National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for buildings sector appliance

  1. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Full report (3.6 mb) Major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies

  2. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9...

  3. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration This is an unedited Transcript of the Fall Meeting of the Energy Information Administration and the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. The meeting took place October 16 and 17, 2003 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. Most of the sessions were in 8E-089, although several break out sessions were in

  4. Appliance Standards and Building Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards Overview for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review appstdsoverviewcymbalsky040213...

  5. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  6. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Logic Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    standards, resulting in energy savings in the buildings sector The Appliance & Equipment ... incentives, Legislation Regulation Objectives Activities ...

  7. Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

    1993-08-01

    This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

  8. SEP Special Projects Report: Buildings Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    The buildings section of this Sharing Success document describes SEP special projects in the buildings sector including funding.

  9. Technical Meeting: Data/Communication Standards and Interoperability of Building Appliances, Equipment, and Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On May 1, BTO hosted a technical meeting on Data and Communications Standards and Interoperability of Building Appliances, Equipment and Systems. This page includes the presentation slides and meeting notes.

  10. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances (2015 Update)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Executive Summary W. Goetzler, M. Guernsey, K. Foley, J. Young, G. Chung June 2016 (This page intentionally left blank) Executive Summary 1 Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's), Building Technologies Office (BTO) commissioned this characterization and technology assessment of appliances used in commercial buildings. The primary objectives of this study were to document the energy consumed by commercial appliances and

  11. Attendees: John Cymbalsky, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program Manager, Building Technologies Office,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lutron ex-parte meeting at DOE Pekka Hakkarainen 11 February 2015 Page 1 of 4 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. ex-parte meeting at the U.S. Department of Energy Subject: LED drivers are not external power supplies Meeting date: 11 February 2015 Attendees: John Cymbalsky, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program Manager, Building Technologies Office, DOE Jeremy Dommu, Project Manager, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program, Building Technologies Office, DOE Laura Barhydt, Assistant General

  12. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zogg, Robert; Goetzler, William; Ahlfeldt, Christopher; Hiraiwa, Hirokazu; Sathe, Amul; Sutherland, Timothy

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes and assesses the appliances used in commercial buildings. The primary objectives of this study were to document the energy consumed by commercial appliances and identify research, development and demonstration (RD&D) opportunities for efficiency improvements, excluding product categories such as HVAC, building lighting, refrigeration equipment, and distributed generation systems. The study included equipment descriptions, characteristics of the equipment’s market, national energy consumption, estimates of technical potential for energy-saving technologies, and recommendations for U.S. Department of Energy programs that can promote energy savings in commercial appliances.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2008 Refrigerator Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company GE 27% Electrolux (Frigidaire) 23% Whirlpool 33% Maytag (Admiral) (1) Haier 6% W.C. Wood 1% Others 10% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): Market Share (%) Total Units Shipped: 9,310,000 1) Included in Whirpool shipments Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 5

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2008 Room Air Conditioner Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company Market Share (%) LG Electronics (Goldstar) 32% Fedders 12% Electrolux (Frigidaire) 13% Whirlpool 13% Haier 8% Samsung 5% Sharp 4% Friedrich 4% UTC/Carrier 3% Matsushita 2% Others 4% Total 100% Source(s): Total Units Shipped: 9,085,500 Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 5

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Major Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Typical Service Average 2005 Average Lifetime Range Lifetime Stock Age Units to be Replaced Appliance Type (years) (years) (years) During 2011 (thousands) Refrigerators (1) 10 - 16 12 7.8 9,217 Freezers 8 - 16 11 11.3 2,215 Microwave Ovens 7 - 10 9 N.A. Ranges (2) Electric 12 - 19 16 N.A. 4,281 Gas 14 - 22 17 N.A. 2,854 Clothes Washers 7 - 14 11 N.A. 7,362 Clothes Dryers Electric 8 - 15 12 N.A. 5,095 Gas

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Stock 2010 U.S. Average Best Available Residential Appliance Type Parameter (1) Efficiency ... Source(s): 0.30 - 0.60 0.80 - 0.95 0.60 - 0.70 1) EF Energy Factor. MEF Modified ...

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Other Major Appliance Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 1990 2000 2009 2009 Value of Shipments (4) Appliance Type (thousands) (thousands) (thousands) ($million) Room Air Conditioners 3,799 6,496 6,418 129 Ranges (total) 5,873 8,202 5,941 3,158 Electric Ranges 3,350 5,026 3,509 2,041 Gas Ranges 2,354 3,176 2,433 1,117 Microwave Ovens/Ranges 7,693 9,333 N.A. Clothes Washers 5,591 7,495 7,999 4,820 Clothes Dryers (total) 4,160 6,575 6,547 N.A. (5) Electric Dryers 3,190 5,095 5,261 N.A. Gas

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Major Appliance Ownership (Millions of Households and Percent of U.S. Households) Appliance Type Room Air Conditioners 30.2 32% 30.4 31% 26.9 26% 27.4 25% 32.7 29% Refrigerators 91.2 98% 96.8 98% 100.0 96% 104.7 96% 111.6 99% Freezers 42.4 45% 41.9 42% 42.8 41% 36.1 33% 48.5 43% Electric Ranges/Cooktops 58.4 63% 65.3 66% 69.2 66% 71.0 65% 68.8 61% Gas Ranges/Cooktops 36.1 39% 38.3 39% 39.4 38% 42.2 39% 45.1 40% Microwave Ovens 77.2 83% 89.5 91% 94.6 91% 97.2 89% 102.6 91% Clothes Washers 86.4

  19. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air Partners: American Gas Association www.aga.org Center of Energy and Environment www.mncee.org Building Performance Institute www.bpi.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org/PARR Building Components: Gas Appliances Application: Retrofit Single Family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate

  20. LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: ...

  1. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    characterizes most major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, and water heating equipment. Appendix A was used in developing Reference case projections, while...

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Refrigeration System Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 1990 2000 2005 2010 Appliance Type (thousands) (thousands) (thousands) ($million) Refrigerator-Freezers (1) 7,317 9,462 9,369 (2) 5,466 Freezers (chest and upright) 1,328 2,007 2,274 1,958 N/A Refrigerated Display Cases 359 347 177 N/A N/A Unit Coolers (3) 178 207 209 N/A 205 Ice-Making Machines (4) 171 385 373 246 636 Water Cooler 253 348 N/A N/A N/A Beverage Vending Machine 229 353 N/A N/A N/A Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Value of

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Room Air Conditioner Capacities and Energy Efficiencies (Shipment-Weighted Averages) EER 1972 5.98 N.A. 1980 7.02 N.A. 1985 7.70 N.A. 1990 8.73 N.A. 1995 9.03 12.0 2000 9.30 11.7 2001 9.63 11.7 2002 9.75 11.7 2003 9.75 11.7 2004 9.71 11.7 2005 9.95 12.0 2006 10.02 12.0 2007 9.81 12.0 2008 9.93 12.0 2009 10.05 12.0 2010 10.18 12.0 Source(s): AHAM, Energy Efficiency and Consumption Trends 2010; AHAM, Efficiency and Consumption Trends 2009; AHAM, 1997 Major Appliance Industry Fact Book, Oct.

  4. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  5. NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NEMS Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Erin Boedecker Owen Comstock Behjat Hojjati Kevin Jarzomski David Peterson Steve Wade October 4, 2012 | Washington, D.C. AEO2013 Preliminary Results WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Overview Buildings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 | October 4, 2012 2 * Recap of project list

  6. Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Potential and Research, Development, & Demonstration Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances December 2009 i NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

  7. July 11 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial And Residential Building End-Use Equipment And Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These documents contain the three slide decks presented at the public meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances, held on July 11, 2014 in Washington, DC.

  8. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturers produce products with a high level of compliance that meet minimum energy conservation standards, resulting in energy savings in the buildings sector The Appliance & Equipment Standards Program promulgates energy conservation standards and test procedures in a rulemaking process to reduce energy consumption across residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. External Influences: DOE budget, Energy prices, Real estate market, Market incentives, Legislation / Regulation

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this case study, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team provides guidance on how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings.

  10. Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Language: English References: Building Efficiency: Development of an Agent-based Model of the US...

  11. City of San Jose- Private Sector Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet...

  12. Energy-Efficient Appliances: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) Technology Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-08-01

    Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors that explains the energy savings potential of efficient appliances, how to purchase them, and how to maintain them.

  13. LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification | Department of Energy Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification This March 26, 2009 webcast presented information about the Commercial Building Energy Alliances' (CBEA) efforts to explore the viability of LED site lighting in commercial parking lots.

  14. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Presentation Slides: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

  15. 2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

  16. Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and  Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

  17. Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nexus of Energy Use and Technology in the Buildings Sector EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC Tom Leckey, EIA Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Statistics 2. Select segments 1. Select Primary Sampling Units (PSUs) - counties or groups of counties Main St Diagonal Ave 3. Select buildings How is CBECS Conducted? Nexus of Energy Use and and Technology, Buildings July 15, 2014 2 * No comprehensive source of buildings exists * Area frame - Randomly select small,

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half

  19. Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

  20. MECS 2006- Computer, Electronics and Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy Footprint for Computer, Electronics and Appliances (NAICS 334, 335) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and

  2. Second AEO2016 Buildings Sector Workingb Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES ONLY DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE June 10, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Paul Holtberg Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team James Turnure Director, Office of Energy Consumption & Efficiency Analysis FROM: Buildings Consumption & Efficiency Analysis Team Subject: Second AEO2016 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Summary, workshop held on February 18, 2016

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Avg. Avg. (3) 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 37.22 7.70 13.06 18.52 17.99 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 39.06 8.29 14.78 20.56 19.68 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 40.15 9.40 13.28 21.21 20.48 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 39.51 10.43 12.53 21.55 21.23 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 38.68 10.00

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Total Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (3) Total Expenditures 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 70.9 20.5 17.2 108.6 267.2 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 79.4 21.4 16.5 117.3 281.3 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 83.4 25.1 13.7 122.2 294.5 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 83.6 26.1 14.6 124.3 300.4 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 87.6 25.9

  5. Appliance Standards Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementation, Certification, & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR Building Energy Codes Appliance Standards Guidance and Frequently Asked...

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) (cents/therm) (cents/gal) ($/gal) 1980 12.42 83.51 1.53 2.24 12.70 77.01 1.43 2.05 1981 13.14 88.83 1.47 2.51 13.33 82.90 1.63 2.32 1982 13.70 100.83 1.54 2.30 13.70 93.95 1.40 2.11 1983 13.79 113.04 1.51 2.14 13.48 104.33 1.30 1.75 1984 13.24 110.16 1.46 2.10 13.20 100.01 1.37 1.68 1985 13.28 106.80 1.37 1.96 13.06 95.96 1.21 1.56 1986 13.05 99.76 1.25 1.54 12.66 86.86 0.71 1.01 1987 12.72 92.16 1.22 1.42 11.92 79.32 0.79 1.05 1988 12.36

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2015 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (3) 49.5 15.9 1.3 8.1 0.7 25.9 0.2 18.7 94.3 22.7% Space Cooling 0.3 48.0 48.3 11.6% Lighting 45.9 45.9 11.0% Water Heating 17.6 2.6 1.5 4.1 18.3 40.0 9.6% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 6.0% Electronics (5) 19.8 19.8 4.7% Ventilation (6) 15.1 15.1 3.6% Computers 11.6 11.6 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.8 11.4 2.7% Cooking 3.9 0.9 0.9 4.4

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 2025 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 56.7 14.3 1.5 7.8 0.7 24.3 0.2 19.5 100.7 22.0% Space Cooling 0.3 50.5 50.9 11.1% Lighting 45.2 45.2 9.9% Water Heating 21.3 2.3 1.3 3.6 19.6 44.4 9.7% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 5.4% Electronics (5) 23.2 23.2 5.1% Computers 13.2 13.2 2.9% Wet Clean (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 2.3% Cooking 4.8 0.8 0.8 4.9 10.5 2.3%

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 2035 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 63.4 13.0 1.6 7.7 0.8 23.1 0.2 20.6 107.2 20.9% Water Heating 23.8 2.2 1.2 3.4 35.8 63.0 12.3% Space Cooling 0.4 55.7 56.1 10.9% Lighting 47.8 47.8 9.3% Electronics (4) 27.2 27.2 5.3% Refrigeration (5) 27.0 27.0 5.3% Computers 14.8 14.8 2.9% Cooking 5.8 0.8 0.8 5.4 12.1 2.3% Wet Clean (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 2.2%

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2

  13. Introduction to the Buildings Sector Module of SEDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Bonnet, Florence; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2010-12-31

    SEDS is a stochastic engineering-economics model that forecasts economy-wide energy consumption in the U.S. to 2050. It is the product of multi-laboratory collaboration among the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Lumina Decision Systems. Among national energy models, SEDS is unique, as it is the only model written to explicitly incorporate uncertainty in its inputs and outputs. The primary purpose of SEDS is to estimate the impact of various US Department of Energy (DOE)R&D and policy programs on the performance and subsequent adoption rates of technologies relating to every energy consuming sector of the economy (shown below). It has previously been used to assist DOE in complying with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA). The focus of LBNL research has been exclusively on develop the buildings model (SBEAM), which is capable of running as a stand-alone forecasting model, or as a part of SEDS as a whole. The full version of SEDS, containing all sectors and interaction is also called the 'integrated' version and is managed by NREL. Forecasts from SEDS are often compared to those coming from National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The intention of this document is to present new users and developers with a general description of the purpose, functionality and structure of the buildings module within the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS). The Buildings module, which is capable of running as a standalone model, is also called the Stochastic Buildings Energy and Adoption Model (SBEAM). This document will focus exclusively on SBEAM and its interaction with other major sector modules present within SEDS. The methodologies and major assumptions employed in SBEAM will also be discussed. The organization of this report will parallel the organization of the model itself, being divided into major submodules

  14. April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

  15. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption March 2012 8.1.2 Average Energy Intensity of Public Water Supplies by Location (kWh per Million Gallons) Location United States (2) 627 437 1,363 United States (3) 65 (6) 1,649 Northern California Indoor 111 1,272 1,911 Northern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Southern California Indoor (5) 111 1,272 1,911 Southern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Iowa (6) 380 1,570 Massachusetts (6) (6) 1,750 Wisconsin Class AB (4) - - Wisconsin Class C (4) - - Wisconsin Class

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2005 Energy End-Use Expenditures for an Average Household, by Region ($2010) Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating 1,050 721 371 352 575 Air-Conditioning 199 175 456 262 311 Water Heating 373 294 313 318 320 Refrigerators 194 145 146 154 157 Other Appliances and Lighting 827 665 715 716 725 Total (1) 2,554 1,975 1,970 1,655 2,003 Note(s): 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to totals. Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-15; EIA,

  18. Lost Opportunities in the Buildings Sector: Energy-Efficiency Analysis and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Anderson, David M.; Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2008-09-12

    This report summarizes the results and the assumptions used in an analysis of the potential “lost efficiency opportunities” in the buildings sector. These targets of opportunity are those end-uses, applications, practices, and portions of the buildings market which are not currently being addressed, or addressed fully, by the Building Technologies Program (BTP) due to lack of resources. The lost opportunities, while a significant increase in effort and impact in the buildings sector, still represent only a small portion of the full technical potential for energy efficiency in buildings.

  19. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Appliance and equipment standards are saving saving consumers and businesses billions of dollars. Appliance and equipment standards are saving saving consumers and businesses billions of dollars. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) implements minimum energy conservation standards for more than 60 categories of appliances and equipment. As a result of these standards, American consumers saved $63 billion on

  20. EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building Activity (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b pdf table 1b. Total Primary Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) By Principal Building Activity (Table 1c) html...

  1. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Technical assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L.; Popelka, A.; Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to characterize the economic energy efficiency potential and investment requirements for space heating and hot water provided by district heat in the stock of state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The assessment involves three activities. The first is a survey of state and municipal institutions to characterize the stock of institutional buildings. The second is to develop an estimate of the cost-effective efficiency potential. The third is to estimate the investment requirements to acquire the efficiency resource. Institutional buildings are defined as nonresidential buildings owned and occupied by state and municipal organizations. General categories of institutional buildings are education, healthcare, and cultural. The characterization activity provides information about the number of buildings, building floorspace, and consumption of space heating and hot water energy provided by the district system.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Commercial Building Vintage, as of 2003 1919 or Before 5% 1920 to 1945 10% 1946 to 1959 10% 1960 to 1969 12% 1970 to 1979 17% 1980 to 1989 17% 1990 to 1999 20% 2000 to 2003 9% Total 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Floorspace EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A1, p. 1-

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Commercial Building Median Lifetimes (Years) Building Type Median (1) 66% Survival (2) 33% Survival (2) Assembly 55 40 75 Education 62 45 86 Food Sales 55 41 74 Food Service 50 35 71 Health Care 55 42 73 Large Office 65 46 92 Mercantile & Service 50 36 69 Small Office 58 41 82 Warehouse 58 41 82 Lodging 53 38 74 Other 60 44 81 Note(s): Source(s): 1) PNNL estimates the median lifetime of commercial buildings is 70-75 years. 2) Number of years after which the building survives. For example,

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Building Size, as of 2003 (Number of Buildings and Percent of Total Floorspace) Square Foot Range Number of Buildings (thousands) 1,001 to 5,000 10% 5,001 to 10,000 10% 10,001 to 25,000 18% 25,001 to 50,000 13% 50,001 to 100,000 14% 100,001 to 200,000 (1) 14% 200,001 to 500,000 10% Over 500,000 11% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 26 8 4,859 1) 35% of commercial floorspace is found in 2.2% of commercial buildings that are larger than 100,000 square feet. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings

  5. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Share of Commercial Floorspace, by Census Region and Vintage, as of 2003 (Percent) Region Prior to 1960 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 Total Northeast 9% 8% 3% 20% Midwest 8% 11% 6% 25% South 5% 18% 14% 37% West 3% 9% 5% 18% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, Oct. 2006, Table A2, p. 3-4

  7. Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector October 19, 2011 - 1:10pm Addthis An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs

  9. Emerging Technologies: HVAC, WH and Appliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies: HVAC, WH and Appliance BTO Peer Review 2016 Antonio M Bouza antonio.bouza@ee.doe.gov April 5-7, 2016 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Codes and Standards Emerging Technologies Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings Integration 3 HVAC, Water Heating and Appliance R&D Strategy: National Labs CRADA projects, FOAs and use of BTO's deployment teams with research homes CRADA : Collaborative Research and Development Agreement More than just discrete

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Number of Floors and Type of Ownership, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) Floors Ownership One 40% Nongovernment Owned 76% Two 25% Owner-Occupied 36% Three 12% Nonowner-Occupied 37% Four to Nine 16% Unoccupied 3% Ten or More 8% Government Owned 24% Total 100% Federal 3% State 5% Local 15% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 2003, June 2006, Table C1

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 2003 Average Commercial Building Floorspace, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Building Type 1959 or Prior 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Education 27.5 26.9 21.7 25.6 Food Sales N.A. N.A. N.A. 5.6 Food Service 6.4 4.4 5.0 5.6 Health Care 18.5 37.1 N.A. 24.5 Inpatient N.A. 243.6 N.A. 238.1 Outpatient N.A. 11.3 11.6 10.4 Lodging 9.9 36.1 36.0 35.9 Retail (Other Than Mall) 6.2 9.3 17.5 9.7 Office 12.4 16.4 14.2 14.8 Public Assembly 13.0 13.8 17.3 14.2 Public Order and Safety N.A. N.A. N.A.

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100%

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Vintage ($2010) Vintage $/SF Prior to 1960 1.44 1960 to 1969 1.70 1970 to 1979 1.88 1980 to 1989 2.09 1990 to 1999 1.88 2000 to 2003 1.72 Average 1.77 Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Table C4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators

  14. Text-Alternative Version: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification webcast.

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019

  16. Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Next-Generation Appliances Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances provides recommendations to the Building Technologies Office (BTO) on R&D activities to pursue that will aid in achieving BTO's energy savings goals. For appliances, BTO targets 14% and 29% primary energy savings by 2020 and 2030, respectively. The recommended initiatives in the report target high-priority R&D,

  17. Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet Appliance and Equipment Standards Fact Sheet Appliance and equipment efficiency standards have served as one of the nation's most effective policies for improving energy efficiency and saving consumers energy and money. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Appliance and Equipment Standards Program covers more than 60 products, representing about 90% of home energy use, 60% of commercial building energy use, and 30% of industrial energy use.

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Total Commercial Floorspace and Number of Buildings, by Year 1980 50.9 (1) N.A. 3.1 (3) 1990 64.3 N.A. 4.5 (3) 2000 (4) 68.5 N.A. 4.7 (5) 2008 78.8 15% N.A. 2010 81.1 26% N.A. 2015 84.1 34% N.A. 2020 89.2 43% N.A. 2025 93.9 52% N.A. 2030 98.2 60% N.A. 2035 103.0 68% N.A. Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127-128 for 2000 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

  19. Hydrogen Generator Appliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J slide presentation: hydrogen Generator appliance Gus Block, Nuvera Fuel Cells

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A.

  1. Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about appliance standards, building energy codes, ENERGY STAR program and tax incentives for building efficiency.

  2. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Overview - 2016 BTO...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO ...

  3. Report Highlights Significant Energy Savings Potential for Commercial Appliances

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Appliances used in commercial buildings for cooking, cleaning, water heating, and other end-uses account for nearly 22 percent of annual commercial building primary energy usage. According to a new report from DOE’s Building Technologies Office, energy-saving technologies available today could reduce commercial appliance consumption by 22 percent, with emerging technologies offering even bigger savings potential—36 percent.

  4. Appliance Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HVAC, Water Heating, & Appliances Appliance Projects Appliance Projects This project seeks to demonstrate a ventless residential dryer with an energy factor greater than ...

  5. Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's buildings consume more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy, including transportation and industry. Learn more about: Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Design Water Heating Lighting and Daylighting Energy Basics Home Renewable Energy Homes & Buildings Lighting

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26%

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Buildings Delivered Total Residential Commercial 2029 38% 38% | 76% 24% 0% 100% | 14.62 2030 38% 38% | 76% 24% 0% 100% | 14.75 2031 38% 38% | 76% 23% 0% 100% | 14.87 2032 38% 38% | ...

  8. Federal Appliance Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: HR 6582 of 2012 made some modifications to the efficiency standards previously adopted for some appliance types. The bill did not adopt new standards for previously unregulated appliances,...

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation 1980 37% 41% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 36% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 40% 39% 18% 3% | 51% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 40% 39% 17% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 39% 40% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 39% 40% 18% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 41% 40% 16% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 39% 41% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 40% 42% 15% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.44

  10. Kyiv institutional buildings sector energy efficiency program: Lending and implementation assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secrest, T.J.; Freeman, S.L.; Popelka, A.; Shestopal, P.A.; Gagurin, E.V.

    1997-08-01

    The government of Ukraine, through the State Committee of Energy Conservation (State Committee), is considering the implementation of energy efficiency measures in state and municipal institutional buildings in the city of Kyiv. The State Committee entered into a Memorandum of Cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct an assessment of the institutional buildings sector efficiency potential. This assessment will be used to support a potential loan by the World Bank for implementing a buildings efficiency improvement program in Kyiv. This report provides an assessment of the options for structuring the lending scenarios and the implementation of the program. Components to the lending structure are options for the disbursement of funds, options for the loan service, and other financial options and considerations. Program implementation includes management structures, reporting, installation activities, and post-installation activities such as training and verification.

  11. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. Energy data sourcebook for the US residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, T.P.; Koomey, J.G.; Sanchez, M.

    1997-09-01

    Analysts assessing policies and programs to improve energy efficiency in the residential sector require disparate input data from a variety of sources. This sourcebook, which updates a previous report, compiles these input data into a single location. The data provided include information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment efficiency; historical and current appliance and equipment market shares; appliances and equipment efficiency and sales trends; appliance and equipment efficiency standards; cost vs. efficiency data for appliances and equipment; product lifetime estimates; thermal shell characteristics of buildings; heating and cooling loads; shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings; baseline housing stocks; forecasts of housing starts; and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. This report is the essential sourcebook for policy analysts interested in residential sector energy use. The report can be downloaded from the Web at http://enduse.lbl. gov/Projects/RED.html. Future updates to the report, errata, and related links, will also be posted at this address.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Million Barrels per Day) Buildings Residential Commercial Total Industry Transportation Total 1980 2.62 2.01 l 4.63 10.55 19.01 34.19 1981 2.26 1.73 l 3.98 9.13 18.81 31.93 1982 1.96 1.49 l 3.45 8.35 18.42 30.23 1983 1.87 1.61 l 3.48 7.97 18.60 30.05 1984 1.95 1.60 l 3.55 8.48 19.02 31.05 1985 1.92 1.40 l 3.32 8.13 19.47 30.92 1986 2.03 1.60 l 3.62 8.39 20.18 32.20 1987 2.04 1.51 l 3.54 8.50 20.82 32.86 1988 2.20 1.57 l 3.77 8.88 21.57 34.22 1989

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector, May 10, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 10, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: Business Models and Case Examples for Working with the Real Estate Sector Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  Is your program currently working with real estate sector (or are you thinking about doing so), and if so, how? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Cynthia Gunn, DOE  San Diego, CA: Jeremy Hutman, CCSE * Discussion:  What are some key strategies for engaging this sector?  How can the value

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Shares of U.S. Buildings Generic Quad (Percent) (1) Renewables (2) Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydroelectric Other Total Nuclear Total 1980 37% 18% 29% 7% 3% 10% 6% 100% 1981 37% 15% 31% 6% 4% 10% 7% 100% 1982 36% 13% 31% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1983 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1984 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1985 33% 12% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1986 31% 13% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1987 31% 13% 36% 6% 3% 9% 11% 100% 1988 31% 13% 35% 5% 3% 9% 12% 100% 1989 31% 12% 34% 6% 4% 10% 12% 100% 1990 31%

  16. Appliance Standards: Saving Consumers Energy and Money | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Appliance Standards: Saving Consumers Energy and Money Appliance Standards: Saving Consumers Energy and Money June 8, 2016 - 1:38pm Addthis Appliance Standards: Saving Consumers Energy and Money Key Facts The program tests, sets, and helps enforce minimum efficiency levels on more than 60 U.S. products mandated by Congress. Standards cover more than 90% of home energy use, 60% of commercial building use, and 30% of industry energy use. The standards program is saving consumers $63

  17. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances About the Portfolio The HVAC/Water Heating/Appliance subprogram develops cost effective, energy efficient technologies with national labs and industry partners. Technical analysis has shown that heat pumps have the technical potential to save up to 50% of the energy used by conventional HVAC technologies in residential buildings. Our focus is on the introduction of new heat pumping technologies, heat

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA,

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 7.42 28.2% 3.04 11.5% 0.15 0.6% 0.87 3.3% 4.35 10.47 14.82 56.4% 26.29 100% - 1981 7.11 27.5% 2.63 10.2% 0.17 0.6% 0.89 3.5% 4.50 10.54 15.03 58.2% 25.84 100% - 1982 7.32 27.8% 2.45 9.3% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.57 10.80 15.37 58.4% 26.31 100% - 1983 6.93 26.4% 2.50 9.5% 0.19

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Buildings Share of U.S. Primary Energy Consumption (Percent) Total Consumption Total Industry Transportation Total (quads) 1980(1) 20.1% 13.5% | 33.7% 41.1% 25.2% 100% | 78.1 1981 20.0% 13.9% | 33.9% 40.4% 25.6% 100% | 76.1 1982 21.2% 14.8% | 36.0% 37.9% 26.1% 100% | 73.1 1983 21.1% 15.0% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.3% 100% | 72.9 1984 20.8% 14.9% | 35.7% 38.7% 25.7% 100% | 76.6 1985 21.0% 15.0% | 35.9% 37.8% 26.3% 100% | 76.5 1986 20.8% 15.1% | 35.9% 37.0% 27.1% 100% | 76.6 1987 20.5% 15.1% | 35.6%

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 U.S. Buildings Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GSHP (4) Total 2010-Year 1980 0.867 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.867 - 1981 0.894 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.894 - 1982 0.993 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.993 - 1983 0.992 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.992 - 1984 1.002 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.002 - 1985 1.034 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.034 - 1986 0.947 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.947 - 1987 0.882 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.882 - 1988 0.942 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.942 - 1989 1.018 0.052 N.A.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2010 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Fuel Other Renw. Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.14 0.76 0.30 0.10 0.54 0.72 7.56 37.0% | 2.24 9.07 22.5% Space Cooling 0.04 1.92 1.96 9.6% | 5.94 5.98 14.8% Lighting 1.88 1.88 9.2% | 5.82 5.82 14.4% Water Heating 1.73 0.13 0.07 0.04 0.54 2.51 12.3% | 1.67 3.63 9.0% Refrigeration (6) 0.84 0.84 4.1% | 2.62 2.62 6.5% Electronics (7)

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2015 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.10 0.68 0.26 0.09 0.55 0.59 7.27 35.9% | 1.77 8.45 21.5% Lighting 1.52 1.52 7.5% | 4.65 4.65 11.8% Space Cooling 0.04 0.54 0.57 2.8% | 4.60 4.63 11.8% Water Heating 1.79 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.57 2.55 12.6% | 1.71 3.70 9.4% Refrigeration (6) 0.81 0.81 4.0% | 2.43 2.43 6.2%

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2025 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.96 0.57 0.24 0.09 0.57 0.63 7.05 33.2% | 1.89 8.31 19.6% Space Cooling 0.03 1.64 1.67 7.9% | 4.94 4.97 11.7% Lighting 1.55 1.55 7.3% | 4.68 4.68 11.0% Water Heating 1.84 0.08 0.04 0.05 0.62 2.63 12.4% | 1.86 3.88 9.1% Refrigeration (6) 0.82 0.82 3.9% | 2.47 2.47 5.8%

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 2035 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.84 0.49 0.22 0.09 0.57 0.66 6.87 30.5% | 1.93 8.15 17.9% Space Cooling 0.03 1.79 1.82 8.1% | 5.27 5.30 11.7% Lighting 1.63 1.63 7.3% | 4.81 4.81 10.6% Water Heating 1.81 0.07 0.03 0.06 0.63 2.60 11.6% | 1.86 3.83 8.4% Electronics (6) 0.90 0.90 4.0% | 2.66 2.66 5.8%

  6. Appliance Standards and Building Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Team Lead - Test Procedures and Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Ashley Armstrong, (202) 586-6590 * Lucas Adin, (202) 287-1317 * Bryan Berringer, (202) 586-0371 * Josh ...

  7. Guide to Kitchen Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    This fact sheet tells you how to buy and maintain energy-efficient kitchen appliances, including refrigerators, freezers, and dishwashers, to save energy and money.

  8. Appliance Efficiency Regulations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: The federal government has imposed and updated appliance efficiency standards through several legislative acts,* and now has standards in place or under development for 30 classes of...

  9. Energy Star Appliances

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updates and News ENERGY STAR appliances have been a successful program offer for many BPA utility customers and are expected to continue. However, as ENERGY STAR specifications...

  10. Appliance Standards Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The federal government, and some states, have established minimum efficiency standards for certain appliances and equipment, such as refrigerators and clothes washers.

  11. The energy investment decision in the nonresidential building sector: Research into the areas of influence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkreader, S.A.; Ivey, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and to characterize the decision process in the nonresidential building sector as well as the variables influencing energy investment decisions, both of which impact the development of R and D agendas for the Office of Building and Community Systems (BCS). The report reviews the available information on the factors that influence energy investment decisions and identifies information gaps where additional research is needed. This report focuses on variables and combinations of these variables (descriptive states) that influence the non residential energy investment decision maker. Economic and demographic descriptors, energy investment decision maker characteristics, and variables affecting energy investments are identified. This response examines the physical characteristics of buildings, characteristics of the legal environment surrounding buildings, demographic factors, economic factors, and decision processes, all of which impact the nonresidential energy investment market. The emphasis of the report is on providing possible methodologies for projecting the future of the nonresidential energy investment market, as well as, collecting the data necessary for such projections. The use of alternate scenarios is suggested as a projection tool and suggestions for collecting the appropriate data are made in the recommendations.

  12. Tips: Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Appliances Learn about appliances that can automatically shift your use to off-peak hours, saving you money. Home Office and Electronics Select energy-efficient electronics ...

  13. Tips: Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Follow Us followontwitter.png followonfacebook.png Appliance & Electronics Blogs Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season Choose the Right Advanced Power Strip for You ...

  14. Global residential appliance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.; Lebot, B.

    1993-03-01

    In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

  15. Simulation of the GHG Abatement Potentials in the U.S. Building Sector by 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; DeForest, Nicholas; Marnay, Chris; Bonnet, Florence; Lai, Judy; Phan, Trucy

    2010-10-01

    Given the substantial contribution of the U.S. building sector to national carbon emissions, it is clear that to address properly the issue of climate change, one must first consider innovative approaches to understanding and encouraging the introduction of new, low-carbon technologies to both the commercial and residential building markets. This is the motivation behind the development of the Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM), a long range, open source model to forecast the impact of policy decisions and consumer behavior on the market penetration of both existing and emerging building technologies and the resulting carbon savings. The SLBM, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is part of the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) project, a multi-laboratory effort undertaken in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and private companies. The primary purpose of SEDS is to track the performance of different U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Research and Development (R&D) activities on technology adoption, overall energy efficiency, and CO{sub 2} reductions throughout the whole of the U.S. economy. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with a number of characteristics to distinguish it from existing energy forecasting models. SEDS has been written explicitly to incorporate uncertainty in its inputs leading to uncertainty bounds on the subsequent forecasts. It considers also passive building systems and their interactions with other building service enduses, including the cost savings for heating, cooling, and lighting due to different building shell/window options. Such savings can be compared with investments costs in order to model real-world consumer behavior and forecast adoption rates. The core objective of this paper is to report on the new window and shell features of SLBM and to show the implications of

  16. Student-Built Appliances Made to Do More with Less | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Student-Built Appliances Made to Do More with Less Student-Built Appliances Made to Do More with Less August 30, 2012 - 1:40pm Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Although today's home appliances are designed to be far more energy efficient than those made in the decades past, there's always room for improvement. Industry leaders are building energy-saving appliances because consumers demand high-performance products that

  17. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1

  18. Evaluation of the Contribution of the Building Sector to PM2.5 Emissions in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Fridley, David

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we quantify the current and potential contribution of China’s building sector to direct primary and indirect PM2.5 emissions and co-benefits of key pollution reduction strategies of energy efficiency, fuel switching and pollution control technologies on PM2.5 emissions reduction. We use a bottom-up end-use accounting model to model residential and commercial buildings’ coal demand for heating and electricity demand in China’s Northern and Transition climate zones from 2010 to 2030. The model is then used to characterize the current coal-based heating (e.g., district heating, combined heat and power generation, small-scale coal-fired boilers) and power generation technologies to estimate direct and indirect PM2.5 emissions. Model scenarios are developed to evaluate and compare the potential co-benefits of efficiency improvements, fuel switching and pollution control technologies in reducing building-related direct and indirect PM2.5 emissions. An alternative pathway of development in which district heating is introduced to China’s Transition zone to meet growing demand for heat is also modeled to evaluate and quantify the potential impact on PM2.5 emissions.

  19. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air ...

  20. Appliance Energy Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our appliance and electronic energy use calculator allows you to estimate your annual energy use and cost to operate specific products. The wattage values provided are samples only; actual wattage...

  1. Research & Development Roadmap for Next-Generation Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Foley, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Appliances present an attractive opportunity for near-term energy savings in existing building, because they are less expensive and replaced more regularly than heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems or building envelope components. This roadmap targets high-priority research and development (R&D), demonstration and commercialization activities that could significantly reduce residential appliance energy consumption. The main objective of the roadmap is to seek activities that accelerate the commercialization of high-efficiency appliance technologies while maintaining the competitiveness of American industry. The roadmap identified and evaluated potential technical innovations, defined research needs, created preliminary research and development roadmaps, and obtained stakeholder feedback on the proposed initiatives.

  2. Appliance and Equipment Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards April 22, 2014 John Cymbalsky Program Manager 1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Appliance & Equipment Standards Mission The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program's Mission to Fulfill its Statutory Obligation to: * Develop and amend energy conservation standards that achieve the maximum energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. * Develop and amend test procedures that are repeatable, reproducible, representative,

  3. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances Tips: Shopping for Appliances What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new...

  4. Appliances and Electronics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appliances Home office and electronics. Follow Us followontwitter.png followonfacebook.png Appliance & Electronics Blogs Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season...

  5. Tips: Smart Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn More Smart meters and a smart power grid Kitchen appliances Laundry Shopping for appliances Estimating appliance and home electronic energy use Links What is the Smart Grid? ...

  6. Scale Matters: An Action Plan for Realizing Sector-Wide"Zero-Energy" Performance Goals in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen; Selkowitz, Stephen; Granderson, Jessica; Haves, Philip; Mathew, Paul; Harris, Jeff

    2008-06-16

    It is widely accepted that if the United States is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions it must aggressively address energy end use in the building sector. While there have been some notable but modest successes with mandatory and voluntary programs, there have also been puzzling failures to achieve expected savings. Collectively, these programs have not yet reached the majority of the building stock, nor have they yet routinely produced very large savings in individual buildings. Several trends that have the potential to change this are noteworthy: (1) the growing market interest in 'green buildings' and 'sustainable design', (2) the major professional societies (e.g. AIA, ASHRAE) have more aggressively adopted significant improvements in energy efficiency as strategic goals, e.g. targeting 'zero energy', carbon-neutral buildings by 2030. While this vision is widely accepted as desirable, unless there are significant changes to the way buildings are routinely designed, delivered and operated, zero energy buildings will remain a niche phenomenon rather than a sector-wide reality. Toward that end, a public/private coalition including the Alliance to Save Energy, LBNL, AIA, ASHRAE, USGBC and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) are developing an 'action plan' for moving the U.S. commercial building sector towards zero energy performance. It addresses regional action in a national framework; integrated deployment, demonstration and R&D threads; and would focus on measurable, visible performance indicators. This paper outlines this action plan, focusing on the challenge, the key themes, and the strategies and actions leading to substantial reductions in GHG emissions by 2030.

  7. Dual Integrated Appliances as an Energy and Safety Solution for Low Income

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherization Webinar | Department of Energy Dual Integrated Appliances as an Energy and Safety Solution for Low Income Weatherization Webinar Dual Integrated Appliances as an Energy and Safety Solution for Low Income Weatherization Webinar Slides from the Building America webinar presented by the NorthernSTAR team. webinar_northernstar_dual_appliances_20111019.pdf (9.61 MB) More Documents & Publications Building America Expert Meeting: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in

  8. Appliance Commitment for Household Load Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Pengwei; Lu, Ning

    2011-06-30

    This paper presents a novel appliance commitment algorithm that schedules thermostatically-controlled household loads based on price and consumption forecasts considering users comfort settings to meet an optimization objective such as minimum payment or maximum comfort. The formulation of an appliance commitment problem was described in the paper using an electrical water heater load as an example. The thermal dynamics of heating and coasting of the water heater load was modeled by physical models; random hot water consumption was modeled with statistical methods. The models were used to predict the appliance operation over the scheduling time horizon. User comfort was transformed to a set of linear constraints. Then, a novel linear, sequential, optimization process was used to solve the appliance commitment problem. The simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm is fast, robust, and flexible. The algorithm can be used in home/building energy-management systems to help household owners or building managers to automatically create optimal load operation schedules based on different cost and comfort settings and compare cost/benefits among schedules.

  9. Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances & Electronics » Shopping for Appliances Shopping for Appliances What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new appliance. What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new appliance. When you're shopping for appliances, think of two price tags. The first one covers the purchase price -- think of it as a down

  10. Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural Resources Defense Council - ... Earthjustice, Appliance Standards Awareness Project, Natural Resources Defense Council - ...

  11. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  12. Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

  13. EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to use several diverse approaches to purchase or acquire energy savings from commercial sector...

  14. The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2009-05-14

    The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.

  15. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Through Appliance Zone Isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Bohac, D.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the isolation of natural draft combustion appliances from the conditioned space of low-rise residential buildings. It deals with combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage. This subset of houses does not require comprehensive combustion safety tests and simplified prescriptive procedures can be used to address safety concerns. This allows residential energy retrofit contractors inexperienced in advanced combustion safety testing to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits including tightening and changes to distribution and ventilation systems to proceed.

  16. Green buildings: DOE`s historical role and new directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millhone, J.P.

    1994-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Building Technologies (OBT) has traditionally played a major role in the development of {open_quotes}green buildings{close_quotes} technologies. OBT`s mission is to reduce the amount of fossil-based energy consumed by new and existing buildings, and improved energy efficiency is a critical factor in the green movement. A number of OBT`s programs also address other, non-energy facets of green technology, including the development of CFC-free insulation and appliances, indoor air quality research, and the development of standards for water-consuming appliances. This paper describes OBT`s strategy for enhancing the energy efficiency of the buildings sector, and outlines new directions in the area of green buildings technology resulting from recent Congressional legislation and administration initiatives.

  17. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (CEC), March 1990. Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines (ALTAG), Building and Appliance Efficiency Office. 3. Dubin, F.S., Mindell, H.L., and Bloome, S., 1976....

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 2009 Annual Natural Gas Consumption per Appliance by Census Division Census Division New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific United States Average Total Source(s): 515,657 208,173 43,648 42,723 90,171 American Gas Association, Residential Natural Gas Market Survey, Jan. 2011, Table 10-1. 61,928 23,005 5,238 5,135 10,270 44,675 20,232 3,286 3,286 29,064 33,891 24,648 3,595 3,081 5,135 58,334 26,702

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating 70.3 56.6 20.4 23.8 38.7 Space Cooling 3.6 5.6 13.9 4.0 7.9 Water Heating 21.1 20.4 15.8 21.2 19.0 Refrigerator 5.4 7.0 6.6 5.7 6.3 Other Appliances & Lighting 23.0 25.9 25.0 24.1 24.7 Total (1) 79.9 77.4 95.0 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Delivered Energy End-Uses for an Average Household, by Region (Million Btu per Household) 122.2 113.5 1) Due to rounding, sums do not add up to totals. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct.

  20. Appliance/Equipment Efficiency Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Massachusetts Boilers Furnaces No Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards (Maryland) ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Maryland...

  1. Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

    1988-02-01

    This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

  2. Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

  3. Assessment of Literature Related to Combustion Appliance Venting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, V. H.; Less, B. D.; Singer, B. C.; Stratton, J. C.; Wray, C. P.

    2015-02-01

    In many residential building retrofit programs, air tightening to increase energy efficiency is often constrained by safety concerns with naturally vented combustion appliances. Tighter residential buildings more readily depressurize when exhaust equipment is operated, making combustion appliances more prone to backdraft or spill combustion exhaust into the living space. Several measures, such as installation guidelines, vent sizing codes, and combustion safety diagnostics, are in place with the intent to prevent backdrafting and combustion spillage, but the diagnostics conflict and the risk mitigation objective is inconsistent. This literature review summarizes the metrics and diagnostics used to assess combustion safety, documents their technical basis, and investigates their risk mitigations. It compiles information from the following: codes for combustion appliance venting and installation; standards and guidelines for combustion safety diagnostics; research evaluating combustion safety diagnostics; research investigating wind effects on building depressurization and venting; and software for simulating vent system performance.

  4. Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2011-11-01

    For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

  5. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in Residential Buildings, 1984 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand)...

  6. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in Residential Buildings, 1987 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand)...

  7. Streamlining ENERGY STAR Appliance Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To save taxpayer dollars and help lower the costs of innovative energy-efficient technologies, the Energy Department is streamlining ENERGY STAR testing for appliances.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand Btu/SF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4% Outpatient 205.9 2% | Food Service 522.4 6% Food Sales 535.5 5% | Religious Worship 77.0 2% Lodging 193.1 7% | Public Order and Safety 221.1 2% Office 211.7 19% | Warehouse and Storage

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2

  10. HVAC, Water Heater and Appliance R&D - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Heater and Appliance R&D - 2014 BTO Peer Review HVAC, Water Heater and Appliance R&D - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Tony Bouza, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's HVAC, Water Heater and Appliance R&D activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation HVAC, Water Heater and Appliance R&D

  11. Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings : Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    Bonneville has carefully considered the potential environmental impacts associated with installation of currently known Energy- efficient Conservation Measures (ECMs) in new and existing commercial buildings, and has implemented specific requirements to minimize those impacts. These Commercial Environmental Requirements would apply to the three proposed conservation approaches outlined in this environmental assessment. The cumulative energy savings from these proposed commercial programs will have a positive impact on the region. These savings will help reduce the region's dependence on other resource types needed to meet Bonneville's load requirements. However, the savings are not large enough to negate or replace other needed resources or other conservation programs. To summarize, the following environmental requirements have been incorporated in all BPA commercial conservation programs, including this proposal. Building owners are required to comply with all Federal, state, and local building and safety codes and environmental regulations. ASHRAE Standard 62-89 has been adopted by Bonneville as the required ventilation standard to improve indoor air quality in commercial buildings. Specific guidelines for installing HPS lighting indoors is provided to program participants. Guidance regarding disposal of fluorescent light ballasts which may contain PCBs is routinely provided to building owners. Bonneville will not fund removal and disposal of asbestos material. The use of urea formaldehyde foam insulation is not permitted in either new construction or in existing building retrofits. The use of toxic transfer fluids is not permitted in any ECM. All commercial buildings over 45 years old will be reviewed in accordance with Bonneville's PMOA with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the State Historic Preservation Offices.

  12. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    minimum standards for efficiency and quality -- ... windows, and other products that consume energy in your home. ... Kitchen appliances Laundry Smart appliances Home office ...

  13. Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain Air Con International Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Department of Energy Opens Appliance Standards Investigation for Certain ...

  14. Xcel Energy - Appliance Recycling Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Rebate Amount 40appliance Summary The Appliance Recycling Program offers free pick up and recycling of old, inefficient, working refrigerators and freezers....

  15. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, Frederick K.; Wilkinson, Jay C.; Wooding, David R.

    1997-01-01

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a worksite on a substantially circular bore of a workpiece and for providing video signals of the worksite to a remote monitor comprising: a baseplate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the baseplate and positioned to roll against the bore of the workpiece when the baseplate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the baseplate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the baseplate; a camera for providing video signals of the worksite to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the baseplate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the baseplate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris.

  16. Remote repair appliance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heumann, F.K.; Wilkinson, J.C.; Wooding, D.R.

    1997-12-16

    A remote appliance for supporting a tool for performing work at a work site on a substantially circular bore of a work piece and for providing video signals of the work site to a remote monitor comprises: a base plate having an inner face and an outer face; a plurality of rollers, wherein each roller is rotatably and adjustably attached to the inner face of the base plate and positioned to roll against the bore of the work piece when the base plate is positioned against the mouth of the bore such that the appliance may be rotated about the bore in a plane substantially parallel to the base plate; a tool holding means for supporting the tool, the tool holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate such that the working end of the tool is positioned on the inner face side of the base plate; a camera for providing video signals of the work site to the remote monitor; and a camera holding means for supporting the camera on the inner face side of the base plate, the camera holding means being adjustably attached to the outer face of the base plate. In a preferred embodiment, roller guards are provided to protect the rollers from debris and a bore guard is provided to protect the bore from wear by the rollers and damage from debris. 5 figs.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36% Government Owned 105.3 28% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (thousand Btu/SF) 1) Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, June 2006,

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Supermarkets in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use Toilets/Urinals Other/Misc. Indoor (2) Cooling Total Building Size (SF) Benchmarking Values for Supermarkets (3) N Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/year 38 Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/daily transaction 38 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 52 - 64 9 - 16 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for

  20. Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: A literature review and a preliminary characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.; Gadgil, A.; Sezgen, O.

    1991-04-01

    Energy use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of those in the mix of industries elsewhere in the US. Many California firms operate small and medium-sized facilities, often in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services'' to provide occupant comfort and necessities (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. In this report, published or unpublished information on energy use for building services in the industrial sector have been compiled and analyzed. Seven different sources of information and data relevant to California have been identified. Most of these are studies and/or projects sponsored by the Department of Energy, the California Energy Commission, and local utilities. The objectives of these studies were diverse: most focused on industrial energy use in general, and, in one case, the objective was to analyze energy use in commercial buildings. Only one of these studies focused directly on non-process energy use in industrial buildings. Our analysis of Northern California data for five selected industries shows that the contribution of total electricity consumption for lighting ranges from 9.5% in frozen fruits to 29.1% in instruments; for air-conditioning, it ranges from nonexistent in frozen fruits to 35% in instrument manufacturing. None of the five industries selected had significant electrical space heating. Gas space heating ranges from 5% in motor vehicles facilities to more than 58% in the instrument manufacturing industry. 15 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 = 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55 1992 0.77 2002 0.92 1983 0.58 1993 0.78 2003 0.94 1984 0.60 1994 0.80 2004 0.97 1985 0.62 1995 0.82 2005 1.00 1986 0.63 1996 0.83 2006 1.03 1987 0.65 1997 0.85 2007 1.06 1988 0.67 1998 0.86 2008 1.09 1989 0.70 1999 0.87 2009 1.10 2010 1.11 Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, August 2011, Appendix D, p. 353.

  2. Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  3. Appliance Standards Program Overview- 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand Btu/SF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A. 65.9 West 22.0 25.3 N.A. 46.2 National Average 33.0 43.4 68.3

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Million Btu/Household) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 21.2 34.9 36.2 54.7 Midwest 16.6 36.6 N.A. 51.8 South 39.4 20.0 N.A. 48.5 West 16.6 19.3 N.A. 34.8 National Average 24.6 32.2 51.0

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% |

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Consumption per Year Constructed Square Foot (thousand Btu/SF) Prior to 1960 84.4 23% 1960 to 1969 91.5 12% 1970 to 1979 97.0 18% 1980 to 1989 100.0 19% 1990 to 1999 90.3 19% 2000 to 2003 81.6 8% Average 91.0 Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1a

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 -

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other

  11. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  12. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Emerging Technologies: HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  13. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Subprogram Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Emerging Technologies: HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance subprogram. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per

  15. Appliance Standard Testing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standard Testing Appliance Standard Testing Addthis Description Below is the text version for the "Appliance Standard Testing" video. The video follows Deputy Assistant Secretary Kathleen Hogan through the Intertek laboratory. Appliances are being tested, including air conditioners, water heaters, and washing machines. Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency The Department of Energy runs a very successful program known as the National Appliance

  16. Appliances and Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Saver » Appliances and Electronics Appliances and Electronics Choose efficient appliances and use them wisely to save money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder/NREL. Choose efficient appliances and use them wisely to save money and energy. | Photo courtesy of Dennis Schroeder/NREL. You can save money and energy at home by choosing energy efficient appliances and electronics and reducing the amount you use them. Explore the following topics to reduce your electricity use and

  17. Nebraska Appliance Rebate Program opens

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nearly 500 people lined up outside of Omaha's Nebraska Furniture Mart on July 6, waiting to get ENERGY STAR washing machines, dishwashers and refrigerators on the first day of Nebraska's Appliance Rebate Program.

  18. Appliances & Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    href"node587248">Check out these tips -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try. Looking for ways to...

  19. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been...

  20. Challenges in Commercial Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working on real building projects with a range of large institutional and private sector ... AERGs to real buildings in collaboration with institutional and private sector partners. ...

  1. Climate change, insurance, and the buildings sector: Technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-11-01

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to better understand this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognized are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to significantly expanding these efforts. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.65 12% 0.16 14% Walls -1.00 19% 0.11 10% Foundation -0.76 15% -0.07 - Infiltration -1.47 28% 0.19 16% Windows (conduction) -1.34 26% 0.01 1% Windows (solar gain) 0.43 - 0.37 32% Internal Gains 0.79 - 0.31 27% Net Load -3.99 100% 1.08 100% Note(s): Source(s): Aggregate Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy losses/gains that when combined will be offset by a

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 -

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204

  5. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary

  6. Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

    1981-03-01

    The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

  7. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and...

  8. Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies Information about appliance ...

  9. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1982 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

  10. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1980 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

  11. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1981 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

  12. Better Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Initiative aims to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient by 2020 and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency.

  13. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use Electricity Use Residential Transportation 21 quads 27 quads Commercial 18 quads Industrial 31 quads U.S. Energy Bill for Buildings: $410 billion per year 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Emerging Technologies Building Codes Appliance Standards Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings

  14. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  15. MC Appliance: Order (2014-CE-20002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes washers and residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Midea Washing Appliance: Order (2011-CE-1903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Midea Washing Appliance Mfg. Co., Ltd. to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Midea Washing Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  17. Tips: Smart Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    available as smart appliances. Smart appliances don't just turn off during times of peak electricity demand -- instead, they use subtle ways to shift energy use. You might not...

  18. BSH Home Appliances: Order (2014-CE-23013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered BSH Home Appliances Corporation to pay a $12,000 civil penalty after finding BSH Home Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. Tips: Shopping for Appliances | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances July 16, 2014 - 7:33pm Addthis What's the real cost? Every appliance has two price tags -- the purchase price and the operating cost. Consider both when buying a new...

  20. Fort Collins Utilities- Residential Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated...

  1. Distinctive Appliances: Order (2015-CE-14019)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Distinctive Appliances Distributing, Inc. to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Distinctive Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of Fhiaba-brand refrigerator-freezers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Distinctive Appliances: Order (2014-CE-23020)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Distinctive Appliances Distributing, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Distinctive Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  3. GE Appliances: Order (2010-CE-2113)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with General Electric Appliances after finding GE Appliances had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  5. Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building Other EE Tankless Water Heater Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Questar Gas Website http:www.thermwise.combuilder...

  6. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Historically, only Industrial Facilities (ISO 50003 Industry - light to medium and ... is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ...

  7. Save Energy on Appliances this Holiday Season

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Before the holiday shopping mayhem begins, take a look at Energy Saver's tips for finding the most energy efficient appliances.

  8. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  9. Buildings Sector Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Group Forrestal 2E-069 July 22, 2013 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Lighting model - Equipment, shell subsidies - ENERGY STAR benchmarking - Housing stock formation ...

  10. ETs HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ET's HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTO Technology Manager April 14-15 2015 2 Introduction Program Goals: Support BTO's goals to achieve 50 percent building energy savings * By 2020, develop technologies enabling 10 percent energy savings in HVAC; 20 percent energy savings in water heating, and 15 percent energy savings in appliances * By 2030, develop technologies enabling 25 percent energy savings in HVAC; 35 percent energy savings in water heating, and 30 percent energy

  11. Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

    1995-01-01

    Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

  12. Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

    1986-09-01

    This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

  13. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses. The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  14. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  15. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

  16. ASKO Appliances: Compliance Determination (2010-SE-0601)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE tested four units dishwasher manufactured by ASKO Appliances, Inc. Applying statistical analysis, DOE found that the dishwasher meets the federal energy standards for maximum energy use.

  17. Smart Domestic Appliances Provide Flexibility for Sustainable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentsmart-domestic-appliances-provide-fle Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible...

  18. Appliance Rebates: Frequently Asked Questions | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spikes Former Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory The appliance rebate program has been wildly successful in many states. So successful, in fact, that people...

  19. Distinctive Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23020)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Distinctive Appliances Distributing Inc. failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Appliances & Electronics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Energy Efficiency » Homes » Appliances & Electronics Appliances & Electronics Looking for ways to save energy? <a href="/node/587248">Check out these tips</a> -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try. Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips -- which include using a power strip and switching to ENERGY STAR appliances -- that every homeowner should try.

  1. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York appliance efficiency standards legislation, enacted in 2005, covers the following products offered for sale in New York not preempted by federal standards as of August 2011:

  2. Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2005, Oregon passed legislation setting minimum energy efficiency standards for 11 appliances. The standards have been updated to include additional products, most recently by Senate Bill...

  3. Energy Department Issues New Appliance Efficiency Standards ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASHINGTON, DC -- U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced that a final rule to codify fifteen energy efficiency standards for residential appliances and commercial ...

  4. GE Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-2113)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that General Electric Appliances failed to certify a variety of dehumidifiers as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.3 Value of Construction and Research

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2003 U.S. Private Investment into Construction R&D Sector Average Construction R&D (1) 1.2 Building Technology Heavy Construction 2.0 Appliances 2.0 Special Trade Construction 0.2 Lighting 1.2 HVAC 1.5 U.S. Average of All Private R&D (2) 3.2 Fans, Blowers, & Air Cleaning Equipment 1.6 Manufacturing Average 3.1 Lumber and Wood Products 0.3 Service Industry Average 3.3 Commercial Building Operations 2.2 Note(s): Source(s): Percent of Sales Percent of Sales 1) Includes all

  6. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  7. Appliance Rebate Program Still Buzzing in the Beehive State

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah's appliance rebate program, known as Cash for Appliances Utah, distributes rebates across the state ranging from $30-$300 for ENERGY STAR appliances - including washers, furnaces, storage and tankless water heaters, and air conditioners.

  8. Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

  9. Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Appliance & Equipment Standards » Rulemakings & Notices » Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program established the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee (ASRAC) in an effort to further improve the Department of Energy's (DOE) process of establishing energy efficiency standards for certain appliances and commercial

  10. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliances (2009 Version) | Department of Energy (2009 Version) Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Commercial Building Appliances (2009 Version) This study characterizes and assesses the appliances used in commercial buildings. The primary objectives of this study were to document the energy consumed by commercial appliances and identify research, development and demonstration (RD&D) opportunities for efficiency improvements, excluding product categories such as

  11. Commercial Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Appliance and Equipment Standards Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO ...

  12. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    sealing and insulating exterior walls and attic and installing new, efficient appliances. ... Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit ...

  13. ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated February 3, 2012 ENERGY STAR Appliance Verification Testing - Pilot Program Summary Report dated ...

  14. Energy Efficient Appliance Sales Soar in North Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It took just eight days for retailers to rack up $64 million in sales of appliances through the state's Appliance Rebate Program.

  15. EIA Energy Efficiency-Appliance Standards and Labeling Links

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and enforcement requirements for residential appliances; final rule Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Appliances & Commercial Equipment Standards, the program develops test...

  16. Four-County EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four-County EMC offers its customers $50 rebates for purchasing certain Energy Star appliances. Eligible appliances include refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers and freezers. The rebates are...

  17. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - Program Design Lessons Learned State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned View the report State Energy-Efficient Appliance ...

  18. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Tony Bouza, U.S. Department of Energy View the Presentation HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances ...

  19. Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating Products Secretary Chu Announces More Stringent Appliance Standards for Home Water Heaters and Other Heating ...

  20. ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings ISSUANCE 2016-01-27: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: ...

  1. State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports database The State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) reports database includes rebate reports...

  2. Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Place: Xixiang Town,Shenzhen, Guangdong...

  3. Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report and Actions Proposed - Appendix B Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority ... Actions Proposed - Appendix C Appliance Standard Program - The FY 2003 Priority -Setting ...

  4. Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cixi Renhe Photovoltaic Electrical Appliance Co Ltd Place: Cixi, Zhejiang Province, China Zip:...

  5. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Antonio M. Bouza, U.S. Department ...

  6. HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance Subprogram Overview - 2016...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heating, and Appliance Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review HVAC, Water Heating, and ... Office's Emerging Technologies: HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliance subprogram. ...

  7. Energy Sector Security Appliances in a System for Intelligent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... (R&D) program, which aims to enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's energy infrastructure by reducing the risk of energy disruptions due to cyber attacks. ...

  8. MC Appliance: Order (2012-CE-1508)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered CNA International Inc. d/b/a MC Appliance Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding MC Appliance had failed to certify that certain models of room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Appliance Standards Awareness Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appliance Standards Awareness Project Appliance Standards Awareness Project On January 14, representatives of energy efficiency advocates and fan manufacturers met to describe technical considerations related to fan efficiency with DOE. ex parte memo for Jan 15 (36.82 KB) BSQ-300 (1) (718.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Ex parte communication Ex parte communication NRDC Ex Parte Communication

  10. Rebates for ENERGY STAR Appliances: State Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As you're probably aware by now, every state and U.S. territory has been given funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to allow eligible consumers to receive rebates for the purchase of new energy-efficient appliances when they replace used appliances.