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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment Using an Embedded Device Network for Lighting and Building Equipment Control Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Date: December 5, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare IBECS, an implementation of an Embedded Device Network designed to allow communications between lighting systems, building equipment, and sensors and meters will be presented during this seminar. IBECS is a low-cost network infrastructure that piggybacks on existing Ethernets to allow control of building loads at an added cost under $5/control point. Several core components of the IBECS technology have been developed and tested at LBNL including: a network/ballast interface, an addressable light switch, a motorized blind interface, an environmental sensor (capable of measuring

2

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4248,2184,3943,941,455,565 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2261,1070,2068,382,101,205 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,821,416,772,148,88,107 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,716,412,665,189,105,123 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,231,145,223,102,60,55

3

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,38528,59688,27571,20643,17703 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,2918,5579,1123,312,604 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,3061,5726,1109,686,781 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,6424,10458,2944,1721,1973

4

Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Appliance & Equipment Standards...

5

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light - Farm Equipment Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment, Ceiling Fan, Clothes Washers, CustomOthers pending approval, Dishwasher, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Heat recovery, Lighting,...

6

Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Standards Result in Large Energy, Economic, and Environmental Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards Result...

7

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

8

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Title Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in...

9

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

10

Face equipment lighting: integrated vs. add-on  

SciTech Connect

The problems of providing lighting on face equipment are examined. In the US, some equipment manufacturers are building-in lighting systems to their machinery; others will install lighting systems as add-on or retrofitted items. The pros and cons of each method are examined and the views of manufacturers are quoted.

Scott, F.E.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BBA Equipment Performance BBA Equipment Performance Specifications William Goetzler Navigant Consulting william.goetzler@navigant.com (781) 270 8351 April 4, 2013 Better Buildings Alliance BTO Program Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Project Overview The BBA Performance Specifications project provides information and tools to help BBA members and other commercial building owners/operators specify and purchase high efficiency equipment. - Ensures targeted technologies are of interest to end users and manufacturers

12

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BBA Equipment Performance BBA Equipment Performance Specifications William Goetzler Navigant Consulting william.goetzler@navigant.com (781) 270 8351 April 4, 2013 Better Buildings Alliance BTO Program Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Project Overview The BBA Performance Specifications project provides information and tools to help BBA members and other commercial building owners/operators specify and purchase high efficiency equipment. - Ensures targeted technologies are of interest to end users and manufacturers

13

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

14

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

15

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--End-Use Equipment  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey Lighting Equipment Standard fluorescent and incandescent light bulbs were the most widely used types of lighting equipment (Figure 3). The vast...

16

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) This is the approved revision of this page, as...

17

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

18

Miscellaneous equipment in commercial buildings: The inventory, utilization, and consumption by equipment type  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the miscellaneous equipment (devices other than permanently installed lighting and those used for space conditioning) in commercial buildings is diverse, comprising a wide variety of devices that are subject to varied patterns of use. This portion of the commercial load is frequently underestimated, and widely hypothesized to be growing. These properties make it a particularly difficult load to characterize for purposes of demand-side management. In the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), over 100 commercial sites in the Pacific Northwest have been metered at the end-use level for several years. Detailed inspections of the equipment in them have also been conducted. This paper describes how the ELCAP data have been used to estimate three fundamental properties of the various types of equipment in several classes of commercial buildings: (1) the installed capacity per unit floor area, (2) utilization of the equipment relative to the installed capacity, and (3) the resulting energy consumption by building type and for the Pacific Northwest commercial sector as a whole. Applications for the results include assessment of conservation potential, prediction of equipment loads from survey data, estimating equipment loads for energy audits, targeting of conservation technology development, and disaggregating building total or mixed end-use data. 4 tabs., refs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Appliance and About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program on AddThis.com... About History & Impacts Statutory Authorities & Rules Regulatory Processes

20

Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Buildings Technologies Office sets minimum energy efficiency standards for approximately 50 categories of appliances and equipment used in homes, businesses, and other applications, as required by existing law. The appliances and equipment covered provide services that are used by consumers and businesses each day, such as space heating and cooling, refrigeration, cooking, clothes washing and drying, and lighting. DOE's minimum efficiency standards significantly reduce U.S. energy demand, lower emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, and save consumers billions of dollars every year, without lessening the vital services provided by these products. In addition, DOE implements laws designed to limit the water consumption of several plumbing products.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling E-mail: yanda@tsinghua.edu.cn A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST...

22

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS%20analysis/CBECS%20lighting/lighting_pdf.html[4/28/2009 9:20:44 AM] Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the

23

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Lighting in Commercial Buildings Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

24

Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling E-mail: yanda@tsinghua.edu.cn A detailed loads comparison of three building energy modeling programs: EnergyPlus, DeST and DOE-2.1E Dandan Zhu 1 , Tianzhen Hong 2 , Da Yan 1 (), Chuang Wang 1 1. Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China 2. Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Building energy simulation is widely used to help design energy efficient building envelopes and HVAC systems, develop and demonstrate compliance of building energy codes, and implement building energy rating programs. However, large discrepancies exist between simulation results

25

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

26

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting Types Lighting Types The following are the most widely used types of lighting equipment used in commercial buildings. Characteristics such as energy efficiency, light quality, and lifetime vary by lamp type. Standard Fluorescent A fluorescent lamp consists of a sealed gas-filled tube. The gas in the tube consists of a mixture of low pressure mercury vapor and an inert gas such as argon. The inner surface of the tube has a coating of phosphor powder. When an electrical current is applied to electrodes in the tube, the mercury vapor emits ultraviolet radiation which then causes the phosphor coating to emit visible light (the process is termed fluorescence). A ballast is required to regulate and control the current and voltage. Two types of ballasts are used, magnetic and electronic. Electronic ballasts

27

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

28

Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

29

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of cost of upgraded equipment, or an amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1.5 year simple payback. New Construction: 70% of incremental cost of higher efficiency equipment, or an amount that buys down the incremental investment to a 1.5 year simple

30

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Funding Source Efficiency Vermont Public Benefit Fund Expiration Date 06/30/2013 State Vermont Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies according to technology; prescriptive and custom rebates available Provider Efficiency Vermont In Vermont, agricultural operations are eligible for prescriptive and customized incentives on equipment proven to help make farms more efficient. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting (free to $175 per fixture, depending on the type of fixture or lighting) and for a variety of equipment including plate coolers, variable speed milk transfer

31

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Buildings Sector Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency 1

32

Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

33

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project accomplishments, including the course development phases, tasks associated with each phase, and detailed list of the course materials developed. A summary of each year's activities is also included.

Leah Glameyer

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets",,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets" "All Buildings ................",4657,950,658,255,719,67338,25652,19713,8808,19938 "Building Floorspace"

36

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: United Resources Group Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United Resources Group Lighting Conservation United Resources Group Lighting Conservation Comprehensive lighting software designed to analyze existing lighting systems and provide alternative systems that will offer energy-savings retrofit options with corresponding total wattage reduction, percent reduction, kilowatt hour savings, maintenance savings, net air conditioning savings, and a corresponding cost and dollar savings total with payback. Screen Shots Keywords Quantify, Lighting Conservation, Cost and Savings Validation/Testing Regular updates of wattage table. Expertise Required Some familiarity with Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and the codes used to describe existing equipment which is in place at a site. Users 1 Audience Energy Efficiency Consultants, Energy Contractors, Architects, and Building

37

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Lighting Changes in Lighting The percentage of commercial buildings with lighting was unchanged between 1995 and 2003; however, three lighting types did show change in usage. Compact fluorescent lamps and halogen lamps showed a significant increase between 1995 and 2003 while the use of incandescent lights declined. The lighting questions in the 1995, 1999, and 2003 CBECS questionnaires were virtually identical which facilitates comparison across survey years. The use of compact fluorescent lamps more than doubled, from just under 10 percent of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent lights was the only lighting type to decline; their use dropped from 59 percent to just over one-half of lit buildings.

38

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment Energy Efficiency Incentives < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Contact Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Farm Energy Audit: Free Automatic Milker Takeoffs: $5/cow Dairy Scroll Compressor: $250 Heat Reclaimers: $5/cow Milk Precooler: $3.40/cow Variable Speed Drives for Dairy Vacuum Pumps: $5/cow Motors: Up to $1080 Variable Frequency Drives: $30/HP

39

Comparison of ELCAP data with lighting and equipment load levels and profiles assumed in regional models  

SciTech Connect

The analysis in this report was driven by two primary objectives: to determine whether and to what extent the lighting and miscellaneous equipment electricity consumption measured by metering in real buildings differs from the levels assumed in the various prototypes used in power forecasting; and to determine the reasons for those differences if, in fact, differences were found. 13 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Facilities Engineering Materials, Equipment, and Relocatable Building Management This regulation--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o Consolidates AR 420-83; AR 420-17, chapters 5 and 6 and appendixes E through M; and implements applicable portions of DOD directives, DOD instructions, and DOD regulations. o Adds a requirement for major Army commands (MACOMS) to biennially inspect subordinate supply and equipment operations and relocatable building programs (para 1-9b). o Designates the installation Director of Engineering and Housing as the “assessable unit manager ” (per AR 11-2) for completion of the Internal Management Control Review Checklist applicable to this regulation (para 1-11b). o Directs “open ” warehouses during inventories (para 2-7a). o Requires a yearly inventory of four types of supplies, no inventory of other types, and no periodic inventories (para 2-7b). o Establishes management thresholds for inventory discrepancies (para 2-8b). o Addresses “excess ” management (para 2-15). o Describes “self help ” supply centers (para 2-21). o Delegates decision to lease equipment to DEH (para 3-5b). o Requires that MACOMs appoint an individual to be responsible for Directorate of Engineering and Housing equipment management (para 3-8b). o Allows a cash flow approach to equipment management (rental and depreciation rates) (para 3-8d).Headquarters Department of the Army

unknown authors

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

42

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Minimizing lighting power density in office rooms equipped with Anidolic Daylighting Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lighting is responsible for up to one third of an office building's electricity needs. Making daylight more available in office buildings can not only contribute to significant energy savings but also enhance the occupants' performance and wellbeing. Anidolic Daylighting Systems (ADS) are one type of very effective facade-integrated daylighting systems. All south-facing office rooms within the LESO solar experimental building in Lausanne (Switzerland) are equipped with a given type of ADS. A recent study has shown that these offices' occupants are highly satisfied with their lighting environment. The most energy-efficient south-facing offices have a lighting power density of less than 5W/m{sup 2}. The lighting situation within these ''best practice''-offices has been assessed using the lighting simulation software RELUX Vision. Because this lighting situation is very much appreciated by the occupants, it was used as a starting point for developing even more energy-efficient office lighting designs. Two new lighting designs, leading to lighting power densities of 3.9W/m{sup 2} and 3W/m{sup 2}, respectively, have been suggested and simulated with RELUX Vision. Simulation results have shown that the expected performances of these new systems are comparable to that of the current lighting installation within the ''best practice''-offices or even better. These simulation results have been confirmed during experiments on 20 human subjects in a test office room recently set up within the LESO building. This article gives engineers, architects and light planers valuable information and ideas on how to design energy-efficient and comfortable electric lighting systems in office rooms with abundant access to daylight. (author)

Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis [Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL '03). Turin, Italy.Devoted to Appliance and Lighting Standards. ” Energy andAppliances, Equipment, and Lighting Murakoshi, C. 1999. “

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Lighting technology specifications for relighting federal buildings  

SciTech Connect

Under a Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI) project, a set of Master Lighting Technology Specifications was developed for use by the Federal sector in relighting buildings. The specifications were to cover all major lighting technologies. The initial set was developed and issued for extensive peer review in December 1991. Extensive comments were received from industry, Federal sector participants (DOD, GSA, NASA, DOE, etc.), national laboratories, professional lighting organizations, private lighting professionals, and recognized experts in the lighting community. The document underwent extensive revision and was reissued in June 1992 for a second round of peer review. The current FRI Lighting Technology Specifications are organized into two sections: (1) Technical Notes and (2) Master Specifications. The Technical Notes contain explanations that enable the users to understand the background and reasons for specification requirements. The Master Specifications are organized in the Construction Specifications Institute (CSI) format and are intended to form the basis for competitive bidding and contracting to undertake relighting initiatives.

Harris, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Purcell, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gordon, H. [Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates (United States); McKay, H. [McKay (Hayden) Lighting Design (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 37. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 38. Water-Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 39. Lighting...

47

Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harmonization of Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Harmonization of Wireless Dimming Lighting Controls Research Project on

48

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ZIP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Building Analysis Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Envelope Systems HVAC Equipment & Systems Lighting Systems Other Applications Tools Listed...

49

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLighting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercLighting SPElectrtyUsePercLighting Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Lighting Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercLighting" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19.0328399893 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 46.2232615553 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 34.7717923865 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 22.0431358106 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 31.1832874134 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 18.0356496585 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24.5339800461 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 37.7154176036 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34.3932478145 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 24.6640988083 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 47.0283985768 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 34.1786814575 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 31.4027334982 +

50

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 6: Lighting | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 6: Lighting The Building Upgrade Manual is a...

51

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Profile Lighting Equipment - Type and Characteristics of Equipment Emits Found In Incandescent Incandescent Light Bulb Produces light by electrically heating a tungsten filament Includes energy-efficient incandescent bulbs, such as Reflector or R-Lamps (accent and task lighting), Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR) lamps (flood and spot lighting), and Ellipsoidal Reflector (ER) lamps (recessed lighting) Highly inefficient because much of the energy is lost as heat 14-18 Lumens Per Watt (LPW) 14% of Lit Commercial Floorspace Standard Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballast Standard Fluorescent with Magnetic Ballast Produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce

52

Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E's Innovative Federal Collaboration E's Innovative Federal Collaboration Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings Federal Utility Partnership Working Group November 1, 2006 "A 3 MW Success Story: Delivering on the Promise" Today's Presentation * Setting the Scene - U.S & Global Perspective * Program Overview: - Advanced Lighting Technology Program for Federal Buildings * Benefits - Energy and environmental * Conclusion: - The Lamborghini Analogy Setting the Scene U.S. Policy: The National Direction "The answer to high energy prices is the kind of comprehensive approach embraced by the President-that includes...increasing our reliance on energy efficiency and conservation. "Let me be clear: Encouraging greater energy efficiency is part and parcel of changing the way we power our homes and

53

Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Lighting in the Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification on Delicious

54

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Chillers, Compressed air, CustomOthers pending approval, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting Controls...

55

Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 02/11/00 Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 02/11/00 Training: (1) ESH114 Lockout/Tagout ASD125 APS LOTO ESH371 Electrical Safety - General ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (2) ESH707 Accelerator Worker ESH738 GERT (3) ESH196 Hazard Communication ESH376 or 456 Chemical Waste (4) ASDSF6 (5) ESH170 OSHA Lead Standard ESH196 Hazard Communication ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (6) ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (7) Informal OJT (8) Formal OJT Management Tools: (A) ANL-E ESH Manual SMART (B) APS-SAD APS-CO (C) Waste Handling Procedure Manual Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical

56

Review of Pre- and Post-1980 Buildings in CBECS - HVAC Equipment  

SciTech Connect

PNNL was tasked by DOE to look at HVAC systems and equipment for Benchmark buildings based on 2003 CBECS data. This white paper summarizes the results of PNNL’s analysis of 2003 CBECS data and provides PNNL’s recommendations for HVAC systems and equipment for use in the Benchmark buildings.

Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; Halverson, Mark A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Lighting Development, Adoption, and Compliance Guide BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Development, Adoption, and Compliance Guide BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM I Lighting Development, Adoption, and Compliance Guide BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM I Lighting BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Development, Adoption, and Compliance Guide Lighting BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 | PNNL-SA-90653 Development, Adoption, and Compliance Guide 3.3 Exterior Lighting Controls ...........................................................................24 3.3.1 Dusk to Dawn Controls ...............................................................................25 3.3.2 Lighting Power Reduction Controls ........................................................25 3.3.3 Parking Garage Controls ............................................................................26

58

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

59

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

lit floorspace in commercial buildings. Figure 5. Office, education, and warehouse and storage buildings account for more than half of total lit floorspace in commercial...

60

Building Technologies Office: About the Appliance and Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used by consumers and businesses each day, such as space heating and cooling, refrigeration, cooking, clothes washing and drying, and lighting. DOE's minimum efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

20.6 33% Halogen 17.7 29% Note(s): Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B44, p. 220. Lighted...

62

Interactions between lighting and space conditioning energy use in U.S. commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling and heating energy consumption. In general, lighting energy reductions increase heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. The net change in a building`s annual energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and climate. This paper characterizes the effects of lighting/HVAC interactions on the annual heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using the DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Twelve building types of two vintages and five climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination of building type, vintage, and climate, a prototypical building is simulated with varying lighting power densities, and the resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. These loads are used together with market information on the saturation of the different HVAC equipment in the commercial buildings to determine the changes i energy use and expenditures for heating and cooling. Results are presented by building type for the US as a whole. Therefore, the data presented in this paper can be utilized to assess the secondary effects of lighting-related federal policies with widespread impacts, like minimum efficiency standards. Generally, in warm climates the interactions will induce monetary savings and in cold climates the interactions will induce monetary penalties. For the commercial building stock in the US, a reduction in lighting energy that is well distributed geographically will induce neither significant savings nor significant penalties from associated changes in HVAC primary energy and energy expenditures.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Market Profiles: Hospital Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report profiles the U.S. healthcare market on size and energy-related characteristics and provides energy benchmarking data that can be used to make meaningful comparisons between healthcare facilities. The intent of the report is to provide both utility and hospital managers with a better understanding of the key characteristics of the healthcare market and enhance their abilities to assess how well their facilities are performing relative to hospitals with similar energy equipment.

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

64

LIGHTING EFFICIENCY FEASIBILITY STUDY OF THREE OHIO UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aims to evaluate the lighting efficiency of three Ohio University campus buildings. The primary research question is: What are the short- versus long-term… (more)

Kariyeva, Jahan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions...

66

Information Resources: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Commercial Building Energy Alliances' (CBEA) efforts to explore the viability of LED site lighting in commercial parking lots. LED technology has the potential for...

67

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Lighting Chapter 6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O&M Manual 34 Dispose of Lamps Properly 35 6.9 Summary 36 Bibliography 36 Glossary G-1 ENERGY STAR Building Manual 2 6. Lighting 6.1 Overview A lighting upgrade is the second...

68

Laboratory Equipment - DynaPro NanoStar Dynamic Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DynaPro NanoStar Dynamic Light Scattering. Description: Location: E136. The DynaPro NanoStar is a dynamic light scattering ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Light duty utility arm equipment qualification test procedure  

SciTech Connect

The Equipment Qualification Test described in this test procedure document is the acceptance test procedure (ATP) for the LDUA Baseline System. It verifies that the equipment is complete and in working order, and demonstrates its readiness for being deployed into an actual underground storage tank.

Kiebel, G.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Manual gas cutting equipment consists of gas regulators, gas hoses, cutting torches, cutting tips, and multipurpose wrenches. Auxiliary equipment may include a hand truck, tip cleaners, torch ignitors, and protective goggles. Machine cutting

71

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

72

Exterior Lighting Requirements and COMcheck | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Exterior Lighting Requirements and COMcheck This course includes a discussion of the exterior lighting...

73

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Lighting Market Characterization, Vol. 1: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption Estimate, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,...

74

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) - Farm Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Farm Energy Audit: Free Automatic Milker Takeoffs: 5cow Dairy Scroll Compressor: 250 Heat...

76

Flicker Performance of Newer Lighting Technologies and Other Sensitive Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary results of the response of the modern lighting technologies and sensitive household electronic loads to the voltage fluctuations in the supply system.

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

78

Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes Automatic shutoff capability for all interior building lighting (with exceptions) is required by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 (as well as previous versions back to 1999) and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (including versions back to 2003) for buildings over 5,000ft2. Publication Date: Thursday, March 10, 2011 cn_automatic_lighting_shutoff_for_tenant_spaces.pdf Document Details Document Number: PNNL-SA-66719 Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official

79

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 data) -- Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary 6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings > Executive Summary Executive Summary Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's(EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

80

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Links to Related Government Sites Publications list from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights Program Updated FLEX 3.0 Lighting software solution available from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs Section 3.4 on Lighting and Section 7.2 on Lighting Control can be obtained at this site U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs lights basic training will be completed in FY '98 Lighting mailing list for exchange of information on lighting issues Lights in commercial buildings in the 21st Century List of major areas of expertise at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, illustrated with specific projects

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Lighting Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Characteristics of Lighting Types Characteristics of Lighting Types Efficacy Efficacy is the amount of light produced per unit of energy consumed, expressed in lumens per watt (lm/W). Lamps with a higher efficacy value are more energy efficient. Average Rated Life The average rated life of a particular type of lamp is defined by the number of hours when 50 percent of a large sample of that type of lamp has failed. Color Rendering Index (CRI) The CRI is a measurement of a light source's accuracy in rendering different colors when compared to a reference light source. The highest attainable CRI is 100. Lamps with CRIs above 70 are typically used in office and living environments. Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) The CCT is an indicator of the "warmth" or "coolness" of the color

82

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state, fluorescent, and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated when operating the standard, 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely, from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (1m/W) in efficacy, and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was measured at up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 6: Lighting | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: Lighting 6: Lighting Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

84

Building Technologies Office: Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of two pages from the CALiPER Snapshot Report on A lamps. CALiPER Product Snapshot on LED Light Bulbs Report on the current state of the market for LED A lamp and omnidirectional...

85

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings* ............................. 61,707 58,693 49,779 6,496 37,150 3,058 5,343 1,913 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................ 6,750 5,836 4,878 757 3,838 231 109 162 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 7,940 7,166 5,369 1,044 4,073 288 160 109 10,001 to 25,000 ....................... 10,534 9,773 7,783 1,312 5,712 358 633 232 25,001 to 50,000 ....................... 8,709 8,452 6,978 953 5,090 380 771 281

86

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*........................ 54,068 51,570 45,773 6,746 34,910 1,161 3,725 779 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000....................... 6,272 5,718 4,824 986 3,767 50 22 54 5,001 to 10,000.................... 7,299 6,667 5,728 1,240 4,341 61 169 45 10,001 to 25,000.................. 10,829 10,350 8,544 1,495 6,442 154 553 Q 25,001 to 50,000.................. 7,170 7,022 6,401 789 5,103 151 485 86

87

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003 Floorspace (million square feet) Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*............................. 64,783 62,060 51,342 5,556 37,918 4,004 4,950 2,403 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000............................. 6,789 6,038 4,826 678 3,932 206 76 124 5,001 to 10,000........................... 6,585 6,090 4,974 739 3,829 192 238 248 10,001 to 25,000........................ 11,535 11,229 8,618 1,197 6,525 454 506 289 25,001 to 50,000........................ 8,668 8,297 6,544 763 4,971 527 454 240

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

89

NREL: News Feature - Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design March 1, 2010 Photo of a man and a woman in a lab holding a window with tinted glass. Enlarge image NREL Researchers Dane Gillespie and Erin Whitney will get to see the windows they normally test in the lab used in a real world environment at the RSF. Credit: Pat Corkery Artists find inspiration in many ways. But for the artists (architects and researchers) working collaboratively to create the most energy efficient office space in the U.S., the inspiration was simply light. In fact, light and the access to light turned out to be a top factor when designing the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on NREL's South Table Mountain Campus near Golden, Colo. "One of the most powerful drivers in the project is daylight," Philip

90

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code include requirements for interior and exterior lighting in new construction, additions, and alterations for all commercial buildings, including residential structures with four or more stories above grade. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_comparing_commercial_lighting_energy_requirements.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-49098 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 15:22

91

State options in lighting: efficiency standards for existing public buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses requirements and options for state lighting-efficiency standards for existing public buildings under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. EPCA, as implemented under present regulations, is found to allow great flexibility to the states in what they adopt, so long as they do adopt some standard. A wide variety of substantive standards is described, and it is recommended that states adopt a standard based on a maximum-lighting power budget with cost-effectiveness criteria. Several options for adoption and enforcement of standards are discussed. It is recommended that states adopt a requirement that owners of all public buildings submit reports of lighting energy audits and estimates of energy savings from modifications to comply with substantive standards. It is further recommended that while filing of reports should be mandatory, substantive compliance, at least initially, need not be; if it turns out that voluntary compliance is not great enought to achieve a state's desired energy savings, compliance could then be made mandatory. It is recommended that exemptions from the standards be limited to small buildings and that variances under a mandatory standard be available only when an applicant can show insufficient capital to make required modifications, even though they would soon pay for themselves in reduced operating costs. It is suggested that a lighting standard of the kind recommended could substantially reduce wasted energy in lighting, be simple enough to be easily understood and applied, be technically and economically reasonable, and allow for needed exemptions without loopholes.

Meeker, F.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit Second Live Test Demonstration (LTD)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes and summarizes the Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit Live Test demonstration (LTD) performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Room 5E-080 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C. The purpose of the LTD was to evaluate proposed lighting retrofits for compliance with the requirements laid out in the request for proposal (RFP) for the Shared Energy Savings (SES) Lighting Retrofit Project for the Forrestal Building, Washington, D.C. Testing was conducted from March 9 through March 18, 1992, and again on August 3 through August 6, 1992. Four contractors were initially tested in March. Then, two contractors were retested in August due to changes in the rebate schedule for electronic ballasts being offered by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO), the utility servicing the Forrestal Building. The two contractors tested in March were retested with different ballasts, tubes, and reflectors. The results from these new tests are reported here and compared with those from the earlier tests.

Halverson, M.A.; Schmelzer, J.R.; Parker, G.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Analysis of Potential Free-Rider Eligibility for a Proposed Commercial Building Lighting Tax Deduction  

SciTech Connect

The report provides estimates of the potential volume of ''free riders'', in terms of both eligible square footage and associated available tax deductions, in a proposed commercial building lighting tax amendment to the 2003 Energy Bill. Determination of the actual tax rate for businesses and how the amendment may impact tax revenue collected by the treasury is beyond the scope of this effort. Others, such as the Treasury itself, are best equipped to make their own estimates of the eventual impact based on the total deductions available to taxable entities.

Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Biyani, Rahul K.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Introduction Chapter 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offer- ings. The label now covers new homes, commercial and institutional buildings, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, lighting,...

95

AEDG Recommendations - Lighting Overview | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Overview Lighting Overview This course provides an overview of the lighting recommendations provided in the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides (30% Series). Estimated Length: 56 minutes Presenters: Michael Lane, Lighting Design Lab Original Webcast Date: Thursday, July 31, 2008 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Commercial Focus: Adoption Compliance Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 Target Audience: Advocate Policy Maker State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - 16:08

96

Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extremely Low-Energy Design Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility Preprint Rois Langner and Michael Deru National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alexander Zhivov, Richard Liesen, and Dale Herron U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Presented at the 2012 ASHRAE Winter Conference Chicago, Illinois January 21-25, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-53810 March 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

97

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Lighting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is a property of type String. This is a property of type String. Lighting Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Lighting" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 13.6004313481 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 51.2740526316 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 25.3519773429 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 14.5539566929 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 17.1088606195 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 11.7758321884 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 16.0796522459 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 15.7053876478 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 19.44639866 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 37.0625 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 12.9336787565 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 12.985779547 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 21.6361810339 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 29.853732347 +

98

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Typical Efficacies and Lifetimes of Lamps (1) Current Technology CRI (2) Incandescent 10 - 19 97 Halogen 14 - 20 99 Fluorescent - T5 25 - 55 52 - 75 Fluorescent - T8 35 - 87 7,500 - 20,000 52 - 90 Fluorescent - T12 35 - 92 7,500 - 20,000 50 - 92 Compact Fluorescent 40 - 70 82 Mercury Vapor 25 - 50 15 - 50 Metal Halide 65 - 70 High-Pressure Sodium 22 Low-Pressure Sodium 0 Solid State Lighting 33-97 Note(s): Source(s): 18 - 180 18,000 20 - 100 15,000 - 50,000 1) Theoretical maximum luminous efficacy of white light is 220 lumens/Watt. 2) CRI = Color Rendering Index, which indicates a lamp's ability to show natural colors. 3) The DOE Solid State Lighting program has set an efficacy goal twice that of fluorescent lights (160 lumen per Watt). DOE, EERE, Building Technology Program/Navigant Consulting, U.S. Lighting Market Characterization, Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy

99

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2003 Lighting Consumption and Energy Intensities, by Commercial Building Type Annual Lighting Building Type Education 14% 33.1 8.4% 3.4 Food Sales 2% 13.5 3.4% 10.8 Food Service 2% 12.3 3.1% 7.4 Health Care 5% 30.8 7.8% 9.7 Inpatient 3% 22.3 5.7% 11.8 Outpatient 2% 8.2 2.1% 6.6 Lodging 7% 36.3 9.3% 7.1 Mercantile 16% 90.3 23.0% 8.1 Retail (Other Than Mall) 6% 32.5 8.3% 7.5 Enclosed and Strip Malls 10% 57.7 14.7% 8.4 Office 18% 82.4 21.0% 6.8 Public Assembly 6% 7.9 2.0% 2.1 Public Order and Safety 2% 5.3 1.3% 4.8 Religious Worship 5% 5.0 1.3% 1.3 Service 6% 18.5 4.7% 4.6 Warehouse and Storage 13% 38.7 9.9% 3.8 Other 2% 17.3 4.4% 10.0 Vacant 1% 1.2 0.3% 0.5 Total (1) 392.4 100% Source(s): Percent of Total Total Annual Lighting Lighted Floorspace Energy (billion KWh) End-Use Intensity (kWh/SF) EIA, 2003 Commericial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Characteristics and End-Uses, Oct. 2006 and Sept. 2008, Table A1 and Table E1A

100

Integrated envelope and lighting systems for commercial buildings: a retrospective  

SciTech Connect

Daylighting systems in use world-wide rarely capture the energy-savings predicted by simulation tools and that we believe are achievable in real buildings. One of the primary reasons for this is that window and lighting systems are not designed and operated as an integrated system. Our efforts over the last five years have been targeted toward (1) development and testing of new prototype systems that involve a higher degree of systems integration than has been typical in the past, and (2) addressing current design and technological barriers that are often missed with component-oriented research. We summarize the results from this body of cross-disciplinary research and discuss its effects on the existing and future practice of daylighting in commercial buildings.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

102

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous EquipmentElectricity Use in New Homes  

SciTech Connect

The "Other" end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment) continue to grow. This is particularly true innew homes, where increasing floor area and amenities are leading tohigher saturation of these types of devices. This paper combines thefindings of several field studies to assess the current state ofknowledge about the "Other" end-uses in new homes. The field studiesinclude sub-metered measurements of occupied houses in Arizona, Florida,and Colorado, as well as device-level surveys and power measurements inunoccupied new homes. We find that appliances, lighting, electronics, andmiscellaneous equipment can consume from 46 percent to 88 percent ofwhole-house electricity use in current low-energy homes. Moreover, theannual consumption for the "Other" end-uses is not significantly lower innew homes (even those designed for low energy use) compared to existinghomes. The device-level surveys show that builder-installed equipment isa significant contributor to annual electricity consumption, and certaindevices that are becoming more common in new homes, such as structuredwiring systems, contribute significantly to this power consumption. Thesefindings suggest that energy consumption by these "Other" end uses isstill too large to allow cost-effective zero-energy homes.

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan,Gregory

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Why Agencies Should Buy Efficient Products s Executive Order 13123 and FAR section 23.704 direct agencies to purchase products in the upper 25% of energy efficiency, including all models that qualify for the EPA/DOE ENERGY STAR ® product labeling program. s Agencies that use these guidelines to buy efficient products can realize substantial operating cost savings and help prevent pollution. s As the world's largest consumer, the federal government can help "pull" the entire U.S. market towards greater energy efficiency, while saving taxpayer dollars. How to Select Lighting Controls For Offices and Public Buildings LT-8 PAGE 1 DECEMBER 2000 Definitions Daylight dimming employs sensors that detect ambient light levels and then allow ballasts to

104

Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Title Data Analysis and Modeling of Lighting Energy Use in Large Office Buildings Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zhou, Xin, Da Yan, Xiaoxin Ren, and Tianzhen Hong Keywords building simulation, energy use, lighting, modeling, occupant beh building, occupant beh building simulation, occupant behbuilding simulation Abstract Lighting consumes about 20 to 40% of total electricity use in large office buildings in the U.S. and China. In order to develop better lighting simulation models it is crucial to understand the characteristics of lighting energy use. This paper analyzes the main characteristics of lighting energy use over various time scales, based on the statistical analysis of measured lighting energy use of 17 large office buildings in Beijing and Hong Kong. It was found that the daily 24-hour variations of lighting energy use were mainly driven by the schedule of the building occupants. Outdoor illumination levels have little impact on lighting energy use in large office buildings due to the lack of automatic daylighting controls and relatively small perimeter areas. A stochastic lighting energy use model was developed based on different occupant activities during six time periods throughout a day, and the annual distribution of lighting power across those periods. The model was verified using measured lighting energy use of one selected building. This study demonstrates how statistical analysis and stochastic modeling can be applied to lighting energy use. The developed lighting model can be adopted by building energy modeling programs to improve the simulation accuracy of lighting energy use.

105

Argonne CNM News: Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Using Light to Build Nanoparticles into Superstructures Scientists in the Center for Nanoscale Materials and Argonne's Biosciences Division have demonstrated a remarkably simple, elegant, and cost-effective way of assembling nanoparticles into larger structures of any desired shape and form at will via a process called "optically directed assembly." Optically directed assembly (ODA) involves suspensions of gold and carbon nanoparticles in water. A small droplet of the suspension is placed on a glass slide, and a low-power laser is focused onto a small region within the droplet near its surface. Through a complex process involving optical trapping, heating, evaporation, convective fluid flow, and chemical interactions, the nanoparticles fuse near the laser focus and as the experimenter moves the laser focus around in the droplet, a continuous filament of the fused material follows. These remarkable structures remain completely intact even after the fluid is drained off. In this manner "handcrafted" filaments of up to millimeter lengths and 10-60 times wider than the original nanoparticles can be formed with arbitrary shape and design. The resulting hierarchical architectures may be useful for a variety of applications, including biological sensing, electronics, optics, and emerging energy technologies. As a first demonstration, the researchers handcrafted a microscopic glyph — the Chinese symbol for "king."

106

Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the integrated energy optimization process for buildings and building clusters and demonstrates this process for new construction projects and building retrofits. An explanation is given of how mission critical building loads affect possible site and source energy use reduction in Army buildings.

Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Liesen, R.; Herron, D.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effect of High Efficiency Lighting on Power Quality in Public Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study investigates the effect of high efficiency lighting on PQ in public buildings. The buildings scheduled for lighting retrofits that were involved in this study include a graduate center, a hospital facility, and a social services building.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

62440 Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneousof California. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, anduses (appliances, lighting, electronics, and miscellaneous

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

COMPREHENSIVE DIAGNOSTIC AND IMPROVEMENT TOOLS FOR HVAC-SYSTEM INSTALLATIONS IN LIGHT COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

Proctor Engineering Group, Ltd. (PEG) and Carrier-Aeroseal LLP performed an investigation of opportunities for improving air conditioning and heating system performance in existing light commercial buildings. Comprehensive diagnostic and improvement tools were created to address equipment performance parameters (including airflow, refrigerant charge, and economizer operation), duct-system performance (including duct leakage, zonal flows and thermal-energy delivery), and combustion appliance safety within these buildings. This investigation, sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, a division of the U.S. Department of Energy, involved collaboration between PEG and Aeroseal in order to refine three technologies previously developed for the residential market: (1) an aerosol-based duct sealing technology that allows the ducts to be sealed remotely (i.e., without removing the ceiling tiles), (2) a computer-driven diagnostic and improvement-tracking tool for residential duct installations, and (3) an integrated diagnosis verification and customer satisfaction system utilizing a combined computer/human expert system for HVAC performance. Prior to this work the aerosol-sealing technology was virtually untested in the light commercial sector--mostly because the savings potential and practicality of this or any other type of duct sealing had not been documented. Based upon the field experiences of PEG and Aeroseal, the overall product was tailored to suit the skill sets of typical HVAC-contractor personnel.

Abram Conant; Mark Modera; Joe Pira; John Proctor; Mike Gebbie

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Lighting recommendations for the Social Security Administration Frank Hagel Federal Building in Richmond CA  

SciTech Connect

Specific recommendations are made to improve the lighting quality and energy efficiency of the lighting system at the Social Security Administration Frank Hagel Building in Richmond, CA. The main recommendation is to replace the recessed fluorescent lighting system in the general office area with indirect lighting. Indirect lighting will improve lighting quality, will provide an energy efficient solution and will be about the same cost as the direct lighting system originally proposed.

Rubinstein, Francis M.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Training the Next Generation of Commercial Building ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment, in these buildings, is controlled by a thermostat and other systems (lights and plugs) have ...

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Simulation Analyses in Support of DOE’s Fossil Fuel Rule for Single Component Equipment and Lighting Replacements  

SciTech Connect

At the request of DOE’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a series of building energy simulations using a large office model to investigate the potential savings that could be accrued from a typical chiller, boiler, or lighting replacement in a Federal office building.

Halverson, Mark A.; Wang, Weimin

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of cost...

114

Lighting/HVAC interactions and their effects on annual and peak HVAC requirements in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Lighting measures is one effective strategy for reducing energy use in commercial buildings. Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling/heating energy consumption and peak HVAC requirements; in general, they increase the heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. Net change in a building`s annual and peak energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on building characteristics, operating conditions, climate. This paper characterizes impacts of lighting/HVAC interactions on annual and peak heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Ten building types of two vintages and nine climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination, a prototypical building is simulated with two lighting power densities, and resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. Simple concepts of Lighting Coincidence Factors are used to describe the observed interactions between lighting and HVAC requirements. (Coincidence Factor (CF) is ratio of changes in HVAC loads to those in lighting loads, where load is either annual or peak load). The paper presents tables of lighting CF for major building types and climates. These parameters can be used for regional or national cost/benefit analyses of lighting- related policies and utility DSM programs. Using Annual CFs and typical efficiencies for heating and cooling systems, net changes in space conditioning energy use from a lighting measure can be calculated. Similarly, Demand CFs can be used to estimate the changes in HVAC sizing, which can then be converted to changes in capital outlay using standard-design curves; or they can be used to estimate coincident peak reductions for the analysis of the utility`s avoided costs. Results from use of these tables are meaningful only when they involve a significantly large number of buildings.

Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies...

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

117

DATA ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF LIGHTING ENERGY USE IN LARGE OFFICE BUILDINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DATA ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF LIGHTING ENERGY USE IN DATA ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF LIGHTING ENERGY USE IN LARGE OFFICE BUILDINGS Xin Zhou 1 , Da Yan 1, , Xiaoxin Ren 1 , Tianzhen Hong 2 1 Department of Building Science, School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA ABSTRACT Lighting consumes about 20 to 40% of total electricity use in large office buildings in the U.S. and China. In order to develop better lighting simulation models it is crucial to understand the characteristics of lighting energy use. This paper analyzes the main characteristics of lighting energy use over various time scales, based on the statistical analysis of measured lighting energy use of 17 large office buildings in Beijing and Hong Kong. It was found that the daily 24-hour

118

List of Data Center Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Incentives Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 17 Data Center Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 17) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Minnesota Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Retail Supplier State Government Central Air conditioners Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators Windows Room Air Conditioners Ground Source Heat Pumps Building Insulation Clothes Washers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Dishwasher Water Heaters LED Exit Signs Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Data Center Equipment

119

Design criteria for lighting and controls modifications OSW, CTF, COS buildings  

SciTech Connect

This project will retrofit the lighting systems in three (3) buildings at the Mound Plant. The buildings are Central Operational Support (COS), Component Test Facility (CTF) and operational Support West (OSW). This project consists of the installation of occupancy sensors in private offices, break areas and laboratories, automatic control lighting, (occupied/unoccupied) with the existing DDC system, removing selected light fixtures, replacing incandescent lighting and reprogramming some of the software controlling the operation of the air handling units in the a forementioned buildings.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code This course addresses the lighting requirements of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-62440 Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, andUniversity of California. Appliances, Lighting, Electronics,The “Other” end-uses (appliances, lighting, electronics, and

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

online: www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/esr/esr_sum.html.Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes RichardMiscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes Richard

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

L&E - high efficiency lighting for parking structure | The Better Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structure structure Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management & Information Systems Public Sector Teams Market Solutions Teams Adopt high-efficiency lighting for your parking structure Parking structures and garages are typically lighted by older HID lighting technology without any energy-saving controls. The latest high-efficiency alternatives with energy-saving controls-including light-emitting diode (LED), induction, and fluorescent technology options-can save building owners over 40% on their parking lot lighting bills while delivering additional benefits such as better-lighted spaces. The Lighting & Electrical team developed a performance specification that

124

Commercial Building Energy Alliance Exterior Lighting Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a scoping study about challenges and energy saving potential regarding exterior lighting.

Myer, Michael

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Boiler Efficiencies (1) Gas-Fired Boilers Oil-Fired Boilers Average shipped in 1985 (2): 74% AFUE Average shipped in 1985 (2): 79% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 81% AFUE Best Available in 1981: 86% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 96% AFUE Best Available in 2007: 89% AFUE Note(s): Source(s): 1) Federal appliance standards effective Jan. 1, 1992, require a minimum of 80% AFUE (except gas-fired steam boiler, which must have a 75% AFUE or higher). 2) Includes furnaces. GAMA, Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Residential Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Aug. 2005, p. 88 and 106 for best- available AFUE; and GAMA for 1985 average AFUEs; GAMA Tax Credit Eligible Equipment: Gas- and Oil-Fired Boilers 95% AFUE or Greater, May 2007; and GAMA Consumer's Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, May 2007

126

Lighting.  

SciTech Connect

Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

128

Apparatus for conserving energy in a building. [Patent equipment for controlling energy use in unoccupied hotel rooms and other buildings  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus for turning off power-consuming appliances in rooms of a building having a private automatic branch exchange telephone system includes computer-controlled means at the exchange central periodically to apply short bursts of audio-frequency oscillations to telephone lines going to rooms in which power can be conserved. Detecting means in each room connected to the room telephone line provide an output on receipt of a burst which operates a line relay in the room, disconnecting power from the appliance in the room, for a predetermined time period greater than the time period between the periodic application of bursts at the exchange central.

James, E.C.; Fairfax, G.H.

1977-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Value of Electric Lighting Fixture Shipments (Million) Lighting Fixture Type 1985 1990 1995 2000 2001 Residential 786.8 827.6 983.8 983.9 CommercialInstitutional (except...

130

NREL: Buildings Research - Brilliant White Light with Amber LEDs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brilliant White Light with Amber LEDs; NREL Licensing Webinar December 10th November 12, 2013 LED bulbs are the future of lighting for industry, business, and consumers. As the...

131

Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems, sensors, and communication technologies for demand response and load factor control applications

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; DeVault, Robert C [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STAR ® Buildings programs, the partners agree to voluntarily survey their facilities and perform cost-effective energy upgrades.

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Main Residential Heating Equipment as of 1987, 1993, 1997, 2001, and 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Equipment Type 1987 1993 1997 2001 2005 Natural Gas 55% 53% 53% 55% 52% Central Warm-Air Furnace 35% 36% 38% 42% 40% Steam or Hot-Water System 10% 9% 7% 7% 7% Floor/Wall/Pipeless Furnace 6% 4% 4% 3% 2% Room Heater/Other 4% 3% 4% 3% 3% Electricity 20% 26% 29% 29% 30% Central Warm-Air Furnace 8% 10% 11% 12% 14% Heat Pump 5% 8% 10% 10% 8% Built-In Electric Units 6% 7% 7% 6% 5% Other 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% Fuel Oil 12% 11% 9% 7% 7% Steam or Hot-Water System 7% 6% 5% 4% 4% Central Warm-Air Furnace 4% 5% 4% 3% 3% Other 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% Other 13% 11% 9% 8% 10% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Other equipment includes wood, LPG, kerosene, other fuels, and none. EIA, A Look at Residential Consumption in 2005, June 2008, Table HC2-4; EIA, A Look at Residential Energy Consumption in 2001, Apr. 2004, 'Table HC3-

134

A pattern of light : a new library for Newton and an analysis of the building type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural light can add clarity to the organization of buildings by distinguishing areas of occupation with varying quantities and qualities of illumination. Libraries are good to study in this regard because of their varying ...

Flavin, Colin

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2012 IECC | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2012 IECC The materials for this course may be used for in-person...

137

Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2009 IECC This training provides an overview of the commercial...

138

Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2006 IECC | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2006 IECC This training provides an overview of the commercial...

139

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Full Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (www1.eere.energy.govbuildingsssltechreports.htmllmcvol1final.pdf. (Back) Lighting in...

140

Energymaster Desiccant System Application to Light Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling systems offer unique advantages over conventional equipment in certain applications. AskCorp's Energymaster unit has been applied in several commercial situations where these advantages are most significant. The magnitude of operating cost savings and improved control is greatest in humid climates where both ambient enthalpy levels and space latent loads are highest.

Blanpied, M. C.; Coellner, J. A.; Macintosh, D. S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 1: 1995 Commercial Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the region, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how to best narrow a research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with commercial market profiles for 10 regions in the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders ma...

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

142

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 3: 1998 Industrial Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the region, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how best to narrow the research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with industrial market profiles for 10 regions of the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders ...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 1: 1998 Commercial Buildings, Equipment, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the region, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how best to narrow the research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with commercial market profiles for 10 regions of the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders ...

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Literature Review of the Effects of Natural Light on Building Occupants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents summary findings from a literature search of the term ''daylighting''-using natural light in a building to offset or replace electric lighting. According to the Department of Energy's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs 2000 BTS Core Databook, in 1998, commercial buildings consumed 32% of the total electricity in the United States, of which more than one-third went to lighting. Using daylighting systems and turning off the lights will help reduce this energy load. Electrical lighting adds to both the electrical and cooling loads in a commercial building. Utility costs can be decreased when daylighting is properly designed to replace electrical lighting. Along with the importance of energy savings, studies have demonstrated the non-energy-related benefits of daylighting. We compiled the data from books, periodicals, Internet articles, and interviews. The books, periodicals, and Internet articles provided the background information used to identify the main subjects of the paper. The interviews provided us with details related to specific buildings and companies that have integrated daylighting into their buildings.

Edwards, L.; Torcellini, P.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Developing integrated envelop and lighting systems for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Integrated envelope and lighting systems achieve significant energy, peak demand, and cost savings over typical component-by-component design practice by leveraging the interactive energy balance between electric lighting energy use and cooling due to lighting and solar radiation. We discuss how these savings can be achieved using conventional glazing and lighting components by taking an integrated systems design approach. We describe integrated dynamic envelope and lighting systems, currently under development, that actively achieve this energy balance through the use of intelligent control systems. We show how prototypical daylighting systems can be used to increase the efficacy and distribution of daylight throughout the space for the same or less glazing area as a typical window, while achieving greater energy savings with increased visual comfort. Energy performance simulations and field tests conducted to date illustrate significant energy savings, peak demand reductions, and potential practical implementation of these proposed systems.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Klems, J.H.; Beltran, L.O.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Sullivan, R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lighting retrofit monitoring for the Federal sector-strategies and results at the DOE Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), and Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) have been conducting short-term monitoring studies at the Forrestal Building, headquarters of the DOE, since 1990. These studies were an integral part of the Shared Energy Savings (SES) lighting retrofit project completed in 1993. The overall goal of the project was to reduce electricity consumption at the Forrestal Building. One objective of the project was to use the building as a model for other federal SES lighting retrofit efforts. A complete short-term monitoring strategy in support of the SES project was developed. The strategy included baseline measurements of electrical consumption, performance measurements of proposed retrofits, and post-retrofit measurements of electricity consumption. Measurements included power consumption, power harmonics, and lighting levels. The results show a 56% reduction in electrical power consumed for lighting, as well as improved power quality and increased lighting levels.

Halverson, M.A.; Schmelzer, J.R.; Keller, J.M.; Stoops, J.L.; Chvala, W.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. 1996. Energy Labeling, Standards and Building Codes: Aof National Energy-Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators.2000. Energy Labels and Standards, IEA/OECD, Paris, France.

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Products (CECP) endorsement label program also began implementation not through broad public education but through communication and rela- tionship-building

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sectoral Trends in Global Energy Use a n d Greenhouse Gas1998. “The Role of Building Energy Efficiency in ManagingDirectorate General for Energy. Danish Energy Management.

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of Building Energy Efficiency in Managing AtmosphericConference on Energy Efficiency in Domestic Appliances andAnalysis of National Energy-Efficiency Standards for

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired Combustion Efficiency 77 80 98 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 80 84 98 Electric Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Furnace AFUE 77 80 82 Water Heater Gas-Fired Thermal Efficiency 78 80 96 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 79 80 85 Electric Resistance Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 77 84 89 Source(s): Parameter Efficiency

152

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used elsewhere. 1) 2005 average stock age is for gas- and oil-fired steam and hot water boilers. Appliance Magazine, U.S. Appliance Industry: Market Share, Life Expectancy & Replacement Market, and Saturation Levels, January 2010, p. 10 for service and average lifetimes, and units to be replaced; ASHRAE, 1999 ASHRAE Handbook: HVAC Applications, Table 3, p. 35.3 for boilers service lifetimes; and

153

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year with significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation has made this the international guidance tool it was intended to be. The lead authors would also like to thank the following individuals for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook: Marcy Beck, Elisa Derby, Diana Dhunke, Ted Gartner, and Julie Osborn of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as well as Anthony Ma of Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards-setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs and on the design of the labels and standards themselves. In addition, it directs the reader to references and other resources likely to be useful in conducting the activities described and includes a chapter on energy policies and programs that complement appliance efficiency labels and standards. This guidebook attempts to reflect the essential framework of labeling and standards programs. It is the intent of the authors and sponsors to distribute copies of this book worldwide at no charge for the general public benefit. The guidebook is also available on the web at www.CLASPonline.org and can be downloaded to be used intact or piecemeal for whatever beneficial purposes readers may conceive.

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook for Appliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that go Blip in the Night: Standby Power and How to LimitBertoldi, P. et. al. 2002. “Standby Power Use: How Big ispower to reduce equipment standby power. ” Proceedings of

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Lower Tropospheric Ozone Measurements by Light Aircraft Equipped with Chemiluminescent Sonde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel use of a commercial, battery-powered, chemiluminescent ozonesonde on a light aircraft is described. This fast-response instrument, originally designed for balloon deployment into the stratosphere, is light, inexpensive, robust (reuseable), ...

I. G. McKendry; D. G. Steyn; S. O’Kane; P. Zawar-Reza; D. Heuff

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Economic analysis of the daylight-linked lighting control system in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to perform an economic analysis of the daylight-linked automatic on/off lighting control system installed for the purpose of energy savings in office buildings. For this, a building was chosen as a typical example, and the energy cost was calculated by using the daylight and building energy analysis simulation. When the lighting control was utilized, an economic analysis was performed using a payback period that was calculated by comparing the initial cost of installing the lighting control system with the annual energy cost which was reduced thanks to the application of the lighting control. The results showed that the lighting energy consumption, when the lighting control was applied, was reduced by an average of 30.5% compared with the case that there was not lighting control applied. Also, the result for total energy consumption showed that, when lighting control was applied, this was reduced by 8.5% when the glazing ratio was 100%, 8.2% for 80%, and 7.6% for 60% when compared to non-application. The payback period was analyzed in terms of the number of floors in a building; 10 floors, 20 floors, 30 floors, and 40 floors. Hence, the building with 40 floors and glazing ratio 100% resulted in the shortest payback period of 8.8 years, the building with 10 floors and glazing ratio 60% resulted in the longest period of 12.7 years. In other words, the larger the glazing ratio and the number of building floors are, the shorter the payback period is. (author)

Yang, In-Ho; Nam, Eun-Ji [Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, Dongguk University, 26-3, Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Motor Vehicle Plant Lighting Level Best Practices | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Plant Lighting Level Best Practices Motor Vehicle Plant Lighting Level Best Practices Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

158

Laboratory Equipment - DynaPro-LSR 99-E-15 Dynamic Light ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DynaPro-LSR 99-E-15 Dynamic Light Scattering. Description: Location: N/A. Specifications / Capabilities: Uses: Measuring ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Appliances, Lighting, Electronics, and Miscellaneous Equipment Electricity Use in New Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar-assisted gas-fired boiler heating, a thermal wall assembly, high performance lighting, and high-efficiency

Brown, Richard E.; Rittelman, William; Parker, Danny; Homan, Gregory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

What are the lighting requirements for residences? | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lamps (2009 IECC, Section 404.1). The 2012 IECC has increased the minimum percentage from 50% to 75%, along with an exception for low-voltage lighting (2012 IECC,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

U.S. Heating and Air-Conditioning System Manufacturer Shipments, by Type (Including Exports) 2005 Value of 2000 2005 2007 2009 2010 Shipments Equipment Type (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) (1,000s) ($million) (7) Air-Conditioners (1) 5,346 6,472 4,508 3,516 3419 5,837 Heat Pumps 1,539 2,336 1,899 1,642 1,748 2,226 Air-to-Air Heat Pumps 1,339 2,114 1,899 1,642 1748 1,869 Water-Source Heat Pumps (2) 200 222 N.A. N.A. N.A. 357 Chillers 38 37 37 25 29 1,093 Reciprocating 25 24 30 20 24 462 Centrifugal/Screw 8 6 7 5 5 566 Absorption (3) 5 7 N.A. N.A. N.A. 64 Furnaces 3,681 3,624 2,866 2,231 2,509 2,144 Gas-Fired (4) 3,104 3,512 2,782 2,175 2453 2,081 Electric 455 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Oil-Fired (5) 121 111 84 56 56 63 Boilers (6) 368 370 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes exports and gas air conditioners (gas units <10,000 units/yr) and rooftop equipment. Excludes heat pumps, packaged terminal air

162

The design and evaluation of integrated envelope and lighting control strategies for commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates control strategies for coordinating the variable solar-optical properties of a dynamic building envelope system with a daylight controlled electric lighting system to reduce electricity consumption and increase comfort in the perimeter zone of commercial buildings. Control strategy design can be based on either simple, instantaneous measured data, or on complex, predictive algorithms that estimate the energy consumption for a selected operating state of the dynamic envelope and lighting system. The potential benefits of optimizing the operation of a dynamic envelope and lighting system are (1) significant reductions in electrical energy end-uses - lighting, and cooling due to solar and lighting heat gains - over that achieved by conventional static envelope and lighting systems, (2) significant reductions in peak demand, and (3) increased occupant visual and thermal comfort. The DOE-2 building energy simulation program was used to model two dynamic envelope and lighting systems, an automated venetian blind and an electrochromic glazing system, and their control strategies under a range of building conditions. The energy performance of simple control strategies are compared to the optimum performance of a theoretical envelope and lighting system to determine the maximum potential benefit of using more complex, predictive control algorithms. Results indicate that (1) predictive control algorithms may significantly increase the energy-efficiency of systems with non-optimal solar-optical properties such as the automated venetian blind, and (2) simpler, non-predictive control strategies may suffice for more advanced envelope systems 1 incorporating spectrally selective, narrow-band electrochromic coatings.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Standard Measurement & Verification Plan for Lighting Equipment Retrofit or Replacement Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a framework for a standard Measurement and Verification (M&V) plan for lighting projects. It was developed to support cost-effective retrofits (partial and complete replacements) of lighting systems and is intended to provide a foundation for an M&V plan for a lighting retrofit utilizing a "best practice" approach, and to provide guidance to site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations on what is essential for a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. This document provides examples of appropriate elements of an M&V plan, including the calculation of expected energy savings. The standard M&V plan, as provided, also allows for consistent comparison with other similar lighting projects. Although intended for lighting retrofit applications, M&V plans developed per this framework document may also be used for other non-lighting technology retrofits and new installations.

Richman, Eric E.

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

165

Standard Measurement and Verification Plan for Lighting Retrofit Projects for Buildings and Building Sites  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a framework for standard measurement and verification (M&V) of lighting retrofit and replacement projects. It was developed to provide site owners, contractors, and other involved organizations with the essential elements of a robust M&V plan for lighting projects. It includes details on all aspects of effectively measuring light levels of existing and post-retrofit projects, conducting power measurement, and developing cost-effectiveness analysis. This framework M&V plan also enables consistent comparison among similar lighting projects, and may be used to develop M&V plans for non--lighting-technology retrofits and new installations.

Richman, Eric E.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project  

SciTech Connect

This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy-efficiency labels and standards: A guidebook for appliances, equipment and lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D.C. Ginthum, M. 1995. Appliance. September. Greening, L. ,Projected Regional Impacts of Appliance Efficiency StandardsSpecial Issue Devoted to Appliance and Lighting Standards. ”

McMahon, James E.; Wiel, Stephen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Persistence of energy savings of lighting retrofit technologies at the Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Forrestal Building, headquarters for the U.S. Department of Energy, was chosen for a major lighting retrofit project. The project replaced the aging fighting system newer, energy-efficient fixtures. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a three-part monitoring study at the Forrestal Building to (1) characterize building energy use, (2) empirically measure savings realized by the lighting retrofit, and (3) determine the persistence of energy savings. This report summarizes the findings from the third and final monitoring phase. Two data loggers were left installed at the Forrestal Building and data were collected for a 12-month period after the lighting retrofit was completed. An analysis-of-variance test indicated that the mean monthly lighting demand is increasing. A regression analysis performed on the data indicated that the mean monthly lighting demand for workdays is increasing at a rate of 0.3652{+-}0.1101 kW/mo. The nonworkday demand is increasing at a rate of 0.3408{+-}0.1027 kW/mo. During the same period, workday mean monthly plug load demand increased 0.0912{+-}0.0275 kW/mo., while nonworkday plug loads decreased slightly. The gradual increase, though significant, is reduced when compared to the 56% savings recorded after the lighting retrofit. The increase is attributed to a combination of occupants returning to original (pre-retrofit poor) behavior and a small set of occupancy sensors being defeated by building occupants. Degradation of lighting fixtures from {open_quotes}burn-in time{close_quotes} was ruled out because all burn-in time is expected in the first few months and the increasing trend persists over the 11 months of this study. Because the lighting demand was still increasing at the end of the study, without further data collection, it was not possible to determine when the increase would level out. Therefore, the true energy savings from the lighting retrofit remain unknown.

Chvala, W.D. Jr.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Halverson, M.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Do it yourself lighting power survey: lighting power audit for use with the Massachusetts type watts per square foot method of calculating a building's lighting power budget  

SciTech Connect

Advantages of the self-audit approach to energy conservation are presented. These are that it is cheaper to do it yourself; the employees become part of the corporate conservation effect; and no one knows the building and its needs better than the occupant. Steps described in the lighting survey procedure are: (1) divide the building into categories; (2) determine the total square footage for each category; (3) assign a power allowance for each category; (4) multiply the total square footage for each category by the respective power allowances; (5) add the budget sub-totals for each category to determine total building budget; and (6) walk through the building room-by-room and calculate the connected lighting load fixture-by-fixture. Some worksheets are provided. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

To build with light : an exploration into the relationship between light, space, and built form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to look at how light works with form to generate space. The thesis attempts to deal with the physical reality that light, space and form exist in a symbiotic relationship. The thesis deals ...

Heffron, Michael Thomas

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Using measured equipment load profiles to "right-size" HVAC systems and reduce energy use in laboratory buildings (Pt. 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using measured equipment load profiles to “right-size” HVAClighting and occupancy load profiles in all the spaces wereintensity” equipment load profile, while the remaining zones

Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Frenze, David; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Performance Evaluation of Energy-Efficient Lighting and Office Technologies in New York City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lighting and office equipment are significant electricity end uses in commercial office buildings. Recent technology developments offer significant improvements in lighting quality along with potentially substantial reductions in lighting and office equipment electricity use. This project demonstrated successful application of energy-efficient lighting and office technologies in an office building in New York City.

1997-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study discusses parameters for selecting the most suitable auxiliary lighting device to operate and control gas-discharge lamps. The devices tested in this study include solid-state fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) ballasts; current limiters; and dynamic lighting controls. They have been evaluated in combination with the standard 40-W, F-40, T-12, rapid-start, cool-white fluorescent lamps. Solid-state ballast performance varied widely- from 68 to 79 lumens per watt (lm/W) in efficacy and from 0.83 to 0.98 in ballast factor. System efficacy was up to 26% higher than standard core-coil ballast efficacy. Current limiters used with standard core-coil ballast reduce light output and input power by 30 to 50% and may be suitable as retrofit devices to reduce light in overilluminated spaces. When operated at a constant lamp wall temperature, these devices either maintain or reduce system efficacy.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Total Lighting Technology Light Output, by Sector (Trillion Lumen-Hour per Year)(1) Residential Commercial Industrial Other (2) Total Incandescent 1640 49% 180 1% 0 0% 50 1% 1870 5% General (A-type, Decorative) 1390 42% 120 0% 0 0% - - 1510 4% Reflector 190 6% 60 0% 0 0% - - 250 1% Miscellaneous 60 2% 0 0% - - 50 1% 110 0% Halogen 170 5% 240 1% 0 0% 20 0% 430 1% General 20 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 20 0% Reflector 110 3% 100 0% 0 0% - - 210 1% Low Voltage Display 10 0% 130 1% - - - - 140 0% Miscellaneous 30 1% 10 0% 0 0% 20 0% 70 0% Compact Fluorescent 780 23% 880 4% 0 0% 50 1% 1710 4% General (Screw, Pin) 670 20% 760 3% 0 0% - - 1430 4% Reflector 60 2% 130 1% 0 0% - - 180 0% Miscellaneous 50 2% - - - - 50 1% 100 0% Linear Fluorescent 670 20% 19180 79% 1800 40% 750 9% 22400 55% T5 0 0% 1480 6% 210 5% - - 1700 4% T8 80 2% 9690 40% 960 21% - - 10740 26% T12 470 14% 7880 32% 640 14% - - 8980 22% Miscellaneous 100 3% 120 0% 10 0% 750 9% 980 2% High Intensity Discharge

175

Lighting  

SciTech Connect

The lighting section of ASHRAE standard 90.1 is discussed. It applies to all new buildings except low-rise residential, while excluding specialty lighting applications such as signage, art exhibits, theatrical productions, medical and dental tasks, and others. In addition, lighting for indoor plant growth is excluded if designed to operate only between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. Lighting allowances for the interior of a building are determined by the use of the system performance path unless the space functions are not fully known, such as during the initial stages of design or for speculative buildings. In such cases, the prescriptive path is available. Lighting allowances for the exterior of all buildings are determined by a table of unit power allowances. A new addition the exterior lighting procedure is the inclusion of facade lighting. However, it is no longer possible to trade-off power allotted for the exterior with the interior of a building or vice versa. A significant change is the new emphasis on lighting controls.

McKay, H.N. (Hayden McKay Lighting Design, New York, NY (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Lighting in Commercial Buildings (1986 Data)> -- Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Executive Summary > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Ranges of Potential Savings, Maintaining Current Lighting Levels Figure on Ranges of Potential Savings, Maintaining Current Lighting Levels Note: Each shaded band indicates the range of savings estimates obtained, under varying assumptions for the effectiveness of the conservation features considered for each case. The potential savings are shown for each case as a percent of the base case lighting energy estimate (321 billion kilowatthours). Additional savings are possible if lighting levels are reduced. Sources: Adapted from Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Form EIA-871A, "Building Questionnaire" of the 1986 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey; and sources described in Appendices B and C.

177

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2010 Lamp Wattage, Number of Lamps, and Hours of Usage Lamp Wattage (Watts per lamp) Number of Lamps per Building Hours of Usage per Day Res Com Ind Other (1) Res Com Ind Res Com Ind Other Incandescent 56 53 46 68 32 14 1 2 10 13 9 General (A-type, Decorative) (2) 58 58 46 N/A 27 8 1 2 10 13 N/A Reflector 69 79 65 N/A 4 4 0 (3) 2 10 12 N/A Miscellaneous 45 7 0 68 1 3 N/A 2 11 0 9 Halogen 65 68 68 149 2 9 0 2 12 12 11 General 50 46 36 N/A 0 0 0 2 12 12 N/A Reflector 68 78 64 N/A 1 4 0 2 12 12 N/A Low Voltage Display 44 60 0 N/A 0 5 N/A 2 13 0 N/A Miscellaneous 82 99 145 149 0 0 0 2 10 12 11 Compact Fluorescent 16 19 31 22 12 39 1 2 10 13 9 General (Screw, Pin) 17 19 36 N/A 10 32 1 2 10 13 N/A Reflector 17 20 16 N/A 1 7 0 2 10 13 N/A Miscellaneous 18 0 0 22 1 N/A N/A 2 0 0 9 Linear Fluorescent 24 37 39 63 5 301 283 2 11 13 14 T5 19 36 58 N/A 0 20 20 2 12 13 N/A T8 26 31 32 N/A 1 181 182 2 11 13 N/A T12 28 50 53 N/A 3 98 79 2 11 12 N/A Miscellaneous 16 31 42 63 1 2 1

178

The live test demonstration (LTD) of lighting retrofit technologies at the DOE Forrestal Building  

SciTech Connect

DOE`s Forrestal Building in Washington, DC, has successfully awarded a performance-based shared energy savings contract for retrofit of office and hallway lighting systems. The winning contractor estimates that the retrofit (and associated occupancy sensors) will lead to savings of up to 62% of the power currently used for lighting, with an estimated annual cost savings of $340,000. The retrofit will also increase lighting levels to required levels, while reducing total harmonic distortion on the lighting circuits. The performance-based shared energy savings approach to lighting retrofits will result in a guaranteed contract to maintain lighting levels and savings for the next seven years. Over the life of the contract, the shared energy savings approach will provide $1 million each for DOE and the contractor.

Halverson, M.A.; Schmelzer, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Harris, L.G. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Total Lighting Technology Electricity Consumption, by Sector (TWh per Year) (1) Incandescent 136 78% 15 4% 0 0% 4 4% 156 22% General (A-type, Decorative) 112 64% 9 3% 0 0% - - 122 17% Reflector 19 11% 5 2% 0 0% - - 24 3% Miscellaneous 5 3% 0 0% 0 0% 4 4% 9 1% Halogen 12 7% 15 4% 0 0% 1 1% 28 4% General 1 1% 0 0% 0 0% - - 1 0% Reflector 8 5% 7 2% 0 0% - - 15 2% Low Voltage Display 1 0% 7 2% - - - - 8 1% Miscellaneous 2 1% 1 0% 0 0% 1 1% 4 1% Compact Fluorescent 15 9% 16 5% 0 0% 1 1% 32 5% General (Screw, Pin) 13 7% 13 4% 0 0% - - 26 4% Reflector 1 1% 3 1% 0 0% - - 4 1% Miscellaneous 1 1% - - 0 0% 1 1% 2 0% Linear Fluorescent 10 6% 250 72% 23 40% 10 9% 294 42% T5 0 0% 16 5% 2 4% - - 19 3% T8 1 1% 124 35% 12 21% - - 137 20% T12 7 4% 109 31% 9 15% - - 124 18% Miscellaneous 2 1% 2 0% 0 0% 10 9% 14 2% High Intensity Discharge 0 0% 49 14% 35 60% 98 83% 183 26% Mercury Vapor 0 0% 1 0% 4 7% 4 3% 9 1% Metal Halide 0 0% 43 12% 25 42% 29 25% 97 14% High Pressure Sodium 0 0% 5 1%

180

A comprehensive approach to integrated envelope and lighting systems for new commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The authors define a comprehensive approach to integrated envelope and lighting systems design as one that balances energy efficiency with an equal regard to the resultant environmental quality. By integrating envelope components (glazing, shading, and daylighting), lighting components (fixtures and controls) and building HVAC/energy management control systems, they create building systems that have the potential to achieve significant decreases in electricity consumption and peak demand while satisfying occupant physiological and psychological concerns. This paper presents results on the development, implementation, and demonstration of two specific integrated envelope and lighting systems: (1) a system emphasizing dynamic envelope components and responsive electric lighting systems, that offer the potential to achieve energy efficiency goals and a near optimum comfort environment throughout the year by adapting to meteorological conditions and occupant preferences in real time, and (2) perimeter daylighting systems that increase the depth of daylight penetration from sidelight windows and improves visual comfort with the use of a small inlet aperture. The energy performance of the systems was estimated using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Field tests with reduced scale models were conducted to determine daylighting and thermal performance in real time under actual weather conditions. Demonstrations of these integrated systems are being planned or are in progress in collaboration with utility programs to resolve real-world implementation issues under complex site, building, and cost constraints. Results indicate that integrated systems offer solutions that not only achieve significant peak demand reductions but also realize consistent energy savings with added occupant comfort and satisfaction.

Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.E.; Rubinstein, F.M.; Klems, J.H.; Beltran, L.O.; DiBartolomeo, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Building Technologies Program

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Teaching students about two-dimensional heat transfer effects in buildings, building components, equipment, and appliances using Therm 2.0.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Components, Equipment, and Appliances Using THERM 2.0as products such as appliances. Although there are other

Huizenga, Charlie; Arasteh, Dariush; Finalyson, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Robin; Griffith, Brent; Curcija, Dragan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of automotive lighting equipment and accessories  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

Fleischman, M.; Couch, B.; Handmaker, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics; Looby, G.P. [University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Lighting Group: Controls: IBECS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IBECS IBECS Integrated Building Environmental Communications System Objective The overall technical goal of the IBECS project is to develop an integrated building equipment communications network that will allow appropriate automation of lighting and envelope systems to increase energy efficiency, improve building performance, and enhance occupant experience in the space. This network will provide a low-cost means for occupants to control local lighting and window systems, thereby improving occupant comfort, satisfaction and performance. A related goal is to improve existing lighting control components and accelerate development of new daylighting technologies that will allow daylighting to be more extensively applied to a larger proportion of building floor space.

185

Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices: A Role for IEEE P1451  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controller Controller sensor actuator sensor sensor actuator actuator Building equipment Building equipment Building equipment Environmental Variables: Temperature Light Airflow Occupancy CO 2 É Fire É Figure 1. Shown is a generic diagram of the relationship between controller, actuators and sensors in a typical building control application. Sensors detect the key environmental parameters, while the controller "decides" which actuator is to be controlled and how. The actuators operate the building equipment, which, in turn affects the building environment. The physical connection between controller and actuator and controller and sensor usually takes place over wires carrying an analog signal. Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Control Devices A Role for IEEE P1451

186

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy efficient buildings: A world of possibilities  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the world, buildings are a major energy consumer. However, it can be shown that buildings that save from 30 to 50% over common practice can be built using available technologies while actually increasing occupant comfort and functionality. In addition, many technologies are in the development stage that promise even further increases in energy efficiency in buildings. This paper reviews the current state-of-the-art in energy efficient building practice including building equipment and envelopes. Topics discussed include heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment; lighting; insulation; building envelopes; and building commissioning. The energy effects of switching to non-chlorofluorocarbons in building insulation and refrigeration equipment are discussed. Advanced technologies currently under development that might have a substantial impact on future energy use including advanced absorption chillers, new lighting and window technologies, and thermally activated heat pumps are also described. 24 refs., 6 figs.

Kuliasha, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

List of Food Service Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Equipment Incentives Service Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 112 Food Service Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 112) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Energy Efficiency Solutions for Business (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Retail Supplier Schools State Government Building Insulation Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators LED Exit Signs Evaporative Coolers Vending Machine Controls Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

190

Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. About the Building Technologies Office The Energy Department's Building Technologies Office leads a network of research and industry partners to continually develop innovative, cost-effective energy-saving solutions for homes and buildings. Learn more about the Building Technologies Office. How We Help Homes & Buildings Save Energy Value-Driven Applications Advanced energy efficiency technologies like lighting, HVAC, windows, appliances, and commercial equipment. Practical Standards

191

Commercial Lighting and LED Lighting Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Incentives for energy efficient commercial lighting equipment as well as commercial LED lighting equipment are available to businesses under the Efficiency Vermont Lighting and LED Lighting...

192

An assessment and evaluation for recycle/reuse of contaminated process and metallurgical equipment at the DOE Rocky Flats Plant Site -- Building 865. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis of the potential advantages of alternatives for recycling and reusing equipment now stored in Building 865 at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado has been conducted. The inventory considered in this analysis consists primarily of metallurgical and process equipment used before January 1992, during development and production of nuclear weapons components at the site. The economic analysis consists of a thorough building inventory and cost comparisons for four equipment dispositions alternatives. The first is a baseline option of disposal at a Low Level Waste (LLW) landfill. The three alternatives investigated are metal recycling, reuse with the government sector, and release for unrestricted use. This report provides item-by-item estimates of value, disposal cost, and decontamination cost. The economic evaluation methods documented here, the simple cost comparisons presented, and the data provided as a supplement, should provide a foundation for D&D decisions for Building 865, as well as for similar D&D tasks at RFP and at other sites.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

List of Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooking Equipment Incentives Cooking Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 39 Commercial Cooking Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 39) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Room Air Conditioners Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

194

Peak Power Reduction Strategies for the Lighting Systems in Government Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lighting systems are the second major contributor to the peak power demand and energy consumption in buildings after A/C systems. They account for nearly 20% of the peak power demand and 15% of the annual energy consumption. Thus energy efficient lighting systems and their smart operation can be very effective in reducing the national peak power and energy consumption, particularly for a country like Kuwait where power demand grew from 6750 MW in 2001 to 9075 MW in 2007 (MEW, 2002- 2008). This paper presents an approach developed to reduce the peak power demand in the lighting. The approach included optimum use of daylight, time of day control and delamping. The implementation of this approach for eight government buildings with occupancy of between 7:30 and 2:30 and peak power demand of 29.3 MW achieved a reduction of 2 MW in the peak power demand (around 7%). More importantly this 7% in peak load reduction and 10,628 MWh reduction in the annual energy consumption was achieved without any added cost. Also, the paper includes recommendations for retrofitting cost effective energy efficient lighting systems and implementation of more effective control.

Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A. A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Guide to Building Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

Baechler, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Guide to Building Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

Baechler, Michael C.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 -- Lighting and Power Requirements | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting and Power Requirements Lighting and Power Requirements This course provides an overview of the lighting and power requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. Estimated Length: 60 minutes Presenters: Eric Richman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Thursday, January 10, 2008 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Commercial Focus: Compliance Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov

198

Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Smart Operations of Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems in Government Buildings for Peak Power Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summer 2007 smart operation strategies for air-conditioning (A/C) and lighting systems were developed and tested in a number of governmental buildings in Kuwait as one of the solutions to reduce the national peak demand for electrical power that commonly occur around 15:00 h. The working hours for these building are generally between 07:00 and 14:00 h and their peak demand exceeds 600 MW. The smart operation strategies implemented in these buildings included pre-closing treatment (PCT) between 13:00 and 14:00 h and time-of-day control (TDC) after 14:00 h. Also de-lamping was carried out in some of the buildings to readjust the higher than recommended illumination levels. This paper presents the achievements of implementing these smart operations strategies in Justice Palace Complex (JPC) as a case study. The peak load of this building was 3700 kW. The achievements are summarized as an all time saving of 22 kW by de-lamping, an additional saving of 27 kW through TDC of lighting, direct savings between 13:00 and 22:00 h by closing supply and return air fans of 52 air-handling units with a connected load 400 kW, and an additional saving of 550 kW during the same period by optimizing the cooling production and distribution. In conclusion project achieved an overall reduction in power demand of around 20% between 13:00 to 17:00 h and reduction ranging from 7% to 15% between 17:00 to 20:00 h.

Al-Hadban, Y.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.; Alasseri, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Inventory Equipment Resources Title Equipment Type Facility Laboratory Building Room Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Agate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.2 Windows 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment 5.4 Water Heaters 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems 5.6 Lighting 5.7 Appliances 5.8 Active Solar Systems 5.9 On-Site Power 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 5 contains market and technology data on building materials and equipment. Sections 5.1 and 5.2 cover the building envelope, including building assemblies, insulation, windows, and roofing. Sections 5.3 through 5.7 cover equipment used in buildings, including space heating, water heating, space cooling, lighting, thermal distribution (ventilation and hydronics), and appliances. Sections 5.8 and 5.9 focus on energy production from on-site power equipment. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

202

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4E 4E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F. Rubinstein & D. Bolotov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. Levi & K. Powell U.S. General Services Administration P. Schwartz Peter Schwartz, & Associates, LLC August 2008 Presented at the 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, CA, August 17-22, 2008, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

204

Using measured equipment load profiles to 'right-size' HVACsystems and reduce energy use in laboratory buildings (Pt. 2)  

SciTech Connect

There is a general paucity of measured equipment load datafor laboratories and other complex buildings and designers often useestimates based on nameplate rated data or design assumptions from priorprojects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequentlyoverestimated, and load variation across laboratory spaces within abuilding is typically underestimated. This results in two design flaws.Firstly, the overestimation of peak equipment loads results in over-sizedHVAC systems, increasing initial construction costs as well as energy usedue to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. Secondly, HVAC systemsthat are designed without accurately accounting for equipment loadvariation across zones can significantly increase simultaneous heatingand cooling, particularly for systems that use zone reheat fortemperature control. Thus, when designing a laboratory HVAC system, theuse of measured equipment load data from a comparable laboratory willsupport right-sizing HVAC systems and optimizing their configuration tominimize simultaneous heating and cooling, saving initial constructioncosts as well as life-cycle energy costs.In this paper, we present datafrom recent studies to support the above thesis. We first presentmeasured equipment load data from two sources: time-series measurementsin several laboratory modules in a university research laboratorybuilding; and peak load data for several facilities recorded in anational energy benchmarking database. We then contrast this measureddata with estimated values that are typically used for sizing the HVACsystems in these facilities, highlighting the over-sizing problem. Next,we examine the load variation in the time series measurements and analyzethe impact of this variation on energy use, via parametric energysimulations. We then briefly discuss HVAC design solutions that minimizesimultaneous heating and cooling energy use.

Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Frenze, David; Morehead, Michael; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Lighting fundamentals handbook: Lighting fundamentals and principles for utility personnel  

SciTech Connect

Lighting accounts for approximately 30% of overall electricity use and demand in commercial buildings. This handbook for utility personnel provides a source of basic information on lighting principles, lighting equipment, and other considerations related to lighting design. The handbook is divided into three parts. Part One, Physics of Light, has chapters on light, vision, optics, and photometry. Part Two, Lighting Equipment and Technology, focuses on lamps, luminaires, and lighting controls. Part Three, Lighting Design Decisions, deals with the manner in which lighting design decisions are made and reviews relevant methods and issues. These include the quantity and quality of light needed for visual tasks, calculation methods for verifying that lighting needs are satisfied, lighting economics and methods for evaluating investments in efficient lighting systems, and miscellaneous design issues including energy codes, power quality, photobiology, and disposal of lighting equipment. The handbook contains a discussion of the role of the utility in promoting the use of energy-efficient lighting. The handbook also includes a lighting glossary and a list of references for additional information. This convenient and comprehensive handbook is designed to enable utility lighting personnel to assist their customers in developing high-quality, energy-efficient lighting systems. The handbook is not intended to be an up-to-date reference on lighting products and equipment.

Eley, C.; Tolen, T. (Eley (Charles) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Benya, J.R. (Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Building blocks for future detectors: Silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use the combination of quasi-monochromatic, continuous-wave laser light at 1064 nm and fused silica test masses at room temperature. Detectors of the third generation, such as the Einstein-Telescope, will involve a considerable sensitivity increase. The combination of 1550 nm laser radiation and crystalline silicon test masses at low temperatures might be important ingredients in order to achieve the sensitivity goal. Here we compare some properties of the fused silica and silicon test mass materials relevant for decreasing the thermal noise in future detectors as well as the recent technology achievements in the preparation of laser radiation at 1064 nm and 1550 nm relevant for decreasing the quantum noise. We conclude that silicon test masses and 1550 nm laser light have the potential to form the future building blocks of gravitational wave detection.

R. Schnabel; M. Britzger; F. Brückner; O. Burmeister; K. Danzmann; J. Dück; T. Eberle; D. Friedrich; H. Lück; M. Mehmet; R. Nawrodt; S. Steinlechner; B. Willke

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

207

Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS -- a "light-shining-through-walls" experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into "weakly interacting sub-eV particles" (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run.

Klaus Ehret; Maik Frede; Samvel Ghazaryan; Matthias Hildebrandt; Ernst-Axel Knabbe; Dietmar Kracht; Axel Lindner; Jenny List; Tobias Meier; Niels Meyer; Dieter Notz; Javier Redondo; Andreas Ringwald; Günter Wiedemann; Benno Willke

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

HVAC BESTEST: A Procedure for Testing the Ability of Whole-Building Energy Simulation Programs to Model Space Conditioning Equipment: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Validation of Building Energy Simulation Programs consists of a combination of empirical validation, analytical verification, and comparative analysis techniques (Judkoff 1988). An analytical verification and comparative diagnostic procedure was developed to test the ability of whole-building simulation programs to model the performance of unitary space-cooling equipment that is typically modeled using manufacturer design data presented as empirically derived performance maps. Field trials of the method were conducted by researchers from nations participating in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme Task 22, using a number of detailed hourly simulation programs from Europe and the United States, including: CA-SIS, CLIM2000, PROMETHEUS, TRNSYS-TUD, and two versions of DOE-2.1E. Analytical solutions were also developed for the test cases.

Neymark, J,; Judkoff, R.; Knabe, G.; Le, H.-T.; Durig, M.; Glass, A.; Zweifel, G.

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Technology data characterizing lighting in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with commend 4.0  

SciTech Connect

End-use forecasting models typically utilize technology tradeoff curves to represent technology options available to consumers. A tradeoff curve, in general terms, is a functional form which relates efficiency to capital cost. Each end-use is modeled by a single tradeoff curve. This type of representation is satisfactory in the analysis of many policy options. On the other hand, for policies addressing individual technology options or groups of technology options, because individual technology options are accessible to the analyst, representation in such reduced form is not satisfactory. To address this and other analysis needs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has enhanced its Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND) to allow modeling of specific lighting and space conditioning (HVAC) technology options. This report characterizes the present commercial floorstock in terms of lighting technologies and develops cost-efficiency data for these lighting technologies. This report also characterizes the interactions between the lighting and space conditioning end uses in commercial buildings in the US In general, lighting energy reductions increase the heating and decrease the cooling requirements. The net change in a building`s energy requirements, however, depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and the climate. Lighting/HVAC interactions data were generated through computer simulations using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program.

Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Koomey, J.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

List of Equipment Insulation Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation Incentives Insulation Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 242 Equipment Insulation Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 242) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Equipment Insulation Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators Yes AEP Public Service Company of Oklahoma - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program (Oklahoma) Utility Rebate Program Oklahoma Residential Building Insulation

211

Energy-Efficiency Labels and Standards: A Guidebook forAppliances, Equipment, and Lighting - 2nd Edition  

SciTech Connect

Energy-performance improvements in consumer products are an essential element in any government's portfolio of energy-efficiency and climate change mitigation programs. Governments need to develop balanced programs, both voluntary and regulatory, that remove cost-ineffective, energy-wasting products from the marketplace and stimulate the development of cost-effective, energy-efficient technology. Energy-efficiency labels and standards for appliances, equipment, and lighting products deserve to be among the first policy tools considered by a country's energy policy makers. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and several other organizations identified on the cover of this guidebook recognize the need to support policy makers in their efforts to implement energy-efficiency standards and labeling programs and have developed this guidebook, together with the Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program (CLASP), as a primary reference. This second edition of the guidebook was prepared over the course of the past year, four years after the preparation of the first edition, with a significant contribution from the authors and reviewers mentioned previously. Their diligent participation helps maintain this book as the international guidance tool it has become. The lead authors would like to thank the members of the Communications Office of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for their support in the development, production, and distribution of the guidebook. This guidebook is designed as a manual for government officials and others around the world responsible for developing, implementing, enforcing, monitoring, and maintaining labeling and standards setting programs. It discusses the pros and cons of adopting energy-efficiency labels and standards and describes the data, facilities, and institutional and human resources needed for these programs. It provides guidance on the design, development, implementation, maintenance, and evaluation of the programs and on the design of the labels and standards themselves. In addition, it directs the reader to references and other resources likely to be useful in conducting the activities described and includes a chapter on energy policies and programs that complement appliance efficiency labels and standards. This guidebook attempts to reflect the essential framework of labeling and standards programs. It is the intent of the authors and sponsor to distribute copies of this book worldwide, at no charge, for the general public benefit. The guidebook is also available on the web at www.clasponline.org and may be downloaded to be used intact or piecemeal for whatever beneficial purposes readers may conceive.

Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About the Appliance and About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program About the Appliance and Equipment Standards Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Buildings Technologies Office sets minimum energy efficiency standards for approximately 50 categories of appliances and equipment used in homes, businesses, and other applications, as required by existing law. The appliances and equipment covered provide services that are used by consumers and businesses each day, such as space heating and cooling, refrigeration, cooking, clothes washing and drying, and lighting. DOE's minimum efficiency standards significantly reduce U.S. energy demand, lower emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants, and save consumers billions of dollars every year, without lessening the

213

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

214

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their real consumption. Energy and Buildings 40(4):514-523.monitored case studies. Energy and Buildings 35(5):441-461.of daylighting. Energy and Buildings 34: 421-429. Bourgeois

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

217

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

218

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

219

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1982-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

Frank, Alan M. (Livermore, CA); Edwards, William R. (Modesto, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

1983-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercialefficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles.s “ambient” and “task” lighting components, 2) occupancy

Rubinstein, Francis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

CAN POLARIZED LIGHTING PANELS REDUCE ENERGY CONSUPTION AND IMPROVE VISIBILITY IN BUILDING INTERIORS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

65: 504. Effectiveness of Lighting Systems. 12. Blackwell,Factors to Practical Lighting Design and Appl. 4 (5): 45-53.communication with Bill Jones, Lighting Research Laboratory,

Berman, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Occupancy-Based Lighting Control Systems: AReview. ” Lighting Residential Technology 42:415-431. Itron,Information Template – Indoor Lighting Controls. Pacific Gas

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lighting recommendations for the Social Security Administration Frank Hagel Federal Building in Richmond CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lighting Research Group FinalReport October 1999 Lighting Recommendations for the Socialin Richmond CA Final Report Lighting Recommendations for the

Rubinstein, Francis M.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored this project to estimate potential energy and monetary savings resulting from the implementation of light-colored roofs on residential and commercial buildings in major U.S. metropolitan areas. Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, so they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typically, rooftops in the United States are dark, and thus there is a potential for saving energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. Naturally, the expected savings are higher in southern, sunny, and cloudless climates. In this study, we make quantitative estimates of reduction in peak power demand and annual cooling electricity use that would result from increasing the reflectivity of the roofs. Since light-colored roofs also reflect heat in the winter, the estimates of annual electricity savings are a net value corrected for the increased wintertime energy use. Savings estimates only include direct reduction in building energy use and do not account for the indirect benefit that would also occur from the reduction in ambient temperature, i.e. a reduction in the heat island effect. This analysis is based on simulations of building energy use, using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Our methodology starts with specifying 11 prototypical buildings: single-family residential (old and new), office (old and new), retail store (old and new), school (primary and secondary), health (hospital and nursing home), and grocery store. Most prototypes are simulated with two heating systems: gas furnace and heat pumps. We then perform DOE-2 simulations of the prototypical buildings, with light and dark roofs, in a variety of climates and obtain estimates of the energy use for air conditioning and heating.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Gartland, L. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Simplified Building Energy Model (SBEM): A Tool to Analyse Building...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes,...

228

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.25. Water-Heating Equipment in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and...

229

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface NORA WANG GEOFF ELLIOTT JUSTIN ALMQUIST EDWARD ELLIS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory JUNE 14, 2013 Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Energy asset score evaluates the as- built physical characteristics of a building Energy Asset Score and its overall energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The physical characteristics include Building envelope (window, wall, roof) HVAC systems (heating, cooling, air distribution) Lighting system (luminaire and lighting control systems) Service hot water system Other major energy-using equipment (e.g. commercial refrigerator, commercial kitchen appliances, etc.) Building energy use is affected by many factors.

230

An Investigation of Window and Lighting Systems using Life Cycle Cost Analysis for the Purpose of Energy Conservation in Langford Building A at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Langford Building A forms part of the Langford Architectural Complex at Texas A & M University. Inefficient lighting fixtures and single pane windows in Langford Building A contribute to a considerable portion of the total cost of energy for this building. In the Southwestern United States, a building's windows can be responsible for a significant loss of energy. The windows and inefficient light bulbs can result in high utility costs and high labor charges from more frequent lighting maintenance than that required for efficient lighting. In Langford Building A, window system energy efficiency has not been improved since the building was constructed in 1977. This paper investigates the economic feasibility of using efficient lighting and window systems in Langford Building A. The cost for windows and new lighting tubes was analyzed and compared by using Life Cycle Cost Analysis. The payback periods, determined in this analysis, showed that more efficient lighting and window systems would reduce costs. As results of this analysis, the window film and LED lighting tube reduce building life cycle cost and short payback periods than other alternatives.

Hwang, Hea Yeon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Evergreen LED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Envelope Systems HVAC Equipment & Systems Lighting Systems...

232

Quantifying National Energy Savings Potential of Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type, such as wasted light hours and energy costs. However,percent of wasted light hours. Figure 3. Energy Savings for

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings – heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of four artificial lighting simulation tools with virtual building reference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are number of software environment available to provide physically accurate lighting simulation to support lighting researchers and designers. This paper compares and analyses performance of four lighting simulation programs (AGI32, DIALux, RADIANCE ... Keywords: CIE test case, artificial lighting, evaluation, tools, validation

Shariful Shikder

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies Program: hotel guest room energy controls. Sanhotel and institutional bathroom lighting. [CEC] California Energy

Williams, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

An experimental setup to evaluate the daylighting performance of an advanced optical light pipe for deep-plan office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research focuses on an advanced optical light pipe daylighting system as a means to deliver natural light at the back of deep-plan office buildings (15ft to 30ft), using optimized geometry and high reflective materials. The light pipe configurations follow a previous study at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Beltr??n et al., 1997). The current system is designed for College Station, TX (lat: 30?? 36??N), with predominantly mostly sunny sky conditions. This work consists of the monitoring of two scale models simulating a portion of a multi-story office building with open-plan configuration, with interior dimensions 30ft x 20ft x 10ft, built at 1:4 of its real scale, one of the models being the reference case and the other the test case where the light pipe system is placed. The main objectives of this thesis are (a) to examine this daylighting system comparative to the reference case, taking measurements for longer periods than the study at LBNL, as well as to collect detailed data of its performance under different weather conditions and with different materials; (b) to evaluate the visual comfort and possible glare problems of the light pipe system through photographic evaluation and the conduction of a survey that provides people??s opinions and suggestions about the daylighting system. The light pipe system demonstrated a higher performance than the reference case in terms of appropriate levels of light and people??s preferences. The illuminance at the workplane level showed to be adequate with any of the two different diffusing materials used to spread the light into the room. The light pipe without a diffuser was the other condition observed to further understand the bounces of the sunbeam inside the reflective chamber and its consequences on the lighting output. Recommended standards for office spaces with VDT screens together with the analysis of the daylight system, led to preliminary suggestions on how to integrate the light pipe system in an open-plan office configuration. Further study is indicated to reach the complete potential of this advanced optical light pipe that ties illuminance quality with energy savings through the integration of daylight and electric light systems.

Martins Mogo de Nadal, Betina Gisela

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mandatory Electric Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on

238

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ” ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Lighting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the grand challenge of reducing our energy and carbon footprint, the development of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies offer a potential solution. Energy technologies can reduce our dependence on foreign oil as well as the energy consumed by the petroleum industry, the leading consumer of energy by a U.S. industry sector. Nonetheless, the manufacturing processes utilized to manufacture equipment for alternative energy technologies often involve energy-intensive processes. This undermines some of the advantages to moving to 'green' technologies in the first place. Our answer to the Industrial Technology Program's (ITP) Grand Challenge FOA was to develop a transformational low cost manufacturing process for plastic-based photovoltaics that will lower by over 50% both energy consumption and greenhouse emissions and offer a return-of-investment of over 20%. We demonstrated a Luminescent Solar Concentrator fabricated on a plastic acrylic substrate (i.e. no glass) that increases the power output of the PV cell by 2.2x with a 2% power efficiency as well as an LSC with a 7% power efficiency that increased the power output from the PV cells by 35%. S large area 20-inch x 60-inch building-integrated photovoltaic window was fabricated using contract manufacturing with a 4% power efficiency which improved the power output of the PV cell by over 50%. In addition, accelerated lifetimes of the luminescent material demonstrate lifetimes of 20-years.

Sue A. Carter

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An Energy and Peak Loads Analysis of the TYC/TRC Building – Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy use of the Texas Youth Commission/Texas Rehabilitation Commission (TYC/TRC) Building at Austin, Texas, was analyzed using the DOE 2.IB building energy simulation program. An analysis was made for the building as specified in the building plans and the specifications provided by the State Purchasing and General Services Commission. Operating schedules for occupancy, lighting, office equipment, and infiltration were assumed. The energy consumption of the TYC/TRC Building can be reduced with certain modifications.

Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D. L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Unfortunately, the equipment used to determine the thermal resistance of traditional building, insulation materials is not well suited for measuring ...

243

Energy efficient electric lighting for buildings in developed and developing countries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As energy is a fundamental service for human development and economic growth, the demand for it is constantly on the rise worldwide. Lighting energy use… (more)

Bhusal, Pramod

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

245

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

246

Scientist Equipment and Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outline and Equipment Outline and Equipment LIGHT AND COLOR Grade levels: can be adapted for grades 2-8. Length of time: 30-45 minues. Room preference: Double classroom or all-purpose room. Equipment is located in the Lederman Science Center. Talk to Susan Dahl to borrow this set. Spectrum tube power supply, gas tubes and diffraction grating glasses Light box with red, green, and blue translucent film Power chord, extension chord Large set of lenses Small concave and convex lenses Magnetic optics kit, includes a small laser Slinky Flashlight Clear plastic tub, powdered milk Water Radiometer Electromagnetic energy spectrum poster Set of red, green and blue flood lights Where does light come from? Use a boy and a girl to make a human demonstration of molecules and atoms. Have students rub their hands together and notice friction equals heat.

247

The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include:

249

Can polarized lighting panels reduce energy consumption and improve visibility in building interiors  

SciTech Connect

The lighting and vision literature, materials on management science and the reflectivity of surfaces are reviewed. The analysis emphasized the connection between lighting design and productivity. It is concluded that polarizing panels should be included among the alternatives normally considered by the lighting designer to utilize energy more efficiently than normal general lighting systems using standard prismatic or diffusing panels. A lighting design using polarizing panels might use 1/4 to 1/3 less energy than a reference system using standard prismatic panels without compromising function. The estimate of the potential energy savings available with polarizing panels is based on the estimate of their efficiency at producing Equivalent Spherical Illumination (ESI). ESI combines the effects of luminance and contrast into a single figure of merit for visibility. A short history and some background of ESI and a discussion of the measured reflectivities of paper and pencil on paper are presented. These data are used in ESI calculations. The problems and limitations of evaluating lighting systems strictly in terms of ESI per watt (or dollar) are discussed. An attempt was made to evaluate polarizing panels in terms of the factors discussed. Additional information is provided in 4 appendices.

Berman, S.; Clear, R.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

MEASURED ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT NEW COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: RESULTS FROM THE BECA-CN DATA COMPILATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the glazing, daylighting, and lighting systems. Limitationslighting and daylighting, HVAC system and controls, buildingsystems are common Ceatures and are Cast becoming standard equipment Cor many large commercial buildings. Daylighting

Piette, M.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Energy Audit Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tools (equipment) needed to perform an energy audit include those items which assist the auditor in measuring the energy used by equipment or lost in inefficiency. Each tool is designed for a specific measurement. They can be inexpensive simple tools or expensive technically complex or multifunctional tools. In general, tools are needed which measure light, temperature and humidity, electricity, air flow, heat loss, and general energy information.

Phillips, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

254

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

255

FIERAsystem: A Fire Risk Assessment Model for Light Industrial Building Fire Safety Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. The current report describes the framework for the new model, individual submodels used for calculations, and the information that the model provides to the design engineer or building official. The framework that FIERAsystem uses to conduct a hazard analysis and the process used to perform a risk analysis are also discussed in the report. 2. FRAMEWORK OF FIERAsystemMODEL The FIERAsystem model allows the user to perform a number of fire protection engineering calculations in order to evaluate fire protection systems in industrial buildings. At start-up, FIERAsystem provides several calculation options, which allow the user to: use standard engineering correlations, run individual submodels, conduct a hazard analysis, or conduct a risk analysis

N. Kashef; A. Torvi; G. Reid; Noureddine Benichou; Ahmed Kashef; David Torvi; George Hadjisophocleous; Irene Reid

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

257

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

258

A smart GUI based air-conditioning and lighting controller for energy saving in building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will concentrate on the algorithm and control strategies where the air-conditioners and lighting system can be controlled using microcontroller; a microcontroller is chosen due to its low cost and high flexibility. Conceptually, the controller ... Keywords: energy saving control system, graphic LCD, graphical user interface (GUI), microcontroller

M. F. Abas; N. MD. Saad; N. L. Ramli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SBEM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SBEM SBEM SBEM screen Simplified tool which provides an analysis of a building's energy consumption primarily for the purposes of assessing compliance with Part L (England & Wales), Section 6 (Scotland) and Part F (Northern Ireland) of Building Regulations and eventually for building performance certification EPBD in UK. SBEM (Simplified Building Energy Model) calculates monthly energy use and carbon dioxide emissions of a building given a description of the buildingÂ’s geometry, construction, use, and HVAC and lighting equipment. It was originally based on the Dutch methodology NEN 2916:1998 (Energy Performance of Non-Residential Buildings) and has since been modified to comply with the emerging CEN Standards. SBEM makes use of standard sets of data for different activity areas and calls on databases

260

Office Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Office Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in office spaces are poorly understood.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

263

Office Equipment Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous electric loads in office buildings consume nearly 58 billion kilowatt hours per year, which translates to $6.1 billion in electricity costs to businesses. Most office space is not sub metered, thus making it difficult for tenants to know how much electricity they use. Consequently, they are unable to see how the amount they pay for their space is affected by the efficiency of equipment they choose and how they operate it. By using recommended power-saving equipment and best practices outlin...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

The USDOE Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit: Preliminary Analysis of Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September of 1993 a 36,832 fixture lighting retrofit was completed at the United States Department of Energy Forrestal complex in Washington, D.C. This retrofit represents DOE's largest project to date that utilizes a Shared Energy Savings (SES) agreement as authorized under Public Law 99-272. As DOE's first major SES contract, it was important that every aspect of this project serve as the cornerstone of DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, including the careful measurement of the electricity and thermal energy savings.

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Vajda, E. J.; Shincovich, M.; D'Angelo III, L.; Harris, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

List of Agricultural Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agricultural Equipment Incentives Agricultural Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 90 Agricultural Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 90) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Boilers Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Dishwasher Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Water Heaters Commercial Cooking Equipment Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program (Vermont) State Rebate Program Vermont Agricultural Agricultural Equipment Custom/Others pending approval Lighting

266

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.7 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Efficiency Standards for Lighting Efficiency Standards for Lighting March 2011 7.7.2 Efficiency Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps Effective for products manufactured before July 14, 2012 Minimum Nominal Lamp Average Lamp Lamp Type (1) Wattage (W) Minimum CRI Efficacy (lm/W) Effective Date 4-Foot Medium Bipin >35 69 75.0 November 1, 1995 4-Foot Medium Bipin 45 75.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped >35 69 68.0 November 1, 1995 2-Foot U-Shaped 45 64.0 November 1, 1995 8-Foot Slimline >65 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot Slimline 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output >100 69 80.0 May 1, 1994 8-Foot High Output 45 80.0 May 1, 1994 Effective for products manufactured on or after July 14, 2012 Minimum Correlated Color Average Lamp Lamp Type Temperature (K) Efficacy (lm/W) 4-Foot Medium Bipin 89 4-Foot Medium Bipin 88 2-Foot U-Shaped

267

PFP Emergency Lighting Study  

SciTech Connect

NFPA 101, section 5-9 mandates that, where required by building classification, all designated emergency egress routes be provided with adequate emergency lighting in the event of a normal lighting outage. Emergency lighting is to be arranged so that egress routes are illuminated to an average of 1.0 footcandle with a minimum at any point of 0.1 footcandle, as measured at floor level. These levels are permitted to drop to 60% of their original value over the required 90 minute emergency lighting duration after a power outage. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) has two designations for battery powered egress lights ''Emergency Lights'' are those battery powered lights required by NFPA 101 to provide lighting along officially designated egress routes in those buildings meeting the correct occupancy requirements. Emergency Lights are maintained on a monthly basis by procedure ZSR-12N-001. ''Backup Lights'' are battery powered lights not required by NFPA, but installed in areas where additional light may be needed. The Backup Light locations were identified by PFP Safety and Engineering based on several factors. (1) General occupancy and type of work in the area. Areas occupied briefly during a shiftly surveillance do not require backup lighting while a room occupied fairly frequently or for significant lengths of time will need one or two Backup lights to provide general illumination of the egress points. (2) Complexity of the egress routes. Office spaces with a standard hallway/room configuration will not require Backup Lights while a large room with several subdivisions or irregularly placed rooms, doors, and equipment will require Backup Lights to make egress safer. (3) Reasonable balance between the safety benefits of additional lighting and the man-hours/exposure required for periodic light maintenance. In some plant areas such as building 236-Z, the additional maintenance time and risk of contamination do not warrant having Backup Lights installed in all rooms. Sufficient light for egress is provided by existing lights located in the hallways.

BUSCH, M.S.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

News From the D.C. Office: Energy-Saving Office Equipment Part 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Energy-Saving Office Equipment Part 2: Making the "Virtual Office" Real More on the DC Office efficiency up-grade: Lighting, Office Equipment: Part 1 Regular readers of the Center for Building Science News know that energy-efficient lighting and office equipment can have significant environmental and economic benefits. Previous articles ("Monitored Savings from Energy-Efficient Lighting in D.C. Office" [Spring 1997, p. 3] and "Energy-Saving Office equipment" [Summer 1997, p. 3]) discussed these features of Berkeley Lab's Washington, D.C. office. The D.C. office also serves as a demonstration site for telecommunications technologies, which have energy and environmental benefits of their own.

269

Laboratory - Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available Equipment. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z. B. Ohaus ... W. Barnstead ...

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Autodesk Green Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other...

271

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Lighting Standards for General Service Incandescent Lamps Prescribed by EISA 2007 General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life Modified Spectrum General Service Incandescent Effective Date Maximum Wattage Rated Lumen Range Minimum Life By 2020, the minimum efficacy for general service incandescent will be 45 lm/W unless the Secretary of Energy has implemented another standard which saves as much or more energy than a 45 lm/W standard. Source(s): U. S. Government, Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, January 2007, Section 321. 2014 43 563-787 1000 hrs. 2015 29 232-563 1000 hrs. 2012 72 1,118-1,950 1000 hrs. 2013 53 788-1,117 1000 hrs. 2014 43 750-1,049 1000 hrs. 2015 29 310-749 1000 hrs. 2012 72 1,490-2,600 1000 hrs. 2013 53 1,050-1,498

272

Smart Operations of Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems in a Government Buildings for Peak Power Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the achievements of implementing smart operations strategies for air-conditioning (A/C) and lighting systems in Justice Palace Complex (JPC), Kuwait during the summer 2007. The peak load of this building was 3700 kW. The achievements are summarized as direct savings between 13:00 and 22:00 h by closing supply and return air fans of 52 air-handling units with a connected load 400 kW, and an additional saving of 550 kW during the same period by optimizing the cooling production and distribution. Also an all time saving of 22 kW by de-lamping, and additional saving of 27 kW through TDC of lighting were achieved. In conclusion project achieved an overall reduction in power demand of around 20% between 13:00 to 17:00 h and reduction ranging from 7% to 15% between 17:00 to 20:00 h.

Al-Hadban, Y.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.; Alasseri, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and increased awareness of the need to standardize on emerging wireless technologies are evidence of this transformation. In addition to increased standardization of digital control protocols controller capabilities, the lighting industry has improved the performance of dimming lighting systems over the last two years. The system efficacy of today's current dimming ballasts is approaching that of non-dimming program start ballasts. The study finds that the benefits of applying digital controls technologies to California's unique commercial buildings market are enormous. If California were to embark on an concerted 20 year program to improve the demand responsiveness and energy efficiency of commercial building lighting systems, the State could avoid adding generation capacity, improve the elasticity of the grid, save Californians billion of dollars in avoided energy charges and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

276

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events ICMA 99th Annual Conference September 22-25, 2013 Register Now for the 2013...

277

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... keynote address entitled "Green Buildings - The White House Perspective ... in the areas of building materials, lighting, and indoor air ... Selected Papers. ...

278

EERE: Building Technologies Office Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Get Started Now Get Started Now Building Technologies Office and You Working together to empower energy efficiency where you live, work, and play. Get Started Now Start Saving Energy Now - Find Out How Value-Driven Applications: Advanced energy efficiency technologies like lighting, HVAC, windows, appliances, and commercial equipment. Practical Standards: Leading-edge appliance and equipment energy standards and improved building energy codes. Real World Solutions: Holistic strategies for new construction and building upgrades that reduce energy bills, enhance comfort and productivity, and provide healthier indoor environments in new or existing homes and commercial buildings. Program Evaluation: Program peer reviews are important in providing robust, documented feedback for program planning. Knowledge about the quality and effectiveness of current projects and programs is absolutely essential in designing future programs and/or enhancing existing efforts. Learn more about the 2013 Program Peer Review.

279

Performance of electronic ballasts and other new lighting equipment: (Phase 2, The 34-watt F40 rapid start T-12 fluorescent lamp): Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study has measured the performance of energy-saving 34-watt F40, T-12, rapid-start, lite white fluorescent lamps being operated by solid-state ballasts and lighting control equipment. The performances of these lamp systems are compared with those of 40-watt F40, T-12 rapid-start cool white fluorescent lamp systems studied in the prior phase of this project. With the 34-watt F40 lamps and various solid-state ballasts, system efficacy ranged from 67 to 84 lumens per watt and ballast factor from 0.756 to 0.908. Average system efficacy using the 34-watt lamps exceeded that of systems using 40-watt lamps and the same solid-state ballasts by only 1 percent even though the 34-watt lamps is about 6 percent more efficacious than the 40-watt lamp. This apparent discrepancy is due to increased ballast losses when operating the 34-watt lamps. However, the systems efficacy of the 34-watt lamps used with a solid-state ballast exceeded that of a 34-watt, two-lamp system using the standard core-coil ballast by as much as 29 percent. A T-8 fluorescent lamp system with a smaller lamp diameter was also included in the study. Operating this lamp with a solid-state ballast produced a high system efficacy of 90 lumens per watt, a 39 percent improvement over the efficacy of a 40-watt F40 system using the standard core-coil ballast. The use of static controllers with 34-watt F40 lamps can result in excessive flickering (46 percent) and the generation of a second harmonic as high as 96 percent of the fundamental frequency. The dynamic controllers, when used to dim the 34-watt lamps generally cannot be dimmed as low as the 40-watt lamp system without flickering. In general, the 34-watt energy-saving lamps are appropriate as a retrofit to reduce illumination levels. However, for new construction, the 40-watt F40 argon filled lamps cost less, perform better, and provide a more reliable system. 5 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Appliances & Equipment Standards About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement Rulemakings & Notices Further Guidance ENERGY STAR® Guidance and Frequently Asked Questions This webpage is designed to provide guidance and answer Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the U.S. Department of Energy's appliance standards program. Guidance types span all covered products and covered equipment and cover such topics as: definitions, scope of coverage, conservation standards, test procedures, certification, Compliance and Certification Management System (CCMS), and enforcement. This website offers users an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7.1 National Legislation 7.1 National Legislation 7.2 Federal Tax Incentives 7.3 Efficiency Standards for Residential HVAC 7.4 Efficiency Standards for Commercial HVAC 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting 7.7 Water Use Standards 7.8 State Building Energy Codes 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 7 outlines national climate change legislation, tax incentives, Federal regulations, and State programs that have influenced building energy consumption. Section 7.1 summarizes the past 40 years of national energy legislation beginning with the Clean Air Act of 1970. Section 7.2 describes the energy efficiency-related Federal tax incentives created in the last 5 years. Sections 7.3 through 7.7 describe the energy and water efficiency standards currently or soon to be in effect for residential and commercial HVAC equipment, appliances, lighting, and water-consuming products. Section 7.8 covers building energy codes. Following is a summary of the energy legislation discussed in this chapter:

282

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

283

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Green Energy Compass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Building Analysis Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, &...

284

"Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning AgentsAuditors" "Recovery Act: Training...

285

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

286

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards for single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps as a separate equipment class since 2008. Before 2010, this equipment was regulated under the broader scope of commercial air conditioning and heating equipment. Single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps are commercial air conditioning and heating equipment with its main components arranged in a vertical fashion. They are mainly used in modular classrooms, modular office buildings, telecom shelters, and hotels, and are typically installed on the outside of an exterior wall or in a closet against an exterior wall but inside the building.

287

Tier 2 Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Results for a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Light-Duty Diesel Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigates the emission control system performance and system desulfurization effects on regulated and unregulated emissions in a light-duty diesel engine.

Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Thornton, M.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Foodservice Equipment Applications Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A typical foodservice operation may spend 75 percent or more of its energy dollar to provide lighting, refrigeration, ventilation, and miscellaneous end uses. Performance characteristics and operational advantages make electricity an excellent option for powering major cooking equipment. This handbook describes the six most common types of major cooking appliances--griddles, fryers, broilers, ovens, ranges, and kettles--including typical applications and industry purchasing trends. Such information will ...

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lighting Daylighting Variable speed rooftop supply fans Variable speed hydronic systems Energy recovery Plug-load controls and efficient office equipment Outdoor air optimization...

290

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

291

Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corridors. The overall range of savings was six to 80 percent. The Advanced Lighting Guidelines On-Line Edition New Buildings Institute 2011 presents a table of lighting energy...

292

Lighting Systems Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement equipment with light beam Lighting Systems Test Facilities NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be...

293

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Labeled Labeled Devices, equipment, appliances, assemblies, or materials to which have been affixed a label, seal, symbol, or other identifying mark of a nationally recognized testing laboratory, inspection agency, or other organization concerned with product evaluation that maintains periodic inspection of the production of the above-labeled items and by whose label the manufacturer attests to compliance with applicable nationally recognized standards. Lamp A generic term for a man-made light source, often called a bulb or tube. lb Pound. Lighting Power Density (LPD) The maximum lighting power per unit area of a building classification or space function. Lighting System A group of luminaires circuited or controlled to perform a specific function. Liquid-Immersed Transformer

294

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercial Buildinghas analyzed lighting energy usage across different buildings La Figure 9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercial Building

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Data] Figure 9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercialhas analyzed lighting energy usage across different buildings La Figure 9: Lighting Energy Usage for Commercial Building

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Continuous Controls: Lighting Energy Management for Retrofit and New Construction Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rising interest of specifiers and end-users in Lighting Energy Management (LEM) control equipment has led to an increased need for further education in the selection, capabilities and applications of such equipment. This paper addresses these and related points for a particular type of LEM equipment referred to as "continuous controls." More specifically, the need for such equipment and its performance are reviewed. The remainder of the paper discusses the capabilities and applications of continuous control equipment for retrofit and new construction projects. Particular attention is drawn to the need for specifiers and end-users to become more control conscious as continuous controls become more fully integrated into building design.

Schuett, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

298

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

299

Solar Equipment Certification | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification Solar Equipment Certification < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Equipment Certification Provider Minnesota Department of Commerce Minnesota law requires that all active solar space-heating and water-heating systems, sold, offered for sale, or installed on residential and commercial buildings in the state meet Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) standards. Specifically, the rule references SRCC's "Operating Guidelines" pertaining to collector certification and system certification: OG-100 and OG-300, respectively. Local building officials

300

News From the D.C. Office: Monitored Savings from Energy-Efficient Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. 3 Aerial view of Washington D.C. News From the D.C. Office Monitored Savings from Energy-Efficient Lighting in D.C. Office More on the DC Office efficiency up-grade: Office Equipment: Part 1, Part 2 Figure 1: Lighting energy use profile for a typical exterior office. Berkeley Lab's office in Washington, D.C. is located a few blocks from DOE headquarters, in a five-year-old office building constructed mainly for lease to Federal agencies and their contractors. Despite its recent vintage, the building's standard lighting specifications were far from today's best, cost-effective practice. In designing the build-out plans for offices and meeting rooms in our 7,500-square-foot suite, we wanted to showcase some of the energy-efficient lighting and office equipment developed for DOE's Building Technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lighting for Tomorrow: Building on the results of the first national energy-efficient lighting fixture design competition in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Lighting for Tomorrow was the first residential lighting fixture design competition conducted in the United States to focus on energy-efficient light sources. Sponsored by the American Lighting Association, the Consortium for Energy Efficiency, and the U.S. Department of Energy, the competition was carried out in two phases between 2002 and 2004. Five winning fixture designs were selected from a field of 24 finalists. The paper describes the competition in detail, including its origins, sponsors, structure and rules, timeline, prizes, selection criteria, and judges. The paper describes the results of the competition, including industry response, promotion and publicity efforts, technical and design innovations demonstrated by the winners, and retail placements to date. Finally, the paper offers several lessons learned that are instructive for future efforts to promote high-efficiency lighting through the design competition approach.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Foster, Rebecca; McGowan, Terry

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

302

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Applications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Specific questions concerning equipment should be directed to the point of Specific questions concerning equipment should be directed to the point of contact responsible for the item(s) under consideration. This information is listed on the "Equipment Information" page, as well as on the grant award e-mail sent to the applicant. Step 1: Search and Apply for Equipment Note: If you know the Item Control Number of the equipment you need, you may go directly to the on-line application. Please follow these procedures to "Search Equipment" and apply for equipment using the LEDP Online Application: Select the "Search Equipment" menu link. Enter the type of equipment desired into the search box or choose the "Equipment List" link, which will allow you see a complete list of available equipment. Select the "Item Control Number" for the desired equipment. This

303

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

information for that building such as building size, year constructed, type of energy used, energy-using equipment, and conservation features. The smallest level of...

304

Advanced Demand Responsive Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

305

Estimation the Performance of Solar Fiber Optic Lighting System after Repairing the Glass Fiber Cables in a South Korean Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar fiber optic lighting system consists of the solar ray concentrating apparatus, the tracking control, lighting transmission and emission parts. This system was installed on a 20-storey apartment building in South Korea. Many residents had concerns about its long-term maintenance. The most common maintenance difficulties are sun tracking problems and damaged glass fiber cables. Sometimes fiber optic lighting systems should not be repaired with splices. Splicing glass fiber cables often results in decreased system efficiency and further cable damage. In this study, the cost of replacing the cables was prohibitive; hence, the drop in efficiency of the damaged cables was answered by repairing through splicing. These damaged cables were repaired by specially process of cutting and polishing. Results showed that the luminous intensity ratio improved by 0.391%, though this was still lower than the recommended guideline of 0.725%. Accordingly, on average 55% of luminous intensity was increased.

Cha, K. S.; Kim, T. K.; Park, M. S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

JEA - New Home Build Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JEA - New Home Build Rebate Program JEA - New Home Build Rebate Program JEA - New Home Build Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Solar Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat pumps and central air conditioning: $125 - $200 Pin-based lighting fixtures: $10 per fixture Clothes Washers: $25 Refrigerators: $25 Solar Water Heaters: $800 Provider JEA JEA's New Home Build Program is an incentive program offered by JEA to promote the use of energy efficient equipment in new single family homes constructed in Northeast Florida. rebates are available for certain energy efficient products. See the program web site for complete details.

307

Building Technologies Office: Operate and Maintain Efficient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Photo of an equipment room in a high-rise commercial office building with red and green equipment. Proper O&M is a cost-effective strategy for...

308

Home and Building Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

309

REDUCING ENERGY USE IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2007 Florida Building Code (ICC, 2008) requires building designers and architects to achieve a minimum energy efficiency rating for commercial buildings located throughout Florida. Although the Florida Building Code is strict in the minimum requirements for new construction, several aspects of building construction can be further improved through careful thought and design. This report outlines several energy saving features that can be used to ensure that new buildings meet a new target goal of 85% energy use compared to the 2007 energy code in order to achieve Governor Crist’s executive order to improve the energy code by 15%. To determine if a target goal of 85% building energy use is attainable, a computer simulation study was performed to determine the energy saving features available which are, in most cases, stricter than the current Florida Building Code. The energy savings features include improvements to building envelop, fenestration, lighting and equipment, and HVAC efficiency. The impacts of reducing outside air requirements and employing solar water heating were also investigated. The purpose of the energy saving features described in this document is intended to provide a simple, prescriptive method for reducing energy consumption using the methodology outlined in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE, 2007). There are two difficulties in trying to achieve savings in non-residential structures. First, there is significant energy use caused by internal loads for people and equipment and it is difficult to use the energy code to achieve savings in this area relative to a baseline. Secondly, the ASHRAE methodology uses some of the same features that are proposed for the new building, so it may be difficult to claim savings for some strategies that will produce savings such as improved ventilation controls, reduced window area, or reduced plug loads simply because the methodology applies those features to the comparison reference building. Several measures to improve the building envelope characteristics were simulated. Simply using the selected envelope measures resulted in savings of less than 10% for all building types. However, if such measures are combined with aggressive lighting reductions and improved efficiency HVAC equipment and controls, a target savings of 15% is easily attainable.

Raustad, R.; Basarkar, M.; Vieira, R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

311

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: LISA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other...

312

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TAPS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other...

313

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, refrigeration, water ...

314

Building Technologies Office: Diagnostic Measurement and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic Measurement and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning Equipment Expert Meeting Building America hosted the "Diagnostic Measurement and Performance...

315

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Subject Whole Building Analysis Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other Applications Atmospheric Pollution Energy Economics Indoor Air Quality...

316

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Evergreen LED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems...

317

Lighting Group: Controls: Advanced Digital Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Digital Controls Advanced Digital Controls HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Objective The goal of this project is to hasten the adoption of digital lighting control systems to allow commercial building operators to optimize the neergy performance of their lighting systems, implement demand responsive control, and improve occupant comfort and productivity. The specific objectives are as follows: (1) Advance the adoption of digital lighting control systems by working with industry to embed IBECS technology into existing analog control and DALI products, and by developing compelling demonstrations of digital control systems for evaluation by early adopters. (2) In collaboration with equipment manufacturers, produce digital lighting system prototypes that demonstrate the advantages of digitally controlled lighting systems to innovative property managers and other energy stakeholders. A digitally controlled lighting system consists of lights that are individually controllable via a network. The advantages of digital control are:

318

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Public Use Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data Public Use Files: yellow indicator arrow 2003 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1999 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1995 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1992 CBECS The Public Use Files are microdata files that contain more than 5,000 records, representing commercial buildings from the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Each record corresponds to a single responding, in-scope sampled building and contains information for that building about the building size, year constructed, types of energy used, energy-using equipment, conservation features, energy consumption and expenditures, and the amount of energy used for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other end uses.

319

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Conservation Features and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Features and Practices Conservation Features and Practices Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Conservation Features and Practices The 1999 CBECS collected information about HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning) system, building shell, and lighting conservation features and practices plus information on off-hour reduction of end-use equipment. In general, commercial buildings that were larger than average were more likely to have used these conservation features or measures. Detailed tables HVAC Conservation Features and Practices Among HVAC conservation features and practices, commercial buildings owners and managers widely performed maintenance on their HVAC systems (Figure 1). Approximately the same percentage of buildings and floorspace were served by other HVAC conservation features.

320

Lighting and Daylighting Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Lighting and Daylighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by using daylighting, or the process of using natural sunlight, windows, and skylights to provide lighting.

322

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23E 23E A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building E.S. Lee, L.L. Fernandes, B. Coffey, A. McNeil, R. Clear Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory T. Webster, F. Bauman, D. Dickerhoff, D. Heinzerling, T. Hoyt University of California Berkeley Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 ! 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

323

Energy Basics: Lighting and Daylighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lighting Daylighting Passive Solar Design Space Heating & Cooling Water Heating Lighting and Daylighting Buildings can be lit in two ways: by using artificial lighting, or by...

324

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

325

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into advanced integrated controls for building operations and seeking to validate energy savings strategies by simulations. Project Description This project will develop an advanced, integrated control for the following building systems: Cooling and heating Lighting Ventilation Window and blind operation. A variety of operation and energy saving control strategies will be evaluated on a building equipped with alternative cooling and heating methods, including fan coil units, radiant mullions, and motorized window and blinds. Project Partners Research is being undertaken by DOE, Siemens Corporate Research, Siemens

326

System/Building Tech Integration | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System/Building Integration System/Building Integration SHARE System Building Technologies Integration ZEBRAlliance home The buildings industry encompasses numerous designers, builders, construction materials and components manufacturers, distributors, dealers, and other vendors and service providers. Whether coming together for new construction or retrofitting established structures, these stakeholders often face research limitations and challenges when integrating components, equipment, and systems. This is especially true for anything that is new. System/Building Integration provides the means for our industry partners to work out the wrinkles in their new products in low-risk, realistic test bed environments before market introduction. In ORNL's residential and light commercial building test beds, in addition to natural exposure to weather,

327

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

328

Building Equipment Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rooftop units Appliances Water heaters Supermarket refrigeration systems Ground-source space conditioning and water heating systems Multi-zone heating, ventilation, and air...

329

TECHNOLOGY DATA CHARACTERIZING LIGHTING IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS: APPLICATION TO END-USE FORECASTING WITH COMMEND 4.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Heating and Cooling Coincidence Factors for Large Office............... 43 Table 16.e. Heating and Cooling for Medium Office............ 44 Table 16.g. Heating and Cooling Coincidence Factors for Small Hotel for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Planning and Analysis and Office of Building

330

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ENFORMA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENFORMA ENFORMA ENFORMA logo. Includes the MicroDataLogger portable data acquisition equipment and HVAC and Lighting Analyzer software. ENFORMA is designed to cost-effectively gather data and convert it into information about building performance. ENFORMA provides a unique solution that can gather the data at a minimal cost and help you determine solutions to typical building problems. This detailed diagnostic information is the key that allows you to improve upon your current services or expand into new business opportunities. ENFORMA solutions typically result in projects with paybacks of less than one year. ENFORMA solutions can help you improve upon or begin doing the following services: Performance Guarantees, Comfort Trouble Shooting, HVAC Operation Outsourcing, Commissioning, Accurate Equipment Tune-ups, and Energy

331

Building Technologies Program - 1995 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Daylighting Innovative Technology and Systems Fenestration Performance, Building Applications, and Design Tools Lighting Systems Advanced

Selkowitz, S.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Office Buildings (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in office spaces are poorly understood.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements of HVAC and lighting usage from the existingmeasurements of HVAC and lighting usage from the existingof HVAC, lighting, and plug usage from the existing building

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assembly Assembly Characteristics by Activity... Public Assembly Public assembly buildings are those in which people gather for social or recreational activities, whether in private or non-private meeting halls. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Public Assembly Buildings... Most public assembly buildings were not large convention centers or entertainment arenas; about two-fifths fell into the smallest size category. About one-fifth of public assembly buildings were government-owned, mostly by local governments; examples of these types of public assembly buildings are libraries and community recreational facilities. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

336

Sportsfield Service Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.28 University Avenue Parking Ramp 0.04 Burton Hall 0.84 University Hotel Minneapolis Wallin Medical Biosciences.35 University Stores South 0.67 Steam Utilities Bldg Heavy Equipment Building 0.40 University Stores North 0

Webb, Peter

337

Energy and lighting decisions  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the fundamental principles of lighting and uses them to evaluate energy-conserving lighting equipment and techniques. The selection of the proper lighting components and systems is complex, requiring a knowledge of the characteristics of light sources and their interactions with the auxiliary equipment and the environment. Furthermore, there are subjective aspects of lighting that are difficult to quantify. We address the simplistic way in which lighting is commonly approached, then present an argument as to the critical nature of the lighting decision. In the final sections we discuss and evaluate lighting equipment in terms of its applications and characteristics. Familiarity with the fundamental characteristics of the elements of lighting equipment will also permit more judicious appraisal and use of lighting concepts that may be introduced in the future. 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Verderber, R.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Building Data Visualization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Building Data Visualization contour plot Figure 1: Contour plot showing the various operating stages of occupancy sensors described in the case study. Data visualization for buildings is the display of a rich set of variables and parameters that managers can use to verify the energy savings of energy- efficient technology and identify malfunctions in building equipment or problems with operating strategies. Effective data visualization depends on having graphic presentation formats that reveal the phenomena relevant to the building's performance. A research project at the Center for Building Science is aimed at developing data visualization techniques for improved building management. Buildings with energy management control systems as well as dedicated monitoring equipment in the

339

Health Care Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Health Care Health Care Characteristics by Activity... Health Care Health care buildings are those used as diagnostic and treatment facilities for both inpatient and outpatient care. Doctor's and dentist's offices are considered health care if they use any type of diagnostic medical equipment and office if they do not. Skilled nursing or other residential care buildings are categorized as lodging. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Health Care Buildings... Health care buildings in the South tended to be smaller and were more numerous than those in other regions of the country. Buildings on health care complexes tended to be newer than those not on multibuilding facilities. The median age for buildings on health care complexes was 9.5 years, compared to 29.5 years for health care buildings not on a multibuilding facility.

340

After-hours Power Status of Office Equipment and Inventory of Miscellaneous Plug-load Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted in support of two branches of the EPA ENERGY STAR program, whose overall goal is to reduce, through voluntary market-based means, the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the U.S. The primary objective was to collect data for the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program on the after-hours power state of computers, monitors, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, and multi-function devices. We also collected data for the ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings branch on the types and amounts of ''miscellaneous'' plug-load equipment, a significant and growing end use that is not usually accounted for by building energy managers. This data set is the first of its kind that we know of, and is an important first step in characterizing miscellaneous plug loads in commercial buildings. The main purpose of this study is to supplement and update previous data we collected on the extent to which electronic office equipment is turned off or automatically enters a low power state when not in active use. In addition, it provides data on numbers and types of office equipment, and helps identify trends in office equipment usage patterns. These data improve our estimates of typical unit energy consumption and savings for each equipment type, and enables the ENERGY STAR Office Equipment program to focus future effort on products with the highest energy savings potential. This study expands our previous sample of office buildings in California and Washington DC to include education and health care facilities, and buildings in other states. We report data from twelve commercial buildings in California, Georgia, and Pennsylvania: two health care buildings, two large offices (> 500 employees each), three medium offices (50-500 employees), four education buildings, and one ''small office'' that is actually an aggregate of five small businesses. Two buildings are in the San Francisco Bay area of California, five are in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and five are in Atlanta, Georgia.

Roberson, Judy A.; Webber, Carrie A.; McWhinney, Marla C.; Brown, Richard E.; Pinckard, Margaret J.; Busch, John F.

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HVAC equipment replacement for best size and efficiency  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to explore the potential benefits of HVAC equipment replacement for buildings owned by the City of Phoenix. The specific research objectives were as follows: Establishment an understanding of the magnitude and sources of saving available through equipment replacement; Establish an economic model for understanding equipment replacement and deciding when equipment should be replaced; Establish technical methods for calculating savings from replacement of various types of equipment; Demonstrate the replacement of a major item of HVAC equipment and document the savings through actual experimentation and measurement; and Provide guidance material for other jurisdictions wishing to investigate equipment replacement. 11 figs., 9 tabs.

Teji, D.S.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Commercial equipment loads: End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP)  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Energy Resources of the Bonneville Power Administration is generally responsible for the agency's power and conservation resource planning. As associated responsibility which supports a variety of office functions is the analysis of historical trends in and determinants of energy consumption. The Office of Energy Resources' End-Use Research Section operates a comprehensive data collection program to provide pertinent information to support demand-side planning, load forecasting, and demand-side program development and delivery. Part of this on-going program is known as the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), an effort designed to collect electricity usage data through direct monitoring of end-use loads in buildings. This program is conducted for Bonneville by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report provides detailed information on electricity consumption of miscellaneous equipment from the commercial portion of ELCAP. Miscellaneous equipment includes all commercial end-uses except heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and central lighting systems. Some examples of end-uses covered in this report are office equipment, computers, task lighting, refrigeration, and food preparation. Electricity consumption estimates, in kilowatt-hours per square food per year, are provided for each end-use by building type. The following types of buildings are covered: office, retail, restaurant, grocery, warehouse, school, university, and hotel/motel. 6 refs., 35 figs., 12 tabs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Miller, N.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings, distributed among these five types. The buildings selected have average demands of 100 to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration. plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data.

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

345

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Description: Location of Equipment: Address Line 2: Address Line 3: City: State: Zip: Contact: Phone: Fax: Email address: Quantity: Original Acquisition Cost: 0.00 U.S....

346

Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defaults and Whole Building Energy Use Intensity andand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of thesystems and equipment, and building energy consumption. The

Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

349

Religious Worship Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Religious Worship Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Religious Worship Buildings... 93 percent of religious worship buildings were less than 25,000 square feet. The oldest religious worship buildings were found in the Northeast, where the median age was over two and half times older than those in South, where religious worship buildings were the newest. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Top Number of Religious Worship Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of worship buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

350

Integrated Envelope and Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

351

Lighting market sourcebook for the US  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the United States, in every sector and building type, lighting is a significant electrical end-use. Based on the many and varied studies of lighting technologies, and experience with programs that promote lighting energy-efficiency, there is a significant amount of cost-effective energy savings to be achieved in the lighting end use. Because of such potential savings, and because consumers most often do not adopt cost-effective lighting technologies on their own, programs and policies are needed to promote their adoption. Characteristics of lighting energy use, as well as the attributes of the lighting marketplace, can significantly affect the national pattern of lighting equipment choice and ownership. Consequently, policy makers who wish to promote energy-efficient lighting technologies and practices must understand the lighting technologies that people use, the ways in which they use them, and marketplace characteristics such as key actors, product mix and availability, price spectrum, and product distribution channels. The purpose of this report is to provide policy-makers with a sourcebook that addresses patterns of lighting energy use as well as data characterizing the marketplace in which lighting technologies are distributed, promoted, and sold.

Vorsatz, D.; Shown, L.; Koomey, J.; Moezzi, M.; Denver, A.; Atkinson, B.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Intensity Discharge Lamps High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps. HID lamps are electric discharge lamps and include high-pressure sodium, mercury vapor, and metal halide lamps. HID lamps require an HID ballast to start and regulate electric current flow through the lamp. HID lamps are used in street and roadway lighting, area lighting such as for parking lots and plazas, industrial and commercial building interior lighting, security lighting for commercial, industrial, and residential spaces, and landscape lighting. The Standards and Test Procedures for this product are related to Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Energy Conservation Standard and Rulemaking for High Intensity Discharge Lamps Test Procedures.

353

"Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Program Development for Commercial Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" "Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" A report detailling the Recovery Act: training program development for commercial building equipment technicians, building operators, and energy commissioning agents/auditors. "Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - kDE-FOA-0000090.rtf Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning

354

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives (Arizona) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps,...

355

Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive (Arizona) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps,...

356

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

357

What`s new in codes and standards - Office of Building Technologies (OBT): Appliance and lighting standards  

SciTech Connect

US homeowners spend $110 billion each year to power such home appliances as refrigerators, freezers, water heaters, furnaces, air conditioners, and lights. These uses account for about 70% of all the primary energy consumed in homes. During its typical 10-15-year lifetime, the appliance`s operating costs may exceed its initial purchase price several times over. Nevertheless, many consumers do not consider energy efficiency when making purchases. And manufacturers are reluctant to invest in more efficient technology that may not be accepted in the highly competitive marketplace. Recognizing the great potential for energy savings, many states began prescribing minimum energy efficiencies for appliances. Anticipating the burden of complying with differing state standards, manufacturers supported developing federal standards that would preempt state standards.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

359

Figure 61. Efficiency gains for selected commercial equipment ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Efficiency gains for selected commercial equipment in three cases, 2040 ... Refrigeration Electric water heating Ventilation Lighting $4.74 $4.35 ...

360

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pROGRAM Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Test Report: AeroVironment EVSE Features LED status light EVSE Specifications Grid connection Hardwired Connector type J1772 Test...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Focus on Energy - Incentives for Existing Multi-Family Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Geothermal...

362

Energy-Goal-Based Building Procurement: Achieving 90% Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dennis Schroeder, NREL 30 Design Solution-Systems * Electric lighting o Light-emitting diode (LED) fi fixtures o Lighting controls * Security equipment o Cameras o Gates o...

363

Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water,...

364

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

365

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

366

Energy Efficiency Report-Chapter 4: Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) The CBECS ... water heating, refrigeration, powering office equipment, and other uses.

367

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adoption Model distributed generation building energycosts of the DG (distributed generation) equipment, alongcapability: DG (distributed generation, electricity only);

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Data Center Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole Building Analysis Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other Applications Atmospheric Pollution Energy Economics Indoor Air Quality Multibuilding...

369

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subjects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Simulation Load Calculation Renewable Energy Retrofit Analysis SustainabilityGreen Buildings Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other...

370

Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Construction) Multifamily Energy Savings Program (Existing Buildings and New Construction) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Prescriptive: Varies by equipment type, $200,000 per project Custom: Lesser of 50% of cost or $200,000 per project Total: $200,000 per project and $400,000 per customer tax ID per year for all Focus incentives. Program Info Funding Source Focus on Energy Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Wisconsin

371

Federal Energy Management Program: Lighting Control Types  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Control Types Characteristics of the most common lighting controls for offices and other public buildings are outlined below. Typical Lighting Control Applications...

372

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events DOE Challenge Home Zero Net-Energy-Ready Home Training September 23, 2013 EEBA...

373

Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund (Arkansas) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat recovery, Lighting, Motor VFDs,...

374

Building Energy Conservation Initiative (New Hampshire) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Chillers, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation Active...

375

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's...

376

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

377

Ventilation problems in heritage buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of indoor conditions in heritage buildings, such as castles or museums, is of paramount importance for the proper preservation of the artworks kept in. As heritage buildings are often not equipped with HVAC systems, it is necessary to provide ... Keywords: CO2 concentration, IAQ, heritage buildings, ventilation

S. Costanzo; A. Cusumano; C. Giaconia; S. Mazzacane

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Collaborative Systems for Building Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of new generation of PLC's and WinCC software in creating collaborative systems for managing, controlling and supervising building electric equipment. These systems assure all the requirements of a building and offer to the ... Keywords: Building Automation System, PLC, WinCC, Redundancy, HVAC, HAS, SCADA, HMI

Ioan Valentin Sita

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs Puget Sound Energy - Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Lighting''' Small Business Lighting: $3 - $190 CFLs: $3 - $12 LEDs: $10 - $25 Ceramic Metal Halide Lamps: $25 LED Exit Signs: $50 LED Traffic Signals: $5 - $20 Lighting Controls: $40 - $80 T8 Lamp Upgrade: $1 per lamp '''HVAC''' HVAC Installations (New Construction): $30/ton HVAC Replacements: $100 - $550

380

Energy conservation opportunities in small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint project between Duke Power Co. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a study was performed to determine the energy savings potential of small commercial buildings, located in the Duke Power service territory. This relatively untouched portion of the commercial sector has the potential for reducing energy consumption by 13% - 25%, which corresponds to a reduction in average annual operating costs of $500 - $1000 per building. A database of over sixty customers was used to target five buildings with unusually high levels of energy consumption and/or peak demand. Conservation measures in these buildings were selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness and relative non-intrusiveness on the occupants. Together, ORNL and Duke Power representatives worked on data analysis, site-audits, and measure recommendations. Duke Power supplied hourly and monthly utility data, customer survey information and participated in site-audits. ORNL analyzed the data, developed targeting indices, performed site-audits and corresponding first-order energy simulations on candidate buildings, and recommended individualized conservation retrofits. For the five buildings examined, retrofits including lighting, controls, and HVAC systems accounted for a total reduction in consumption of 32%, and in peak demand of 22%. In addition, the study emphasizes the importance of continuous attention to the operating conditions of HVAC equipment and controls, in order to ensure long-term sustainability of these energy savings.

Abraham, M.M.; MacDonald, J.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illuminated Exit Signs Illuminated Exit Signs Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of illuminated exit signs since 2005. Illuminated exit signs are used to indicate exit doors in schools, hospitals, libraries, government buildings, and commercial buildings of all kinds, including offices, restaurants, stores, auditoriums, stadiums, and movie theatres. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates There are no recent updates for this equipment. Standards for Illuminated Exit Signs The following content summarizes the energy conservation standards for illuminated exit signs. The text is not an official reproduction of the Code of Federal Regulations and should not be used for legal research or citation.

382

Lighting Group: Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Links Organizations Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) International Commission on Illumination (CIE) International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) International Association of Energy-Efficient Lighting Lightfair International Energy Agency - Task 21: Daylight in Buildings: Design Tools and Performance Analysis International Energy Agency - Task 31: Daylighting Buildings in 21st Century National Association on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions (NCQLP) National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors (NAILD) International Association of Lighting Management Companies (NALMCO) Research Centers California Lighting Technology Center Lighting Research Center Lighting Research at Canada Institute for Research in Construction

383

Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances Research to Appliances Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Building Energy Modeling

384

Monitoring of electrical end-use loads in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A California utility is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings selected have average demands of 100kW to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration, plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. PC-based software programs have been developed for reviewing and validating the end-sue load data and for generating reports.

Martinez, M. (Southern California Edison, CA (US)); Alereza, T.; Mort, D. (ADM Associates, Sacramento, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Energy End-Use Intensities in Commercial Buildings 1989 -- Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary 9 Energy End-Use Intensities > Executive Summary Executive Summary Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Energy End Uses Ranked by Energy Consumption, 1989 Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A through F of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line The demand for energy in U.S. stores, offices, schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings has been increasing. This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and "other." The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand.

386

Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)  

SciTech Connect

This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

Anita Lewis

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

List of Personal Computing Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Personal Computing Equipment Incentives Personal Computing Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 21 Personal Computing Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 21) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alexandria Light and Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) Utility Rebate Program Minnesota Commercial Industrial Central Air conditioners Chillers Compressed air Custom/Others pending approval Heat pumps Lighting Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Water Heaters Windows Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Personal Computing Equipment Ground Source Heat Pumps Yes Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program (Idaho) Utility Rebate Program Idaho Commercial

388

Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Office Search Building Technologies Office Search Search Help Building Technologies Office HOME ABOUT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Residential Buildings Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner Locator on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: DOE Challenge Home Partner

389

Building Technologies Office: Diagnostic Measurement and Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic Measurement and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning Equipment Expert Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Diagnostic...

390

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cake Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Share this resource Home About the Directory Tools by Subject Whole Building Analysis Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Other...

391

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power...

392

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Share this resource Home About the Directory Tools by Subject Whole Building Analysis Codes & Standards Materials, Components, Equipment, & Systems Envelope...

393

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COMFIE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

architects ; COMFIE is also linked to a life cycle assessment software (EQUER) allowing environmental evaluation of the building. Weaknesses Equipment is modeled very simply...

394

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Equipment List Equipment List Already know the item control number? Submit Reset Item Control Number Equipment Name Date Entered Condition Picture 89022833290004 1300594 TLD DETECTOR 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290005 1300595 PICOMETER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290008 1300598 READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290010 1300600 DETECTOR VACUUM PUMP 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290016 1300606 TLD READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290018 1300608 READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290019 1300609 ANALYZER WITH DETECTOR 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180013 1300993 PRESSURE REGULATOR 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180022 1301098 VACUUM GAUGE 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180023 1301099 OSCILLOSCOPE 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A

395

Georgia Interfaith Power and Light - Energy Improvement Grants...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeasuresWhole Building, CustomOthers pending approval, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat pumps,...

396

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Visual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lighting design knowledge is beneficial. Users More than 5000. Audience Architects, electrical and civil engineers, lighting designers, design-build contractors, electrical...

397

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DAYSIM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free RADIANCE-based daylighting analysis software to predict the annual daylight availability and electric lighting use in arbitrary buildings for manual and automated lighting...

398

Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing  

SciTech Connect

The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

Burdick, A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Appliance Standards and Building Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Manager Presentation Program Manager Presentation Appliance Standards and Building Codes John Cymbalsky U.S Department of Energy - Building Technologies Office john.cymbalsky@ee.doe.gov 202.287.1692 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Appliance Standards and Building Codes Program Goals Appliance Standards Program Goals Provide cost-effective energy savings through national appliance and equipment standards: Issue 23 final rules by end of FY2015 Deliver at least 1 qBtu of savings annually by

400

Strategic Energy Management Through Optimizing the Energy Performance of Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/12/2007 Strategic Energy Management Through Optimizing the Energy Performance of Buildings Oak ambitious federal energy goals and achieve energy independence. The energy engineers, building equipment Buildings and Industrial Energy Efficiency areas has engendered a unique, comprehensive capability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: MarketManager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MarketManager MarketManager MarketManager logo. Models any type of commercial, institutional, industrial, and residential facility and determines the energy and cost impact of virtually any type of energy conservation measure or utility rate schedule. MarketManager calculates the operating costs of any piece of equipment in the facility and determines the cost-effectiveness of improving the building envelope, HVAC controls, motors, lighting systems, heating and cooling equipment. Screen Shots Keywords building energy modeling, design, retrofit Validation/Testing N/A. Expertise Required MarketManager is best used by energy professionals who have a good understanding of HVAC systems.� Others have been known to use it. Users Approximately 1000 users worldwide, mostly in the United States.

402

ORNL MAXLAB occupied, nearing fully equipped status | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with heat pumps. Companion facilities funded by the same ARRA project and called the light commercial building flexible research platforms (FRPs) are also near completion....

403

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

Adaptive Control and Fault Detection of HVAC Equipment in Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Control and Fault Detection of HVAC Equipment in Commercial Buildings Speaker(s): John Seem Date: February 27, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

405

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 498,407 square feet and 12 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.94 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

406

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 53,608 square feet and 3 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 18.85 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

407

Making Buildings Part of the Climate Solution by Enforcing Aggressive Commercial Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of an aggressive commercial building codes policy in the United States. The policy would require both new construction and existing buildings that undergo major modifications to comply with higher building shell efficiency and more stringent equipment standards similar to the latest versions of the ASHRAE 90.1 Standard. Using the Georgia Tech version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS), we estimate that the building codes policy could reduce the energy consumption of commercial buildings by 0.94 Quads in 2035, equal to 4 % of the projected energy consumption of commercial buildings in that year. In the four targeted end-uses – space heating and cooling, water heating and lighting – estimated energy consumption would be 17%, 15%, 20 % and 5 % less than the Reference case forecast in 2035, respectively. The reduction of electricity and natural gas prices along with the consumption decline could save commercial consumers $12.8 billion in energy bills in 2035 and a cumulative $110 billion of bill savings between 2012 and 2035. The environmental benefits of the policy could also be significant. In 2035, 47 MMT of CO2 emissions could be avoided, generating cumulative benefits of $17 billion by 2035. The estimated benefit-cost ratio of this policy within the commercial sector is 1.4, with a resulting net benefit of $59 billion. The positive spillover effect of this policy would lead to an even higher economy-wide benefit-cost ratio. *Corresponding author:

Xiaojing Sun; Marilyn A. Brown; Roderick Jackson; Matt Cox; Dr. Marilyn; A. Brown; D. M. Smith Building

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lighting Group: Controls and Communications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communications Communications Controls and Communications The Controls and Communications research activity investigates how digital technologies, such as Bluetooth, can be applied to building lighting control systems to increase building efficiency and improve occupant comfort and productivity. Projects range from embedded device networks applied to building lighting systems, to WiFi and environmental sensing and monitoring. light switch Current Projects IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) Wireless Lighting Controls (with DUST Networks) HPCBS Advanced Digital Controls Building Control Systems Integration Completed Projects CEC Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Projects 450 Golden Gate Project New Publications Standardizing Communication Between Lighting Devices: A Role for

409

Second International Green Building Conference and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on the building materials and ventilation system. ... light bulbs, and energy efficient appliances will ... embrace similar energy efficiency measures for ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy Sub-Metering Equipment and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Sub-Metering Equipment and Applications Energy Sub-Metering Equipment and Applications Speaker(s): Sim Gurewitz Date: July 24, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Paul Mathew This talk will address the following topics:Submetering basics: What is it? How does a submeter work?How to obtain a finer level of energy information within the buildingApplications: Who submeters and why?LEED NC/EB/CS and submetering / Energy & Atmosphere pointsSubmetering equipment: gas, electric, water, steam, CW Btu and HHW BtuHow to install equipment without scheduling an outageLoad Control option for automated load shedding and peak shavingWireless submeters and communication options / integration to EMS-BMCSAutomatic remote meter reading and cost allocation softwarePutting it all together into a metering SYSTEM: read from anywhere, IP

411

Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

413

Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Major Equipment Types for Major Equipment Types Operations and Maintenance for Major Equipment Types October 7, 2013 - 9:53am Addthis Equipment lies at the heart of all operations and maintenance (O&M) activities. This equipment varies greatly across the Federal sector in age, size, type, model, condition, etc. No single resource covers all equipment in use by Federal agencies, and listing major equipment types is beyond the scope of this website. Instead, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) outlines major equipment types within chapter 9 of the Federal Energy Management Programs's (FEMP) O&M Best Practices Guide. The FEMP O&M Best Practices Guide focuses on: Boilers Steam traps Chillers Cooling towers Energy management and building automation systems Air handling systems

414

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone A space or group of spaces within a building with any combination of heating, cooling, or lighting requirements sufficiently similar so that desired conditions can be...

415

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Tables Conservation Tables (16 pages, 86 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 41. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 42. Building Shell Conservation Features, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 43. Building Shell Conservation Features, Floorspace, 1995 Table 44. Reduction in Equipment Use During Off Hours, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

416

Superconducting Power Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Watch (Techwatch) report on superconducting power applications (EPRI report 1019995, Superconducting Power Equipment: Technology Watch 2010) introduced coverage about superconducting magnetic energy storage systems and superconducting transformers. The 2011 report contains additional information about superconducting power equipment, including progress to demonstrations in some projects. The 2011 report also includes a section on superconductin...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

417

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

REAL ESTATE & EQUIPMENT LEASING / RENTAL CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REAL ESTATE & EQUIPMENT LEASING / RENTAL REAL ESTATE & EQUIPMENT LEASING / RENTAL CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB POC David Chen Telephone (510) 486-4506 Email dtchen@lbl.gov Construction, Mining, and Forestry Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing 532412 Office Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing 532420 LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB POC Jill Swanson Telephone (925) 423-4535 Email swanson6@llnl.gov Construction, Mining, and Forestry Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing 532412 Office Machinery and Equipment Rental and Leasing 532420 COLORADO GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE POC Karen Downs Telephone (720) 356-1269 Email karen.downs@go.doe.gov Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings 531110 Lessors of Nonresidential Buildings (except Miniwarehouses) 531120 Lessors of Miniwarehouses and Self-Storage Units 531130 Truck, Utility Trailer, and RV (Recreational Vehicle) Rental and Leasing

419

Materials for solid state lighting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Proceedings. Materials for Solid State Lighting S.G.Johnson Lighting Research Group Building TechnologiesMaterials for Solid State Lighting S.G. Johnson 1 and J. A.

Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Lighting Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demand for lighting control systems in residential, commercial, and industrial facilities is on the rise with the demand for increased energy savings. With lighting accounting for almost 23% of grid load, there is significant opportunity to reduce lighting load while improving the quality of light for customers. Lighting control systems are becoming more intelligent as the need for them to interface with building control systems and demand response systems also increases. Lighting control systems use...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alliant Energy - Interstate Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates for high efficiency equipment for commercial customers. Rebates are available for high efficiency lighting equipment, occupancy...

422

Building technology roadmaps  

SciTech Connect

DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) is facilitating an industry-led initiative to develop a series of technology roadmaps that identify key goals and strategies for different areas of the building and equipment industry. This roadmapping initiative is a fundamental component of the BTS strategic plan and will help to align government resources with the high-priority needs identified by industry.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

UDS Recovery Equipment Installation (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)  

SciTech Connect

This letter documents the successful installation of the un-dissolved solids (UDS) recovery equipment into the hot-cell in building 7920 at ORNL. This installation (see Figure 1) satisfies the AFCI Level 4 milestone in the CETE Investments and Hot Cell Upgrades work package (OR0915020323) to 'Complete UDS recovery equipment installation' (M4502032306), due 30 June 09.

Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

425

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

426

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

427

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Industry Use Shares of Mineral Fiber (GlassWool) Insulation (1) 1997 1999 2001 2003 2004 2005 Insulating Buildings (2) Industrial, Equipment, and Appliance Insulation Unknown...

428

Personal building controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings are some of the largest energy consumers in the world and yet occupants are regularly dissatisfied with the interior environment in large part due to thermal discomfort [7]. Studies show that given personal control over their environment, occupants ... Keywords: building, energy, hvac, lighting, personal controls

Andrew Krioukov; David Culler

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Buildings Energy Efficiency Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Emphasized lighting · Insulation, HVAC, motors, windows also significant · Savings typically 1-10% per al., 2009, ACEEE #12;Building Energy Rating & Disclosure · Two states: California and Washington · Five cities: Austin, DC, NYC, San Francisco, Seattle · Coverage will extend to 60,000 buildings & 4.1B

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

430

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows...

432

Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarilyin commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarilyof HVAC. 6.1.2. Lighting wastes energy and unnecessarily

Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 24,683 square feet and 1 floor. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 19.2 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 7.63 thousand Btu/SF.

434

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Star Perfomer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Star Perfomer Star Perfomer Star Perfomer logo. Outlines simple steps to help office building owners, managers and tenants improve their greenhouse and energy efficiency performance, simply by asking some straightforward questions about the size, operating hours, current performance and equipment standards of the building. Star Performer is a diagnostic tool that uses the current operational energy performance of the building measured against a national benchmark, obtained through the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating scheme (see links below), as a basis for making recommendations. The tool covers all areas of the building which affect operational energy performance, including building fabric, equipment and operational practices. Star Perfomer will point you in the right direction and give

435

List of Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Incentives Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 130 Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 130) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial Custom Project Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Boilers Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Furnaces Heat pumps Heat recovery Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Refrigerators Yes AEP Ohio - Commercial Self Direct Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial

436

List of Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refrigeration Equipment Incentives Refrigeration Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 103 Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 103) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs (West Virginia) Utility Rebate Program West Virginia Commercial Industrial Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Programmable Thermostats Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Ground Source Heat Pumps Yes AEP Ohio - Commercial New Construction Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Industrial Local Government Municipal Utility

437

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

438

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

439

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Commercial and Industrial Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pumps are used in agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. Currently there are no energy conservation standards for pumps. The Department of Energy (DOE) will conduct an analysis of the energy use, emissions, costs, and benefits associated with this equipment during the commercial and industrial pumps energy conservation standards rulemaking. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document. 78 FR 7304 (Feb. 1, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking page.

440

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT REPORT HVAC EQUIPMENT DEMOGRAPHICS AND CAPACITY ANALYSIS TOOLS APPLICABLE TO MULTI Commercial HVAC Design Process 12 5.0 Conclusion 18 6.0 References 19 TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTIONS #12;MULTI performance by collectively improving the enve- lope, lighting and HVAC systems. The primary goals of the UC

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy efficiency buildings program, FY 1980  

SciTech Connect

A separate abstract was prepared on research progress in each group at LBL in the energy efficient buildings program. Two separate abstracts were prepared for the Windows and Lighting Program. Abstracts prepared on other programs are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Program; DOE-21 Building Energy Analysis; and Building Energy Data Compilation, Analysis, and Demonstration. (MCW)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Lighting a building with a single bulb : toward a system for illumination in the 21st c.; or, A centralized illumination system for the efficient decoupling and recovery of lighting related heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Piping light represents the first tenable method for recovery and reutilization of lighting related heat. It can do this by preserving the energy generated at the lamp as radiative, departing from precedent and avoiding ...

Levens, Kurt Antony, 1961-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Equipment/product classification. [Equipment suppliers for the oil and gas industry  

SciTech Connect

This article contains information about the manufacturers and suppliers of goods for the oil and gas industry, including machines, software, services, and equipment used to build, operate, and maintain energy pipeline systems. The article represents companies around the world and are arranged by product category for ease of use.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Grid Equipment Reliability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the world, utilities have witnessed changes to electrical power markets. These changes have presented new and continuous challenges to maintaining the transmission system's integrity. In the past, emphasis at the transmission level has been on the system as a whole and not at the equipment level. This report summarizes the finding of a study that investigated the need to develop a new set of metrics and benchmarks to measure and compare grid equipment performance.

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Photo of two inspectors looking at a clipboard on a commercial building site with the steel frame of a commercial building in the background. Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by including it in state and local codes is an effective strategy for achieving that goal. The Building Energy Codes Program works with the International Code Council (ICC), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), American Institute of Architects (AIA), the building industry, and state and local officials to develop and promote more stringent and easy-to-understand building energy codes and to assess potential code barriers to new energy-efficient technologies.

447

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

b: Help b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 5b: Help Program Contractors Obtain the Necessary Equipment on

448

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Business...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Refrigeration Equipment, Food Service Equipment, Room Air Conditioners, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heaters, Heat Pump Water Heaters Active Incentive Yes...

449

Efficiency Vermont - newLIGHT Incentive Program (Vermont) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentive Programs Amount Lighting: 35-125 depending on the equipment installed LED Exit Sign: 35 Sensors: 40-200 depending on the equipment installed Expiration Date 12...

450

Existing Building Commissioning (EBCx) Project Considerations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Building Existing Building Commissioning (EBCx) Project Considerations Phil Welker, Executive Director PECI 2 Mapping Out Your Commissioning Strategy Three big questions: 1. Which buildings are commissioning candidates? 2. What commissioning approach(es) should I employ? 3. What expertise do I need to get it done? 3 Which buildings? Many factors come in to play: * Building sizes * Project budgets * Current energy performance * Building control systems * Occupancy rates * Operator/ engineering resources * Long term investment strategy * Sustainability plans or mandates * Equipment Replacements Selecting the right buildings is critical to achieve the maximum benefit in a cost-efficient manner. See the EPA's "A Retrocommissioning Guide for Building Owners"

451

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

452

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

453

Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

Mathew, Paul A.

2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

454

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

455

Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study Title Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4190E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Rubinstein, Francis M., Li Xiaolei, and David S. Watson Keywords ancillary services, contingency reserves, demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, dimmable lighting controls, dimming ballasts, lighting, regulation capacity Abstract The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a "fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47% of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

456

Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Detailed Report and Appendices Title Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices Publication Type Report LBNL Report...

457

NSLS Services | Repair & Equipment Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair & Equipment Services Repair & Equipment Services Cleaning Facility (BNL Central Shops) Solvent cleaning of vacuum parts and leak checking service is also available. Work is billed to each user via a BNL ILR. Contact the NSLS Building Manager to arrange for any of these services. Electronics Repair Limited repairs for electronic equipment are available from an outside contractor through the Control Room. Contact Control Room Supervisor Randy Church (x2550 or x2736, pager 5310). Shipping memos are filled out on the web, and pick ups are on Fridays. Come to the Control Room for assistance. The user should call the contractor on the day before scheduled pickups to alert the contractor of the pickup. Items to be repaired should be left in the Control Room with the completed shipping memo. Costs are charged to the

458

Guide to efficient unitary cooling equipment  

SciTech Connect

The universe of unitary cooling equipment is a large one; these systems are used in nearly forty percent of the residential and commercial buildings in the United States. Unitary cooling equipment is made up of off-the-shelf units: factory-assembled single or split systems, including air-source heat pumps and air conditioners. The efficiency of this class of cooling equipment has increased steadily in recent years, driven primarily by government standards. Although most of the units have efficiencies near the minimum federal standards, a significant number of models beat the standards by 10 to 30 percent. However, the larger the system, the narrower the range of efficiencies available and the fewer models available in the most efficient categories. For the buyer and the utility, this report reveals where to get efficiency information on current products, and a recommended purchasing process. It also examines the ratings, standards, and programs that can expand the number of high-efficiency models available.

Gregerson, J.; George, K.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Adaptive Street Lighting Controls to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components.

460

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings lighting equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Connecticut Light & Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Heat pumps, Central Air conditioners, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Motors, HVAC Controls Active Incentive No...

462

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

463

NSLS Electrical Equipment Inspection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inspection Information Electrical Equipment Inspection Information A note to vendors visiting NSLS A note to users visiting NSLS Proteus Electrical Conformity Remediation Currently Certified Electrical Equipment Inspectors: First Line Contacts Email Extension Poshka, Dennis poshka@bnl.gov 2825 Alternate Contacts Boerner Jr, Albert aboerner@bnl.gov 5990 Buda, Scott buda@bnl.gov 3914 Caruso, Michael caruso@bnl.gov 4100 Chmiel, Robert chmiel@bnl.gov 8141 Church, Randolph church@bnl.gov 2736 Clay, Barret clay@bnl.gov 7284 D'Alsace, Roy dalsace@bnl.gov 3973 Danneil, Christopher cdanneil@bnl.gov 8609 Davila, Peter davila@bnl.gov 7625 De Toll, Peter detoll@bnl.gov 4100 Durfee, Douglas ddurfee@bnl.gov 7625 Fulkerson, Michael fulkerso@bnl.gov 5194 Gallagher, John jgallagher@bnl.gov 5770 Harder, David dharder@bnl.gov 4978

464

Using Dimmable Lighting for Regulation Capacity and Non-Spinning Reserves in the Ancillary Services Market. A Feasibility Study.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this Feasibility Study was to identify the potential of dimmable lighting for providing regulation capacity and contingency reserves if massively-deployed throughout the State. We found that one half of the total electric lighting load in the California commercial sector is bottled up in larger buildings that are greater an 50,000 square feet. Retrofitting large California buildings with dimmable lighting to enable fast DR lighting would require an investment of about $1.8 billion and a"fleet" of about 56 million dimming ballasts. By upgrading the existing installed base of lighting and controls (primarily in large commercial facilities) a substantial amount of ancillary services could be provided. Though not widely deployed, today's state-of-the art lighting systems, control systems and communication networks could be used for this application. The same lighting control equipment that is appropriate for fast DR is also appropriate for achieving energy efficiency with lighting on a daily basis. Thus fast DR can leverage the capabilities that are provided by a conventional dimming lighting control system. If dimmable lighting were massively deployed throughout large California buildings (because mandated by law, for example) dimmable lighting could realistically supply 380 MW of non-spinning reserve, 47percent of the total non-spinning reserves needed in 2007.

Rubinstein, Francis; Xiaolei, Li; Watson, David S.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

465

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

466

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subpart W. Statutory Authority The current energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment are mandated by Part A-1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of...

467

Laboratory Equipment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities Scientific Labs Equipment Query Equipment Lab: HFIR - Biology Lab HFIR - Post Beam Sample Handling Lab HFIR - User Chemistry Lab High Pressure Lab SNS -...

468

Equipment Insulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Equipment Insulation Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Equipment Insulation...

469

Commercial Building Codes and Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Commercial Building Codes and Standards Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by

470

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid-State Lighting Search Solid-State Lighting Search Search Help Solid-State Lighting HOME ABOUT THE PROGRAM R&D PROJECTS MARKET-BASED PROGRAMS SSL BASICS INFORMATION RESOURCES FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Solid-State Lighting Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on AddThis.com... Pause/Resume Photo of a large room with people standing around poster boards.