% 33% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.73 1998 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.14 1999 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.30 2000 35% 34% | 69% 31% 0% 100% | 11.67 2001 35% 35% | 70% 29% 0% 100% | 11.58 2002 37% 35% | 71% 29% 0% 100% | 11.82

73

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Shares of U.S. Buildings Generic Quad (Percent) (1) Renewables (2) Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydroelectric Other Total Nuclear Total 1980 37% 18% 29% 7% 3% 10% 6% 100% 1981 37% 15% 31% 6% 4% 10% 7% 100% 1982 36% 13% 31% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1983 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1984 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1985 33% 12% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1986 31% 13% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1987 31% 13% 36% 6% 3% 9% 11% 100% 1988 31% 13% 35% 5% 3% 9% 12% 100% 1989 31% 12% 34% 6% 4% 10% 12% 100% 1990 31% 11% 36% 6% 4% 10% 13% 100% 1991 31% 10% 35% 6% 4% 10% 14% 100% 1992 32% 10% 35% 5% 4% 9% 14% 100% 1993 32% 9% 36% 6% 4% 9% 13% 100% 1994 33% 9% 36% 5% 3% 9% 14% 100% 1995 33% 8% 35% 6% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1996 32% 8% 36% 7% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1997 32% 8% 37% 7% 3% 10% 13% 100% 1998 31% 8% 38% 6% 3% 9% 14% 100% 1999 31% 8% 37% 6% 3% 9% 14% 100% 2000 32% 8% 37% 5% 3% 8% 14% 100% 2001 32% 9% 38% 4% 2% 7% 15% 100% 2002 32% 7% 37% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2003 32% 8% 38% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2004 31%

74

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 World Primary Energy Consumption and Population, by Country/Region 1990-2000 2000-2010 Region/Country 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 Energy Pop. Energy Pop. United States 85.0 99.8 97.8 18.7% 250 282 311 4.6% 1.6% 1.2% -0.2% 1.0% China 27.0 36.4 104.6 20.0% 1,148 1,264 1,343 20.0% 3.0% 1.0% 11.1% 0.6% OECD Europe 69.9 76.8 79.6 15.2% 402 522 550 8.2% 0.9% 2.6% 0.4% 0.5% Other Non-OECD Asia 12.5 20.6 31.3 6.0% 781 1,014 1,086 16.2% 5.1% 2.6% 4.2% 0.7% Russia (1) 61.0 27.2 29.9 5.7% 288 147 140 2.1% -7.7% -6.5% 0.9% -0.5% Central & S. America 14.5 20.8 28.1 5.4% 359 422 462 6.9% 3.7% 1.6% 3.0% 0.9% Middle East 11.2 17.3 27.6 5.3% 135 173 213 3.2% 4.5% 2.5% 4.8% 2.1% Japan 18.8 22.4 20.8 4.0% 124 127 127 1.9% 1.8% 0.3% -0.8% 0.0% India 7.9 13.5 23.8 4.6% 838 1,006 1,214 18.1% 5.5% 1.8% 5.9% 1.9% Canada 11.0 13.1 14.3 2.7% 28 31 34 0.5% 1.8% 1.1% 0.9% 0.9% Oth. Non-OECD Europe 6.4 17.6

75

Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings - Saving Energy in the Retail Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ASHRAE, AIA, DOE, IESNA and USGBC have partnered to produce an advanced energy design guide for use in small retail building applications. The guide contains recommendations for saving 30% energy over the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This paper describes the guide, compares it to a similar guide previously produced for small office buildings, and then presents simulation results demonstrating the energy savings over the 8 climate regions of the U.S.

Jarnagin, Ronald E.; McBride, Merle F.; Colliver, Donald G.

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

77

Public Sector Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capitol dome Capitol dome Public Sector Energy Efficiency Research on sustainable federal operations supports the implementation of sustainable policies and practices in the public sector. This work serves as a bridge between the technology development of Department of Energy's National Laboratories and the operational needs of public sector. Research activities involve many aspects of integrating sustainability into buildings and government practices, including technical assistance for sustainable building design, operations, and maintenance; project financing for sustainable facilities; institutional change in support of sustainability policy goals; and procurement of sustainable products. All of those activities are supported by our work on program and project evaluation, which analyzes overall program effectiveness while ensuring

78

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 12. Market penetration rates of electrochromic windowsmarket penetration level in that year. Keywords: Building energy-efficiency, electrochromic

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Comparative analysis of energy use in China building sector: current status, existing problems and solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy use in buildings has attracted more and more attention due to its significant proportion in the energy pan of the world. China is the second largest energy user, yet the situation of energy use in the C...

Shengyuan Zhang; Xiu Yang; Yi Jiang…

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Energy Use of Wastewater Treatment Plants by Capacity and Treatment Level (kWh per Million Gallons) 1 - 5 - 10 - 20 - 50 - 100 - Note(s): Source(s): 673 1,028 1,188 1,558 The level of treatment indicates the amount of processing involved before water is released from the treatment facility. Primary treatment removes solids and oils from wastewater. Secondary treatment uses biological processes to remove organic material from the water. Tertiary treatment includes additional processes to further refine the water. Nitrification is a process to remove nitrogen from water. Electric Power Research Institute, Water & Sustainability (Volume 4): U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water Supply & Treatment - The Next Half Century,

82

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

83

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

84

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

85

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide"Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely accepted that if the United States is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it must aggressively address energy end use in the building sector. While there have been some notable but modest successes with mandatory and voluntary programs, there have also been puzzling failures to achieve expected savings. Collectively, these programs have not yet reached the majority of the building stock, nor have they yet routinely produced very large savings in individual buildings. Several trends that have the potential to change this are noteworthy: (1) the growing market interest in 'green buildings' and 'sustainable design', (2) the major professional societies (e.g. AIA, ASHRAE) have more aggressively adopted significant improvements in energy efficiency as strategic goals, e.g. targeting 'zero energy', carbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision is widely accepted as desirable, unless there are significant changes to the way buildings are routinely designed, delivered and operated, zero energy buildings will remain a niche phenomenon rather than a sector-wide reality. Toward that end, a public/private coalition including the Alliance to Save Energy, LBNL, AIA, ASHRAE, USGBC and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) are developing an 'action plan' for moving the U.S. commercial building sector towards zero energy performance. It addresses regional action in a national framework; integrated deployment, demonstration and R&D threads; and would focus on measurable, visible performance indicators. This paper outlines this action plan, focusing on the challenge, the key themes, and the strategies and actions leading to substantial reductions in GHG emissions by 2030.

Selkowitz, Stephen; Selkowitz, Stephen; Granderson, Jessica; Haves, Philip; Mathew, Paul; Harris, Jeff

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Modeling distributed generation Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. July 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors 1

87

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4%...

88

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

even further. These “net zero energybuildings (ZEB) followperformance goals for net zero energy buildings. There are abuilding site: a net zero energy building is characterized

Selkowitz, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Washington,Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Washington,Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Washington,

Selkowitz, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

BetterBuildings Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the Commercial Sector - Part 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Small Commercial Energy Efficiency Finance Programs Sponsored by State Governments SURVEY OF SURVEY OF SMALL COMMERCIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY FINANCE PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY STATE GOVERNMENTS May 3, 2011 Background of Small Commercial Finance Program Survey  Includes 20 States ( (mostly y identified from database of state incentives for renewable energy, DSIRE)  Sponsoring programs for:  small commercial (generally defined as 30,000 square feet or less and/or 150 kW or less) or   both small and large commercial sectors both small and large commercial sectors  Discussions with program managers   Creation of a table of program elements Creation of a table of program elements

92

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand BtuSF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A....

93

BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 2 Demand-Side Efficiency Technologies I. Energy Management Systems (EMSsLBL-33887 UC-000 BUILDINGS SECTOR DEMAND-SIDE EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY SUMMARIES Jonathan G. Koomey

94

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption 8.4 WaterSense 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter includes data on water use in commercial and residential buildings and the energy needed to supply that water. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In 2005, water use in the buildings sector was estimated at 39.6 billion gallons per day, which is nearly 10% of total water use in the United States. From 1985 to 2005, water use in the residential sector closely tracked population growth, while water use in the commercial sector grew almost twice as fast.

95

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available from authors. DOE EERE. High Performance BuildingsProgram: Building Database. DOE EERE; August Available from:buildings/database/. DOE EERE. State Energy Alternatives:

Selkowitz, Stephen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions 3.5 Commercial Builders and Construction 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities 3.9 Educational Facilities 3.10 Hotels/Motels 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 3 focuses on energy use in the commercial sector. Section 3.1 covers primary and site energy consumption in commercial buildings, as well as the delivered energy intensities of various building types and end uses. Section 3.2 provides data on various characteristics of the commercial sector, including floorspace, building types, ownership, and lifetimes. Section 3.3 provides data on commercial building expenditures, including energy prices. Section 3.4 covers environmental emissions from the commercial sector. Section 3.5 briefly addresses commercial building construction and retrofits. Sections 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10 provide details on select commercial buildings types, specifically office and retail space, medical facilities, educational facilities, and hotels and motels.

97

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

99

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: A literature review and a preliminary characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of those in the mix of industries elsewhere in the US. Many California firms operate small and medium-sized facilities, often in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services'' to provide occupant comfort and necessities (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. In this report, published or unpublished information on energy use for building services in the industrial sector have been compiled and analyzed. Seven different sources of information and data relevant to California have been identified. Most of these are studies and/or projects sponsored by the Department of Energy, the California Energy Commission, and local utilities. The objectives of these studies were diverse: most focused on industrial energy use in general, and, in one case, the objective was to analyze energy use in commercial buildings. Only one of these studies focused directly on non-process energy use in industrial buildings. Our analysis of Northern California data for five selected industries shows that the contribution of total electricity consumption for lighting ranges from 9.5% in frozen fruits to 29.1% in instruments; for air-conditioning, it ranges from nonexistent in frozen fruits to 35% in instrument manufacturing. None of the five industries selected had significant electrical space heating. Gas space heating ranges from 5% in motor vehicles facilities to more than 58% in the instrument manufacturing industry. 15 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.; Gadgil, A.; Sezgen, O.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

102

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

103

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

104

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

105

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet.

106

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the US EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (2: US commercial building stock energy consumption and floorof time varying energy consumption in the US commercial

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Better Buildings Alliance for the Public Sector | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Alliance for the Public Sector Better Buildings Alliance for the Public Sector Better Buildings Alliance for the Public Sector Webinar. Presentation More Documents...

108

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercialof questions. The building stock modeling work outlined indetailed modeling of individual buildings). Beyond meeting

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

110

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.01 1.01 11.4% | 3.05 3.05 16.7% Space Heating 1.69 0.20 0.06 0.11 0.17 2.23 25.2% | 0.50 2.57 14.1% Space Cooling 0.04 0.51 0.54 6.1% | 1.52 1.56 8.6% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.62 1.62 8.9% Refrigeration 0.35 0.35 4.0% | 1.06 1.06 5.8% Electronics 0.32 0.32 3.6% | 0.95 0.95 5.2% Water Heating 0.48 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.63 7.1% | 0.27 0.81 4.5% Computers 0.19 0.19 2.1% | 0.57 0.57 3.1% Cooking 0.19 0.02 0.21 2.4% | 0.07 0.26 1.4% Other (5) 0.33 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.81 1.35 15.2% | 2.45 2.99 16.4% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 16.9% | 1.90 2.77 15.2% Total 3.33 0.43 0.14 0.11 0.15 4.63 8.88 100% | 13.99 18.23 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.35 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

111

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% | 1.01 1.06 4.8% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.18 0.43 3.7% | 0.57 0.81 3.7% Computers 0.17 0.17 1.5% | 0.53 0.53 2.4% Other (8) 0.00 0.16 0.01 0.20 0.37 3.2% | 0.63 0.80 3.6% Adjust to SEDS (9) 0.42 0.42 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.8% Total 5.06 0.63 0.56 0.04 0.45 4.95 11.69 100% | 15.34 22.07 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.42 quad), solar water heating (0.01

112

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% | 0.95 1.01 4.3% Cooking 0.23 0.02 0.15 0.40 3.3% | 0.44 0.69 2.9% Computers 0.27 0.27 2.2% | 0.79 0.79 3.3% Other (8) 0.00 0.22 0.07 1.48 1.77 14.6% | 4.35 4.64 19.6% Total 4.76 0.35 0.51 0.03 0.55 5.94 12.14 100% | 17.50 23.69 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.44 quad), solar water heating (0.02

113

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% | 0.91 0.98 4.4% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.13 0.38 3.2% | 0.40 0.64 2.9% Computers 0.24 0.24 2.0% | 0.72 0.72 3.2% Other (8) 0.00 0.20 0.07 1.20 1.46 12.5% | 3.61 3.87 17.3% Total 4.88 0.43 0.50 0.03 1.00 5.30 11.69 100% | 16.00 22.39 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

114

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% | 0.98 1.04 5.0% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.11 0.36 3.1% | 0.34 0.59 2.8% Computers 0.19 0.19 1.7% | 0.57 0.57 2.7% Other (8) 0.00 0.17 0.05 0.94 1.17 10.2% | 2.85 3.07 14.6% Total 4.99 0.55 0.51 0.03 0.51 4.79 11.38 100% | 14.47 21.06 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

115

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.08 1.08 11.3% | 3.27 3.27 16.3% Space Heating 1.68 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.20 23.1% | 0.49 2.53 12.6% Ventilation 0.60 0.60 6.2% | 1.80 1.80 9.0% Space Cooling 0.03 0.52 0.55 5.7% | 1.56 1.59 7.9% Electronics 0.40 0.40 4.2% | 1.22 1.22 6.1% Refrigeration 0.34 0.34 3.6% | 1.02 1.02 5.1% Water Heating 0.52 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.67 7.0% | 0.27 0.85 4.2% Computers 0.20 0.20 2.1% | 0.60 0.60 3.0% Cooking 0.21 0.02 0.23 2.4% | 0.07 0.27 1.4% Other (5) 0.48 0.01 0.15 0.05 0.01 1.12 1.82 19.1% | 3.39 4.09 20.3% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 15.3% | 2.09 2.85 14.2% Total 3.50 0.41 0.15 0.12 0.15 5.23 9.56 100% | 15.77 20.10 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.33 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (less than 0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

117

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.15 1.15 11.1% | 3.40 3.40 15.6% Space Heating 1.65 0.18 0.06 0.11 0.16 2.16 20.8% | 0.48 2.48 11.3% Ventilation 0.65 0.65 6.2% | 1.91 1.91 8.7% Space Cooling 0.03 0.54 0.57 5.5% | 1.59 1.62 7.4% Electronics 0.46 0.46 4.5% | 1.37 1.37 6.3% Refrigeration 0.36 0.36 3.4% | 1.05 1.05 4.8% Water Heating 0.54 0.03 0.04 0.09 0.70 6.8% | 0.25 0.87 4.0% Computers 0.22 0.22 2.1% | 0.64 0.64 2.9% Cooking 0.22 0.02 0.25 2.4% | 0.06 0.29 1.3% Other (5) 0.81 0.01 0.16 0.06 0.01 1.46 2.51 24.2% | 4.30 5.35 24.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 13.1% | 2.28 2.86 13.1% Total 3.65 0.40 0.16 0.12 0.16 5.89 10.38 100% | 17.33 21.83 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.32 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

118

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5 18.19 186.1 1994 98.7 N.A. 105.2 18.08 183.2 1995 100.0 N.A. 104.6 18.49 185.0 1996 101.0 N.A. 110.2 19.48 192.9 1997 102.2 N.A. 104.4 18.94 185.3 1998 103.5 N.A. 98.9 18.93 182.8 1999 104.9 N.A. 101.5 19.53 186.1 2000 105.7 N.A. 105.6 20.37 192.7 2001 107.0 1.7% 102.1 20.01 187.0 2002 105.0 3.3% 106.6 20.75 197.7 2003 105.6 5.2% 109.2 21.07 199.6 2004 106.6 7.1% 106.6 21.06 197.6 2005 108.8 9.0% 105.7 21.59

119

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Lighting 1.19 1.19 13.6% | 3.69 3.69 20.2% Space Heating 1.65 0.22 0.06 0.11 0.28 2.33 26.6% | 0.88 2.93 16.0% Space Cooling 0.04 0.84 0.88 10.1% | 2.60 2.64 14.5% Ventilation 0.54 0.54 6.1% | 1.66 1.66 9.1% Refrigeration 0.39 0.39 4.5% | 1.21 1.21 6.6% Water Heating 0.44 0.03 0.03 0.09 0.58 6.7% | 0.28 0.78 4.3% Electronics 0.26 0.26 3.0% | 0.81 0.81 4.4% Computers 0.21 0.21 2.4% | 0.66 0.66 3.6% Cooking 0.18 0.02 0.20 2.3% | 0.07 0.25 1.4% Other (5) 0.30 0.01 0.14 0.05 0.01 0.69 1.20 13.7% | 2.13 2.64 14.5% Adjust to SEDS (6) 0.68 0.25 0.02 0.95 10.9% | 0.06 0.99 5.4% Total 3.29 0.52 0.14 0.12 0.14 4.54 8.74 100% | 14.05 18.26 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes (0.43 quad) distillate fuel oil and (0.08 quad) residual fuel oil. 2) Kerosene (0.01 quad) and coal (0.06 quad) are assumed

120

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

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121

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new buildings after 2020 are net-zero energy, but note thatRamping up to net-zero energy new buildings by 2020 and a

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

123

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Henry C. Foley Henry C. Foley April 3, 2013 Presentation at the U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office Peer Review Meeting Purpose and Objectives * Problem Statement - Building energy efficiency has not increased in recent decades compared to other sectors especially transportation - Building component technologies have become more energy efficient but buildings as a whole have not * Impact of Project - A 20% reduction in commercial building energy use could save the nation four quads of energy annually * Project Focus - This is more than a technological challenge; the technology needed to achieve a 10% reduction in building energy use exists - The Hub approach is to comprehensively and systematically address

124

Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the Commercial Sector Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Financing Energy Efficiency Retrofits in the Commercial Sector Webinar, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings program.

125

Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in thea commitment to delivering net-zero energy new (and in someplan calls for net-zero energy commercial buildings by

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparison o f energy consumption i n housing (1998) (Trends i n household energy consumption (Jyukankyo Research4) Average (N=2976) Energy consumption [GJ / household-year

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and techniques. The goal is to enable the nation to cut energy use in the commercial buildings sector by 20% by 2020.

129

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Supermarkets in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use Toilets/Urinals Other/Misc. Indoor (2) Cooling Total Building Size (SF) Benchmarking Values for Supermarkets (3) N Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/year 38 Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/daily transaction 38 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 52 - 64 9 - 16 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Includes water for sinks, spraying vegetables, cleaning, etc. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of

130

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n g s 2.1 Total Energy Consumption i n Japan's Residentialhouses. 2.1 Total Energy Consumption in Japan's Residentialorder to reduce total energy consumption. Figure 2 suggests

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e d u c i n g Primary Energy Consumption and C O 2 emissionssystem can reduce primary energy consumption by about 22system can reduce primary energy consumption by about 26

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from household energy consumption i n Japan increased b y 20is that household energy consumption i n Japan has notfrom a l l households i n Japan, through 2050 (with energy-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

134

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

135

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

136

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Hotels in Western United States (Gallons per Room per Year) (1) Fixture/End Use Bathtub (2) Faucets Showers Toilets Leaks Laundry Ice making (3) Other/misc. indoor Total Indoor Use Number of Rooms Logged average daily use, kgal: Peak instantaneous demand, gpm: Benchmarking Values for Hotels N Indoor Use, gal./day/occupied room 98 Cooling Use, gal./year/occupied room 97 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 60 - 115 7,400 - 41,600 Based on four budget hotels and one luxury hotel. Three budget hotels in Southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. Luxury hotel in Los Angeles, CA. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Based on one hotel. 3) Based on three hotels. 5) The

137

Danish Government - Sector Programmes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government - Sector Programmes Government - Sector Programmes Jump to: navigation, search Name Danish Government - Sector Programmes Agency/Company /Organization Danish Government Partner Danish Ministry for Climate, Energy, and Building; The Danish Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Wind Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Policies/deployment programs Program End 2012 Country South Africa, Vietnam Southern Africa, South-Eastern Asia References Denmark[1] Promoting wind energy in South Africa and energy efficiency in Vietnam (subject to parliamentary approval) References ↑ "Denmark" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Danish_Government_-_Sector_Programmes&oldid=580876" Category: Programs

138

Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honest Buildings Honest Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Honest Buildings Agency/Company /Organization: Honest Buildings Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.honestbuildings.com/ Web Application Link: www.honestbuildings.com/ Cost: Free Honest Buildings Screenshot References: Honest Buildings[1] Logo: Honest Buildings Honest Buildings is a software platform focused on buildings. It brings together building service providers, occupants, owners, and other stakeholders onto a single portal to exchange information, offerings, and needs. It provides a voice for everyone who occupies buildings, works with buildings, and owns buildings globally to comment, display projects, and

139

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

140

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and C O Reduction i n District Heating and C o o l i n g . "Energy Efficiency o f District Heating and C o o l i n g byP o w e r Generation/District Heating and C o o l i n g

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Buildings Sector Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency 1

142

Energy Analysis by Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Energy Analysis by Sector Energy Analysis by Sector Manufacturers often rely on energy-intensive technologies and processes. AMO conducts a range of analyses to explore energy use...

143

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Regulations Resource Center About Building Energy Codes U.S. Energy Consumption by Sector (2011) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Annual, U.S. residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in significant cost savings in both the private and public sectors of the U.S. economy. Efficient buildings reduce power demand and have less of an environmental impact. The Purpose of Building Energy Codes Energy codes and standards set minimum efficiency requirements for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and emissions over

144

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Build an energy management program | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Build an energy management program Build an energy management program Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Advance your energy program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

146

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures 2.4 Residential Environmental Data 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market 2.6 Residential Home Improvements 2.7 Multi-Family Housing 2.8 Industrialized Housing 2.9 Low-Income Housing 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 2 focuses on energy use in the U.S. residential buildings sector. Section 2.1 provides data on energy consumption by fuel type and end use, as well as energy consumption intensities for different housing categories. Section 2.2 presents characteristics of average households and changes in the U.S. housing stock over time. Sections 2.3 and 2.4 address energy-related expenditures and residential sector emissions, respectively. Section 2.5 contains statistics on housing construction, existing home sales, and mortgages. Section 2.6 presents data on home improvement spending and trends. Section 2.7 describes the industrialized housing industry, including the top manufacturers of various manufactured home products. Section 2.8 presents information on low-income housing and Federal weatherization programs. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

147

Energy Sector Market Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Windows and Building Envelope | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and market challenges in the windows and building envelope sector. Image: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Read more Insulation and Window Projects Named as Top Energy...

149

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

150

Building Energy Modeling  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building energy simulation—physics-based calculation of building energy consumption—is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency.

151

Barriers to the adoption of energy-saving technologies in the building sector: A survey study of Jing-jin-tang, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The building sector of China currently consumes 20% of the total energy consumption. Studies on barriers to the adoption of building energy-saving technologies are of great significance on implementing policies related to achieving energy-saving goals. This paper studied 15 barriers with the aid of information collected through questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The respondents were 135 employees working in the Jing-jin-tang area. Based on the results of the factor analysis, the barriers were categorized into five groups: attitudes of stakeholders, policies and regulations, auxiliary resources, profitability, and adaptability of the technologies. Analysis of the entire sample showed that the stakeholders’ reluctance to use was the largest barrier, followed by high initial investment and low profitability. Further analysis showed that the occupation and designation of the respondents and the size of the enterprises that they served influenced their perspectives on the barriers. It was found that architects attributed more importance to the adoption of energy-saving technologies than contractors; barriers confronted by employees of large enterprises and small enterprises were different; managers perceived weaker barriers than frontline employees and were more optimistic about the prospect of building energy-saving technologies. Finally, policy recommendations were proposed based on these in-depth and targeted analyses.

Ping Du; Li-Qun Zheng; Bai-Chen Xie; Arjun Mahalingam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

153

Better Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Better Buildings Better Buildings Last year, commercial and industrial buildings used roughly 50% of the energy in the U.S. economy at a cost of over $400 billion. These buildings and operations can be made much more efficient using a variety of cost effective efficiency improvements while creating jobs and building a stronger economy. We have similar opportunities in our homes. In February 2011, President Obama, building upon the investments of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, announced the Better Buildings Initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency. Better Buildings strategies include: Last year, commercial and industrial buildings used roughly 50% of the

154

Building Energy Code | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Code Code Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial and/or residential construction to adhere to certain energy standards. While some governmental bodies have developed their own building energy codes, many use existing codes, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), developed and published by the International Code Council (ICC); or ASHRAE 90.1, developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). A few local building energy codes require certain commercial facilities to meet green building standards. [1] Building Energy Code Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 85) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

155

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

156

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

157

Making the Market Right for Environmentally Sound Energy-Efficient Technologies: U.S. Buildings Sector Successes that Might Work in Developing Countries and Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Standards for Appliances, Equipment, and Buildings Golden Carrots: Motivating New Products that Beat the Standards Revenue-Neutral "Feebates" for Whole Buildings,

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Energy Savers [EERE]

DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

159

Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development...

160

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial 13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to use several diverse approaches to purchase or acquire energy savings from commercial sector buildings region wide. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Final Environmental Assessment Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Finding of No Significant Impact Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Introduction to the Buildings Sector Module of SEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ma. CBECS, Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey,R. , and Lai, J. – A Buildings Module for the Stochasticon Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 17 – 22, 2008,

DeForest, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance  

Energy Savers [EERE]

JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

163

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage technology (thermal energy storage, TES). Accordingmight benefit from Thermal Energy Storage (TES). Include

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Dose assessment from domestic building materials used in housing sector in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......domestic building materials used in housing sector in Serbia M. Petrovic 1 D...domestic building materials used in a housing sector are presented. Natural radionuclides...is the efficiency, from the curve of energy efficiency. The activity concentration of mentioned......

M. Petrovi?; D. Vu?i?; J. Karamarkovi?

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

City of San Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy City of San Jose - Private Sector Green Building Policy < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of San Jose In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet certain green building requirements in order to receive a building permit. Requirements are dependent on the size and type of the project. * Tier 1 Commercial Projects include commercial industrial projects

166

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

167

Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House graphic...

168

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score - 2014 BTO Peer Review...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory One of the primary market barriers to enhancing energy efficiency in the commercial building sector is that building owners and investors...

169

Building Energy Codes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Codes Codes Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial and/or residential construction to adhere to certain energy standards. While some governmental bodies have developed their own building energy codes, many use existing codes, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), developed and published by the International Code Council (ICC); or ASHRAE 90.1, developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). A few local building energy codes require certain commercial facilities to meet green building standards. [1] Contents 1 Building Energy Code Incentives 2 References Building Energy Code Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 85) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

170

Department of Energy Releases New Report on Energy Sector Vulnerablities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Sector Energy Sector Vulnerablities Department of Energy Releases New Report on Energy Sector Vulnerablities July 11, 2013 - 7:00am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy released a new report which assesses how America's critical energy and electricity infrastructure is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Historically high temperatures in recent years have been accompanied by droughts and extreme heat waves, more wildfires than usual, and several intense storms that caused power and fuel disruptions for millions of people. These trends are expected to continue, which could further impact energy systems critical to the nation's economy. The U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather report, which builds on President Obama's Climate Action Plan,

171

Better Buildings Alliance for the Public Sector  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scoring Tool Buildings Performance Database Green Button Data Access Map Real Estate appraisal work 3 Make public, commercial, and industrial buildings 20% more...

172

Refining building energy modeling through aggregate analysis and probabilistic methods associated with occupant presence.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The building sector represents the largest energy consumer among the United States' end use sectors. As a result, the public and private sector will continue… (more)

Stoppel, Christopher Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Title Market Assessment of Public Sector Energy Efficiency Potential in India Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Iyer, Maithili, and Jayant A. Sathaye Date Published 10-Mar Publisher LBNL Keywords energy efficiency, india, market assessment Abstract The purpose of this study is to assess, with limited resources, the potential for improving energy efficiency in public buildings by providing preliminary estimates of the size of the public sector buildings market, the patterns of energy use in public buildings, and the opportunity for reducing energy use in public buildings. This report estimates the size of this market and the potential for carbon savings with conservative assumptions requiring moderate investment towards efficiency improvement in public sector buildings-here defined as the sum of the public sector commercial and institutional buildings as characterized by the Ministry of Statistics and Program Implementation (MOSPI). Information from this study will be provided to the World Bank and the BEE to assist them in designing effective energy efficiency programs for public buildings

174

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

still appears important. Electric motor energy consumpt1m isHeat Space Heat Electric Motors Hot Water Miscellaneous PG&EHeat Space Heat Electric Motors Hot Water Miscellaneous PG&E

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no Energy Use Intensity (EUI) determinations or efficiencyindustry has the highest EUI f2r gas: approximately 4002 . Meat Packing shows a gas EUI of only about 200 KBtu/ft .

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY UTILIZATION AUDIT (EUA) INDUSTRIAL DATA BASE 2 The EVA data base contains auditorenergy sources possibly in use and different activities facility to facility, or pos- sibly of incorrect perceptions by the auditors,

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

CDM as a Solution for the Present World Energy Problems (An Overview with Respect to the Building and Construction Sector)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Insulated glazing and selective glazing films ? Night and cold-weather movable insulation ? On site electric power generation by renewable energy in the form of photovoltaics (PV) ? Wind generators ? Micro-hydro (either with fully-independent systems...

Sudarsan, N.; Jayaraj, S.; Sreekanth, K. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

179

Buildings Technologies Deployment | Clean energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Technologies Deployment Building Technologies Deployment SHARE Building Technologies Deployment benchmarking commercial buildings Once building technologies emerge and become commercially available, only in exceptional cases does robust market uptake automatically follow. Additional efforts remain to ensure that emerging and under-utilized technologies are successfully deployed to the fullest extent possible. ORNL helps optimize the energy performance of buildings and industrial processes by moving technologies to full use in residential, commercial, and industrial sectors through applications research, technical assistance, and a variety of deployment strategies. The team's comprehensive knowledge of buildings and energy use spans multi-building sites, whole-buildings, systems, components, and multi-level

180

Insights into Improving the Energy Performance of Buildings Taken from UK Case Studies in the Domestic and Education Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, schools, supermarkets and houses have shown levels of 30 to 50 % of heat loss could be attributed to air leakage.? [Knutson, 2008] Studies conducted on a typical modern Finnish detached house in Finland indicate infiltration causes about 15... analyses for Finnish detached houses Helsinki University of Technology, HVAC Laboratory, Finland Knutson.J, 2008. Air leakage a major contributor to energy loss. Available from: http://www.a-aexteriors.com NHBC, 2008. Air Leakage Testing and EPCs...

Bunker, G.; Wright, A.; Greenough, R.; Shao, L.; Hernandez, J.; Kerrigan, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

182

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...

183

Model Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

184

Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For...

185

Building Energy Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

186

Building Energy Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

187

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections.

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

189

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

190

Midwest Building Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Stacey Paradis Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance sparadis@mwalliance.org 312-784-7267 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Purpose * Reduce Energy Use in New Construction (Energy Codes) * Reduce Energy Use in Existing Construction (Benchmarking) Objectives * Technical Assistance to States In Midwest Adopt Latest Model Energy Codes * Foster Maximum Compliance with Current Energy Codes

191

Whole Building Energy Simulation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Whole building energy simulation, also referred to as energy modeling, can and should be incorporated early during project planning to provide energy impact feedback for which design considerations...

192

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

193

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area, energy use intensity (EUI) by fuel type, maintenanceas (e.g. floor area) and (e.g. EUI). This is the basic dataattributes are floor area, EUI broken down by fuel type and

Coffey, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

195

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 6 focuses on the U.S. energy supply. Sections 6.1 and 6.2 contain data on electric utilities, including generation capacity, primary fuel consumption, transmission and distribution losses, and electricity prices. Section 6.3 addresses the production, consumption, and storage of natural gas and petroleum. Section 6.4 covers emissions from the utility sector. Section 6.5 provides data on how utilities spend public and system benefit funds. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

196

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made in the energy efficiency of buildings. Better cost dataimproving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressedimprovement of energy efficiency in buildings are briefly

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.iea.org/papers/pathways/buildings_certification.pdf Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Screenshot References: nergy Performance Certification of Buildings[1] Logo: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency

198

Building Energy Tools Software Directory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Energy Tools Software Directory Building Energy Tools Software Directory Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Building Energy Tools Software Directory Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/ References: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/tools_directory/ Logo: Building Energy Tools Software Directory This directory provides information on 388 building software tools for evaluating energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability in buildings. The energy tools listed in this directory include databases,

199

Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013...

200

Autotune Building Energy Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Autotune Building Energy Models Autotune Building Energy Models Joshua New Oak Ridge National Laboratory newjr@ornl.gov, 865-241-8783 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * "All (building energy) models are wrong, but some are useful" - 22%-97% different from utility data for 3,349 buildings * More accurate models are more useful - Error from inputs and algorithms for practical reasons - Useful for cost-effective energy efficiency (EE) at speed and scale

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

202

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Better Buildings Challenge | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings » Better Buildings Challenge Commercial Buildings » Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Challenge Photo of the Atlanta skyline on a sunny day, including the gold dome of the state capitol. The Better Buildings Challenge is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Initiative, which aims to make U.S. commercial and industrial buildings at least 20% more efficient during the next decade. To achieve this aggressive target, DOE is working with public and private sector partners that commit to being leaders in energy efficiency. These partners will implement energy savings practices that improve energy efficiency and save money, and will showcase effective strategies and the results of their efforts. The Better Buildings Challenge supports commercial and industrial building

204

Buildings Energy Databook  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 BUILDINGS 2 BUILDINGS ENERGY DATABOOK U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Buildings Energy Databook The United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has developed this Buildings Energy Databook to provide a current and accurate set of comprehensive buildings-related data and to promote the use of such data for consistency throughout DOE programs. The Databook is considered an evolving document as it will be will be periodically updated and additional data will be incorporated. Users are requested to submit additional data (e.g., more current, widely accepted, and/or better documented data) and suggested changes to the contacts below. Please provide full source references along with all data.

205

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Improved Building Energy Consumption with the Help of Modern ICT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kyoto process and the global combat against climate change will require more intensive energy saving efforts especially in all developed countries. Key for the success in building sector is the energy efficiency of the existing building stock...

Pietilainen, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Current and Past EditionsGlossaryPopular TablesQuery Tools Contact Us Current and Past EditionsGlossaryPopular TablesQuery Tools Contact Us Search What Is the Buildings Energy Data Book? The Data Book includes statistics on residential and commercial building energy consumption. Data tables contain statistics related to construction, building technologies, energy consumption, and building characteristics. The Building Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy developed this resource to provide a current and accurate set of comprehensive buildings- and energy-related data. The Data Book is an evolving document and is updated periodically. Each data table is presented in HTML, Microsoft Excel, and PDF formats. Download Excel Viewer Download Adobe Reader

208

Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt)- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored BEopt software, which ensures a consistent analysis platform and accurate simulations. Many BEopt algorithms have been adopted by private-sector HERS software tools that have helped improve the energy efficiency of tens-of-thousands of ENERGY STAR-certified homes.

209

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results yield national totals for commercial buildings. For more information on CBECS, visit EIA's website. Location Census Division View Map New England West North Central West South Central Middle Atlantic South Atlantic Mountain East North Central East South Central Pacific

210

Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth in Ukraine AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Development Programme Sector Energy,...

211

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects AgencyCompany Organization: International Centre for Trade and...

212

Building Efficiency Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States - more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials, components and energy management systems are enabling progress in reducing the nation's energy consumption and consequent greenhouse gas emissions with payback periods as low as 24 months. With responsibility and funding for the nation's largest set of building energy-related research, development and deployment programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) should lead efforts to ensure building energy efficiency is a national priority. One of the most important things DOE can do to reduce the country's energy use and dependence on fossil fuels is to actively lead the national

213

Building Efficiency Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Building Efficiency Report Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States - more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials, components and energy management systems are enabling progress in reducing the nation's energy consumption and consequent greenhouse gas emissions with payback periods as low as 24 months. With responsibility and funding for the nation's largest set of building energy-related research, development and deployment programs, the Department of Energy (DOE) should lead efforts to ensure building energy efficiency is a national priority. One of the most important things DOE can do to reduce the country's energy use and dependence on fossil fuels is to actively lead the national

214

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products. Similarly, “Biomass” energy use is now availableelectricity imports and biomass energy represent 2 percentresources, coal, and biomass energy sources. In total, CALEB

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large quantity of geothermal energy that is shown as supply.largest supply is geothermal energy representing 6 percent,5 percent in 1990. Geothermal energy also decreased slightly

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May California Energy Commission (CEC). 2002. Inventory ofCalifornia, California Energy Commission, November. 600- 02-Forecast. California Energy Commission. CEC-200-2009-012-

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Working to Achieve Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Working to Achieve Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector Working to Achieve Cybersecurity in the Energy Sector Presentation covers cybersecurity in the energy sector and is given at...

218

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Building Equipment

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: BuildingComparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Buildingof comparing three Building Energy Modeling Programs (BEMPs)

Zhu, Dandan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

02-001F. CEC. 2005. Energy Demand Forecast Methods Report.CEC. 2007. California Energy Demand 2008-2018, Staff RevisedT. Gorin. 2009. California Energy Demand 2010-2020, Adopted

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change in the Final Energy Use Mix of California Industry,California industry energy use mix in 1997 and 2008. ThisChange in the Final Energy Use Mix of California Industry,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Building Energy Efficient Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many new school buildings consume only half the energy required by similar efficient structures designed without energy performance as a design criterion. These are comfortable and efficient while construction costs remain about the same as those...

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Most Popular Tables PDFXLS 3.1.4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type PDFXLS 1.1.1 U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption PDFXLS...

224

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about… (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Communicating Building Energy Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communicating Building Energy Performance Communicating Building Energy Performance Speaker(s): William Bordass Date: August 26, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Paul Mathew The heightened interest in building energy performance has exposed problems with reporting and benchmarking. Established conventions may no longer suit current needs, and new complications are emerging as national and corporate reporting (e.g. for carbon accounting and trading) begin to impact on the certification and labelling of building energy performance. If we are to achieve genuinely low-energy and carbon buildings, we need to get much better at reporting and benchmarking our intentions and outcomes, and particularly making performance visible and communicating it to all the people concerned. In design, this could help us to reduce the persistent

226

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

227

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

228

DOE Issues Energy Sector Cyber Organization NOI  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent Issues National Energy Sector Cyber Organization Notice of Intent February 11, 2010 The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) announced on Jan. 7 that it intends to issue a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a National Energy Sector Cyber Organization, envisioned as a partnership between the federal government and energy sector stakeholders to protect the bulk power electric grid and aid the integration of smart grid technology to enhance the security of the grid. The cyber organization is expected to have the knowledge, expertise, capabilities, and capacity, at a minimum to: * Identify and prioritize cyber security research and development issues.

229

Commercial Building Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Partnerships Building Partnerships Commercial Building Partnerships Image shows a well-lit, warehouse-like produce section of a Whole Foods store. Much of the lighting in the photo eminates from windows along the left side of the photo. The Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) initiative is demonstrating dramatic energy savings in commercial buildings. Through this cost-shared initiative, partner organizations team with Building Technologies Office (BTO) representatives and others to improve energy efficiency in new and existing buildings. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory staff and private-sector technical experts provide energy analysis support and engineering expertise to explore energy-saving ideas and strategies. Organizations not involved with CBP will benefit from the lessons learned,

230

Energy Department Announces Building Energy Efficiency Investments...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Announces Building Energy Efficiency Investments in Twenty-Two States Energy Department Announces Building Energy Efficiency Investments in Twenty-Two States June...

231

Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is for the Building Technologies program webinar titled Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings delivered on July 25, 2011.

232

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9Market Transformation 9Market Transformation 9.1 ENERGY STAR 9.2 LEED 9.3 Certification Programs 9.4 High Performance Buildings Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter contains data on two market transformation programs that reach across the United States and to other countries: the ENERGY STAR program, jointly administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. It also includes data on three professional certifications and five case studies of high performance buildings. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

233

Building Energy Modeling Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling (BEM) Modeling (BEM) Library TDM - Amir Roth Ellen Franconi Rocky Mountain Institute Efranconi@rmi.org 303-567-8609 April 2, 2013 Photo by : Dennis Schroeder, NREL 23250 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Project Overview Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Library * Define and develop a best-practices BEM knowledge repository to improve modeling consistency and address training gaps * Raise energy modeling industry "techniques" to the same

234

energy use by sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use by sector use by sector Dataset Summary Description Statistics New Zealand conducted and published results of an energy use survey across industry and trade sectors to evaluate energy use in 2009. The data includes: energy use by fuel type and industry (2009); petrol and diesel purchasing and end use by industry (2009); energy saving initiatives by industry (2009); and areas identified as possibilities for less energy use (2009). Source Statistics New Zealand Date Released October 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords diesel energy savings energy use by sector New Zealand petrol Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon New Zealand Energy Use Survey: Industrial and Trade Sectors (xls, 108 KiB) application/zip icon Energy Use Survey (zip, 127 KiB) Quality Metrics

235

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Agency/Company /Organization: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry, Transportation Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual Website: ictsd.org/downloads/2010/06/synthesis-re-transport-buildings.pdf Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Screenshot

236

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy efficiency. Intelligent Buildings, 3:43-46, 2011. InM. Bhandari. Comparison of Building Energy Use Data betweenand China, Energy and Buildings, 2013. Under reviewed. 5. T.

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance - Notice of Public Comment: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 177, September 12, 2014 Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework...

238

Photonic Sensing Technology in the Energy Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of photonic sensing technologies based on spectroscopic, fiber optics, and LIDAR technologies used in energy sector for measurement and monitoring applications in wind, oil...

Mendez, Alexis

239

Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and government. In developing this guidance, the Energy Department collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council and the...

240

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

242

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for...

243

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.2 Windows 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment 5.4 Water Heaters 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems 5.6 Lighting 5.7 Appliances 5.8 Active Solar Systems 5.9 On-Site Power 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 5 contains market and technology data on building materials and equipment. Sections 5.1 and 5.2 cover the building envelope, including building assemblies, insulation, windows, and roofing. Sections 5.3 through 5.7 cover equipment used in buildings, including space heating, water heating, space cooling, lighting, thermal distribution (ventilation and hydronics), and appliances. Sections 5.8 and 5.9 focus on energy production from on-site power equipment. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

244

Buildings and Climate Change | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings and Climate Change Buildings and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Buildings and Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/SBCI-BCCSummary.pdf Buildings and Climate Change Screenshot References: Buildings and Climate Change[1] "This report - Buildings & Climate Change: A Summary for Decision-makers draws together the findings of three years of research by UNEP's Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative (SBCI) and it's partners. It sets out priority actions that can be taken by policy makers and industry

245

Industrial energy management information center | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy management information center energy management information center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

246

Communicate energy efficiency | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communicate energy efficiency Communicate energy efficiency Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

247

Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing Success Stories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) successes in converting tax dollars into more efficient energy solutions for our nation's buildings and manufacturing supply lines mean large-scale energy and cost savings. Learn how EERE's investments in energy solutions for homes, buildings, manufacturing, and the federal energy management sector translate into significant cost savings and a reduction in fossil fuel use.

248

Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings Buildings Buildings EERE leads a robust network of researchers and other partners to continually develop cost-effective energy-saving solutions that help make our country run better through increased efficiency — promoting better plants, manufacturing processes, and products; more efficient new homes and improved older homes; and other solutions to enhance the buildings in which we work, shop, and lead our everyday lives. EERE leads a robust network of researchers and other partners to continually develop cost-effective energy-saving solutions that help make our country run better through increased efficiency - promoting better plants, manufacturing processes, and products; more efficient new homes and improved older homes; and other solutions to enhance the buildings in which

249

Building Energy Use Benchmarking | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Data Management Building Energy Use Benchmarking Building Energy Use Benchmarking Benchmarking is the practice of comparing the measured performance of a device, process,...

250

Buildings Energy Data Book | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Energy Data Book Buildings Energy Data Book Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Buildings Energy Data Book Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: buildingsdatabook.eere.energy.gov/ Country: United States Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Better Indoor Climate With Less Energy: European Energy Performance of Building Directive (EPBD)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Commission's Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (2000) indicated the need for specific measures in the building sector. In response, the European Commission (EC) published the proposed Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings...

Magyar, Z.; Leitner, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BUILDING BUILDING ENERGY ASSET RATING WORKSHOP December 8-9, 2011 Washington, D.C. Nora Wang (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Will Gorrissen (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Molly McCabe (Hayden Tanner, LLC) Cody Taylor (Department of Energy) 1 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating * Create a tool to help building owners identify and implement

253

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

's > Overview 's > Overview Overview Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects data on energy consumption, expenditures, and other energy-related topics in the major energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy. The residential and commercial sectors are two major sectors that many energy analysts like to consider together, as energy use is primarily related to the building shell and the stock of energy-consuming goods within the shell in these sectors. EIA conducts separate surveys for the two sectors, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS).1 Prior to the first CBECS, there was a very poor understanding of the complexities of energy use in commercial buildings, or the amount of energy consumed in the commercial sector. This report summarizes and synthesizes energy data that were collected by these two surveys during the 1980Â’s, when major changes in energy policy were implemented following the energy crisis decade of the 1970Â’s.

254

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7.1 National Legislation 7.1 National Legislation 7.2 Federal Tax Incentives 7.3 Efficiency Standards for Residential HVAC 7.4 Efficiency Standards for Commercial HVAC 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting 7.7 Water Use Standards 7.8 State Building Energy Codes 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 7 outlines national climate change legislation, tax incentives, Federal regulations, and State programs that have influenced building energy consumption. Section 7.1 summarizes the past 40 years of national energy legislation beginning with the Clean Air Act of 1970. Section 7.2 describes the energy efficiency-related Federal tax incentives created in the last 5 years. Sections 7.3 through 7.7 describe the energy and water efficiency standards currently or soon to be in effect for residential and commercial HVAC equipment, appliances, lighting, and water-consuming products. Section 7.8 covers building energy codes. Following is a summary of the energy legislation discussed in this chapter:

255

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Title Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-40297 Year of Publication 1997 Authors Wenzel, Thomas P., Jonathan G. Koomey, Gregory J. Rosenquist, Marla C. Sanchez, and James W. Hanford Date Published 09/1997 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley, CA ISBN Number LBNL-40297, UC-1600 Keywords Enduse, Energy End-Use Forecasting, EUF Abstract Analysts assessing policies and programs to improve energy efficiency in the residential sector require disparate input data from a variety of sources. This sourcebook, which updates a previous report, compiles these input data into a single location. The data provided include information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment; historical and current appliance and equipment market shares; appliance and equipment efficiency and sales trends; appliance and equipment efficiency standards; cost vs. efficiency data for appliances and equipment; product lifetime estimates; thermal shell characteristics of buildings; heating and cooling loads; shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings; baseline housing stocks; forecasts of housing starts; and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. This report is the essential sourcebook for policy analysts interested in residential sector energy use. The report can be downloaded from the Web at http://enduse.lbl.gov/Projects/RED.html. Future updates to the report, errata, and related links, will also be posted at this address.

256

Find financing | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Find financing Find financing Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Find financing Calculate returns on energy efficiency investments Rebates, incentives, and financing services Public sector financing options Earn recognition Communicate your success Find financing Postponing the installation of energy-saving equipment can be an expensive

257

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

258

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory One of the primary market barriers to enhancing energy efficiency in the commercial building sector is that building owners and investors lack a reliable and low cost source to understand a building’s as-built efficiency and identify opportunities for cost-effective improvements.

259

BUILDING ENERGY 1987 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) The alternative HVAC compliance method for second generation nonresidential standards has been codifiedBUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS 1987 Edition 1988 SUPPLEMENT December 1987 Supplement May 1988 ,+ -.* CALIFORNIA *-3q-:-- =id-,/* + ,+ I ENERGY For historical reference Current Title 24 Standards are available

260

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Building Energy Code Provider State Board of Building Regulations and Standards ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority

262

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

263

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

264

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

265

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

266

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Property:ProgramSector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ProgramSector ProgramSector Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "ProgramSector" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report + Energy + 2010 Solar Market Transformation Analysis and Tools + Energy + 2011 APTA Public Transportation Fact Book + Energy + A A Case for Climate Neutrality: Case Studies on Moving Towards a Low Carbon Economy + Energy +, Land +, Climate + A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + Land + A Guide to Community Solar: Utility, Private, and Non-profit Project Development + Energy + A Low Carbon Economic Strategy for Scotland + Energy +, Land + A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction + Climate +, Energy +

268

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 1989-2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset

269

Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Site Lighting in the Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Delicious

270

2015 Building Energy Summit | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the public and private sector to debate and discuss energy efficient technologies and solutions, energy policy, funding and incentives, alternative sources of energy, and more....

271

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on AddThis.com...

272

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Ohio Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects

273

2008 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS C A L I F O R N I A E N E RGY CO M M I S S I O N Buildings and Appliances Office #12;Acknowledgments The Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Standards the adoption of the 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards to Jon Leber, PE, (November 13, 1947 - February

274

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

275

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Massachusetts Energy Efficiency and Building ScienceSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. The UnitedStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American Council

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. WashingtonSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. WashingtonStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. American Council

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nevada Energy Code for Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

278

Energy Conservation in Public Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Energy Conservation and Sustainable Buildings Act requires the use of energy-efficient equipment and design, and solar energy devices for heating and cooling state buildings where life...

279

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Energy Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and

280

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Alabama Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites.'' Legislation passed in March 2010 authorized the Alabama Energy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

future impacts of climate change trends on the U.S. energy sector, including: Coastal energy infrastructure is at risk from sea level rise, increasing storm intensity and...

282

Russia’s R&D for Low Energy Buildings: Insights for Cooperation with Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Russian buildings, Russian buildings sector energy consumption. Russian government has made R&D investment a priority again. The government and private sector both invest in a range of building energy technologies. In particular, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, district heating, building envelope, and lighting have active technology research projects and programs in Russia.

Schaaf, Rebecca E.; Evans, Meredydd

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

284

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

285

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal Residential coal Residential market trends icon Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy

286

NREL/OAS-Regional Building Efficiency Workshop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/OAS-Regional Building Efficiency Workshop NREL/OAS-Regional Building Efficiency Workshop < NREL Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NREL/OAS-Regional Building Efficiency Workshop Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Organization of American States (OAS) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, Water Conservation Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials, Online calculator Website: www.nrel.gov/international/ Language: English References: NREL/OAS-Regional Building Efficiency Workshop[1] "NREL/OAS staff held a regional four-day training workshop to provide selected personnel with detailed knowledge of how to conduct a building efficiency audit. Topics covered included lighting, water conservation,

287

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Development to someone by E-mail Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator

288

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, 2010 during which 28 R&D projects were presented for review by industry stakeholders. More than 65 energy sector stakeholders came to network, present, and learn about DOE projects, while more than 20 joined in by webinar. Energy Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's 2010 Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review More Documents & Publications

289

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/

290

Low Carbon Society Toward 2050: Indonesia Energy Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Society Toward 2050: Indonesia Energy Sector Society Toward 2050: Indonesia Energy Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Low Carbon Society Toward 2050: Indonesia Energy Sector Agency/Company /Organization: National Institute for Environmental Studies, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Mizuho Information & Research Institute - Japan, Kyoto University, Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) - Indonesia Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Solar Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

291

Advancing Building Energy Codes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings

292

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Energy Efficient Buildings Hub August 1, 2010 - 4:27pm Addthis This model of a renovated historic building -- Building 661 -- in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility’s renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. This model of a renovated historic building -- Building 661 -- in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The Department's Energy Innovation Hubs are helping to advance promising

293

ENERGY STAR certification for your building | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

certification for your building certification for your building Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Find financing Earn recognition 20-percent recognition ENERGY STAR certification How to apply for ENERGY STAR certification Tips for low-cost verifications Submit a profile of your building

294

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

BUILD UP: Energy Solutions for Better Buildings (Website) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BUILD UP: Energy Solutions for Better Buildings (Website) BUILD UP: Energy Solutions for Better Buildings (Website) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: BUILD UP: Energy Solutions for Better Buildings (Website) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.buildup.eu/home Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/build-energy-solutions-better-buildin Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Training & Education Regulations: Building Certification This website serves as a forum for the exchange of best working practices and knowledge and the transfer of tools and resources. The BUILD UP initiative was established by the European Commission to support European

296

Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings Buildings Sustainable Buildings Mission The team evaluates and incorporates the requirements for sustainable buildings as defined in Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The team advocates the use of sustainable building practices. Scope The team evaluates how to locate, design, construct, maintain, and operate its buildings and facilities in a resource-efficient, sustainable, and economically viable manner, consistent with its mission. The team provides a process to evaluate sustainable building practices for any new construction, major renovation, and existing capital asset buildings in

297

Guam - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Department of Public Works NOTE: In September 2012, The Guam Building Code Council adopted the draft [http://www.guamenergy.com/outreach-education/guam-tropical-energy-code/ Guam Tropical Energy Code]. It must be adopted by the legislature before it is official. This entry and information will be updated accordingly. Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the

298

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Glossary Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Residential Space Heating Residential Space Cooling Residential Water Heating Commercial Space Cooling Commercial Space Heating Commercial Refrigeration Lighting Building Descriptions Commercial Residential Acronyms and Initialisms A B C D E F G H I L M N O P Q R S U V AAMA - American Architectural Manufacturers Association ACEEE - American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy AEO - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook AFEAS - Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study AFUE - Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency AHAM - Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers ARI - Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute ASHRAE - American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers BTS - DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

299

Building Energy Conservation in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Conservation in China Building Energy Conservation in China Speaker(s): Zhang Fulin Date: January 29, 2013 - 11:15am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Haley Gilbert Mr. Zhang Fulin is a Senior Engineer and Director of the Division of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Science &Technology of the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) in China. He is tasked with developing China building energy conservation policies and regulations and is responsible for the approval of major China building energy efficiency projects. Mr. Zhang has been working in the field of building energy efficiency for more than two decades. He will speak about current laws and regulations governing building energy efficiency practice in China,

300

Template:Energy Generation Facilities by Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilities by Sector Facilities by Sector Jump to: navigation, search This is the Energy Generation Facilities by Sector template. It will display energy generation facilities for the specified sector in a map, or in a list with CSV link depending on SUBPAGENAME; the purpose being the separation of the map content from the underlying data. If the page it is included on ends in '/Data' it will display the raw data and the CSV link. Otherwise, it will display the full screen map. Parameters sector - the sector to query on (for example: Biomass, Solar, Wind energy, Geothermal energy) (required) Usage It should be called in the following format: {{Energy Generation Facilities by Sector}} Example For an example of this template in use, see one of the pages listed in 'What links here' below.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Purchase energy-saving products Put computers to sleep Get help from an expert Take a comprehensive approach

302

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases 7. Key assumptions for the commercial sector in the AEO2012 integrated demand technology cases Assumptions Integrated 2011 Deand Technology Integraged High Demand Technologya Integrated Buildings Best Available Demand Technologya End-use equipment Limited to technology menu available in 2011. Promulgated standards still take effect. Earlier availability, lower cost, and/ or higher efficiencies for advanced equipment. Purchases limited to highest available efficiency for each technology class, regardless of cost. Hurdle rates Same as Reference case distribution. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. All energy efficiency investments evaluated at 7-percent real interest rate. Building shells Fixed at 2011 levels. 25 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035. 50 percent more improvement than in the Reference case by 2035.

303

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial and residential buildings, appliances and equipment, and the vali- dation of computational tools for estimating energy usage.

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Better Buildings Challenge U.S. Department of Energy Fort Worth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steps ? Fort Worth Better Buildings Network ? 2014: Refine Energy Audit Process; Host Fort Worth Better Building Network Events; Build Advisory Sub-Committee Network; Target Needed Partner Market Sectors ? 2015-2020: Expand the Fort Worth Better...

Roskelly,A.; LEED aP BD+C; GGP; GPCP USGBC Representative

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub Energy Efficient Buildings Hub August 1, 2010 - 4:27pm Addthis This model of a renovated historic building -- Building 661 -- in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility’s renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. This model of a renovated historic building -- Building 661 -- in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The Department's Energy Innovation Hubs are helping to advance promising

306

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Energy Demand Commercial Sector Energy Demand On This Page End-use efficiency... Growth in electricity use... Core technologies... Improved interconnection... End-use efficiency improvements could lower energy consumption per capita The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. figure data

307

Building Dashboard Kiosk | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management, Building Systems, Energy Management, Enterprise Management, Reporting, Sustainability, Tools, Water Building Dashboard Kiosk Screenshot Logo: Building Dashboard Kiosk...

308

Building Dashboard Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management, Building Systems, Energy Management, Enterprise Management, Reporting, Sustainability, Tools, Water Building Dashboard Network Screenshot Logo: Building Dashboard...

309

New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector August 23, 2012 - 12:20pm Addthis New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

310

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

[Type text] [Type text] Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study September 2011 September 2011 Page 2 Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. 1 The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. In recent years, various regions of the Nation suffered drought, impacting stakeholders in both the Dams and Energy Sectors. Droughts have the potential to affect the operation of dams and reduce hydropower production,

311

Application and development of solar energy in building industry and its prospects in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China is the second largest country in energy consumption. More and more energy demand pressures cause the Chinese government to review its economy and energy policies in order to support the sustainable development. In China, the building sector amounts to 27.8% total energy consumption, which is only behind the industry sector. China has abundant solar energy resource, which is extensively applied to buildings. Therefore, solar energy utilization in buildings has become one of the most important issues to help China optimize the energy proportion, increasing energy efficiency and protecting the environment. Solar energy resource and its district distribution in China are introduced in detail in this paper, and the representative solar energy application to the building sector is highlighted as well. The solar energy utilization obstacles, especially policy disadvantages in building sector in China, are reviewed. Moreover, the application prospects of solar energy in building sector are presented in combination with the China economic and household industry growth.

Zhi-Sheng Li; Guo-Qiang Zhang; Dong-Mei Li; Jin Zhou; Li-Juan Li; Li-Xin Li

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Green Building Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green Building Codes Green Building Codes Green building codes go beyond minimum code requirements, raising the bar for energy efficiency. They can serve as a proving ground for future standards, and incorporate elements beyond the scope of the model energy codes, such as water and resource efficiency. As regional and national green building codes and programs become more available, they provide jurisdictions with another tool for guiding construction and development in an overall less impactful, more sustainable manner. ICC ASHRAE Beyond Codes International Green Construction Code (IgCC) The International Code Council's (ICC's) International Green Construction code (IgCC) is an overlay code, meaning it is written in a manner to be used with all the other ICC codes. The IgCC contains provisions for site

313

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

314

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 7 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2009 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2006 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for the OECD countries. Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure data Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels is projected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2009 reference case, the transportation share of

315

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings....

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

316

High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.nrel.gov/docs/fy01osti/30171.pdf References: High Performance Commercial Buildings Technology Roadmap[1] Overview "This technology roadmap describes the vision and strategies for addressing these challenges developed by representatives of the buildings industry. Collaborative research, development, and deployment of new technologies, coupled with an integrated "whole-buildings" approach, can shape future

317

FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Training materials Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/program/sustainable_resources.html References: FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings[1] Logo: FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings This resource offers many helpful resources about sustainable design and operations to Federal facility managers and other personnel. FEMP also offers training opportunities about sustainable design and practices. Overview "Many helpful resources about sustainable design and operations are available to Federal facility managers and other personnel. These resources

318

Index to Evaluate Energy Efficiency of the Building HVAC System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1An Index to Evaluate Energy Efficiency of the Entire Building HVAC System Presented by Dr. Claridge Date: 09/15/2014 ESL-IC-14-09-15 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14..., Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 3• Why we need the Energy/Load Ratio 1. Building 2. HVAC Systems 3. Common Index • Building sector consumes 40% of total energy usage in US (Residential buildings – 22%, Commercial building – 19%) • HVAC systems...

Wang, L.; Wang, L.; Claridge,D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Buildings Energy Program annual report, FY 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buildings Energy Program at PNL conducts research and development (R&D) for DOE`s Office of Building Technologies (OBT). The OBT`s mission is to lead a national program supporting private and federal sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation`s buildings and to increase the use of renewable energy sources. Under an arrangement with DOE, Battelle staff also conduct research and development projects for other federal agencies and private clients. This annual report contains an account of the buildings-related research projects conducted at PNL during fiscal year (FY) 1991. A major focus of PNL`s energy projects is to improve the energy efficiency of commercial and residential buildings. Researchers who are developing solutions to energy-use problems view a building as an energy-using system. From this perspective, a desirable solution is not only one that is cost-effective and responsive to the needs of the occupants, but also one that optimizes the interaction among the energy components and systems that compose the whole.

Secrest, T.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ImSET: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the ''next generation'' of the previously developed Visual Basic model (ImBUILD 2.0) that was developed in 2003 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. More specifically, a special-purpose version of the 1997 benchmark national Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) -developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version allows for more complete and automated analysis of the essential features of energy efficiency investments in buildings, industry, transportation, and the electric power sectors. This version also incorporates improvements in the treatment of operations and maintenance costs, and improves the treatment of financing of investment options. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act.

Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, Michael J.; Schultz, Robert W.

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet summarizing the Building Technologies Program's commercial building energy asset score program

322

Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building energy codes have been in place for over 20 years. Today's codes are providing energy savings of more than 30% compared to the codes of a decade ago. They're also saving consumers an estimated $5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet below to learn more about the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes program.

323

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

324

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

325

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability Report As part of the Administration's efforts to support national climate change adaptation planning through the Interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force and Strategic Sustainability Planning process -- and to advance the Energy Department's goal of promoting energy security -- the Department released the U.S. Energy Sector Vulnerability to Climate Change and Extreme Weather report. The report examines current and potential future impacts of climate change trends on the U.S. energy sector, including: Coastal energy infrastructure is at risk from sea level rise, increasing storm intensity and higher storm surge and flooding. Oil and gas production -- including refining, hydraulic fracturing

327

Building Energy Certification System: Application to a Building in Lisbon and Paths to a Future Enhanced Scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency in buildings is of particular importance in the pursuit of international objectives in the area of climate and energy, as it is a sector that represents approximately 40% of the total primary energy demand [1], with strong...

Nunes, P.; Carrilho da Graca, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will

329

Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

None

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

Property:Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Sector Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: G Green Economy Toolbox Pages using the property "Sector" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1 Solar Inc + Renewable Energy +, Solar + 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Hydro + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Hydro + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Hydro + 12 Voltz Limited + Renewable Energy +, Solar +, Wind energy + 1366 Technologies + Solar + 1st Light Energy, Inc. + Solar + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Hydro + 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report + Renewable Energy +, Solar +, Concentrating solar power +, ... 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition + Clean Fossil Energy +

332

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Oregon Building Codes Division ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/Codes/cdpub.shtml The Oregon Energy

333

Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building-Level Energy Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building-Level Energy Management Systems Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy

334

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review Energy-Sector Stakeholders Attend the Department of Energy's Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Peer Review August 15, 2011 - 1:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy conducted a Peer Review of its Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and Development Program on July 20-22, during which 28 R&D projects were presented for review by industry stakeholders. More than 65 energy sector stakeholders came to network, present, and learn about DOE projects, while more than 20 joined in by webinar. The CEDS program's national lab, academic, and industry partners-including the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) partners and Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG)

335

Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes 101: An Introduction Codes 101: An Introduction In order to provide a basic introduction to the varied and complex issues associated with building energy codes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program, with valued assistance from the International Codes Council and ASHRAE, has prepared Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction. This guide is designed to speak to a broad audience with an interest in building energy efficiency, including state energy officials, architects, engineers, designers, and members of the public. Publication Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 BECP_Building Energy Codes 101_February2010_v00.pdf Document Details Last Name: Britt Initials: M Affiliation: PNNL Document Number: PNNL-70586 Focus: Adoption Code Development Compliance Building Type:

336

Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Finance Sector the Finance Sector Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Finance, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.unepfi.org/fileadmi References Energy Efficiency and the Finance Sector[1] Summary "This survey was carried out in 2008, when high and volatile oil prices, steadily rising demand for energy, and global imperatives, such as climate change, created significant renewed attention to energy efficiency - both in the policy and commercial world. UNEP Finance Initiative sought to provide an evidence base on current lending activities in the energy efficiency space, as well as views on this issue through a survey among

337

Analysis of the Russian Market for Building Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analysis of the Russian energy efficiency market for the building sector from the perspective of U.S. businesses interested in exporting relevant technologies, products and experience to Russia. We aim to help U.S. energy efficiency and environmental technologies businesses to better understand the Russian building market to plan their market strategy.

Lychuk, Taras; Evans, Meredydd; Halverson, Mark A.; Roshchanka, Volha

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of all natural gas produced in the United States thereby contributing 40% of the carbon dioxide a significant stake in improving the energy footprint and efficiency of the build- ings sector for economic- ergy savings. The large number of existing buildings that do not employ energy efficient technologies

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

339

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

340

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scoring Tool to someone by E-mail Scoring Tool to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Africa - CCS capacity building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - CCS capacity building Africa - CCS capacity building Jump to: navigation, search Name Africa - CCS capacity building Agency/Company /Organization Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Partner EECG Consultants, the University of Maputo, the Desert Research Foundation Namibia and the South Africa New Energy Research Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.ccs-africa.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2011 Country Botswana, Mozambique, Namibia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

342

Building Energy Codes News | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes News Building Energy Codes News News Category: National Policy DOE Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes RFI Posted: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 On August 6, DOE published an RFI on its methodology for assessing code compliance into the Federal Register. Based on feedback received from the individual state compliance pilot studies in 2011-2012, the RFI seeks input on DOE's methodology and fundamental assumptions from the general public. Read the full article... Source: U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Energy 2030 Report Calls for Stricter Energy Building Codes Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 The Alliance Commission on National Energy Efficiency Policy aims to double US energy productivity by 2030, and one of its many ways to achieve that

343

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New York Program Type Building Energy Code Provider NYS Department of State ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (ECCCNYS) requires that all government, commercial and residential buildings,

344

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Montana Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Building Codes Bureau ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The energy codes are reviewed on a three-year cycle corresponding to the adoption of new versions of the International Code Conference (ICC) Uniform

345

GSA Building Energy Strategy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rapid Building Assessments Green Button 12 Remote Building Analytics Platform First Fuel Dashboard 13 Data Center Ronald Reagan Detail Summary First Fuel Analysis 14...

346

Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports and participates in the model building energy code development processes administered by the ASHRAE and the International Code Council (ICC). DOE activities include developing and submitting code change proposals, conducting analysis of building energy efficiency and cost savings, and formulating underlying evaluation methodologies. Through participation in model energy code development for both commercial and residential buildings, DOE strives to make cost-effective, energy efficient upgrades to current model codes. DOE also establishes energy efficiency standards for federal buildings and manufactured housing. Further information on this process is defined under

347

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Commercial Mkt trends Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting. See more issues Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

348

Energy Efficient Industrial Building Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of industrial buildings today is still largely unaffected by energy legislation and building technologies. The present corporate tax structures for industry do little to encourage investment of capital for future operating cost savings...

Holness, G. V. R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

350

Public Sector Leadership: Government Purchasing of Energy-efficient  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Public Sector Leadership: Government Purchasing of Energy-efficient Public Sector Leadership: Government Purchasing of Energy-efficient Products to Save Energy and "Pull" the Market Title Public Sector Leadership: Government Purchasing of Energy-efficient Products to Save Energy and "Pull" the Market Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Coleman, Philip, and Jeffrey P. Harris Conference Name Kuwait ASST Workshop on Energy Conservation in Buildings Series Title Energy Efficiency for Fuelling the World Date Published 01/2004 Conference Location Kuwait Abstract In most countries, government spending represents between 10% and 25% of total economic activity, with the national government generally accounting for the largest portion. Consequently, governments' spending can exert a strong influence on the markets for the products and services they purchase, especially when this procurement is concerted. In the last decade, several governments have instituted programs designed to direct their purchasing of energy-using products to the more efficient models on the market. This has two impacts: It provides substantial direct savings to the government on its utility bills while also helping to increase the availability and lower the prices of these more efficient models for all buyers.

351

Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate $4,000,000 Program Info Expiration Date 3/22/2013 State Illinois Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount $500,000-$4,000,000 Provider Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will allow public sector participants to combine energy efficiency projects in order to simplify the application process and implement projects that might otherwise be

352

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 6 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2008 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 3.0 percent per year from 2005 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.7 percent per year for the OECD countries. Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels and other petroleum is expected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2008 reference case, the transportation share of total liquids consumption increases from 52 percent in 2005 to 58 percent in 2030. Much of the growth in transportation energy use is projected for the non-OECD nations, where many rapidly expanding economies

353

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Efficiency Market...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business Planning Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Energy Efficiency Market Sustainable Business...

354

Moving Toward Zero Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, appliances, etc) and systems integration to optimize the performance of the building. Then we need the best renewable energy technologies that can be incorporated into buildings: solar, small wind, and geothermal heat pumps (some day hydrogen storage..., appliances, etc) and systems integration to optimize the performance of the building. Then we need the best renewable energy technologies that can be incorporated into buildings: solar, small wind, and geothermal heat pumps (some day hydrogen storage...

Ginsberg, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Energy Sources and End Uses  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Sources and End Uses Energy Sources and End Uses Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Energy Sources and End Uses CBECS collects information that is used to answer questions about the use of energy in the commercial buildings sector. Questions such as: What kind of energy sources are used? What is energy used for? and What kinds of equipment use energy? Energy Sources Nearly all commercial buildings used at least one source of energy for some end use (Figure 1). Electricity was the most commonly used energy source in commercial buildings (94 percent of buildings comprising 98 percent of commercial floorspace). More than half of commercial buildings (57 percent) and two-thirds of commercial floorspace (68 percent) were served by natural gas. Three sources-fuel oil, district heat, and district chilled water-when used, were used more often in larger buildings.

356

WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

357

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Building Energy Code Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites. New Hampshire adopted a mandatory statewide building code in 2002 based on the 2000 IECC. SB 81 was enacted in July 2007, and it upgraded the New

358

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Washington State Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The State Building Code Council revised the [https://fortress.wa.gov/ga/apps/sbcc/Page.aspx?nid=14 Washington State

359

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing incentives for green building in the private sector. Permit applications for buildings registered with the US Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for

360

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Retrofit Tool for Improving Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing buildings will dominate energy use in commercial buildings in the United States for three decades or longer and even in China for the about two decades. Retrofitting these buildings to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use is thus critical to achieving the target of reducing energy use in the buildings sector. However there are few evaluation tools that can quickly identify and evaluate energy savings and cost effectiveness of energy conservation measures (ECMs) for retrofits, especially for buildings in China. This paper discusses methods used to develop such a tool and demonstrates an application of the tool for a retrofit analysis. The tool builds on a building performance database with pre-calculated energy consumption of ECMs for selected commercial prototype buildings using the EnergyPlus program. The tool allows users to evaluate individual ECMs or a package of ECMs. It covers building envelope, lighting and daylighting, HVAC, plug loads, service hot water, and renewable energy. The prototype building can be customized to represent an actual building with some limitations. Energy consumption from utility bills can be entered into the tool to compare and calibrate the energy use of the prototype building. The tool currently can evaluate energy savings and payback of ECMs for shopping malls in China. We have used the tool to assess energy and cost savings for retrofit of the prototype shopping mall in Shanghai. Future work on the tool will simplify its use and expand it to cover other commercial building types and other countries.

Levine, Mark; Feng, Wei; Ke, Jing; Hong, Tianzhen; Zhou, Nan

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Colorado Energy Office ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Colorado is a home rule state so no statewide energy code exists. Voluntary

363

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ISOVER Energi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ISOVER Energi ISOVER Energi ISOVER Energi logo Calculates: U-value, for constructions with and without thermal bridges; total heat loss for buildings; and energy demand for buildings. ISOVER Energi compares heat loss to the heat loss frame in the Danish Building Regulations. The energy demand is compared to the energy frame in the Danish Building Regulations. Furthermore ISOVER Energi calculates the profitability of activities e.g. retrofit, renewing of windows, to improve the energy performance of existing buildings. The profitability is compared to the criteria in the Danish Building Regulations. Access to databases with characteristics for common building materials and with linear heat losses for typical solutions for connections. The database facility is planned to be enlarged with databases for windows, boilers,

364

India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name India-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country India Southern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

365

Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

366

NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name NAMA-Programme for the construction sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with

367

Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with work by CDM and UNEP/ISO. NAMA will deliver significant GHG emission

368

Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Department Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building...

369

Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification...

370

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or certificate program on “green buildings” or discussed asand Control Systems Green Buildings, LEED & Energy Starhave also developed green building or sustainability

Goldman, Charles A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Energy Analyzer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer logo. Provides quick economic analysis for commercial and industrial buildings. Building Energy Analyzer (BEA) estimates annual and monthly loads and costs associated with air-conditioning, heating, on-site power generation, thermal storage, and heat recovery systems for a given building and location. The user can compare the performance of standard and high efficiency electric chillers, variable speed electric chillers, absorption chillers, engine chillers, thermal storage, on-site generators, heat recovery, or desiccant systems. The user can also prepare side-by-side economic comparisons of different energy options and equipment life cycle cost analysis. The BEA is a system screening tool. It is a tool that is

372

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance April 15, 2010 EISA SECTION 432 - Benchmarking of Federal Facilities (42 U.S.C. 8253 Subsection (f), Use of Energy and Water Efficiency Measures in Federal Buildings) I. Background A. Authority - Benchmarking Requirements Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires the Secretary of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to select or develop a building energy use benchmarking system and to issue guidance for use of the system. EISA requires the designated agency energy managers to enter energy use data for each metered building that is (or is a part of) a covered facility into a building energy use benchmarking system, such as the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool (Portfolio Manager) (see 42 U.S.C. 8253(f)(8)(A), as

373

News | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News News A variety of resources and news from BECP, states, and other news sources are available for anyone interested in learning more about building energy codes. This includes newsletters, articles, links and more. To receive BECP News and other updates from the Building Energy Codes Program via email, join our mailing list. Featured Codes News DOE Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes RFI Mayors Urge Cities to Strengthen Energy Code AZ Legislature Preserves Local Control of Building Energy Efficiency Codes Washington State Home Builders Lead the Nation in Energy Code Compliance Mississippi Invests in Future Growth With Adoption of Best-in-Class Energy Efficiency Legislation Energy 2030 Report Calls for Stricter Energy Building Codes

374

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 66. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2005-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 67. Change in World Liquids Consumption for Transportation, 2005 to 2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 68. Average Annual Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Gros Domestic Product and Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Use, 2005-2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 69. Motor Vehicle Ownership in OECD Countries, 2005, 2015, and 2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

375

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Labor Statistics. Energy Efficiency Services Sector:Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency: Economic Drivers forStatewide Long Term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. ” San

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the end user while primary energy consumption includes finalWEC 2001). GDP Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) natural gasHistorical Primary Energy Consumption by sector Energy Use

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy and Labor in the Construction Sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The opera-. tional energy demand would be 60.5 mil-lion...and an operational energy demand, due to conduction heat loss...is, 1 percent of the 1976 refinery output of No. 6 fuel oil...final new building construction demand; nevertheless, they may be...

Bruce Hannon; Richard G. Stein; B. Z. Segal; Diane Serber

1978-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory, The International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.nrel.gov/ce/ipeec/w Country Mexico, India UN Region Northern America References Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT)[1] Abstract Included are training materials for the Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building & Training (WEACT) Workshop in Mexico City, 28-30 September 2010.

379

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider West Virginia Division of Energy ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. Local jurisdictions must adopt

380

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Mississippi Development Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Mississippi's existing state code is based on the 1977 Model Code for Energy Conservation (MCEC). The existing law does not mandate enforcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tool Report to someone by E-mail Tool Report to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

382

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Title Two Paths to Transforming Markets through Public Sector Energy Efficiency: Bottom Up versus Top Down Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-60144 Year of Publication 2006 Authors McGrory, Laura Van Wie, Philip Coleman, David Fridley, Jeffrey P. Harris, and Edgar Villasenor Franco Conference Name 2006 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Date Published 08/2006 Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Abstract The evolution of government purchasing initiatives in Mexico and China, part of the PEPS (Promoting an Energy-efficient Public Sector) program, demonstrates the need for flexibility in designing energy-efficiency strategies in the public sector. Several years of pursuing a top-down (federally led) strategy in Mexico produced few results, and it was not until the program was restructured in 2004 to focus on municipal-level purchasing that the program gained momentum. Today, a new partnership with the Mexican federal government is leading to an intergovernmental initiative with strong support at the federal level. By contrast, the PEPS purchasing initiative in China was successfully initiated and led at the central government level with strategic support from international experts. The very different success trajectories in these two countries provide valuable lessons for designing country-specific public sector energy-efficiency initiatives. Enabling conditions for any successful public sector purchasing initiative include the existence of mandatory energy-efficiency performance standards, an effective energy-efficiency endorsement labeling program, an immediate need for energy conservation, a simple pilot phase (focusing on a limited number of strategically chosen products), and specialized technical assistance. Top-down purchasing programs are likely to be more successful where there is high-level political endorsement and a national procurement law in place, supported by a network of trained purchasers. Bottom-up (municipally led) purchasing programs require that municipalities have the authority to set their own purchasing policies, and also benefit from existing networks of cities, supported by motivated municipal leaders and trained purchasing officials.

383

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Georgia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Georgia Environmental Finance Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Georgia's Department of Community Affairs periodically reviews, amends and/or updates the state minimum standard codes. Georgia has "mandatory"

384

Building Design | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Design Building Design As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation’s buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. As a researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Dr. Michael Brambley is working to improve the energy efficiency of our nation's buildings. In this "10 Questions," learn how he is marrying engineering and computer technology to cut energy waste in commercial buildings. Commercial buildings have high energy needs and can put great strain on the nation's power grids during peak periods. Developing more efficient

385

Energy guides | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

guides guides Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial service and product providers

386

Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Hospital Energy Alliance Videos on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Alliance

387

Green Building Studio | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Building Studio Green Building Studio Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Green Building Studio Agency/Company /Organization: Autodesk Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=11179508&siteID=123112 References: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=11179508&siteID=123112 Energy analysis software to help architects and designers perform whole building analysis to optimize energy efficiency. Carbon emission details are calculated, as well as natural ventilation, daylight and water useage costs. Tool Summary Name: Green Building Studio Agency/Company /Organization: Autodesk Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., Develop Goals, Create Early Successes, "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

388

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), European Union Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.undp.org/climatestr References UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme[1] UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Screenshot "This collaborative programme aims to strengthen technical and institutional capacities at the country level, while at the same time facilitating inclusion and coordination of the public and private sector in national initiatives addressing climate change. It does so by utilizing the

389

GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches: Recommendations for the Design of a Long -Term Capacity Building Strategy for the Wind and Solar Sectors by the MEF Working Group Agency/Company /Organization: Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Solar, Wind Resource Type: Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/w/images/8/80/Best_ Cost: Free GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches: Recommendations for the Design of a Long -Term Capacity Building Strategy for the Wind and Solar Sectors by the MEF Working Group Screenshot

390

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject - Whole Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainability Sustainability A B E G K L S U Tool Applications Free Recently Updated Athena Model life cycle assessment, environment, building materials, buildings Free software. BEES environmental performance, green buildings, life cycle assessment, life cycle costing, sustainable development Free software. Software has been updated. Building Greenhouse Rating operational energy, greenhouse performance, national benchmark Free software. Building Performance Compass Commercial Buildings, Multi-family Residence, Benchmarking, Energy Tracking, Improvement Tracking, Weather Normalization BuildingAdvice Whole building analysis, energy simulation, renewable energy, retrofit analysis, sustainability/green buildings Software has been updated. ECO-BAT environmental performance, life cycle assessment, sustainable development Software has been updated.

391

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Building Type Definition Includes These Sub-Categories from 2003 CBECS Questionnaire Building Type Definition Includes These Sub-Categories from 2003 CBECS Questionnaire Education Buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Buildings on education campuses for which the main use is not classroom are included in the category relating to their use. For example, administration buildings are part of "Office", dormitories are "Lodging", and libraries are "Public Assembly". elementary or middle school high school college or university preschool or daycare adult education career or vocational training religious education Food Sales Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. grocery store or food market

392

Building Energy Asset Score | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- such as the building envelope (roof, walls and windows) and lighting, hot water and HVAC systems - have a significant impact on how efficiently energy is used within a building...

393

2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings p , p g , Luminaire Power, etc. for Nonresidential Buildings 4 #12;What is New for 2008? R d l B ld What is New for 2008? R d l B ldResidential BuildingsResidential Buildings Mandatory Measures2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards g gy Efficiency Standardsfficie

394

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

395

Climate change and buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Climate change and buildings Climate change and buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings Climate change and buildings

396

Microsoft Word - Building_sector_supply_curve_writeup final.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Protection Partnerships Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Protection Partnerships Division, Office of Air and Radiation, under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-1096E U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Rich Brown, Sam Borgeson, Jon Koomey, Peter Biermayer ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES DIVISION Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 September 2008 This work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Climate Protection Partnerships Division, Office of Air and Radiation, under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government.

397

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector AEO2013 Reference INFORUM IHSGI ExxonMobil IEA 2011 Residential 11.3 11.5 10.8 -- -- Residential excluding electricity 6.4 6.6 6.0 5.0 -- Commercial 8.6 8.6 8.5 -- -- Commercial excluding electricity 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.0 -- Buildings sector 19.9 20.1 19.3 -- 19.3a Industrial 24.0 23.6 -- -- 23.7a Industrial excluding electricity 20.7 20.2 -- 20.0 -- Lossesb 0.7 -- -- -- -- Natural gas feedstocks 0.5 -- -- -- -- Industrial removing losses and feedstocks 22.9 -- 21.7 -- -- Transportation 27.1 27.2 26.2 27.0 23.1a Electric power 39.4 39.2 40.5 37.0 37.2a Less: electricity demandc 12.7 12.8 12.7 -- 15.0a

398

Building Energy Use Benchmarking Guidance | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use Benchmarking Guidance Use Benchmarking Guidance Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

399

Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Retrofit Guides to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

400

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices References: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building[1] Logo: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building "Developing greenhouse gas inventories is an important first step to managing emissions. U.S. EPA's approach for building capacity to develop GHG inventories is based on the following lessons learned from working alongside developing country experts: Technical expertise for GHG inventories already exists in developing countries.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transforming Commercial Building Operations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Retrocommissioning and the Public Sector retrocommissioningpublicsector.doc Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System Needs: Scoping Study...

402

Commercial Buildings Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

cover key market sectors: retail, food service, commercial real estate, hospitality, health care, higher education, and state and local building owners and managers. Learn...

403

Table E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation...

404

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not provide data on primary energy consumption by sector. Inconsumption into primary energy consumption by multiplyingA.3.5 provides primary energy consumption values for the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this are noteworthy: 1) the growing market interest in "green buildings" and "sustainable design", 2) the major, LBNL, AIA, ASHRAE, USGBC and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) are developing an "action plan" for moving the U.S. commercial building sector towards zero energy performance

406

Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory—a model for high-performance office building design.

407

Review of Building Energy Saving Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pace of building energy saving in our country is late, compared with developed countries, and the consumption of building energy is much higher. Therefore, it is imperative to open up new building energy saving techniques and heighten energy use...

Zeng, X.; Zhu, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

409

Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecn.nl/fileadmin/ecn/units/bs/IEC/LCDS_presentation_082010.pdf Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Screenshot References: Building Energy Efficiency[1] Summary "This report summarizes the findings of an extensive literature survey of

410

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

411

Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-NAMA Programme for the Construction Sector in Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Industry Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Program End 2017 Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References Buildings and Climate Change[1] Program Overview This project will support countries to develop Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMA) for the building sector. The NAMAs will be developed and apply common MRV methodologies for buildings in line with

412

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) May 2007 Department of Energy Energy Sector Government Coordinating Council Letter of Support i ii Energy Sector-Specific Plan (Redacted) Energy Sector Coordinating Councils Letter of Concurrence The National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) provides the unifying structure for the integration of federal critical infrastructures and key resources (CI/KR) protection efforts into a single national program. The NIPP includes an overall framework integrating federal programs and activities that are currently underway in the various sectors, as well as new and developing CI/KR protection efforts. The Energy

414

Building Design | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Design Building Design October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Planning, Programming & Budgeting Building Design Project Construction Integrating renewable energy within Federal new construction or major renovations is critical at each phase of the design process. This overview covers considerations for renewable energy in the design phases of a construction project, including choosing the design team, the design team charrette, preliminary design, schematic design, design development, and construction documents. Information on this page introduces each of the design phases and provides a link to deeper-level information. Key Actions in Building Design Require specific renewable energy experience and skills for design team. Prioritize energy-related program

415

DOE Commercial Reference Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Buildings DOE Commercial Reference Buildings DOE Commercial Reference Buildings refbldgseuitables1-47-0.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Information Agency's 2003...

416

Whole Building Energy Simulation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Simulation Energy Simulation Whole Building Energy Simulation October 16, 2013 - 4:39pm Addthis Whole building energy simulation, also referred to as energy modeling, can and should be incorporated early during project planning to provide energy impact feedback for which design considerations may be pursued. Whole building energy simulation software adequately assesses the interactions between complex building systems and equally complex schedules and utility rates structures for projects in specific locations throughout the world. Energy models incorporate actual building construction, internal load sources, and associated schedules using annual hourly weather data specific to the project location. These models can be used early in the design process when little information is known and updated, continually

417

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Maine | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maine Maine Last updated on 2013-11-04 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Amendments / Additional State Code Information As of September 28, 2011, municipalities over 4,000 in population were required to enforce the new code if they had a building code in place by August 2008. Municipalities under 4,000 are not required to enforce it unless they wish to do so and have the following options: 1. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code 2. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Building Code (the building code without energy) 3. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Energy Code (energy code only) 4. Have no code Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Maine (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

419

Building Energy Modeling Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Scalable Support and Training Services Platform Center-Led Projects CERC: Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation CBERD: Building Energy Simulation &...

420

About Building Energy Modeling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

mechanical systems, and dynamic building control for energy optimization or demand response. The design use cases can exploit prescriptive guidelines rather than simulation....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Energy Simulation & Modeling | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

strategies in a building or test bed equipped with a low-energy heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. Project Impact Products: Improved design analysis tools and data,...

422

2005 Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 Buildings Energy Data Book 5 Buildings Energy Data Book Prepared for the Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy 2005 Buildings Energy Data Book August 2005 Prepared for the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation and Analysis Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy by D&R International, Ltd. under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory This version is dated: August 2005 D I S C L A I M E R This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document will be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government.

423

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: doe2.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software References: DOE2 Home Page[1] Perform detailed comparative analysis of building designs and technologies by applying sophisticated building energy use simulation techniques; does not require extensive experience in building performance modeling. DOE-2 is a freeware building energy analysis program that can predict the

424

Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC’s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Iowa Iowa Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Iowa Office of Energy Independence ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://coolice.legis.state.ia.us/Cool-ICE/default.asp?Category=billinfo&... House File 2361] was signed in April 2006. This law rescinded Iowa's minimum energy efficiency standard for residential construction, the "home heating index," and instead requires the state building commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized

426

Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Energy Systems Innovations to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Energy Systems Innovations on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

427

Restructuring our Transportation Sector | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Restructuring our Transportation Sector Restructuring our Transportation Sector 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting,...

428

Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Agency/Company /Organization: Johnson Controls Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.institutebe.com/ Cost: Free Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions Screenshot References: Driving Transformation to Energy Efficient Buildings:Policies and Actions[1] "The aim of this paper is to review policy options available for policymakers in developing countries that can accelerate energy efficiency improvements in the built environment and track results over time. It

429

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile – Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored BEopt software, which ensures a consistent analysis platform and accurate simulations. Many BEopt algorithms have been adopted by private-sector HERS software tools that have helped improve the energy efficiency of tens-of-thousands of ENERGY STAR-certified homes.

430

Vermont | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vermont Vermont Last updated on 2013-06-03 Current News The Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) became effective January 3, 2012. The CBES incorporates elements of the 2012 IECC. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information 2011 Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) are based on the 2009 IECC. Commercial Building Energy Standards Approved Compliance Tools State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Vermont (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency More energy efficient than 2009 IECC Effective Date 01/03/2012 Adoption Date 10/03/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No

431

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of commercial building energy usage, particularlycommercial building sector. To compare the aggregated energy usagecommercial buildings. For the residential sector, the total heating and cooling energy usages

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems research project, one of six research elements in the Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design of Small Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated

433

U.S. Department of Energy Buildings Technologies Program: Better Buildings, Brighter Future  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

new technologies and practices, energy-efficient new technologies and practices, energy-efficient buildings will be the new standard for residents in all U.S. climate zones. DOE and its partners are pursuing a portfolio of research to make it happen. Better Buildings, Brighter Future Innovative Building Technologies and Practices Save Energy and Money Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy, consuming more than 70 percent of electricity and over 50 percent of natural gas. Investing in energy-efficient buildings yields: * Cost savings for American homeowners and businesses; * Reductions in peak demand, providing the energy needed for a strong economy with fewer new power plants; and * Expeditious and sustained reductions in carbon dioxide emissions-with fast paybacks

434

Energy efficiency buildings program, FY 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A separate abstract was prepared on research progress in each group at LBL in the energy efficient buildings program. Two separate abstracts were prepared for the Windows and Lighting Program. Abstracts prepared on other programs are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program; DOE-21 Building Energy Analysis; and Building Energy Data Compilation, Analysis, and Demonstration. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

ENERGY STAR Snapshot: Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Spring 2008.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Progress in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors Spring 2008 Introduction Through 2007, commercial and industrial (C&I) leaders have made unprecedented progress in their efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions across their buildings and facilities. This includes: y Hundreds of organizations and individuals stepping forward to take the ENERGY STAR Challenge to improve the energy efficiency of America's buildings by 10 percent or more y Measuring the energy performance in tens of thousands of buildings y Achieving energy savings across millions of square feet y Designating more than 4,000 efficient buildings and facilities with the ENERGY STAR label ENERGY STAR partners are building tremendous momentum for energy efficiency and seeing important

436

Building the case for automated building energy management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings comprises a significant fraction of total worldwide energy consumption and is strongly influenced by occupant behavior. To explore the quantitative effect of particular occupant actions on building energy consumption, ... Keywords: building automation, energy saving behaviors, in-home display

Alan Marchiori; Qi Han; William C. Navidi; Lieko Earle

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy"  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings Title Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide "Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2008 Authors Selkowitz, Stephen E., Jessica Granderson, Philip Haves, Paul A. Mathew, and Jeffrey P. Harris Conference Name 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Asilomar, California, USA Abstract It is widely accepted that if the United States is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it must aggressively address energy end use in the building sector. While there have been some notable but modest successes with mandatory and voluntary programs, there have also been puzzling failures to achieve expected savings. Collectively, these programs have not yet reached the majority of the building stock, nor have they yet routinely produced very large savings in individual buildings.

438

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Performance Compass  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass logo Building Performance Compass analyzes commercial and multi-family building energy use patterns in a simple, easy-to-use Web-based interface. Using building details and energy data from the buildingÂ’s utility bills, it is unique in its ability to benchmark and compare all buildings, whether residential or commercial. Recent enhancements to Building Performance Compass include new multi-family support, the ability to track non-energy quantities such as water and waste, and features such as its fast-feedback report, which enables reporting energy savings as early as one month after work is completed. Building Performance Compass also provides extensive tracking of building data and usage, as well as the ability to upload and track

439

Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES i Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90467 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes ACE

440

Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES III Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90466 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ADOPTION TOOLKIT ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES I Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-89963 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

442

A Market-Specific Methodology for a Commercial Building Energy Performance Index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scaling of energy efficiency initiatives in the commercial building sector ... methodologies that do not adequately model patterns of energy consumption, nor provide accurate measures of relative energy perfo...

Constantine E. Kontokosta

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

clean, renewable energy to power its municipally owned buildings. This ground-mounted solar array is built on a brownfield site. | Photo courtesy of Con Edison Solutions. How a...

444

Buildings Events | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

March 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Energy Center of Wisconsin's Better Buildings: Better Business Wisconsin Conference 9:00AM to...

445

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This report introduces several innovations in energy data reporting that complement the previously published triennial reports of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). (1) Both residential and commercial sector buildings data are presented together in the report. Common units of analysis, the residential or commercial building and floorspace, are used to facilitate comparison.17 (2) Unlike the triennial RECS and CBECS that

446

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

447

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Asset Score Energy Asset Score Photo of a laptop with energy asset score image on the screen The free online Asset Scoring Tool will generate a score based on inputs about the building envelope and buildling systems (heating, ventilation, cooling, lighting, and service hot water). Launch Energy Asset Score The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) program to allow building owners and managers to more accurately assess building energy performance. The Asset Score program will act as a national standard and will include the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool) to evaluate the physical characteristics and as-built energy efficiency of buildings. The Asset Scoring Tool will identify cost-effective energy efficient improvements that, if implemented, can reduce energy bills and potentially improve building asset value. View the Asset Score fact sheet for a brief overview of the program.

448

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Michigan Michigan Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Bureau of Construction Codes is responsible for the administration of the State Construction Code Act (1972 PA 230), also known as the Uniform Construction Code. The state energy code is evaluated for revisions or modifications every three years. The new code requirements are adopted at the beginning of each state building code cycle (which corresponds with the three-year cycle of

449

Buildings Success Stories | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Efficiency Buildings Success Stories Buildings Success Stories RSS The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) successes in technology cost reduction,...

450

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

information for that building such as building size, year constructed, type of energy used, energy-using equipment, and conservation features. The smallest level of...

451

Commercial Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

owners adopt new energy efficient technologies. Read more Join the Better Buildings Alliance Join the Better Buildings Alliance Engaging industry leaders to deploy energy saving...

452

Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. About the Building Technologies Office The Energy Department's Building Technologies Office leads a network of research and industry partners to continually develop innovative, cost-effective energy-saving solutions for homes and buildings. Learn more about the Building Technologies Office. How We Help Homes & Buildings Save Energy Value-Driven Applications Advanced energy efficiency technologies like lighting, HVAC, windows, appliances, and commercial equipment. Practical Standards

453

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

454

State Building Energy Standards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In June 2007, South Carolina enacted legislation (the Energy Independence and Sustainable Construction Act of 2007) to promote effective energy and environmental standards for construction,...

455

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

456

REDUCING ENERGY USE IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2007 Florida Building Code (ICC, 2008) requires building designers and architects to achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating for commercial buildings located throughout Florida. Although the Florida Building Code is strict in the minimum...

Raustad, R.; Basarkar, M.; Vieira, R.

457

90.1 Prototype Building Models Outpatient Healthcare | Building Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outpatient Healthcare Outpatient Healthcare The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

458

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

459

Building Envelopes | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Envelope Envelope SHARE Building Envelopes MFEL.jpg The building envelope-the materials that separate the indoor and outdoor environments-primarily determines the amount of energy required to heat, cool, and ventilate a building. The envelope also can significantly influence energy needs in areas accessible to sunlight. To cost-effectively improve the energy efficiency, moisture-durability, and environmental sustainability of building envelopes, ORNL is exploring new and emerging materials, components, and systems as well as the fundamentals of heat, air, and moisture transfer. Research is also focused on multifunctional solutions where the envelope serves as a filter that selectively accepts or rejects solar radiation and outdoor air, depending on the need for heating, cooling, ventilation, and lighting.

460

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indiana Indiana Program Type Building Energy Code Provider TSREI ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Indiana Residential Building Code is based on the 2003 IRC with state amendments (eff. 9/11/05). This code applies to 1 and 2 family dwellings and townhouses. During the adoption process, certain seismic provisions were weakened, primarily affecting nine southwestern counties. Local jurisdictions may amend to make the code more stringent with state approval only.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings sector energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

4 - Life cycle assessment (LCA) of the building sector: strengths and weaknesses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter discusses possibilities and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) in the building sector. Through standardisation, LCA has gained global support as a most important tool for furthering more environmentally friendly choices in the sector. However, there are several limitations of LCA at a macro level such as choice of unit of analysis and at a micro level related to methodological and practical matters. Overall and inherent possibilities and limitations in the steps of LCA analyses are scrutinised. The flexibility of the method gives LCA the power to inform decision makers and the public about the environmental performance of buildings and building products.

A. Rønning; A. Brekke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Building Energy Optimization Software | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Energy Optimization Software Building Energy Optimization Software BEopt 2.1 Now Available! BEopt Version 2.1 is now available and includes major features such as: mini-split heat pumps and room air conditioners (E+); new modeling inputs; component-based air leakage estimate for existing buildings; and more. Read about the new features and visit the BEopt website to download. To help meet Building America's goal to develop market-ready energy solutions that improve efficiency of new and existing homes, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) software tool. This specialized computer program is designed to identify optimally efficient designs for new and existing homes at the lowest possible cost. BEopt produces detailed simulation-based analysis and design optimization

463

Retrofit Existing Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Retrofit Existing Buildings Retrofit Existing Buildings Retrofit Existing Buildings Renovation, retrofit and refurbishment of existing buildings represent an opportunity to upgrade the energy performance of commercial building assets for their ongoing life. Often retrofit involves modifications to existing commercial buildings that may improve energy efficiency or decrease energy demand. In addition, retrofits are often used as opportune time to install distributed generation to a building. Energy efficiency retrofits can reduce the operational costs, particularly in older buildings, as well as help to attract tenants and gain a market edge. The Building Technologies Office provides resources that allow planners, designers, and owners to focus on energy-use goals from the first planning

464

Revisit of Energy Use and Technologies of High Performance Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy performance of LEED for new construction buildings:New Buildings Institute.New Buildings Institute. 2013. Buildings database, http://

Li Ph.D., Cheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Public Finance Mechanisms to Catalyze Sustainable Energy Sector Growth |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Public Finance Mechanisms to Catalyze Sustainable Energy Sector Growth Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Catalyze Sustainable Energy Sector Growth Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Finance, Market analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.sefalliance.org/fileadmin/media/base/downloads/SEFI_Public_Finance Public Finance Mechanisms to Catalyze Sustainable Energy Sector Growth Screenshot

466

Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Superior Energy Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

467

Sustainable Design | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainable Design Sustainable Design Session 5 of a seven-part webcast series presented by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program to help federal agencies comply with the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The Sustainable Design webcast provides an overview of sustainable design federal requirements and strategies. Sustainable design principles and practices are well established and can be applied at some level to any project to reduce the environmental impact and operational cost of a building, while increasing occupant satisfaction. The requirements within Executive Order 13423, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 are driving the federal sector to be leaders in sustainable design. Estimated Length: