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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado-1712 As demand for electricity increases, investments into new generation capacity from renewable,CaliforniaandtherestoftheWestCoastoftheUnited States started to experience severe shortages of electricity. Investments

Kammen, Daniel M.

2

Electric Services in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Institution of Electrical Engineers on October 22. In the early days, electrical installations in buildings were for lighting and bells. Wood casing was used, and, so far as ... equipment were placed anywhere where they would be out of sight. Now new and larger buildings are being erected all over the country, and electrical contractors are having difficulty in ...

1936-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electrical Equipment of Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... eleventh) edition of the regulations of the Institution of Electrical Engineers for the wiring of buildings was published in June (London: Spon. Cloth 1s. 6d. net; paper cover ... of electrical energy in and about all types of dwelling houses, business premises, public buildings and factories, whether tho electric supply is derived from an external source or from ...

1939-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

4

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Electric Quad Average Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Average Utility Fuel Mix (Million Metric Tons) (1) Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Renewable Total 2010 0.83 10.14 46.45 0.00 0.30 57.72 2011 0.00 0.21 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 2012 0.00 0.65 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65 2013 0.00 0.16 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.16 2014 0.00 0.61 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.61 2015 0.00 1.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.04 2016 0.00 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 2017 0.00 0.58 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.58 2018 0.00 0.62 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.62 2019 0.00 0.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.70 2020 0.00 0.71 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.71 2021 0.00 0.76 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.76 2022 0.00 0.74 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.74 2023 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2024 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2025 0.00 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 2026 0.00 0.54 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.54 2027 0.00 0.63 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.63 2028 0.00 0.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.84 2029 0.00 1.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.05 2030 0.00 1.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.29 2031 0.00 1.46

5

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

6

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the calculations. To estimate electric demand savings, the calculated statewide electric demand savings (MW) were then multiplied by the average capital cost of a natural gas combined cycle power plant, $1,165 per kW (Kaplan, 2008) using a 15% reserve margin... (Simulation adjustment3: Heating 72F, Cooling 75F) (b) Heat Pump House: 0.904 360 0.88 kW (Simulation adjustment3: 1.095 kW) HVAC System Type (a) Electric/Gas House: 0.594 (a) Electric/Gas House: 0.544 SLA= 0.00036 (a) Electric/Gas House: SEER 13...

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type.

8

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

9

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis Jennifer Morris* , Mort Webster* and John Reilly* Abstract The electric power sector, which

10

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 To identify the most cost-effective greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction strategies across a Federal agency's building portfolio, a Federal agency will need an understanding of building energy performance and the building characteristics that drive performance. The data required to support current Federal GHG reporting requirements (e.g., agency-wide fuel consumption, electricity use by zip code) are typically not sufficient to fully understand where the best opportunities for improvement are located. More detailed information about the building assets being managed-much of which may already be collected for other purposes-can help to inform where to direct investments.

11

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. This project utilized GridViewTM, an electric grid dispatch software package, to estimate hourly emission factors for all of the eGRID subregions in the continental United States. These factors took into account electricity imports and exports

12

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest...

13

build more efficient electrical grids, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research and development (R&D). The new action plan also places a greater emphasis on energy efficiency. Accomplishments to date under the CED include: (1) completing the final phase of the Weyburn-Midale Carbon Dioxide Monitoring and Storage Project, which focuses on best practices for the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2

14

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type Estimate Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Building Type October 7, 2013 - 10:51am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Starting with the programs contributing the greatest proportion of building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the agency should next determine which building types operated by those programs use the most energy (Figure 1). Energy intensity is evaluated instead of emissions in this approach because programs may not have access to emissions data by building type. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type chart. A rectangle labeled 'Program 1' has lines pointing to three other rectangles below it labeled 'Building Type 1,' 'Building Type 2,' and 'Building Type 3.' Next to the building types it says, 'Step 2. Estimate emissions by building type.

16

Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency, Low High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: High Efficiency, Low Emission Supermarket Refrigeration Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: High

17

Sustainable School Buildings: Some of the Latest Dutch Examples of Nearly zero Emissions Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Netherlands with respect to sustainable educational building there is a continuous development going on from sustainable building, to Passive House schools, to nearly Zero Emission Buildings to even Energy positive buildings. The Dutch...

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Waard, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

When prioritizing building types and sites for evaluating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Federal agencies should first determine which programs contribute the most to their total building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and focus their analysis on those programs.

19

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy costs, CO 2 emissions, or multiple objectives of providing services to a building microgrid produces technology neutral

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Automatic CX Tool for Electrical Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management have been reached [ASHRAE, 2005]. The aim of this paper is to show the methodology used to develop an automatic Cx tool for electrical buildings. The tool contains, on the one hand, several Functional Test Procedures (FTPs) for most... temperature control (set point temperature, etc), • Lighting & Ventilation: scheduling, zoning, • Domestic hot water: scheduling. METHODOLOGY AND TOOL SPECIFICATIONS This Cx tool is intended for the end user, i.e. the energy manager. A particular...

Couillaud, N.; Jandon, M.; Viaud, B.; Clemoncon, B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program Evaluate Buildings Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contribution by Program October 7, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis When prioritizing building types and sites for evaluating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Federal agencies should first determine which programs contribute the most to their total building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and focus their analysis on those programs. Using the total buildings energy use by program, these emissions profile can be calculated using the Federal Energy Management Program's Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report site. In the example below, Agency ABC should focus on Programs B and C first because together they represent over 80% of building emissions. Agencies

22

Wholesale Electricity and Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The European electricity sector liberalization, introduced through the Directive 96/02/EG of the European Union (1996), entailed a separation of the main parts of the electricity value chain: generation, trans...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), European Union Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.undp.org/climatestr References UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme[1] UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Screenshot "This collaborative programme aims to strengthen technical and institutional capacities at the country level, while at the same time facilitating inclusion and coordination of the public and private sector in national initiatives addressing climate change. It does so by utilizing the

24

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions WeiAnalysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions Weiwhich minimizes building energy cost or CO 2 emissions, or a

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Once the relevant data have been collected, the next step is to identify the biggest building energy users and their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribution. Ideally would be done at the program level using actual building characteristic and performance data. However, assumptions may be established about energy performance of buildings based on general location and building type.

27

Benchmarking Buildings to Prioritize Sites for Emissions Analysis |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Buildings to Prioritize Sites for Emissions Analysis Benchmarking Buildings to Prioritize Sites for Emissions Analysis Benchmarking Buildings to Prioritize Sites for Emissions Analysis October 7, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 When actual energy use by building type is known, benchmarking the performance of those buildings to industry averages can help establish those with greatest opportunities for GHG reduction. Energy intensity can be used as a basis for benchmarking by building type and can be calculated using actual energy use, representative buildings, or available average estimates from agency energy records. Energy intensity should be compared to industry averages, such as the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) or an agency specific metered sample by location. When a program has access to metered data or representative building data,

28

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile Using Renewable Energy in Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

After assessing the potential for agency size changes, a Federal agency should evaluate its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions profile using renewable energy in buildings.

29

Response of office building electricity consumption to urban weather in Adelaide, South Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of climate dependency of building energy consumption is useful for predicting the impacts of climate change and urban heat island on energy demand and associated carbon emissions, and to evaluate and improve building energy performance. Climate dependent electricity consumption is examined in this study for four office buildings in Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia with a warm-summer Mediterranean climate. Influences of both outdoor temperature and specific humidity on building electricity consumption are analyzed using the multiple linear regression, based on both sub-daily and monthly electricity consumption data. The results indicate that there is a daytime mean temperature threshold of around 17 °C, above which, electricity consumption increases with air temperature. Specific humidity also contributes to interpreting the temporal variability of office hour electricity consumption. Daytime temperature and specific humidity together determine 80–90% of office hour electricity consumption variation for days with mean daytime temperature above the threshold temperature. Office building daily electricity consumption can be examined with monthly electricity consumption data of a period of three years. The results also suggest that heatwaves may increase office building electricity demand by up to 50%, and that one degree warming can increase annual office electricity consumption by 2% in Adelaide.

Huade Guan; Veronica Soebarto; John Bennett; Roger Clay; Robert Andrew; Yunhui Guo; Saeedeh Gharib; Kathryn Bellette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Analyze Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:47am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Once the relevant data have been collected, the next step is to identify the biggest building energy users and their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions contribution. Ideally would be done at the program level using actual building characteristic and performance data. However, assumptions may be established about energy performance of buildings based on general location and building type. Ultimately, building efficiency measures need to be evaluated at the building level before implementing them, but facility energy managers can evaluate the relative impact of different GHG reduction approaches using assumptions about the building characteristics and estimates of efficiency

31

Electric dipole emission by fullerenes and buckyonions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the rotation rates and electric dipole emission of hydrogenated icosahedral fullerenes (single and multishell) in various phases of the interstellar medium. Using the formalism of Draine and Lazarian for the rotational dynamics of these molecules in various astrophysical environments, we find effective rotation rates in the range 1-65 GHz with a trend toward lower rotational frequency as the radius of the molecule increases. Owing to the moderately polar nature of the C--H bond, hydrogenated fullerenes (fulleranes) are expected to have a net dipole moment and produce electric dipole radiation. Adopting the same size distribution proposed for fullerenes in the study of the UV extinction bump (2175 \\AA) we predict the dipole electric emission of mixtures of fulleranes for various levels of hydrogenation. We find that these molecules could be the carriers of the anomalous microwave emission recently detected by Watson et al. in the Perseus molecular complex.

Susana Iglesias-Groth

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 2 Strategic planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings requires an understanding of a Federal agency's buildings portfolio, including which programs, building types, and sites contribute the most to the agency's emissions. The data described in Table 1 below will support this type of analysis. It is recommended that this information be collected at the agency and program level. Programs refer to major operating units within the agency where there is a significant degree of autonomy in planning and decision-making. In many cases, the type of data required for portfolio planning may already

33

Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings Muhammad Kumail Haider, Asad,13100004,ihsan.qazi}@lums.edu.pk Abstract. Developing energy consumption models for smart buildings is important develop parsimo- nious Markovian models of smart buildings for different periods in a day for predicting

California at Santa Barbara, University of

34

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biofuels, CCS, on-grid energy storage...vehicle batteries, smart charging, building...emission reduction benefits at acceptable cost...electricity before the grid is substantially...negates the emissions benefits of electrification...vehicles without smart charging will reduce...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even though the Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies (CC & ST) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology initiated carbon emission research in late 1990s (CSI, 2013), carbon emissions has only become a hot topic in the last decade...

Kwok, George

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption Aaron Garrett, PhD Joshua load and electrical data from a highly-instrumented and automated ZEBRAlliance research home consume 40% of the US primary energy (73% of the electrical energy). By 2030, it is estimated that 60

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

37

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

38

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2010 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 211.9 211.9 20.4% Space Heating 87.4 10.2 6.7 0.3 17.3 5.6 50.5 160.7 15.5% Space Cooling 2.3 149.1 151.3 14.6% Ventilation 95.2 95.2 9.2% Refrigeration 69.1 69.1 6.7% Electronics 46.4 46.4 4.5% Water Heating 23.2 2.0 2.0 16.2 41.4 4.0% Computers 37.7 37.7 3.6% Cooking 9.5 4.1 13.6 1.3% Other (4) 15.8 0.9 9.0 3.8 13.7 122.0 151.5 14.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.2 18.4 18.4 2.8 57.3 5.5% Total 174.4 31.5 6.7 9.0 4.1 51.3 5.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 805.0 1,036.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

39

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid June 7, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Nancy Sutley Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality Sally Jewell Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior Tom Vilsack Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture Editor's note: This article has been cross-posted from WhiteHouse.gov. As part of President Obama's initiative to make America a magnet for jobs by building a 21st century infrastructure, today he signed a Presidential Memorandum that will speed the modernization of the nation's electric grid. This will help make electricity more reliable, save consumers money

40

Will Monetized Carbon Emission Reductions Buy Enhanced Building Operations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Policies and Measures International and United State Programs - Kyoto Protocol - European Union Emission Trading Scheme - California Global Warming Solutions Act - Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative #0;z Strategies for Expanding Buildings Role Buildings... Emission Targets in 2008-2012 for 37 Annex I Countries Which Have Ratified It ? Relies Primarily on Policies and Measures ? Flexibility Measures Include CDMs and JIs #0;z European Climate Change Program ? Reflects EU’s Leadership in Implementing Kyoto...

Millhone, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge  

SciTech Connect

From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2035 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 179.6 179.6 15.5% Space Heating 87.3 6.7 6.6 0.4 13.7 5.5 25.5 132.0 11.4% Ventilation 100.7 100.7 8.7% Space Cooling 1.7 84.1 85.8 7.4% Electronics 72.3 72.3 6.2% Refrigeration 55.6 55.6 4.8% Water Heating 28.8 2.5 2.5 13.3 44.7 3.9% Computers 33.6 33.6 2.9% Cooking 11.9 3.4 15.2 1.3% Other (4) 42.8 1.0 9.8 4.2 14.9 227.3 285.0 24.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 21.3 13.1 13.1 120.5 154.9 13.4% Total 193.8 23.3 6.6 9.8 4.6 44.3 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 915.8 1,159.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

43

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2025 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 171.2 171.2 16.1% Space Heating 89.4 7.7 6.3 0.4 14.3 5.5 25.7 135.0 12.7% Ventilation 94.4 94.4 8.9% Space Cooling 1.8 81.5 83.3 7.8% Electronics 63.8 63.8 6.0% Refrigeration 53.7 53.7 5.1% Computers 31.2 31.2 2.9% Water Heating 27.5 2.3 2.3 14.0 43.7 4.1% Cooking 11.0 3.5 14.5 1.4% Other (4) 25.3 0.9 9.3 3.8 14.0 177.4 216.8 20.4% Adjust to SEDS (5) 30.9 13.4 13.4 109.4 153.7 14.5% Total 185.8 24.3 6.3 9.3 4.2 44.0 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 825.9 1,061.3 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

44

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2015 Commercial Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Lighting 160.0 160.0 16.6% Space Heating 89.9 9.0 6.2 0.3 15.5 5.5 26.4 137.3 14.2% Space Cooling 1.9 80.0 81.9 8.5% Ventilation 85.0 85.0 8.8% Refrigeration 55.8 55.8 5.8% Electronics 49.9 49.9 5.2% Water Heating 25.5 2.0 2.0 14.3 41.8 4.3% Computers 30.0 30.0 3.1% Cooking 10.2 3.6 13.8 1.4% Other (4) 17.6 0.9 8.6 3.5 12.9 128.6 159.2 16.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 36.0 13.9 13.9 99.8 149.8 15.5% Total 181.2 25.8 6.2 8.6 3.8 44.4 5.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 733.4 964.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

45

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or combined heat and power (CHP) in commercial buildings anda renewable energy source or CHP system at the commercialPV at (GW) microgrids adopted CHP and (GW) DG at microgrids

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed photovoltaic generation and energy storageenergy management in buildings and microgrids with e.g. installed Photovoltaic (energy storage, TS – thermal storage, FB – Flow Battery, AC – Absorption Chiller, ST – solar thermal system, PV – photovoltaic.

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission Murat Celik Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik B.S., Aerospace Engineering and Physics, University;Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik Submitted

48

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project Summary Full Title: Emissions Analysis of Electricity Storage with Hydrogen Project ID: 269 Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Brief Description: Argonne National Laboratory examined the potential fuel cycle energy and emissions benefits of integrating hydrogen storage with renewable power generation. ANL also examined the fuel cycle energy use and emissions associated with alternative energy storage systems, including pumped hydro storage (PHS), compressed air energy storage (CAES), and vanadium-redox batteries (VRB). Keywords: Hydrogen; Emissions; Greenhouse gases (GHG); Energy storage; Life cycle analysis Performer Principal Investigator: Amgad Elgowainy Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

49

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Russia Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia[1] References ↑ "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Russia" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_of_the_Electricity_Carbon_Emission_Factors_for_Russia&oldid=383164" Category: Programs What links here Related changes Special pages

50

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showing the energy flows in the building electrical loadfocus primarily on electrical energy, which represents thefor monitoring electrical energy. However, as wireless

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Collect Data to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Strategic planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation in buildings requires an understanding of a Federal agency's buildings portfolio, including which programs, building types, and sites contribute the most to the agency's emissions. The data described in Table 1 below will support this type of analysis. It is recommended that this information be collected at the agency and program level. Programs refer to major operating units within the agency where there is a significant degree of autonomy in planning and decision-making. In many cases, the type of data required for portfolio planning may already be collected under various Federal and agency-specific reporting requirements.

52

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

53

Natural light controls and guides in buildings. Energy saving for electrical lighting, reduction of cooling load  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The residential sector is responsible for approximately a quarter of energy consumption in Europe. This consumption, together with that of other buildings, mainly from the tertiary sector, makes up 40% of total energy consumption and 36% of CO2 emissions. Artificial lighting makes up 14% of electrical consumption in the European Union and 19% worldwide. Through the use of well-designed natural lighting, controlled by technologies or systems which guarantee accessibility from all areas inside buildings, energy consumption for lighting and air conditioning can be kept to a minimum. The authors of this article carried out a state of the art on the technologies or control systems of natural light in buildings, concentrating on those control methods which not only protect the occupants from direct solar glare but also maximize natural light penetration in buildings based on the occupants? preferences, whilst allowing for a reduction in electrical consumption for lighting and cooling. All of the control and/or natural light guidance systems and/or strategies guarantee the penetration of daylight into the building, thus reducing the electrical energy consumption for lighting and cooling. At the same time they improve the thermal and visual comfort of the users of the buildings. However various studies have also brought to light certain disadvantages to these systems.

E.J. Gago; T. Muneer; M. Knez; H. Köster

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole?Building Electric Load Data in   Continuous or Retro?key features of electric load data and may be easier toWhole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The influence of different electricity-to-emissions conversion factors on the choice of insulation materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current practice of building energy upgrade typically uses thick layers of insulation in order to comply with the energy codes. Similarly, the Norwegian national energy codes for residential buildings are moving towards very low U-values for the building envelope. New and more advanced materials, such as vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) and aerogel, have been presented as alternative solutions to commonly used insulation materials. Both aerogel and \\{VIPs\\} offer very high thermal resistance, which is a favourable characteristic in energy upgrading as the same insulation level can be achieved with thinner insulation layers. This paper presents the results of energy use and lifecycle emissions calculations for three different insulation materials (mineral wool, aerogel, and vacuum insulation panels) used to achieve three different insulation levels (0.18 W/m2 K, 0.15 W/m2 K, and 0.10 W/m2 K) in the energy retrofitting of an apartment building with heat pump in Oslo, Norway. As advanced insulation materials (such as VIP and aerogel) have reported higher embodied emissions per unit of mass than those of mineral wool, a comparison of performances had to be based on equivalent wall U-values rather than same insulation thicknesses. Three different electricity-to-emissions conversion factors (European average value, a model developed at the Research Centre on Zero Emission Buildings – ZEB, and the Norwegian inland production of electricity) are used to evaluate the influence of the lifecycle embodied emissions of each insulation alternative. If the goal is greenhouse gas abatement, the appraisal of buildings based solely on their energy use does not provide a comprehensive picture of the performance of different retrofitting solutions. Results show that the use of the conversion factor for Norwegian inland production of electricity has a strong influence on the choice of which of the three insulation alternatives gives the lowest lifecycle emissions.

Nicola Lolli; Anne Grete Hestnes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of traditional emergency generator applications, these technologies are integrated in building energy systems to provide some portion of a facility’s electricity and thermal energy needs including space heating and air conditioning. In the event of a power.... These CHP systems provide electricity and utilize waste heat from the generation process in existing building thermal applications such as space heating, domestic water heating. Thermal energy can also be used in an absorption refrigeration cycle...

Jackson, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Commercial U.S. Site Growth Rate Growth Rate Com.% Com.% Fossil Electricity Total 2010-Year Total 2010-Year of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 245 409 653 4,723 14% 3.5% 1981 226 427 653 4,601 14% 3.6% 1982 226 426 653 4,357 15% 3.6% 1983 226 434 659 4,332 15% 3.6% 1984 236 455 691 4,561 15% 3.6% 1985 217 477 695 4,559 15% 3.6% 1986 216 481 698 4,564 15% 3.5% 1987 220 503 723 4,714 15% 3.5% 1988 230 531 761 4,939 15% 3.6% 1989 226 543 769 4,983 15% 3.6% 1990 227 566 793 5,039 16% 3.7% 1991 228 567 794 4,996 16% 3.7% 1992 229 567 796 5,093 16% 3.7% 1993 226 593 819 5,185 16% 3.8% 1994 229 605 833 5,258 16% 3.8% 1995 231 620 851 5,314 16% 3.8% 1996 240 643 883 5,501 16% 3.9% 1997 240 686 926 5,575 17% 4.0% 1998 223 724 947 5,622 17% 4.1% 1999 226 735 960 5,682 17% 4.1% 2000 239 783 1,022 5,867 17% 4.3% 2001 230 797 1,027

58

Reducing Emissions Associated with Electric Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A century ago the electric car (now more frequently called electric vehicle or ... development of lithium ion battery technology, the electric car once again offers to be the ideal ... transport pollution problem...

Laurence Sparke OAM

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Event Event Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Event:Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Low Emission Capacity Building Workshop: on 2012/10/01 The workshop sets out to discuss technical and policy relevant issues related to GHG inventory systems, NAMAs, LEDS, MRV, and industrial mitigation actions. It will take place in Marrakech, Morocco from October, 1-4, 2012. The main objectives of the workshop are: Facilitate an exchange among participating Phase 2 countries on the context assessments and the ultimate scope-of-work of Programme projects Identify follow-up actions to assist countries with the implementation of their projects Identify technical assistance needs and training priorities. Event Details

60

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Camp Discovery Helps Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on AddThis.com... Feb. 5, 2011 Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Non-Intrusive Electric Load Monitoring in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for HVAC equipment in commercial buildings has focused allention on instrumentation required to obtain the desired data. In this paper we investigate what can be learned from measurements of electrical power at a single point, that of the elecl...; and detecting suboptimal staging of multiple chillers, Detection of equipment start and stop transitions was strengthened by application of a nonlinear filter that determines the point of median power from a fi Itering window of user selected width. A...

Norford, L. K.; Mabey, N.

62

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electricity sector  

SciTech Connect

As climate change negotiators from around the world prepared together in 1996 to consider new international targets and policies for greenhouse-gas reductions, the US Department of Energy asked the authors to review the options available to the electricity sector to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The charge was to focus on supply-side options and utility demand-side management (DSM) programs because other researchers were considered energy efficiency options for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. The next section presents the EIA baseline projections of electricity production, use, and CO{sub 2} emissions to the year 2010. Subsequent sections briefly summarize the options available to the electricity industry to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions, speculate on how industry restructuring might affect the ability of the industry and its regulators to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, and discuss the policies available to affect those emissions: research and development, voluntary programs, regulation, and fiscal policies.

Hirst, E.; Baxter, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Title Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhai, Pei, Peter H. Larsen, Dev Millstein, Surabi Menon, and Eric R. Masanet Journal Energy Volume 47 Start Page 443 Date Published 2012 Abstract This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO2, SO2 and NOx assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided emissions vary significantly across the country-mainly due to three state-specific factors: the existing resource mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emission intensity of existing fossil fuel power plants and the PV capacity factor within each state. The avoided emissions per solar PV capacity (g/W) - for ten U.S. states -ranged from 670 to 1500 for CO2, 0.01e7.80 for SO2 and 0.25e2.40 for NOx. In general, avoided emissions are likely to be higher in locations with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission of existing fossil fuel plants; and 3) higher PV capacity factor. To further illustrate the quantitative relationship between avoided emissions and the three state-specific factors, we conducted a sensitivity analysis. Finally, we estimated the change in avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying the operational constraints of fossil-fuel power plants. At the 10% penetration level avoided emissions were not constrained by the ramp rate limitations, but the minimum capacity requirement significantly affected the avoided emission estimates.

66

THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

67

Econometric analysis of Australian emissions markets and electricity prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Emissions trading schemes aim to reduce the emissions in certain pollutants using a market based scheme where participants can buy and sell permits for these emissions. This paper analyses the efficiency of the two largest schemes in Australia, the NSW Greenhouse Gas Abatement Scheme and the Mandatory Renewable Energy Trading Scheme, through their effect on the electricity prices from 2004 to 2010. We use a long run structural modelling technique for the first time on this market. It provides a practical long-run approach to structural relationships which enable the determination of the effectiveness of the theoretical expectations of these schemes. The generalised forecast error variance decomposition analysis finds that both schemes? emissions prices have little effect on electricity prices. Generalised impulse response function analysis support this finding indicating that when shocks are applied to electricity by the two schemes it returns to equilibrium very quickly. This indicates that these schemes are not having the effect anticipated in their legislation.

Deborah Cotton; Lurion De Mello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ukraine Ukraine Jump to: navigation, search Name Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine Agency/Company /Organization European Bank for Reconstruction and Development Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.lahmeyer.de/fileadm Country Ukraine UN Region Eastern Europe References Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine[1] "The study project "Development of the Electricity Carbon Emission Factors for Ukraine" was assigned by the European Bank for Development and Reconstruction (EBRD) to the consultant Lahmeyer International with Perspective as subcontractor on 16 July 2009. It is a baseline study with the overall goal to calculate reliable carbon

70

Public Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to build new power lines. Residents living in counties with planned routes for new transmission linesPublic Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines A Report to the National-Voltage Electric Power Lines: A Report to the National Science Foundation and the Electric Power Research Center

Tesfatsion, Leigh

71

CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning Agency/Company /Organization: CLEAN, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Presentation, Training materials, Video, Webinar Cost: Free References: CLEAN Webinar[1] Webinar Pre sentations CLEAN PPT 5 20 2011 (2).pdf TNA Capacity Building- webinar CLEAN-24 May 2011 Final.pdf ESMAP-CLEAN 20110524.pdf Announcement The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) will be offering a free webinar on Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Capacity Building and Training to explore activity design, lessons learned, future

72

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Transmission and Grid Integration: Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Transmission and Grid Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications".

75

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy flows in the building electrical load tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .intrinsic property of energy load trees is additivity - thevisualization of energy flows in the load tree, as shown in

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mikroproduktion av solel i flerfamiljshus; Micro production of solar electricity in multi-family buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis is commissioned by the Swedish electricity trading company GodEl with the purpose of evaluate solar electricity in multi-family buildings in the Stockholm… (more)

Werner, Linus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrically-Assisted Turbocharger Development for Performance and Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Turbocharger transient lag inherently imposes a tradeoff between a robust engine response to transient load shifts and exhaust emissions. By itself, a well matched turbocharger for an engine has limited flexibility in improving this transient response. Electrically-assisted turbocharging has been seen as an attractive option to improve response and lower transient emissions. This paper presents the results of a multi-year joint CRADA between DDC and ORNL. Virtual lab diesel simulation models characterized the performance improvement potential of an electrically assisted turbocharger technology. Operating requirements to reduce transient duration between load shift time by up to 50% were determined. A turbomachine has been conceptualized with an integrated motor-generator, providing transient burst boost plus energy recovery capability. Numerous electric motor designs were considered, and a prototype motor was developed, fabricated, and is undergoing tests. Power controls have been designed and fabricated.

Bailey, Milton

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development (SESD), Secretariat of Industry Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, - Industrial Processes

79

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coop Inc Beauregard Electric Coop Inc Entergy ArkansasInc Entergy Louisiana Inc Magic Valley Electric Coop Inc

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Measuring gas emissions from livestock buildings: A review on uncertainty analysis and error sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measuring gaseous and particulate emissions from livestock houses has been the subject of intensive research over the past two decades. Currently, there is general agreement regarding appropriate methods to measure emissions from mechanically ventilated buildings. However, measuring emissions from naturally ventilated buildings remains an elusive target primarily because there is no reference method for measuring building ventilation rate. Ventilation rates and thus building emissions estimates for naturally ventilated buildings are likely to contain greater errors compared with those from mechanically ventilated buildings. This work reviews the origin and magnitude of errors associated with emissions from naturally ventilated buildings as compared to those typically found in mechanical ventilation. Firstly, some general concepts of error analysis are detailed. Then, typical errors found in the literature for each measurement technique are reviewed, and potential sources of relevant systematic and random errors are identified. The emission standard uncertainty in mechanical ventilation is at best 10% or more of the measured value, whereas in natural ventilation it may be considerably higher and there may also be significant unquantifiable biases. A reference method is necessary to obtain accurate emissions estimates, and for naturally ventilated structures this suggests the need for a new means of ventilation measurement. The results obtained from the analysis of information in this review will be helpful to establish research priorities, and to optimize research efforts in terms of quality of emission measurements.

Salvador Calvet; Richard S. Gates; GuoQiang Zhang; Fernando Estellés; Nico W.M. Ogink; Søren Pedersen; Daniel Berckmans

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

SciTech Connect

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

Plug-in electric vehicles as dispersed energy storage interactions with a smart office building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable energy resources (RESs) with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are being gradually accepted by society for their low carbon emission merits. However reverse power from the RES will result in the grid node's voltage rise and cause protection malfunction. As large amount of PEVs plug in the grid their overall charging power tends to be uncertain due to their complex charging behavior. At the same time if the renewable energy is integrated into the same grid the gird will face a great technological challenge. In this paper a smart building energy management system (SBEMS) is proposed to mitigate negative impact of RES and PEVs to power grid and optimize the operation of the building. The proposed SBEMS is also capable with PEVs system integration photovoltaic (PV) power forecasting optimization algorithm implementation and environmental evaluation criteria. Since PV's output is sensitive to the meteorology a 1-day-ahead power forecasting model is needed and presented. The economic system of PEVs is particularly complex because it needs optimization across multiple time steps and is strongly influenced by tariff structures. Furthermore the optimization problem to minimize the total building operational cost including PEVs charging cost is formulated while satisfying the supply and demand balance and complicated operating constraints of every energy supply equipment and devices. The simulation results have shown that the SBEMS can effectively reduce the PEVs charging cost building operation cost and the environment punishment fee. It is also important for the SBEMS to be responsible for the power grid operational indices. So the trade-off between economic consideration and load factor should be made. It is verified that the SBEMS is beneficial to the PEVs owners building operator environment and grid.

Qian Dai; Shanxu Duan; Tao Cai; Changsong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vibration sensors, for inferring electrical consumption when direct measurementvibration and light sensors, we can increase our coverage, especially in places where direct electrical measurementAND MEASUREMENT Building A/C Unit ? Accelerometer ? Fig (A) accel x Building A/C Unit ? Vibration

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions from Hybrid Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations

87

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;?#0;? Practice??Project example #0;?#0;? Use of data??Analysis Software Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 8 Method of sub-metering Whole electric power consumption of a building Hvac system Heating Circulating pump Oter... systems and equipments Equipments on Socket Special function room Electrically driven heating equipment Chiller Fan of cooling tower Chilled pump cooling pump Air hand unit Fresh air hand unit Fan coil unit Air conditioner Heating water system drinking...

Yuan, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building/street scale for a large US city  

SciTech Connect

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system and contribute to quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this research effort is the first to use bottom-up methods to quantify all fossil fuel CO2 emissions down to the scale of individual buildings, road segments, and industrial/electricity production facilities on an hourly basis for an entire urban landscape. a large city (Indianapolis, Indiana USA). Here, we describe the methods used to quantify the on-site fossil fuel CO2 emissions across the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. This effort combines a series of datasets and simulation tools such as a building energy simulation model, traffic data, power production reporting and local air pollution reporting. The system is general enough to be applied to any large U.S. city and holds tremendous potential as a key component of a carbon monitoring system in addition to enabling efficient greenhouse gas mitigation and planning. We compare our estimate of fossil fuel emissions from natural gas to consumption data provided by the local gas utility. At the zip code level, we achieve a bias adjusted pearson r correlation value of 0.92 (p<0.001).

Gurney, Kevin R.; Razlivanov, I.; Song, Yang; Zhou, Yuyu; Benes, Bedrich; Abdul- Massih, Michel

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Indonesia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap,...

91

Ghana-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap,...

92

Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine efficiency, costs and greenhouse gas emissions of current and future electric cars (EV), including the impact from charging EV on electricity demand and infrastructure for generation and distribution. Uncoordinated charging would increase national peak load by 7% at 30% penetration rate of EV and household peak load by 54%, which may exceed the capacity of existing electricity distribution infrastructure. At 30% penetration of EV, off-peak charging would result in a 20% higher, more stable base load and no additional peak load at the national level and up to 7% higher peak load at the household level. Therefore, if off-peak charging is successfully introduced, electric driving need not require additional generation capacity, even in case of 100% switch to electric vehicles. GHG emissions from electric driving depend most on the fuel type (coal or natural gas) used in the generation of electricity for charging, and range between 0 g km?1 (using renewables) and 155 g km?1 (using electricity from an old coal-based plant). Based on the generation capacity projected for the Netherlands in 2015, electricity for EV charging would largely be generated using natural gas, emitting 35–77 g CO2 eq km?1. We find that total cost of ownership (TCO) of current EV are uncompetitive with regular cars and series hybrid cars by more than 800 € year?1. TCO of future wheel motor PHEV may become competitive when batteries cost 400 € kWh?1, even without tax incentives, as long as one battery pack can last for the lifespan of the vehicle. However, TCO of future battery powered cars is at least 25% higher than of series hybrid or regular cars. This cost gap remains unless cost of batteries drops to 150 € kWh?1 in the future. Variations in driving cost from charging patterns have negligible influence on TCO. GHG abatement costs using plug-in hybrid cars are currently 400–1400 € tonne?1 CO2 eq and may come down to ?100 to 300 € tonne?1. Abatement cost using battery powered cars are currently above 1900 € tonne?1 and are not projected to drop below 300–800 € tonne?1.

Oscar van Vliet; Anne Sjoerd Brouwer; Takeshi Kuramochi; Machteld van den Broek; André Faaij

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) (Redirected from UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Emissions Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section...

95

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Democratic Republic of Congo-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Power Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Policies...

97

NETL: News Release - More Electricity, Lower Emissions from Lignite Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25, 2004 25, 2004 More Electricity, Lower Emissions from Lignite Plants Are Goals of New Clean Coal Project Fuel Enhancement System Expected to Boost Generating Capacities WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today announced the testing of the Lignite Fuel Enhancement System, a new process that could dramatically reduce air emissions from certain coal-based power plants while boosting overall generating capacity. The project, conducted by Great River Energy, is expected to boost the generating capacity and efficiency of power plants that burn high-moisture lignite coal, thereby reducing air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The new technology uses waste heat to dry nearly a quarter of the moisture in the coal before it is fed into the power plant boiler.

98

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generated by offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For wind power generation offshore sites offer significantly better wind conditions compared to onshore. At the same time, the demand for raw materials and therefore the related environmental impacts increase due to technically more demanding wind energy converters and additional components (e.g. substructure) for the balance of plant. Additionally, due to environmental concerns offshore wind farms will be sited farshore (i.e. in deep water) in the future having a significant impact on the operation and maintenance efforts (O&M). Against this background the goal of this analysis is an assessment of the specific GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions as a function of the site conditions, the wind mill technology and the O&M necessities. Therefore, a representative offshore wind farm is defined and subjected to a detailed LCA (life cycle assessment). Based on parameter variations and modifications within the technical and logistical system, promising configurations regarding GHG emissions are determined for different site conditions. Results show, that all parameters related to the energy yield have a distinctive impact on the specific GHG emissions, whereas the distance to shore and the water depth affect the results marginally. By utilizing the given improvement potentials GHG emissions of electricity from offshore wind farms are comparable to those achieved onshore.

Britta Reimers; Burcu Özdirik; Martin Kaltschmitt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Webinar February 17: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications" on Tuesday, February 17, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

102

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables) improves the accuracy of regression models of electric load. 4) A piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence can be derived without the use of a change-point model (which would add complexity to the modeling algorithm) or assumptions about when structural changes occur (which could introduce inaccuracy). 5) A model that includes time-of-week and temperature dependence can be used for weather normalization and can determine whether the building is unusually temperature-sensitive, which can indicate problems with HVAC operation.

Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

104

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

105

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

106

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

107

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

108

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

109

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

110

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

111

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

112

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

113

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

114

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

115

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

116

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

117

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

118

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

119

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

120

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

123

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

124

Lifecycle Energy Management in the Tohoku Electric Power headquarters building-APCBC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ICEBO (Asia Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning) Sept. 2014, Beijing, China ICEBO2014 NSRI Hideki Yuzawa ?2014 yuzawa@nikken.jp Passion for sustainable cities 1 ESL-IC-14-09-07 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced... Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 ICEBO2014 NSRI Hideki Yuzawa ?2014 yuzawa@nikken.jp Passion for sustainable cities 2 Acknowledgements Building Manager / Tohoku electric power co., Inc Shinji Okuda, Tokuro Kurihara, Akinori...

Yuzawa, H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

ELECTRICAL SIMULATION METHODOLOGY DEDICATED TO EMC DIGITAL CIRCUITS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS ON PCB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ELECTRICAL SIMULATION METHODOLOGY DEDICATED TO EMC DIGITAL CIRCUITS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS ON PCB Jean integrated on closer structures, and the upsurge of electric/electromagnetic couplings in a large frequency optimise an electrical models library dedicated to the simulations of EMC emissions of digital integrated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

SciTech Connect

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings around the world. As photovoltaic (PV) technology continues to improve and costs drop, opportunities for PV will multiply. PV systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Pricing and Technology Options: An Analysis of Ontario Electricity Capacity Requirements and GHG Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many jurisdictions face the problem of having to reduce GHG emissions and new electricity capacity requirements. Ontario...2, SO2 and NOx emissions under different technologies. We also introduce “transfer of dem...

Pierre-Olivier Pineau; Stephan Schott

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote...

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

132

Electric Urban Delivery Trucks: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Cost-Effectiveness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering current and projected U.S. regional electricity generation mixes, for the baseline case, the energy use and GHG emissions ratios of electric to diesel trucks range from 48 to 82% and 25 to 89%, respectively. ... The relationship between electric and ICE passenger car manufacturing energy use and GHG emissions is used to infer electric truck data from diesel truck manufacturing data. ... van Vliet, O.; Brouwer, A. S.; Kuramochi, T.; van den Broek, M.; Faaij, A.Energy use, cost and CO2 emissions of electric cars J. Power Sources 2011, 196 ( 4) 2298– 2310 ...

Dong-Yeon Lee; Valerie M. Thomas; Marilyn A. Brown

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

133

Decomposition analysis of CO2 emissions from electricity generation in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity generation in China mainly depends on coal and its products, which has led to the increase in CO2 emissions. This paper intends to analyze the current status of CO2 emissions from electricity generation in China during the period 1991–2009, and apply the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI) technique to find the nature of the factors influencing the changes in CO2 emissions. The main results as follows: (1) CO2 emission from electricity generation has increased from 530.96 Mt in 1991 to 2393.02 Mt in 2009, following an annual growth rate of 8.72%. Coal products is the main fuel type for thermal power generation, which accounts for more than 90% CO2 emissions from electricity generation. (2) This paper also presents CO2 emissions factor of electricity consumption, which help calculate CO2 emission from final electricity consumption. (3) In China, the economic activity effect is the most important contributor to increase CO2 emissions from electricity generation, but the electricity generation efficiency effect plays the dominant role in decreasing CO2 emissions.

Ming Zhang; Xiao Liu; Wenwen Wang; Min Zhou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the european primary aluminium production a comparison of electricity supply approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to estimate the specific CO2 emissions related to the electricity consumption in the European primary aluminium production and ... compare different choices of system boundaries of ...

Matthias Koch; Jochen Harnisch

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Combined heat and power systems for commercial buildings: investigating cost, emissions, and primary energy reduction based on system components.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity and useful heat from fuel. When power is produced near a building which consumes power, transmission… (more)

Smith, Amanda D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

Not Available

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Event:CLEAN Webinar - Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Event Event Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Event:CLEAN Webinar - Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png CLEAN Webinar - LEDS Capacity Building and Training: 13:30-15:00 GMT on 2011/05/24 This webinar will explore design, lessons learned, needs and opportunities to support low emissions development planning (LEDS, TNAs, NAMAs, etc.). Short presentations from MAIN, UNEP-Risoe on TNAs, ESMAP World Bank and the Colombian Ministry of Environment will be followed by a participant discussion on these topics. Event Details Name CLEAN Webinar - LEDS Capacity Building and Training Date 2011/05/24 Time 13:30-15:00 GMT Location Online Tags CLEAN, LEDS Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

139

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

140

Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

THE VALUATION OF CLEAN SPREAD OPTIONS: LINKING ELECTRICITY, EMISSIONS RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CO2 by the regulation should be included in the costs of production to set the price of electricity which can be run when it is profitable to do so (namely when the price of electricity is greater thanTHE VALUATION OF CLEAN SPREAD OPTIONS: LINKING ELECTRICITY, EMISSIONS AND FUELS REN´E CARMONA

Carmona, Rene

142

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

143

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

144

Design and costs estimation of electrical substations based on three-dimensional building blocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substations design is a fundamental engineering component in power network construction. The benefits obtained for having adequate tools and design systems are related mainly to cost savings, reduction of construction problems and faster throughput of ... Keywords: 3D environments, CAD tools, building blocks, electrical substations design

Eduardo Islas Pérez; Jessica Bahena Rada; Jesus Romero Lima; Mirna Molina Marín

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesBuilding Stock. Golden, Colorado: National Renewable Energy

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 12,Standard for Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings. Energyfor Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings in Hot Summer

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of distributed building thermal energy storage in conjunction with wind and solar electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage is often seen as necessary for the electric utility systems with large amounts of solar or wind power generation to compensate for the inability to schedule these facilities to match power demand. This study looks at the potential to use building thermal energy storage as a load shifting technology rather than traditional electric energy storage. Analyses are conducted using hourly electric load, temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation data for a 5-state central U.S. region in conjunction with simple computer simulations and economic models to evaluate the economic benefit of distributed building thermal energy storage (TES). The value of the TES is investigated as wind and solar power generation penetration increases. In addition, building side and smart grid enabled utility side storage management strategies are explored and compared. For a relative point of comparison, batteries are simulated and compared to TES. It is found that cooling TES value remains approximately constant as wind penetration increases, but generally decreases with increasing solar penetration. It is also clearly shown that the storage management strategy is vitally important to the economic value of TES; utility side operating methods perform with at least 75% greater value as compared to building side management strategies. In addition, TES compares fairly well against batteries, obtaining nearly 90% of the battery value in the base case; this result is significant considering TES can only impact building thermal loads, whereas batteries can impact any electrical load. Surprisingly, the value of energy storage does not increase substantially with increased wind and solar penetration and in some cases it decreases. This result is true for both TES and batteries and suggests that the tie between load shifting energy storage and renewable electric power generation may not be nearly as strong as typically thought.

Byron W. Jones; Robert Powell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Methodology of CO{sub 2} emission evaluation in the life cycle of office building facades  

SciTech Connect

The construction industry is one of the greatest sources of pollution because of the high level of energy consumption during its life cycle. In addition to using energy while constructing a building, several systems also use power while the building is operating, especially the air-conditioning system. Energy consumption for this system is related, among other issues, to external air temperature and the required internal temperature of the building. The facades are elements which present the highest level of ambient heat transfer from the outside to the inside of tall buildings. Thus, the type of facade has an influence on energy consumption during the building life cycle and, consequently, contributes to buildings' CO{sub 2} emissions, because these emissions are directly connected to energy consumption. Therefore, the aim is to help develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. The results, based on the parameters used in this study, show that facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle, followed by brick facades covered with compound aluminum panels or ACM (Aluminum Composite Material), facades using structural glazing and reflective glass and brick facades with plaster coating. On the other hand, the typology of facade that emits less CO{sub 2} is brickwork and mortar because its thermal barrier is better than structural glazing facade and materials used to produce this facade are better than brickwork and ACM. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to verify the accuracy of the results attained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This methodology is based in LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use an uncertainty analysis to verify the accuracy of the results attained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study three typologies of facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle.

Taborianski, Vanessa Montoro; Prado, Racine T.A., E-mail: racine.prado@poli.usp.br

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

150

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

151

Solar Electricity with Photon-Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photon-enhanced thermionic emission combines both photonic and thermal excitation to emit electrons from a semiconductor cathode. Theoretical conversion efficiency exceeds 45% at 1,000...

Kribus, Abraham; Segev, Gideon; Rosenwaks, Yossi

152

Electricity generation and emissions reduction decisions under uncertainty : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

Morris, Jennifer F. (Jennifer Faye)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation 10.1073/pnas.1309334111...of unconventional natural gas, particularly shale gas...best-performing coal-fired generation under certain...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

Morris, J.

156

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

157

Electric Vehicles in China: Emissions and Health Impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E-bikes in China are the single largest adoption of alternative fuel vehicles in history, with more than 100 million e-bikes purchased in the past decade and vehicle ownership about 2× larger for e-bikes as for conventional cars; e-car sales, too, are rapidly growing. ... This article’s focus on electric vehicles (EVs: electric cars [e-cars] and electric two-wheelers including electric bicycles and light electric scooters [e-bikes]) in China is motivated in part by their unprecedented rise in popularity (Figure 1). ... Elec. vehicles (EV) are proposed in China as a potential option to address dramatically increasing energy demand from on-road transport; however, mass EV use could involve multiple environmental issues since EV use electricity primarily generated by coal. ...

Shuguang Ji; Christopher R. Cherry; Matthew J. Bechle; Ye Wu; Julian D. Marshall

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

The nexus of electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study reexamines the causal link between electricity consumption, economic growth and CO2 emissions in the BRICS countries (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) for the period 1990–2010, using panel causality analysis, accounting for dependency and heterogeneity across countries. Regarding the electricity–GDP nexus, the empirical results support evidence on the feedback hypothesis for Russia and the conservation hypothesis for South Africa. However, a neutrality hypothesis holds for Brazil, India and China, indicating neither electricity consumption nor economic growth is sensitive to each other in these three countries. Regarding the GDP–CO2 emissions nexus, a feedback hypothesis for Russia, a one-way Granger causality running from GDP to CO2 emissions in South Africa and reverse relationship from CO2 emissions to GDP in Brazil is found. There is no evidence of Granger causality between GDP and CO2 emissions in India and China. Furthermore, electricity consumption is found to Granger cause CO2 emissions in India, while there is no Granger causality between electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in Brazil, Russia, China and South Africa. Therefore, the differing results for the BRICS countries imply that policies cannot be uniformly implemented as they will have different effects in each of the BRICS countries under study.

Wendy N. Cowan; Tsangyao Chang; Roula Inglesi-Lotz; Rangan Gupta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Methodology for estimating building integrated photovoltaics electricity production under shadowing conditions and case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems are a relevant application of photovoltaics. In countries belonging to the International Energy Agency countries, 24% of total installed PV power corresponds to BIPV systems. Electricity losses caused by shadows over the PV generator have a significant impact on the performance of BIPV systems, being the major source of electricity losses. This paper presents a methodology to estimate electricity produced by BIPV systems which incorporates a model for shading losses. The proposed methodology has been validated on a one year study with real data from two similar PV systems placed on the south façade of a building belonging to the Technical University of Madrid. This study has covered all weather conditions: clear, partially overcast and fully overcast sky. Results of this study are shown at different time scales, resulting that the errors committed by the best performing model are below 1% and 3% in annual and daily electricity estimation. The use of models which account for the reduced performance at low irradiance levels also improves the estimation of generated electricity.

Daniel Masa-Bote; Estefanía Caamaño-Martín

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Stochastic model for electrical loads in Mediterranean residential buildings: Validation and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A major issue in modelling the electrical load of residential building is reproducing the variability between dwellings due to the stochastic use of different electrical equipment. In that sense and with the objective to reproduce this variability, a stochastic model to obtain load profiles of household electricity is developed. The model is based on a probabilistic approach and is developed using data from the Mediterranean region of Spain. A detailed validation of the model has been done, analysing and comparing the results with Spanish and European data. The results of the validation show that the model is able to reproduce the most important features of the residential electrical consumption, especially the particularities of the Mediterranean countries. The final part of the paper is focused on the potential applications of the models, and some examples are proposed. The model is useful to simulate a cluster of buildings or individual households. The model allows obtaining synthetic profiles representing the most important characteristics of the mean dwelling, by means of a stochastic approach. The inputs of the proposed model are adapted to energy labelling information of the electric devices. An example case is presented considering a dwelling with high performance equipment.

Joana Ortiz; Francesco Guarino; Jaume Salom; Cristina Corchero; Maurizio Cellura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Economics of electric alternatives to cogeneration in commercial buildings: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The economics of packaged cogeneration systems are characterized for five typical commercial applications: office building with computer center, supermarket, fast food restaurant, hospital, and swimming pool/health club. The operation of these systems in each application is evaluated for three utility rate scenarios. Alternative high-efficiency electric technologies for the thermal energy application of each cogeneration package are identified, characterized, and evaluated. The economics of the packaged cogeneration systems are compared with the high-efficiency electric alternatives. 8 refs., 9 figs., 21 tabs.

Dobyns, J.; Estey, P.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Use of continuous emission monitoring in the electric utility industry. Paper 81. 48. 3  

SciTech Connect

Steam electric generating plants are subject to continuous monitoring regulations. Reliable emission data are recorded to be reported to regulatory agencies. The continuous monitor is being used as a diagnostic tool for optimizing operation of control equipment also. Monitored data identify the magnitude, duration, and time of any emissions exceeding compliance standards so that corrective actions may be taken.

Van Gieson, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A literature survey on measuring energy usage for miscellaneous electric loads in offices and commercial buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the current state of the art regarding work performed related to the electric energy consumption for Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs), in office and commercial buildings. Techniques used for measuring the energy consumption of office plug loads, and efforts for saving energy by using this equipment more rationally and efficiently are identified and categorized. Popular methods and techniques for energy metering are discussed, together with efforts to classify and benchmark office equipment. Our study reveals that many issues are still open in this domain, including more accurate, diverse and meaningful energy audits for longer time periods, taking into account device profiles, occupant behavior and environmental context. Finally, there is a need for a global consensus on benchmarking and performance metrics, as well as a need for a coordinated worldwide activity for gathering, sharing, analyzing, visualizing and exposing all the silos of information relating to plug loads in offices and commercial buildings.

Andreas Kamilaris; Balaji Kalluri; Sekhar Kondepudi; Tham Kwok Wai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Long-Run Equilibrium Modeling of Emissions Allowance Allocation Systems in Electric Power Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide allowance trading systems for electricity generators are in place in the European Union and in several U.S. states. An important question in the design of such systems is how allowances are to be initially allocated: by auction, by giving ... Keywords: Equilibrium programming, economics, electricity and emissions markets, model properties and applications

Jinye Zhao; Benjamin F. Hobbs; Jong-Shi Pang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Efficacy of LEED-certification in reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emission for large New York City office buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper 2011 energy consumption, green house gas (GHG) emission, and ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Rating (EPR) data for 953 office buildings in New York City are examined. The data were made public as a result of New York City's local law 84. Twenty-one of these office buildings were identified as LEED-certified, providing the opportunity for direct comparison of energy performance data for LEED and non-LEED buildings of the same type, time frame, and geographical and climate region. With regard to energy consumption and GHG emission the LEED-certified buildings, collectively, showed no savings as compared with non-LEED buildings. The subset of the LEED buildings certified at the Gold level outperformed other NYC office buildings by 20%. In contrast LEED Silver and Certified office buildings underperformed other NYC office buildings. The average EPR for the LEED buildings was 78, 10 pts higher than that for all NYC office buildings, raising questions about the validity and interpretation of these EPR's. This work suggests that LEED building certification is not moving NYC toward its goal of climate neutrality. The results also suggest the need to re-examine some aspects of ENERGY STAR's benchmarking tool.

John H. Scofield

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Building commissioning: a golden opportunity for reducing energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commissioning is arguably the single most cost-effective strategy for reducing energy, costs, and greenhouse gas emissions in buildings today. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent ...

Evan Mills

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The European electricity market – impact of emissions trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The greenhouse gas emission allowance trading scheme, agreed upon by the European Community, will affect energy-intensive companies, and especially power generators, all over Europe. The objective of this pape...

Wolf Fichtner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Commercial and Residential Building Site Energy Usagecommercial and residential prototype buildings discussed in the previous section is simulated in EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions 1015325 Final Report, July 2007 Each of the ... scenarios showed significant Greenhouse Gas reductions due to PHEV fleet penetration ... ... PHEVs adoption results in significant reduction in the consumption of petroleum fuels. ' ' DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI). NEITHER EPRI, ANY MEMBER OF EPRI, ANY COSPONSOR, THE ORGANIZATION(S) BELOW, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING

173

Experimental and computational studies of electric thruster plasma radiation emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric thrusters are being developed for in-space propulsion needs of spacecraft as their higher specific impulse enables a significant reduction in the required propellant mass and allows longer duration missions. Over ...

Çelik, Murat Alp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities – Emissions Management (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

175

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

OpenEI - buildings  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/488 Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers.  Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions.  Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. 

License

177

Issues in emissions testing of hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has tested more than 100 prototype HEVs built by colleges and universities since 1994 and has learned that using standardized dynamometer testing procedures can be problematic. This paper addresses the issues related to HEV dynamometer testing procedures and proposes a new testing approach. The proposed ANL testing procedure is based on careful hybrid operation mode characterization that can be applied to certification and R and D. HEVs also present new emissions measurement challenges because of their potential for ultra-low emission levels and frequent engine shutdown during the test cycles.

Duoba, M.; Anderson, J.; Ng, H.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Electricity generation: options for reduction in carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...since it results in an e ciency reduction of the plant, CO2 output is increased. (d) Improve technology of combustion processes to reduce emissions A typical process is gasi cation, where the hot coal reacts with oxygen and steam to form...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Electricity-generation mix considering energy security and carbon emission mitigation: Case of Korea and Mongolia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To compare electricity-generation fuel mixes in two countries with multiple energy policy goals and unique circumstances, we look at three scenarios reflecting the carbon emissions mitigation targets, differences in energy security levels, and electricity-generating costs of each nation. Korea and Mongolia show clear differences in electricity-generation structure related to import dependency, the potential of renewable energy, and threats to energy security. These variations lead to different decisions on the power-generation fuel mix plan. Use of fossil fuel resources in Korea results in carbon dioxide emissions and energy insecurity, while in Mongolia carbon emissions, also from fossil fuels, and energy insecurity are separate concerns as Mongolia domestically operates coal-fired power plants and imports electricity. Policies targeting two objectives, carbon emissions mitigation and energy security improvement, show complementarity in Korea as fossil fuels are replaced by renewables or nuclear power, but represent trade-offs in Mongolia as emissions mitigation and improved energy security cannot be achieved with one strategy. In conclusion, national plans to achieve two goals differ by country: In Korea, the appropriate portion of nuclear energy is the determining policy factor. In Mongolia, carbon capture and storage is the clear alternative for mitigating carbon emissions despite large renewables potential.

Hanee Ryu; Shonkhor Dorjragchaa; Yeonbae Kim; Kyunam Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

183

The implications of using hydrocarbon fuels to generate electricity for hydrogen fuel powered automobiles on electrical capital, hydrocarbon consumption, and anthropogenic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers some of the impacts of adopting hydrogen fuel cell powered electric automobiles in the US. The change will need significant adjustments to the electrical generation industry including additional capital and hydrocarbon fuel consumption as well as impacting anthropogenic greenhouse emissions. Examining the use of three fuels to generate hydrogen fuels, using three production methods, distributed in three geographic scenarios, we determine that while the change reduces anthropogenic greenhouse emissions with minimal additional electrical generation capital expenditures, it accelerates the use of natural gas. Electrolysis provides a sustainable, longer-term solution, but requires more capital investment in electrical generation and yields an increase in anthropogenic greenhouse emissions.

Derek Tittle; Jingwen Qu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Economic feasibility of carbon emission reduction in electricity generation, a case study based on Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is an assessment of economic feasibility in reducing carbon dioxide emission of electricity generation in Sri Lanka. The paper shows that the present annual green house gas (GHG) emission with respect to electricity generation in Sri Lanka is about 2.8 million metric tons. The identified total GHG emission reduction potential in electricity generation is about 37 GW. The total reduction in GHG will be 16 million metric tons per year. Considering the savings on fossil fuel combustion, the total investment on CHG reduction methods would be recovered within a reasonable period as confirmed by a sensitivity analysis. To achieve these benefits, broad policies and guidelines are presented in-line with the country's environmental obligations. This is the first time that this type of scientific research study has been carried out in Sri Lanka to ascertain the current situation of GHG emission of electricity generation, to identify possible methods in reducing carbon dioxide emission and their economic feasibility. The methodology employed and the policies derived can be used as guides to similar types of research in other countries as well.

S.W.S.B. Dasanayaka; W. Jayarathne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Central Government Buildings. ” Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Well-to-wheel Energy Consumption and Pollutant Emissions Comparison between Electric and Non-electric Vehicles: a Modeling Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although electric vehicles (EVs) gain more and more popularity these years, the issue on whether they are really more environmentally and ecologically sound than non-electric vehicles, e.g. gasoline and diesel fuel burned internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has become a heat-debated one. This paper outlines an assessment model which intends to compare well-to-wheel energy consumption and pollutant emissions between \\{EVs\\} and non-electric ones, using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique based on the potential environmental and ecological impact. The modeling in this case predicted that from the perspective of total energy consumption and pollution, further improvements are still necessary for the feasibility and widespread use of EVs.

Z.J. Li; X.L. Chen; M. Ding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Development of a thermal and electrical energy management in residential building micro-grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global warming and pressing concern about CO2 emission along with increasing fuel and oil cost have brought about great challenges for energy companies and homeowners. In this regard a potential candidate solution is widely used for Distributed Energy Resources which are capable of providing high quality low-cost heat and power to off-grid or remote facilities. To appropriately manage thermal and electrical energy a Smart Energy Management System (SEMS) with hierarchical control scheme has been presented. The developed SEMS model results in mixed integer non-linear programming optimization problem with the objective function of minimizing the operation cost as well as considering emissions. Moreover the optimization problem has been solved for deterministic and stochastic scheduling algorithms. The novelty of this work is basically reliant on using data mining approach to reduce forecasting error. Several case studies have been carried out to evaluate the performance of proposed data mining method on both energy cost and expected cost.

B. Vahidi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and conventional gas are not significantly...harmonized estimates of life cycle GHG emissions...unconventional gas used for electricity...combined cycle turbine (NGCC) compared...explanation of the remaining harmonization...evaluated shale gas LCAs: inclusion of missing life cycle stages...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle On-Road Emissions Characterization and Demonstration Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-road emissions and operating data were collected from a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) over the course of 6months spanning August 2007 through January 2008 providing the first comprehensive on-road evaluation of the PHEV drivetrain...

Hohl, Carrie

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from the Consumption of Electric and Electronic Equipment by Norwegian Households ... Conventional wisdom holds that large appliances, in particular washers, dryers, refrigerators and freezers, dominate residential energy consumption apart from heat, hot water and light. ... (16) It excludes lighting, all professional equipment, space heating, hot water, garden or car equipment, fire alarms, and air conditioning. ...

Edgar G. Hertwich; Charlotte Roux

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D and Motivation 1 A. Background ­ Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter 2 B. The National Ambient Air Quality Standards 4 C. Improving Future Air Quality 6 D. Research Overview 8 Figures 10 References 15 Chapter 2

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

192

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity Production from Anaerobic Digestion of Household Organic Waste in Ontario: Techno-Economic and GHG Emission Analyses ... The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and economics of electricity generation through anaerobic digestion (AD) of household source-separated organic waste (HSSOW) are investigated within the FiT program. ... AD can potentially provide considerable GHG emission reductions (up to 1 t CO2eq/t HSSOW) at relatively low to moderate cost (-$35 to 160/t CO2eq) by displacing fossil electricity and preventing the emission of landfill gas. ...

David Sanscartier; Heather L. MacLean; Bradley Saville

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use AgencyCompany Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian...

194

The potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States Pei Zhai a, * , Peter Larsen a, b , Dev Millstein a , Surabi Menon a , Eric Masanet c a Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA b Management Science & Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA c McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 April 2012 Accepted 16 August 2012 Available online 29 September 2012 Keywords: Photovoltaics Emissions Energy model United States a b s t r a c t This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided

195

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as combined heat and power (CHP), photovoltaics (PV),Generation, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), DER-CAMfuel cells, combined heat and power (CHP), and electrical

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

SciTech Connect

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the majority of commercial building energy usages. Electricenergy usage inside the building. Fortunately, a commercialcommercial building energy monitoring are insu?cient in identifying waste or guide improvement because they only provide usage

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the building substation into floor-level electricalline (12kV) from the neighborhood substation connectsthe building substation to the grid. Once inside the

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet One barrier to the full support and deployment of alternative energy systems and the development of a sustainable energy policy is the lack of robust conclusions about the life cycle environmental impacts of energy technologies. A significant number of life cycle assessments (LCA) of energy technologies have been published, far greater than many are aware. However, there is a view held by many decision-makers that the state of the science in LCA of energy technologies is inconclusive because of perceived and real variability and uncertainty in published estimates of life cycle

203

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Regulations Resource Center About Building Energy Codes U.S. Energy Consumption by Sector (2011) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Annual, U.S. residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in significant cost savings in both the private and public sectors of the U.S. economy. Efficient buildings reduce power demand and have less of an environmental impact. The Purpose of Building Energy Codes Energy codes and standards set minimum efficiency requirements for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and emissions over

204

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

205

Cumulative energy, emissions, and water consumption for geothermal electric power production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis has been conducted on geothermal electricity generation. The technologies covered in the study include flash binary enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and coproduced gas and electricity plants. The life cycle performance metrics quantified in the study include materials water and energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The life cycle stages taken into account were the plant and fuel cycle stages the latter of which includes fuel production and fuel use (operational). The plant cycle includes the construction of the plant wells and above ground piping and the production of the materials that comprise those systems. With the exception of geothermal flash plants GHG emissions from the plant cycle are generally small and the only such emissions from geothermal plants. Some operational GHGs arise from flash plants and though substantial when compared to other geothermal power plants these are nonetheless considerably smaller than those emitted from fossil fuel fired plants. For operational geothermal emissions an emission rate (g/kW h) distribution function vs. cumulative capacity was developed using California plant data. Substantial GHG emissions arise from coproduced facilities and two other “renewable” power plants but these are almost totally due to the production and use of natural gas and biofuels. Nonetheless those GHGs are still much less than those from fossil fuel fired plants. Though significant amounts of water are consumed for plant and well construction especially for well field stimulation of EGS plants they are small in comparison to estimated water consumed during plant operation. This also applies to air cooled plants which nominally should consume no water during operation. Considering that geothermal operational water use data are scarce our estimates show the lowest water consumption for flash and coproduced plants and the highest for EGS though the latter must be considered provisional due to the absence of field data. The EGS estimate was based on binary plant data.

J. L. Sullivan; C. Clark; J. Han; C. Harto; M. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

207

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boilerCoal Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pumpElectric water heater Gas boiler Coal Boiler Small cogen Oil

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Path to the Building Integrated Photovoltaics of Tomorrow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems may represent a powerful and versatile tool for achieving the ever increasing demand for zero energy and zero emission buildings of the near future, offering an aesthetical, economical and technical solution to integrate solar cells producing electricity within the climate envelopes of buildings. This work addresses possible research opportunities and pathways for the \\{BIPVs\\} of tomorrow.

Bjørn Petter Jelle; Christer Breivik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Quantification of Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions on the Building/Street Scale for a Large U.S. City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface, build an effective carbon monitoring system, and contribute to quantitatively based U.S. climate change policy interests, fine spatial and temporal quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gas, is essential. ... Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor species to atmospheric fine particulate matter with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. ...

Kevin R. Gurney; Igor Razlivanov; Yang Song; Yuyu Zhou; Bedrich Benes; Michel Abdul-Massih

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for electricity waste elimination and energy efficiency. Thefor energy waste reductions and energy efficiency projects,for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will allow us to build models of energy usage aggregatedview allows us to build models of energy usage that can beus – it provides localization of the occupant; it provides a screen for visualizing energy usage

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity factors, building thermal integrity, climate zone, and appliance saturations. Building stock growth rates were estimated from regional population and employment census data. Also, energy audit data from the Bonneville Power Authority (9) were... diversity factors, building thermal integrity, climate zone, and appliance saturations. Building stock growth rates were estimated from regional population and employment census data. Also, energy audit data from the Bonneville Power Authority (9) were...

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Cost of an Electric Quad Used in the Buildings Sector ($2010 Billion) Residential Commercial Buildings Sector 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 11.82 11.82 11.82 11.94 11.68 11.82 10.59 10.83 10.70 11.41 11.58 11.48 11.68 11.33 11.51 11.49 10.77 11.15 11.71 11.67 11.69 11.72 11.52 11.63 10.57 9.76 10.19 10.55 9.73 10.16 11.16 10.35 10.78 10.68 9.90 10.31 10.42 9.48 9.97 10.16 9.20 9.70 10.57 9.73 10.17 10.48 9.62 10.07 9.54 8.46 9.01 9.24 8.11 8.68 9.92 8.97 9.47 9.85 8.78 9.33 9.16 8.44 8.81 9.32 8.58 8.96 9.15 8.16 8.66 9.46 8.64 9.05 10.27 9.34 9.82 10.24 9.27 9.76 9.28 8.48 8.89 9.56 8.77 9.18 11.92 10.52 11.25 11.83 10.40 11.14 10.61 9.76 10.19 10.86 9.60 10.25 11.90 10.08

215

Noise emissions from new electric options: Coal conversion and on?site generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two alternatives being considered for reducing the use of imported petroleum are the reconversion of oil?fired electric power plants to burn coal or the construction of small on?site generators which would make use of the waste heat from diesel generators to improve fuel efficiency. In urban areas there may be insufficient distance between the noise sources and residents to act as an acoustical buffer zone to attenuate noise to the local permissible limit. Calculations made during the preparation of environmental impact statements will determine noise abatement requirements either for achieving compliance with local noise limits or for minimizing community annoyance. Several studies were undertaken to provide a noise emission data base for the sound sources associated with both alternatives and to develop procedures for evaluating the effects of environmental noise changes. Noise emissions from two types of coal delivery and handling systems are reviewed since these are expected to be the main sources of noise resulting from coal reconversion of a central power station. Noise emissions from on?site cogenerators which will most likely be diesel engine?generators will be discussed briefly since it was the subject of a prior paper [A. M. Teplitzky and L. N. Miller J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Suppl. 1 67 S87(1980)]. The studies have shown that noise emissions from either alternative are compatible with the urban environment when adequate noise abatement devices are installed.

Allan M. Teplitzky

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

217

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap,...

218

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material intensity, energy intensity of materials, buildingtype’s manufacturing energy intensity (how much energy itthe manufacturing energy intensity of each type of building

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption (EJ) Primary energy consumption and emissions,Total all sectors Primary energy consumption and emissions,

Williams, J.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cool roofs—roofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emission—lessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in con...

Ronnen Levinson; Hashem Akbari

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,emissions credits) of combined heat and power (CHP), and 2)

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Building Technologies Program Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Technologies Program Website Building Technologies Program Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Technologies Program Website Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/building-technologies-program-website Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Building Codes,Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

223

Bells and Whistles, or Just Plain Effective? The New Generation of Wireless Controls in Existing Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?s Colchester facility is a 1960s-era, single-story building with 22,000 square feet. The HVAC systems are electric heating and cooling. There are electric heat coils in the air handlers, electric perimeter baseboard heat, and air conditioning... complaint is received. EXISTING MEDIUM-SIZE COMMERCIAL BUILDING MARKET Buildings in the United States account for approximately 40% of energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.1 There are more than 4.8 million commercial buildings...

LaFlamme, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Available Software and Modeling Strategies. [25] Autodesk.Autodesk Ecotect Analysis. http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/=123112&id=12602821. [26] Autodesk. Autodesk Green Building

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Existing solutions in commercial building energy monitoring are insufficient in identifying energy waste or for guiding improvement. This is because they only provide usage statistics… (more)

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand ... Fugitive emissions from geothermal fields were noted, though not added to the result for geothermal power generation, but all other “CO2 emissions” pertaining to this study arose from construction, maintenance, and decommissioning of power stations, since renewable technologies (apart from geothermal) do not emit CO2 during normal operation. ... Hondo, H. Life cycle GHG emission analysis of power generation systems: Japanese case Energy 2005, 30 ( 11?12 SPEC. ...

Bridget M. Rule; Zeb J. Worth; Carol A. Boyle

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

“Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector:peg/publications/dsm_electricity_sector_057A01.pdfreview_of_nashik_pilot_CFL_DSM_program_of_ MSEDCL_092A01.pdf

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washers Dish Driers Rice Cookers Vacuum Cleaners Electricovens 20 Electric rice cookers 21 DVD recorders FY2006: oil-

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

231

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Impacts of Saving an Electric Quad (1) Utility Average-Sized Aggregate Number of Units Fuel Input Utility Unit (MW) to Provide the Fuel's Share Plant Fuel Type Shares (%) in 2010 of the Electric Quad (2) Coal 49% 36 Petroleum 1% 96 Natural Gas 19% 141 Nuclear 22% 3 Renewable (3) 10% 184 Total 100% 460 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2 for consumption and Table A8 for electricity supply. 245 17 85 1,026 22 1) This table displays the breakdown of electric power plants that could be eliminated by saving an electric quad, in exact proportion to the actual primary fuel shares for electricity produced nationwide in 2010. Use this table to estimate the avoided capacity implied by saving one

232

Emissions trading and innovation in the German electricity industry — impact of possible design options for an emissions trading scheme on innovation strategies in the German electricity industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper examines what impact different design options of emissions trading have on the innovation process in the ... examined before taking a closer look at different emissions trading design options and their ...

Martin Cames; Anke Weidlich

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Life cycle energy consumption and CO2 emission of an office building in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Office buildings having some part of it or all of it used for office purposes (Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency 2004...) have one of the highest levels of energy consumption compared wi...

Huijun J. Wu; Zengwei W. Yuan; Ling Zhang…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Jeannette. 2004. “Xcel Energy’s RecommissioningLong and Crowe 2008a). Xcel Energy had a similar target inFor example, the 2003 Xcel Energy program excluded buildings

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 10:29am Addthis Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion sources; Scope 2 from indirect electricity, heat, or steam purchases; and Scope 3 emissions from transmission and distribution losses. Also see Use Renewable Energy in Buildings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation. Step 1: Assess Agency Size Changes Step 2: Evaluate Emissions Profile Step 3: Evaluate Reduction Strategies Step 4: Estimate Implementation Costs Step 5: Prioritize Strategies Helpful Data and Tools See GHG planning data and tools for buildings.

236

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reply to comment on “Hydrocarbon emissions characterization...Petron G ( 2012a ) Hydrocarbon emissions characterization...Comment on “Hydrocarbon emissions characterization...emissions of methane from combustion or even from tanks...87% (6); HC = heat content of natural...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Preliminary Investigation into the Mitigation of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Tailpipe Emissions Through Supervisory Control Methods Part 2: Experimental Evaluation of Emissions Reduction Methodologies  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technologies have the potential for considerable petroleum consumption reductions, possibly at the expense of increased tailpipe emissions due to multiple 'cold' start events and improper use of the engine for PHEV specific operation. PHEVs operate predominantly as electric vehicles (EVs) with intermittent assist from the engine during high power demands. As a consequence, the engine can be subjected to multiple cold start events. These cold start events may have a significant impact on the tailpipe emissions due to degraded catalyst performance and starting the engine under less than ideal conditions. On current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), the first cold start of the engine dictates whether or not the vehicle will pass federal emissions tests. PHEV operation compounds this problem due to infrequent, multiple engine cold starts. A continuation of previous analytical work, this research, experimentally verifies a vehicle supervisory control system for a pre-transmission parallel PHEV powertrain architecture. Energy management strategies are evaluated and implemented in a virtual environment for preliminary assessment of petroleum displacement benefits and rudimentary drivability issues. This baseline vehicle supervisory control strategy, developed as a result of this assessment, is implemented and tested on actual hardware in a controlled laboratory environment over a baseline test cycle. Engine cold start events are aggressively addressed in the development of this control system, which leads to enhanced pre-warming and energy-based engine warming algorithms that provide substantial reductions in tailpipe emissions over the baseline supervisory control strategy. The flexibility of the PHEV powertrain allows for decreased emissions during any engine starting event through powertrain 'torque shaping' algorithms. The results of the research show that PHEVs do have the potential for substantial reductions in fuel consumption. Tailpipe emissions from a PHEV test platform have been reduced to acceptable levels through the development and refinement of vehicle supervisory control methods only. Impacts on fuel consumption were minimal for the emissions reduction techniques implemented.

Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL; Lohse-Busch, Henning [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Irick, David Kim [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as buffer for local renewables? Michael Stadler, Gonçaloas buffer for local renewables? *) Michael Stadler Gonçaloowners to integrate renewables and electric vehicles?

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Building a wireless mesh networked real-time electricity metering system in an MIT dormitory .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A competitive, closed-loop information feedback system of wireless electricity meters was designed, tested, and implemented in seven MIT dormitory rooms. The meters utilized Allegro Hall… (more)

Oehlerking, Austin L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withhour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not all constraintslifetime ( a) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Air- Vehicle Air- Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range Preprint September 2000 * NREL/CP-540-28960 R. Farrington and J. Rugh To Be Presented at the Earth Technologies Forum Washington, D.C. October 31, 2000 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

246

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Asheville In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year until the city reaches an 80%

248

Emissions Impacts and Benefits of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Vehicle-to-Grid Services  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to using a cleaner source of fuel, PHEVs may further increase the efficiency of electric generators and reduce overall emissions by providing two vehicle-to-grid (V2G) services (6, 7): energy storage and ancillary services (AS). ... This also demonstrates the importance of detailed emissions impact studies for other power systems: ERCOT is a unique power system in that it has a great deal of natural gas and wind generation, and the emissions impacts of PHEVs may be different in other power systems. ...

Ramteen Sioshansi; Paul Denholm

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings Michaeland Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings 1 Michaelgoal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric loads to deliver load following and regu- lation,6], and regulation/load following [7]), and as DR is used toload as a function of time-of-week and outdoor air temperature. Following

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Webinar: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This webinar, presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will explore the synergy between a facility's use of hydrogen fuel cell forklifts and its reduction of electric grid time of use energy charges.

253

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging PHEVs, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

255

The socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors affecting electricity consumption in domestic buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper aims to investigate the socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors that have significant or non-significant effects on domestic electricity consumption. To achieve this aim, a comprehensive literature review of international research investigating these factors was undertaken. Although papers examining the factors affecting electricity demand are numerous, to the authors’ knowledge, a comprehensive analysis taking stock of all previous findings has not previously been undertaken. The review establishes that no less than 62 factors potentially have an effect on domestic electricity use. This includes 13 socio-economic factors, 12 dwelling factors and 37 appliance factors. Of the 62 factors, four of the socio-economic factors, seven of the dwelling factors, and nine of the appliance related factors were found to unambiguously have a significant positive effect on electricity use. This paper contributes to a better understanding of those factors that certainly affect electricity consumption and those for which effects are unclear and require further research. Understanding the effects of factors can support both the implementation of effective energy policy and aid prediction of future electricity consumption in the domestic sector.

Rory V. Jones; Alba Fuertes; Kevin J. Lomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Significant changes in agency size and operations can impact future energy demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at an agency, program, and worksite level. It is recommended that agencies estimate the impact of the following types of changes may have on energy demand.

257

About Buildings-to-Grid Integration | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Buildings-to-Grid About Buildings-to-Grid Integration About Buildings-to-Grid Integration As electricity demand continues to increase, integrating buildings and the electricity...

258

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Costs and Emissions Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory K. Parks, P. Denholm, and T. Markel Prepared under Task No. WR61.2001 Technical Report NREL/TP-640-41410 May 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle

259

On the impact of urban heat island and global warming on the power demand and electricity consumption of buildings—A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Urban heat island and global warming increase significantly the ambient temperature. Higher temperatures have a serious impact on the electricity consumption of the building sector increasing considerably the peak and the total electricity demand. The present paper aims to collect, analyze and present in a comparative way existing studies investigating the impact of ambient temperature increase on electricity consumption. Analysis of eleven studies dealing with the impact of the ambient temperature on the peak electricity demand showed that for each degree of temperature increase, the increase of the peak electricity load varies between 0.45% and 4.6%. This corresponds to an additional electricity penalty of about 21 (±10.4) W per degree of temperature increase and per person. In parallel, analysis of fifteen studies examining the impact of ambient temperature on the total electricity consumption, showed that the actual increase of the electricity demand per degree of temperature increase varies between 0.5% and 8.5%.

M. Santamouris; C. Cartalis; A. Synnefa; D. Kolokotsa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Emissions Trading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions trading is a comparatively new policy instrument which ... electricity systems in Europe. The development of emissions trading thus represents an innovation in its own...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Regional-Scale Estimation of Electric Power and Power Plant CO2 Emissions Using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System Nighttime Satellite Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For estimation, the relationship between Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) annual nighttime stable light product (NSL) for 2006 and statistical data on power generation, power consumption, and power plant CO2 emissions in 10 electric power supply regions of Japan was investigated. ... There are similar linear correlations of electricity consumption for lighting and total electricity consumption at the regional (e.g., state and province) level, but possibly not for CO2 emissions because of regional concentrations of electricity from renewable energy and nuclear power plants, which produce low CO2 emissions. ...

Husi Letu; Takashi Y. Nakajima; Fumihiko Nishio

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2,311 2031 2,331 2032 2,346 2033 2,362 2034 2,374 2035 2,383 Source(s): EIA, Emissions of Green House Gases in the United States 2009, February 2011 for 1990-2009; EIA, Annual...

264

Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A PV mapping tool visually represents a specific site and calculates PV system size and projected electricity production. This report identifies the commercially available solar mapping tools and thoroughly summarizes the source data type and resolution, the visualization software program being used, user inputs, calculation methodology and algorithms, map outputs, and development costs for each map.

265

Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory  

SciTech Connect

The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Emissions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the extra emissions that are generated from manufacturing the material used to make CNG tanks); they can amount tc more than 2% of the emissions from 32 the fuel production and...

268

Strategic electricity sector assessment methodology under sustainability conditions: a Swiss case study on the costs of CO2 emissions reductions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growing concerns about social and environmental sustainability have led to increased interest in planning for the electricity utility sector because of its large resource requirements and production of emissions. A number of conflicting trends combine to make the electricity sector a major concern, even though a clear definition of how to measure progress toward sustainability is lacking. These trends include imminent competition in the electricity industry, global climate change, expected long-term growth in population and pressure to balance living standards (including per capital energy consumption). In order to approach this global problem on a regional level, a project has been established to develop planning methods for electrical power systems related to sustainability called SESAMS (Strategic Electricity Sector Assessment Methodology under Sustainability Conditions), under the Alliance for Global Sustainability formed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (ETHZ and EPFL), and the University of Tokyo (UT). SESAMS 97 has brought together multi-attribute, multi-scenario electricity system planning, life-cycle assessment, and multi-criteria decision analysis to create an integrated methodology that has been demonstrated using a case study based on the Swiss electricity system. This case study has simulated system dispatch of the Swiss electricity system for 1296 scenarios over a study period from 1996 to 2025. The results for these scenarios include a wide range of direct and indirect sustainability measures, with conclusions that have focused primarily on cost and CO2 emissions. The pairwise scenario trade-off analysis facilitates searching the strategy option space by identifying the best and most robust options. Decision-makers benefit by being able to focus trade-off discussions on the dominant set of best choices for each trade-off pair, rather than covering the entire decision space.

W. Schenler; Adrian V. Gheorghe; Warren Stephen Connors; Stefan Hirschberg; Pierre-Andre Haldi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

270

Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Planning Sector Land Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

271

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9E2D3858A0C0.   [36]  Coal-­?wind  integration,  The  PR&C  with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission ofin avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mills  A,  Wiser  R,  Milligan  M,  O'Malley  M.  Comment  on  "Air  Emissions  Due  to  Wind  and  

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...warming potential (GWP) for methane (28). In addition, we perform...GWP Power plant efficiency (HHV) Coproduct allocation EUR (bcf) CH...Description of published methane emission rates and the harmonization...to all GHG emissions except methane leakage, e.g., CO 2 emissions...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of New and Stock Generating Capacities, by Plant Type Total Capital Costs Size Overnight Costs (2) of Typical New Plant New Plant Type (MW) (2010 $/kW) ($2010 million) Scrubbed Coal 1300 2809 3652 Integrated Coal-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 1200 3182 3818 IGCC w/Carbon Sequestration 520 5287 2749 Conv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 540 967 522 Adv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 400 991 396 Conv. Combustion Turbine 85 961 82 Adv. Combustion Turbine 210 658 138 Fuel Cell 10 6752 68 Advanced Nuclear 2236 5275 11795 Municipal Solid Waste 50 8237 412 Conventional Hydropower (3) 500 2221 1111 Wind 100 2409 241 Stock Plant Type 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Fossil Fuel Steam Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Nuclear Energy Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Plant use of electricity is included in heat rate calculations; however, transmission and distribution losses of the electric grid are excluded.

276

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Electric Capacity Factors, by Year and Fuel Type (1) Conventional Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Solar/PV Wind Total 1990 59% 17% 23% 66% 45% 13% 18% 46% 1991 59% 18% 22% 70% 43% 17% 18% 46% 1992 59% 14% 22% 71% 38% 13% 18% 45% 1993 61% 16% 21% 70% 41% 16% 19% 46% 1994 61% 15% 22% 74% 38% 17% 23% 46% 1995 62% 11% 22% 77% 45% 17% 21% 47% 1996 65% 11% 19% 76% 52% 18% 22% 48% 1997 66% 13% 20% 72% 51% 17% 23% 48% 1998 67% 20% 23% 79% 47% 17% 20% 50% 1999 67% 20% 22% 85% 46% 15% 23% 51% 2000 70% 18% 22% 88% 40% 15% 27% 51% 2001 68% 20% 21% 89% 31% 16% 20% 48% 2002 69% 16% 18% 90% 38% 16% 27% 46% 2003 71% 21% 14% 88% 40% 15% 21% 44% 2004 71% 22% 16% 90% 39% 17% 25% 44% 2005 72% 22% 17% 89% 40% 15% 23% 45% 2006 71% 11% 19% 90% 42% 14% 27% 45% 2007 72% 12% 21% 92% 36% 14% 24% 45% 2008 71% 8% 20% 91% 37% 18% 26% 44% 2009 63% 7% 21% 90% 40% 16% 25% 42% 2010 (2) 65% 6% 23% 91% 37% 17% 29% 43% Note(s): Source(s) 1) EIA defines capacity factor to be "the ratio of the electrical energy produced by a generating unit for the period of time considered to the

277

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onof using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Explosive electron emission and the portion model of the electric arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some parameters and dependences characteristic of the electric arc phenomenon had no satisfactory explanation for a ... number of important ideas in the physics of electric discharges. At a meeting of the RAS Pre...

Gennadii Andreevich Mesyats

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9 ? Annual electricity consumption comparison of the total annual electricity consumption, Buildings A and B mostly  measure  electricity  consumption,  cooling  loads, 

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins in the Contiguous United States (GW) Net Internal Capacity Capacity Demand (1) Resources (2) Margin (3) 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Note(s): Source(s): 778.5 980.3 20.6% 1) Net internal demand represents the system demand that is planned for by the electric power industry`s reliability authority and is equal to internal demand less direct control load management and interruptible demand. Direct control load management: Customer demand that can be interrupted at the time of the seasonal peak by direct control of the system operator by interrupting power supply to individual appliances or equipment on customer premises. This type of control usually reduces the demand of residential customers. Interruptible demand: Customer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

State-of-the-art Building Integrated Photovoltaics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems may represent a powerful and versatile tool for achieving the ever increasing demand for zero energy and zero emission buildings of the near future. In this respect \\{BIPVs\\} offer an aesthetical, economical and technical solution to integrate solar cells harvesting solar radiation to produce electricity within the climate envelopes of buildings. This work summarizes the current state-of-the-art of BIPVs, including both BIPV foil, tile, module and solar cell glazing products.

Bjørn Petter Jelle; Christer Breivik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

283

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 6 focuses on the U.S. energy supply. Sections 6.1 and 6.2 contain data on electric utilities, including generation capacity, primary fuel consumption, transmission and distribution losses, and electricity prices. Section 6.3 addresses the production, consumption, and storage of natural gas and petroleum. Section 6.4 covers emissions from the utility sector. Section 6.5 provides data on how utilities spend public and system benefit funds. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

284

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

285

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

286

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

287

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2009 Peak Load and Capacity Margin, Summer and Winter by NERC Region (MW) NERC Region Capacity Margin Capacity Margin TRE 16.7% 19.1% FRCC 6.0% 2.0% MRO (U.S.) 24.6% 26.8% NPCC (U.S.) 29.1% 43.2% RFC 25.2% 33.3% SERC 24.6% 26.2% SPP 16.4% 34.6% WECC 19.4% 29.6% U.S. TOTAL 22.2% 28.5% Note(s): Source(s): 128,245 109,565 725,958 668,818 1) Summer Demand includes the months of June, July, August, and September. 2) Winter Demand includes December of the previous year and January-March of the current year. 3) Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at peak load as a percentage of net capacity resources. Net Capacity Resources: Utility- and IPP-owned generating capacity that is existing or in various stages of planning or construction, less inoperable capacity, plus planned capacity purchases from other resources, less planned

288

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

289

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

290

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Electric Conversion Factors and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Losses Average Utility Average Utility Growth Rate Delivery Efficiency (1, 2) Delivery Ratio (Btu/kWh) (2, 3) (2010-year) 1980 29.4% 1981 29.9% 1982 29.7% 1983 29.8% 1984 30.5% 1985 30.4% 1986 30.8% 1987 31.1% 1988 31.1% 1989 30.2% 1990 30.3% 1991 30.5% 1992 30.7% 1993 30.6% 1994 30.9% 1995 30.7% 1996 30.7% 1997 30.8% 1998 30.7% 1999 30.6% 2000 30.7% 2001 31.1% 2002 31.1% 2003 31.3% 2004 31.3% 2005 31.5% 2006 31.7% 2007 31.8% 2008 31.8% 2009 32.2% 2010 32.3% 2011 32.1% 2012 32.4% 2013 32.7% 2014 33.0% 2015 33.1% 2016 33.2% 2017 33.1% 2018 33.1% 2019 33.1% 2020 33.1% 2021 33.2% 2022 33.2% 2023 33.2% 2024 33.2% 2025 33.1% 2026 33.2% 2027 33.3% 2028 33.4% 10,218 0.2% 10,294 0.2% 10,266 0.2% 10,247 0.2% 10,277 0.2% 10,291 0.2% 10,281 0.2% 10,300 0.3% 10,301 0.3% 10,282 0.3% 10,292 0.4% 10,310 0.4% 10,305

291

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emissionsolar electricity into the power grid will generally reducefor generators in the power grid of California and Colorado.

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...33% renewable portfolio standard, continued licensing of existing nuclear...improvements in building shell, HVAC systems, lighting, and...carbon pricing (e.g., EE standards, renewable energy standards, and R&D support) that reflect not only economic...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

294

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

295

Supplementing an emissions tax by a feed-in tariff for renewable electricity to address learning spillovers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the presence of learning spillovers related to renewable energy technologies, an optimal strategy to mitigate climate change should complement an emissions tax by a subsidy for renewables. This article addresses the question how such subsidy should be designed. It is shown that the widely-used approach of a revenue-neutral fixed feed-in tariff can yield an optimal outcome under restrictive conditions only. It has to be adapted continuously as the electricity price changes. Moreover, funding the tariff by a surcharge on the electricity price has important implications for the design of the emission tax. The optimal tax rate has to be below the Pigovian level, differentiated across fossil fuels and adapted over time as the patterns of technological development change. These requirements may pose a formidable challenge for practical decision-making. However, it is important to point out that the eventual choices made with respect to the design and funding of a feed-in tariff have to be based on a careful and more comprehensive policy assessment, including, inter alia, economic effects beyond the electricity sector and existing institutional constraints.

Paul Lehmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad Elgowainy and Michael Wang Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory LDV Workshop July26, 2010 2 2 2 Team Members 2  ANL's Energy Systems (ES) Division  Michael Wang (team leader)  Dan Santini  Anant Vyas  Amgad Elgowainy  Jeongwoo Han  Aymeric Rousseau  ANL's Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division:  Guenter Conzelmann  Leslie Poch  Vladimir Koritarov  Matt Mahalik  Thomas Veselka  Audun Botterud  Jianhui Wang  Jason Wang 3 3 3 Scope of Argonne's PHEV WTW Analysis: Vehicle Powertrain Systems and Fuel Pathways 3  Vehicle powertrain systems:  Conventional international combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs)

297

Potential energy savings and reduction of CO2 emissions through higher efficiency standards for polyphase electric motors in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Japan has shut down more than 70% of its nuclear power plants since the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the ensuing accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The country has been challenged with power shortages in the short-term and faces complex energy security decisions in the long-term. Japan has a long history of implementing energy conservation policies, such as the Top Runner Program, which covers 23 products including appliances and industrial equipment. However, Japan's efficiency policy for polyphase electric motors is considered below international standards. Polyphase electric motors accounted for about 55% of the nation's total power consumption in 2008. The aim of this study is to estimate potential energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions (2014–2043) by examining scenarios involving adopting two different polyphase motor efficiency standards and comparing them to a base case and concludes by suggesting pathways for further policy development using the results obtained. The study finds that if level IE2 of the international efficiency standard IEC 60034-30 were implemented, it would save 8.3 TWh (or 0.03 quads) per year, which is equivalent to about 0.8% of Japan's total electric power consumption in 2010. If level IE3 of the IEC 60034-30 were implemented instead, it would save about 13.3 TWh (or 0.05 quads) per year. The corresponding cumulative energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions for the IE2 scenario would be 249 TWh (or 0.85 quads) and 93 Mt. The corresponding cumulative energy savings and reduction in CO2 emissions for the IE3 scenario would be 398 TWh (or 1.36 quads) and 149 Mt.

Chun Chun Ni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum","*","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

299

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions of utility-scale wind power: Systematic review...workover can refer to well maintenance without hydraulic fracturing...compressor blowdowns Engines/turbines Hydraulic fracturing* Pneumatic...recompletion* Engines/turbines Compressors and compressor...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and decarbonized energy supply alone are...dominant form of energy supply, posing...This transformation demands technologies that are...components of an energy transition. California...emitter of GHGs. Its per capita GDP and GHG emissions are...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Implications of CO2 emissions trading for short-run electricity market outcomes in northwest Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the short-run implications of CO2 trading for power production, prices, emissions, and generator profits in northwest Europe in 2005. Simulation results from a transmission-constrained oligopoly model ...

Yihsu Chen; Jos Sijm; Benjamin F. Hobbs; Wietze Lise

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric load thermal storage solar thermal storage chargingcombustion solar thermal CHP heat storage charging generateof solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of electrical storage,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA- Building America Top Innovation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

304

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the commercial building electricity costs distributed energydegradation costs electricity sales fixed electricity costsvariable electricity costs (energy and demand charges) EV

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

PNNL EERE Program: Building Technologies Program (Overview)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Laboratory, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program Home Program Areas Contacts Related Sites Energy Directorate PNNL Home Security & Privacy PNNL Buildings Program Overview PNNL Buildings Portfolio Science Foundation EE & Demand Response High-Performance Sustainable Design Codes and Standards Overcoming Market Barriers Analysis and Planning Key Buildings Projects Contacts Publications & Presentations PNNL Buildings Program Buildings account for about 40 percent of our nation's energy use. That's 72 percent of U.S. electricity and 55 percent of natural gas, resulting in 39 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions and a range of other negative environmental impacts. The buildings sciences team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is committed to dramatically improving the

306

Emission regulations in the electricity market : an analysis from consumers, producers and central planner perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the first part of this thesis, the objective is to identify optimal bidding strategies in the wholesale electricity market. We consider asymmetric producers submitting bids to a system operator. The system operator ...

Figueroa Rodriguez, Cristian Ricardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...economy). 24 Electric Power Research Institute, “Assessment of achievable potential from energy efficiency and demand response programs in the U.S. (2010–2030)” (Rep. No. 1016987, Palo Alto, CA, 2009). 25 California Public...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

308

Household electricity consumption and CO2 emissions in the Netherlands: A model-based analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Twenty percent of the total energy consumption in the Netherlands comes from household electricity consumption. This comes from household electric appliances whose number has grown in recent years. The paper explores the effect of smart meter introduction, appliance efficiency and consumer behaviour on reducing electricity consumption in the Netherlands. It does so by combining two perspectives: a sociotechnical approach and a bottom up simulation approach. The range of scenarios explored through simulation in the paper provides an understanding of the interplay between efficiency, smart meter diffusion and consumer behaviour. The results show their effect on electricity consumption and suggest that further effort is required to control and reduce it. Insights from the paper suggest that future studies should disaggregate with respect to a number of factors.

George Papachristos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar  photovoltaics  (PV)  in  traditional  electric   power  systems.  Energ  Policy.  policy makers when considering the location of PV deployment not only focus their attention on locations which have relatively abundant solar

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Calculation of the emission of nitrogen oxides in electric resistance heating furnaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to the least studied topic in the field of use of modern electric heating equipment, namely, pollution of the atmosphere by nitrogen oxides and reduction of the intensity of this e...

A. V. Aksenov; V. A. Belyakov; Z. G. Sadykova

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

312

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 EPA Criteria Pollutant Emissions Coefficients (Million Short Tons/Delivered Quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) All Buildings | SO2 0.402 0.042 | 0.130 NOx 0.164 0.063 | 0.053 CO 0.057 0.283 | 0.018 Note(s): Source(s): Electricity Electricity (1) Site Fossil Fuel (2) (per primary quad) (1) 1) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings energy consumption related SO2 emissions dropped 65% from 1994 to 2011. 2) Includes natural gas, petroleum liquid fuels, coal, and wood. EPA, 1970-2010 National Emissions Inventory, Average Annual Emissions, All Criteria Pollutants, October 2012; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 for energy consumption

314

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

315

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",113,117,119,122,129,113,113,118,96,72,68,66,64,63,55,48,45,51,44,33,33 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*",1,1,"*","*","*","*","*",1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

316

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",28,30,29,28,30,32,15,24,22,24,13,13,23,11,13,10,11,8,12,11,12 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

317

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",133,172,133,134,139,191,162,162,178,174,139,142,128,128,137,125,119,125,124,121,116 " Petroleum",1,1,1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

318

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",7,10,15,14,15,6,6,7,13,16,13,16,11,12,12,11,8,13,10,10,14 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

319

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",98,77,78,74,86,103,96,98,104,97,79,86,93,84,84,87,84,83,83,76,67 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*",1,1,1,"*",1,21,16,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*"

320

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",54,46,53,52,57,69,71,75,74,67,63,57,46,46,35,28,28,24,20,17,15 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",29,26,27,30,27,30,30,30,30,28,31,32,30,32,34,31,34,25,22,30,25 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

322

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",93,89,92,90,98,88,86,92,91,84,82,85,83,70,59,58,59,59,55,43,45 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

323

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",6,3,6,6,5,3,3,3,3,3,3,1,3,3,4,2,2,4,3,1,3 " Petroleum","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

324

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production activities to the oil produced from associated...of production in the price environment...for transportation and heating should be...study (51%, higher heating value basis). 1 Olmstead...reductions in natural gas prices for emissions of CO2 from the US power...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal efficiency, fuel heating value, power plant...natural gas as a bridge fuel . Clim Change 118 : 609...emissions and freshwater consumption of Marcellus shale gas...following Fig. S1) for the fuel cycle of shale gas...water, and/or oil) Vessel and pipeline blowdowns...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Emissions trading: Impact on electricity prices and energy-intensive industries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under the EU-wide Emission Trading Scheme (ETS), CO2 allowances have thus far been allocated largely free of charge. This paper presents a didactic synthesis on the impact of the ETS and argues that such a cost-f...

Manuel Frondel; Christoph M. Schmidt; Colin Vance

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum",2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

329

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",48,49,51,47,48,46,48,45,45,44,48,45,45,47,49,48,8,8,8,7,7 " Petroleum",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*",4,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

330

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage in the United States. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions over the life of buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP or the Program), supports the improvement of energy efficiency in buildings. BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the

331

Multi-objective dynamic economic emission dispatch of electric power generation integrated with game theory based demand response programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The dynamic economic emission dispatch (DEED) of electric power generation is a multi-objective mathematical optimization problem with two objective functions. The first objective is to minimize all the fuel costs of the generators in the power system, whilst the second objective seeks to minimize the emissions cost. Both objective functions are subject to constraints such as load demand constraint, ramp rate constraint, amongst other constraints. In this work, we integrate a game theory based demand response program into the DEED problem. The game theory based demand response program determines the optimal hourly incentive to be offered to customers who sign up for load curtailment. The game theory model has in built mechanisms to ensure that the incentive offered the customers is greater than the cost of interruption while simultaneously being beneficial to the utility. The combined DEED and game theoretic demand response model presented in this work, minimizes fuel and emissions costs and simultaneously determines the optimal incentive and load curtailment customers have to perform for maximal power system relief. The developed model is tested on two test systems with industrial customers and obtained results indicate the practical benefits of the proposed model.

Nnamdi I. Nwulu; Xiaohua Xia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Impact of Component Sizing in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Energy Resource and Greenhouse Emissions Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Widespread use of alternative hybrid powertrains currently appears inevitable and many opportunities for substantial progress remain. The necessity for environmentally friendly vehicles, in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change, has led to significant investment in enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. Recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. PHEVs are especially appealing for short daily commutes with excessive stop-and-go driving. However, the high costs associated with their components, and in particular, with their energy storage systems have been significant barriers to extensive market penetration of PEVs. In the research reported here, we investigated the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium duty PHEV. An optimization framework is proposed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the Pareto frontier with respect to motor/generator and battery size. The optimization and modeling approach adopted here facilitates better understanding of the potential benefits from proper selection of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions. This understanding can help us identify the appropriate sizing of these components and thus reducing the PHEV cost. Addressing optimal sizing of PHEV components could aim at an extensive market penetration of PHEVs.

Malikopoulos, Andreas [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Technology Path to Deep Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts by 2050: The Pivotal Role of Electricity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...electricity-sector governance as a tool of climate policy, but...regulation has existing tools for pursuing many...wedges in action: A systems approach to energy sustainability...Climate Analysis Indicators Tools (version 4.0 and 7.0...Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the IPCC, B...

James H. Williams; Andrew DeBenedictis; Rebecca Ghanadan; Amber Mahone; Jack Moore; William R. Morrow III; Snuller Price; Margaret S. Torn

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",845,801,806,777,761,655,751,842,830,732,484,402,367,369,384,351,308,301,344,237,231 " Petroleum",4,6,5,4,11,4,6,2,15,24,15,7,1,4,2,1,"*",1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

335

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",436,474,491,425,416,391,421,465,461,417,379,270,260,240,236,205,197,192,196,160,108 " Petroleum",168,200,182,235,227,194,220,213,325,296,221,265,185,213,193,190,117,116,58,43,32 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

336

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",1273,1330,1136,1155,1138,843,894,936,912,881,818,732,715,741,795,801,757,661,554,383,385 " Petroleum",3,3,1,"*","*",2,6,4,5,3,2,3,2,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

337

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",95,83,96,114,117,88,92,100,95,98,93,70,83,83,86,82,80,78,76,60,52 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*",15,17,14,27,17,15,10,7,6,"*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

338

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",485,483,488,520,488,503,553,537,543,515,483,435,417,425,385,428,430,423,335,262,194 " Petroleum",1,2,1,1,1,1,2,2,4,3,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

339

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",182,203,190,198,180,166,155,153,173,155,155,139,134,138,135,135,131,134,149,90,104 " Petroleum","*","*","*",6,11,11,5,8,7,5,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,5,2,4 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","*"

340

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",818,791,810,892,812,613,583,607,567,597,530,486,428,474,460,445,380,336,307,225,241 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*",16,7,5,9,8,8,7,4,5 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",14,9,9,9,10,13,12,13,13,8,11,4,4,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2 " Petroleum",4,2,"*","*","*",3,4,4,4,4,3,4,3,3,2,2,2,2,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",1,1,"*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*"

342

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",241,216,221,228,212,208,228,231,247,237,238,235,241,248,261,258,256,252,222,194,43 " Petroleum",26,31,23,30,29,9,10,12,24,30,14,11,8,14,13,16,12,12,1,1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

343

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",16,18,20,18,19,33,18,21,22,23,22,28,18,16,19,18,18,20,18,19,19 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*",2,19,2,2,2,24,26,3,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,2 " Natural Gas","*","*","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

344

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",91,98,100,106,115,89,86,106,100,102,92,87,89,87,87,82,81,65,62,58,65 " Petroleum",3,"*",40,111,114,61,58,64,66,62,60,79,61,83,20,19,17,13,15,26,48 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

345

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",63,52,50,51,46,53,61,67,56,58,73,45,44,46,47,63,55,45,35,11,14 " Petroleum",9,7,4,4,5,6,5,4,5,4,5,3,2,3,2,2,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

346

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",38,38,31,38,35,35,35,34,35,22,34,30,28,32,33,29,28,32,32,16,13 " Petroleum",41,12,43,43,43,34,33,32,6,6,4,6,4,4,2,2,2,2,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-"

347

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum",2,1,1,1,2,1,1,"*",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*",1,"*","*","*","*",1 " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Total",2,1,1,1,2,1,1,"*",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*",1,"*","*","*","*",1

348

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",32,32,35,33,25,26,28,26,26,24,28,5,2,3,2,3,3,3,1,2,2 " Petroleum",46,17,26,28,47,89,95,98,96,111,94,34,66,13,18,21,21,18,1,1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

349

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Virginia" West Virginia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",876,970,1000,949,990,572,630,636,631,648,568,618,478,506,446,438,427,353,286,167,105 " Petroleum",1,1,"*","*","*",1,1,1,"*","*",1,3,1,"*","*",1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-"

350

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",91,95,85,70,64,72,63,72,64,64,63,55,53,48,41,43,36,38,38,30,34 " Petroleum",120,123,105,67,52,48,36,62,83,56,42,40,31,34,35,33,13,13,6,3,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

351

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal","*","*",2,3,3,4,4,4,4,3,11,1,2,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,1 " Petroleum",35,26,26,19,17,35,39,39,42,41,39,24,20,21,22,20,21,21,20,21,15 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

352

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",363,368,339,356,386,353,372,399,411,369,360,336,325,335,322,329,315,325,329,267,229 " Petroleum",16,14,10,13,15,22,20,19,24,25,21,26,24,24,24,26,6,23,13,15,17 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","-","*","-","-","-","*","*"

353

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",721,677,620,437,487,316,334,289,274,240,194,218,224,255,265,266,253,251,253,234,232 " Petroleum",3,4,4,5,6,4,1,1,1,6,18,18,11,2,3,7,6,6,"*",1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","-","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-"

354

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",96,89,86,81,70,75,86,70,71,71,80,63,60,62,62,60,69,62,60,36,49 " Petroleum",11,5,6,48,14,2,15,33,67,41,38,64,1,12,16,8,3,2,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-"

355

Short Run Effects of a Price on Carbon Dioxide Emissions from U.S. Electric Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, if it were imposed instantaneously, a carbon price that has been shown in other work (13-20) to stimulate investment in new generation technology (?$35/t CO2) would also lead to significant CO2 reductions via demand response and, to a lesser extent, dispatch order before any new technology was deployed. ... Spees, K.; Lave, L. B. Demand Response and Electricity Market Efficiency ... King, C. S.; Chatterjee, S. Predicting California Demand Response: How do Customers React to Hourly Prices? ...

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",5,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,3,2,6,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,1,"*","*" " Petroleum",39,34,8,8,7,26,27,30,38,40,25,21,10,9,9,11,7,11,6,4,2 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",11,11,12,12,12,12,7,10,9,9,9,8,8,19,28,9

358

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",37,30,39,36,34,37,37,45,36,36,42,40,35,30,34,37,35,36,33,29,33 " Petroleum",23,13,12,11,11,11,9,9,16,16,5,5,5,21,17,9,2,3,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*",1,"*",1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*"

359

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",77,69,60,64,65,90,105,98,107,105,102,103,113,119,104,112,98,102,85,46,40 " Petroleum",1,"*","*",1,"*",1,1,1,"*",2,3,6,5,9,8,12,3,3,2,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Total",78,69,60,64,65,90,106,99,107,107,106,109,118,128,112,124,101,105,87,47,41

360

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",805,728,719,649,528,462,452,486,497,490,488,479,495,517,524,583,619,617,481,247,211 " Petroleum",13,15,4,6,4,28,31,34,40,38,39,47,36,42,33,35,37,36,29,24,28 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",39,41,34,33,33,32,31,31,27,27,27,29,28,25,24,25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",11,11,9,8,9,10,10,11,6,1,19,11,5,3,3,3,3,2,3,1,1 " Petroleum",40,38,25,20,16,12,26,37,40,39,26,22,6,5,4,5,3,3,1,"*",1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other1",1,1,1,1,"*",4,5,5,5,5,6,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

362

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",67,64,64,60,66,76,88,79,70,72,69,68,64,65,71,60,66,65,66,62,61 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*",1,1,"*",1,1,2,4,1,2,3,1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",12,13,13,13,13,13,12,12,13,13,36,15,16,11,12,12

363

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

364

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

365

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal, stationary batteries, thermal storage, andThe model allows the EV batteries to transfer electricity toPV, and stationary batteries as options, e) an everything

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy… (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Technology and information management for low-carbon building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All buildings worldwide combined use 40% of the global energy and are responsible for one third of global energy-related greenhouse gas(GHG) emissions. The majority of GHG emissions of buildings come from fossil fuel energy in several stages of the life cycle of the building; 80%–90% of GHG emissions of buildings are emitted in the operations stage; 10%–20% GHG emissions are from embodied energy and carbon emissions related to construction stage. The greatest potential for low-hanging fruit in cost effective quick deep GHG reduction and mitigation is found in the construction industry. With currently available and proven technologies reductions in energy consumption on both new and existing buildings are estimated to achieve 30%–80%. When costs of implementing energy reduction technologies are offset by energy savings there is potential for a net profit over the life span of the building. Much has been done to study energy reductions define GHG emissions and develop metrics and protocols for measuring and reporting carbon emissions. This paper addresses the “How.” How energy consumption of a house was reduced almost 70%. How CO2 emission was reduced 44%. How embodied GHG emissions of the house were measured and certified carbon neutral. How USGBC LEED for Homes platinum certification was attained. How actual savings from energy reductions are able to pay back up-front cost of implementing technologies and begin earning a profit in fifteen years. How reducing electric consumption has the greatest impact in reducing energy costs and reducing CO2 emissions compared to propane and #2 fuel oil. How earning LEED points provided a surprise benefit of mitigating overall GHG emissions by earning carbon offsets. How these achievements and findings were accomplished in the reconstruction of one home.

Frank Dalene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially reduce the energy used in buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 KTA@Bath Challenge The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially research and lead the education of highly skilled low carbon designers. These Centres will have strong

Burton, Geoffrey R.

371

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. Project Benefits Produce approximately 35,000 kilowatt-hours of clean electricity annually Reduce carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 41 tons per year Preserve and increase local jobs for tribal members and others

372

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity electrical flow battery thermal n/a n/a source:lead/acid battery) and thermal storage capabilities were$/kW or $/kWh) thermal storage 30 flow battery 220$/kWh and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced in creating the electricity through a full Life Cycle Analysis. As a result, proper comparison of electrified and conventional vehicles must include a complete Well-to-Wheel (WtW) study including the emissions generated through production and use...

Strecker, Bryan Anthony

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear, photovoltaic, nuclear, life cycle 1 #12;Introduction The production of energy by burning fossil fuels generates, it is envisioned that expanding generation technologies based on nuclear power and renewable energy sources would

375

Optimizing Techology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

More than 56,000 coal quality data records from five public data sets have been selected for use in this project. These data will be used to create maps showing where coals with low mercury and acid-gas emissions might be found for power plants classified by air-pollution controls. Average coal quality values, calculated for 51,156 commercial coals by U.S. county-of-origin, are listed in the appendix. Coal moisture values are calculated for commercially shipped coal from 163 U.S. counties, where the raw assay data (including mercury and chlorine values) are reported on a dry basis. The calculated moisture values are verified by comparison with observed moisture values in commercial coal. Moisture in commercial U.S. coal shows provincial variation. For example, high volatile C bituminous rank coal from the Interior province has 3% to 4% more moisture than equivalent Rocky Mountain province coal. Mott-Spooner difference values are calculated for 4,957 data records for coals collected from coal mines and exploration drill holes. About 90% of the records have Mott-Spooner difference values within {+-}250 Btu/lb.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

377

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

378

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electric resistive space heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost of heating residential buildings using electricity is compared to the cost employing gas or oil. (AIP)

David Bodansky

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

U.S. Department of Energy Buildings Technologies Program: Better Buildings, Brighter Future  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

new technologies and practices, energy-efficient new technologies and practices, energy-efficient buildings will be the new standard for residents in all U.S. climate zones. DOE and its partners are pursuing a portfolio of research to make it happen. Better Buildings, Brighter Future Innovative Building Technologies and Practices Save Energy and Money Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy, consuming more than 70 percent of electricity and over 50 percent of natural gas. Investing in energy-efficient buildings yields: * Cost savings for American homeowners and businesses; * Reductions in peak demand, providing the energy needed for a strong economy with fewer new power plants; and * Expeditious and sustained reductions in carbon dioxide emissions-with fast paybacks

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Title Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2011 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Ratnesh Sharma, Gonçalo Mendes, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Olivier Mégel, and Afzal S. Siddiqui Conference Name 7th IEEE Vehicle Power and Propulsion Conference Date Published 09/2011 Publisher LBNL Conference Location Chicago, IL Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

382

Building Commissioning in the Chinese Mainland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Governmental buildingsGovernmental buildings Building InformationBuilding Information Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 29302930 18001800 39, 60039, 600 JJGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU)burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU...)2456245660060041, 51041, 510GGGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller (FCU)(FCU)65326532>800>80050, 00050, 000HH Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 47004700 560560 45, 45045...

Zhu, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (MMT CO2 Equivalent) (1) Fuel Type Residential Commercial Buildings Total Petroleum 1.0 0.5 1.6 Natural Gas 41.0 26.8 67.8 Coal 0.0 0.3 0.3 Wood 2.6 0.4 3.0 Electricity (2) 52.8 50.5 103.3 Total 97.4 78.5 176.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

384

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type Fuel Type Petroleum 1.0 Natural Gas 38.8 Coal 0.0 Wood 2.6 Electricity (2) 51.6 Total 94.0 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent (1) 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009, April 2011, Table 3-10, p. 3-9 for stationary combustion emissions; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release,

385

NREL: Learning - Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Photo of the front and part of the side of a bus parked at the curb of a city street with tall buildings in the background. This diesel hybrid electric bus operated by the Metropolitan Transit Authority, New York City Transit, was part of a test study that recently investigated the fuel efficiency and reliability of these buses. Credit: Leslie Eudy Today's hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) range from small passenger cars to sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and large trucks. Though they often look just like conventional vehicles, HEVs usually include an electric motor as well as a small internal combustion engine (ICE). This combination provides greater fuel economy and fewer emissions than most conventional ICE vehicles do. HEVs are powered by two energy sources: an energy conversion unit, such as

386

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LDV. However, Ford (Wallington, 1996), the EIA (Emissions ofautomobile air conditioners (Wallington, 1996) . As a resultsystems is not detectable (Wallington, 1996) . Therefore, I

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

New Buildings at Rothamsted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... June 21 was made the occasion of the official opening of a new block of buildings at the farm and the inauguration of an extensive electrical installation in the farm ... at the farm and the inauguration of an extensive electrical installation in the farm buildings. The Right Hon. Sir John Gilmour, Minister of Agriculture, declared the ...

1932-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

390

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source...

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Electricity Heat, and Steam Purchase Guidance v1.2[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for purchased electricity is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

392

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

393

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

Müller, Jens-Dominik

394

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

395

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

396

Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole building electricity consumption for the first eightbuildings. Measured electricity consumption Figure 3 showsthe measured total electricity consumption of the building

Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A review of methods to match building energy simulation models to measured data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whole building heat energy and electrical loads. Therefore,in HVAC system electrical energy consumption in response towhole-building electrical energy consumption). Procedural

Coakley, Daniel; Raftery, Paul; Keane, Marcus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Use Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity in 1999. Office and mercantile buildings used the most total electricity. Both of these building types used electricity as their predominant energy source. Figure showing total electricity consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Electricity Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most electricity per building. Figure showing electricity consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

399

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

SciTech Connect

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

402

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

403

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

404

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

405

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCÓN, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

406

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

407

Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Future energy loads for a large-scale adoption of electric vehicles in the city of Los Angeles: Impacts on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Using plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) has become an important component of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategy in the transportation sector. Assessing the net effect of \\{PEVs\\} on GHG emissions, however, is dependent on factors such as type and scale of electricity generation sources, adoption rate, and charging behavior. This study creates a comprehensive model that estimates the energy load and GHG emissions impacts for the years 2020 and 2030 for the city of Los Angeles. For 2020, model simulations show that the PEV charging loads will be modest with negligible effects on the overall system load profile. Contrary to previous study results, the average marginal carbon intensity is higher if PEV charging occurs during off-peak hours. These results suggest that current economic incentives to encourage off-peak charging result in greater GHG emissions. Model simulations for 2030 show that PEV charging loads increase significantly resulting in potential generation shortages. There are also significant grid operation challenges as the region?s energy grid is required to ramp up and down rapidly to meet PEV loads. For 2030, the average marginal carbon intensity for off-peak charging becomes lower than peak charging mainly due to the removal of coal from the power generation portfolio.

Jae D. Kim; Mansour Rahimi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

410

Nuclear power can reduce emissions and maintain a strong economy: Rating Australia’s optimal future electricity-generation mix by technologies and policies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Legal barriers currently prohibit nuclear power for electricity generation in Australia. For this reason, published future electricity scenarios aimed at policy makers for this country have not seriously considered a full mix of energy options. Here we addressed this deficiency by comparing the life-cycle sustainability of published scenarios using multi-criteria decision-making analysis, and modeling the optimized future electricity mix using a genetic algorithm. The published ‘CSIRO e-future’ scenario under its default condition (excluding nuclear) has the largest aggregate negative environmental and economic outcomes (score = 4.51 out of 8), followed by the Australian Energy Market Operator’s 100% renewable energy scenario (4.16) and the Greenpeace scenario (3.97). The e-future projection with maximum nuclear-power penetration allowed yields the lowest negative impacts (1.46). After modeling possible future electricity mixes including or excluding nuclear power, the weighted criteria recommended an optimized scenario mix where nuclear power generated >40% of total electricity. The life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions of the optimization scenarios including nuclear power were nuclear power is an effective and logical option for the environmental and economic sustainability of a future electricity network in Australia.

Sanghyun Hong; Corey J.A. Bradshaw; Barry W. Brook

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy use in buildings represents the single largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the Federal sector. Buildings can contribute to Scope 1 emissions from direct stationary combustion...

412

Building 32 35 Building 36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 10 Building 13 Building 7 LinHall Drive Lot R10 Lot R12 Lot 207 Lot 209 LotR9 Lot 205 Lot 203 LotBuilding30 Richland Avenue 39 44 Building 32 35 Building 36 34 Building 18 Building 19 11 12 45 29 15 Building 5 8 9 17 Building 16 6 Building 31 Building 2 Ridges Auditorium Building 24 Building 4

Botte, Gerardine G.

413

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53: Total energy use in buildings – evaluation and analysisTY. A design day for building load and energy estimation.Building and Environment, 1999; 34(4): 469-477. [5] Hong TZ,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

416

Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Planning Sector Land Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

417

Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Agency/Company /Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian Development Bank (ADB), Ministry of Planning Sector Land Focus Area Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://cleanairinitiative.org/

418

An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hour hour Fig. 8. Office Building Jul Electricity Use y Fig.9. Office Building Jul Electricity Load Provision with CHPEnergy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment,

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

Collaboration/ University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Building Energy Efficiency Policies (BEEP) Database | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Energy Efficiency Policies (BEEP) Database Building Energy Efficiency Policies (BEEP) Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Energy Efficiency Policies (BEEP) Database Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.sustainablebuildingscentre.org/pages/beep Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/building-energy-efficiency-policies-b Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Training & Education Regulations: "Building Certification,Building Codes,Enabling Legislation,Energy Standards,Incandescent Phase-Out" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: ID-Spec Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large ID-Spec Large is software for the electrical installation design of industrial and tertiary buildings. It helps to design a green electrical installation by enabling the user to: - Assess the impact of selecting energy efficiency solutions like power factor correction and low losses transformers in terms of cost savings - Reduce power losses and consequently carbon emissions in the electrical installation by optimizing equipment locations - Reduce investment cost while using less raw materials by optimizing length and cross-section of cables - Assess the percentage of recyclable materials for cables and busbar trunking systems. Screen Shots Keywords Electrical installation design, power losses assessment, CO2 emissions, quantity of conductors

422

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment, September 2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This market assessment confirms that the current IES research and development projects targeting the commercial building sector have the potential to dramatically reduce fossil fuel use and air pollutant emissions, improve the electric grid’s power quality, efficiency, reliability and return on investment, and enhance energy security.

423

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Average Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Various Functions Stock Refrigerator (1) kWh - Electricity Stock Electric Water Heater kWh - Electricity Stock Gas Water Heater million Btu - Natural Gas Stock Oil Water Heater million Btu - Fuel Oil Single-Family Home million Btu Mobile Home million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Large Building million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Small Building million Btu School Building million Btu Office Building million Btu Hospital, In-Patient million Btu Stock Vehicles Passenger Car gallons - Gasoline Van, Pickup Truck, or SUV gallons - Gasoline Heavy Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Tractor Trailer Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Note(s): Source(s): 10,749 95.8 211,312 1) Stock refrigerator consumption is per household refrigerator consumption, not per refrigerator.

424

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

X-ray absorption and resonant x-ray emission spectra by electric quadrupole excitation in light rare-earth systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have made precise theoretical calculations for both 2p3/2?4f x-ray absorption spectra and 3d?2p3/2 resonant x-ray emission spectra involving electric quadrupole excitations at the L3 edge of light rare-earth elements from La to Eu. It is shown that the energy separation of a double-peak structure observed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) does not agree with that determined from resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES), in contrast to recent experimental results by Bartolomé et al. The reason for this difference is that the energy separation in XAS is determined by the 4f-4f interaction only, while that in RXES is determined by both 4f-4f and 3d-4f interactions.

M. Nakazawa; K. Fukui; H. Ogasawara; A. Kotani; C. F. Hague

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Influence of wind power on hourly electricity prices and GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions: Evidence that congestion matters from Ontario zonal data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract With the growing share of wind production, understanding its impacts on electricity price and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions becomes increasingly relevant, especially to design better wind-supporting policies. Internal grid congestion is usually not taken into account when assessing the price impact of fluctuating wind output. Using 2006–2011 hourly data from Ontario (Canada), we establish that the impact of wind output, both on price level and marginal GHG emissions, greatly differs depending on the congestion level. Indeed, from an average of 3.3% price reduction when wind production doubles, the reduction jumps to 5.5% during uncongested hours, but is only 0.8% when congestion prevails. Similarly, avoided GHG emissions due to wind are estimated to 331.93 kilograms per megawatt-hour (kg/MWh) using all data, while for uncongested and congested hours, estimates are respectively 283.49 and 393.68 kg/MWh. These empirical estimates, being based on 2006–2011 Ontario data, cannot be generalized to other contexts. The main contribution of this paper is to underscore the importance of congestion in assessing the price and GHG impacts of wind. We also contribute by developing an approach to create clusters of data according to the congestion status and location. Finally, we compare different approaches to estimate avoided GHG emissions.

Mourad Ben Amor; Etienne Billette de Villemeur; Marie Pellat; Pierre-Olivier Pineau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Dc Living Walls Posted by: Dc 15 Nov 2013 - 13:26 Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more... Tags: ancient building system, architect, biomimicry, building technology, cooling, cu, daylight, design problem, energy use, engineer, fred andreas, geothermal, green building, heat transfer, heating, living walls, metabolic adjustment, net zero, pre-electricity, Renewable Energy, Solar, university of colorado, utility grid, Wind

428

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 2010 Emissions Summary Table for U.S. Buildings Energy Consumption (Thousand Short Tons) (1) Buildings Buildings Percent Wood/SiteFossil Electricity Total U.S. Total of U.S. Total SO2 (2) 54% NOx 17% CO 5% VOCs 2% PM-2.5 15% PM-10 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1) VOCs = volatile organic compounds; PM-10 = particulate matter less than 10 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. PM-2.5 = particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in aerodynamic diameter. CO and VOCs site fossil emissions mostly from wood burning. 2) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings Energy Consumption related to SO2 emissions dropped 27% from 1994 to 2002. EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5; and EPA, 1970-2010 National Emissions

429

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

SciTech Connect

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

431

The Impact of Electric Passenger Transport Technology under an Economy-Wide Climate Policy in the United States: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Coal Use, and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to be an economic means of reducing direct (or tailpipe) carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector. However, without a climate policy that places a limit on CO2 emissions from the electric generation sector, the net impact of widespread deployment of PHEVs on overall U.S. CO2 emissions is not as clear. A comprehensive analysis must consider jointly the transportation and electricity sectors, along with feedbacks to the rest of the energy system. In this paper, we use the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MiniCAM model to perform an integrated economic analysis of the penetration of PHEVs and the resulting impact on total U.S. CO2 emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions. ACEEEsave energy and reduce energy costs and carbon emissions inminimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year

Feng, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

434

Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

MO) Vehicles Home About Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Alternative Fuels Modeling, Testing, Data & Results Education...

435

electricity.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This...

436

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection Title Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5251E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Gonçalo Mendes, Afzal S. Siddiqui, Ratnesh Sharma, Olivier Mégel, and Judy Lai Journal Journal of Energy Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE): Special Issue: Challenges and opportunities in the 21st century energy infrastructure Volume 138 Issue 2 Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Connection of electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications for building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. When connected to buildings, mobile storage devices such as electric vehicles (EVs) are in competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs can change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions and solved for 2020 technology assumptions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. Special constraints for the available PV, solar thermal, and EV parking lots at the commercial buildings are considered. The research shows that EV batteries can be used to reduce utility-related energy costs at the smart grid or commercial building due to arbitrage of energy between buildings with different tariffs. However, putting more emphasis on CO2 emissions makes stationary storage more attractive and stationary storage capacities increase while the attractiveness of EVs decreases. The limited availability of EVs at the commercial building decreases the attractiveness of EVs and if PV is chosen by the optimization, then it is mostly used to charge the stationary storage at the commercial building and not the EVs connected to the building.

437

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

438

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

439

electricAl engineering College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

encompasses telecommunica- tions, electrical power generation, transmission and distribution, control systems power engineers design and oversee the construction, installation and maintenance of electrical systems modern power electronic devices to control power generation and distribution and build electric drives

Hartman, Chris

440

Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office buildings: An agent based approach. Energy Buildings (2011), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.07.007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in revised form 20 May 2011 Accepted 7 July 2011 Keywords: Office energy consumption Agent-based simulation, catering and hot water. Thus, energy consumption in office buildings is one of the research areas which cause energy consumption. Yet in the UK the energy consumption in office buildings has been primarily

Aickelin, Uwe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

442

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mandatory Electric Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on

444

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

captured  for  both  diesel  and  electric  vehicles.   The for the urban diesel bus,  the electric buses’ fraction of Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THE EMERGING HYBRID-ELECTRIC AND DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES TOof the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies tomodern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric Buses, and Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, and Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, and 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

448

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

449

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

450

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

451

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

Ke, Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Strategic electricity sector assessment methodology under sustainability conditions: a Swiss case study on CO2 emissions, competition and stranded costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Designing and implementing a sustainable energy sector will be a key element of defining and creating a sustainable society. In the electricity industry, the question of strategic planning for sustainability seems to conflict with the shorter time horizons associated with market forces as deregulation replaces vertical integration. In order to address such questions, a project called SESAMS (Strategic Electricity Sector Assessment Methodology under Sustainability) has been established to develop electricity sector planning methods related to sustainability. This effort is part of the Alliance for Global Sustainability (AGS) formed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (ETHZ and EPFL), and the University of Tokyo (UT). The initial phase of SESAMS in 1997 created a methodology integrating multi-scenario simulation, life-cycle analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis. This 1998 case study has expanded the methodology to study the transitional effects of deregulation associated with the issues of stranded cost. This analysis has studied the inclusion of different classes of stranded assets, different recovery periods, and recovery of costs on a fixed vs. variable (per kWh) basis. On a societal basis, stranded costs are a zero-sum transfer payment, but the ownership patterns of stranded assets mean that compensation for stranded assets will produce relative winners and losers. These winners and losers shift according to the stranded cost and other options present in different scenarios. The results of the stranded cost analysis are integrated with updated multi-criteria trade-off analysis and life-cycle analysis results, based on expanded system boundaries.

W. Schenler; Adrian V. Gheorghe; Warren Stephen Connors; Stefan Hirschberg; Pierre-Andre Haldi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

SciTech Connect: Cold Climate Building Enclosure Solutions  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

COST EFFECTIVENESS; RETROFIT; AEROGEL; VACUUM INSULATION PANEL; VIP; EIFS; Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems; Buildings Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

454

building | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 50% (2 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 25% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 25% (1 vote) Total votes: 4 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

455

Electricity in the United States - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline

456

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions 3.5 Commercial Builders and Construction 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities 3.9 Educational Facilities 3.10 Hotels/Motels 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 3 focuses on energy use in the commercial sector. Section 3.1 covers primary and site energy consumption in commercial buildings, as well as the delivered energy intensities of various building types and end uses. Section 3.2 provides data on various characteristics of the commercial sector, including floorspace, building types, ownership, and lifetimes. Section 3.3 provides data on commercial building expenditures, including energy prices. Section 3.4 covers environmental emissions from the commercial sector. Section 3.5 briefly addresses commercial building construction and retrofits. Sections 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10 provide details on select commercial buildings types, specifically office and retail space, medical facilities, educational facilities, and hotels and motels.

458

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

459

Homepage | The Better Buildings Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Alliance Sectors Public Private Commercial Real Estate & Hospitality Healthcare Higher Education Retail, Food Service & Grocery Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management Information Systems Public Sector Teams Energy Savings Performance Contracts Strategic Energy Planning Finance Strategies Data Management Approaches Market Solutions Teams Appraisals & Valuation Data Access Financing Leasing & Split Incentive Workforce Development Events 2014 Better Buildings Summit Better Buildings Webinar Series Efficiency Forum Past Webinars

460

Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

American Electric Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Electric Vehicles Inc Place: Palmer Lake, Colorado Zip: 80133 Sector: Vehicles Product: American Electric Vehicles (AEV) builds high...

462

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

463

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

464

EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Previous reports Previous reports Distributed Generation in Buildings - AEO2005 Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models - July 2002 Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Release date: August 29, 2013 Distributed and dispersed generation technologies generate electricity near the particular load they are intended to serve, such as a residential home or commercial building. EIA defines distributed generation (DG) as being connected to the electrical grid and intended to directly offset retail sales, and dispersed generation as being off-grid and often used for remote applications where grid-connected electricity is cost-prohibitive. Dispersed generation in the buildings sector is not currently gathered by

465

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

466

Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy for County Government Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Santa Clara County Executive's Office In February 2006, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a Green Building Policy for all county-owned or leased buildings. The standards were revised again in September 2009. All new buildings over 5,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver

467

Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Place Wilmington, DE Website http://www.prweb.com/releases/ References Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release[1] BMI Website[2] DuPont Website[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) is a company located in Wilmington, DE. References ↑ "Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release" ↑ "BMI Website"

468

Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the July 11, 1996, Electrical Shock at Technical Area 53, Building MPF-14, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

469

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changes of HVAC source EUI between AMY and TMY3. (a) largeof total building source EUI. (a) large office, 90.1-2004a) changes in HVAC source EUI; (b) changes in total source

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy efficient buildings in Qingdao, China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? At present, an important task for Chinese governments at all levels is to save energy and reduce pollutant emissions. The task of buildings energy… (more)

Tengteng, Sun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov BTO Program Peer Review Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Danielle Sass Byrnett, DOE Dave Roberts, NREL david.roberts@nrel.gov 303.384.7496 April 3, 2013 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Analysis Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United States and are responsible for nearly 40% of the country's greenhouse gas emissions. Several well documented barriers have prevented the development of a self-sustaining building energy upgrade market to reduce this energy use.

473

Sustainable Electricity Factsheets | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factsheets Building Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Newsletters and Media | Sustainable Electricity Factsheets SHARE Sustainable...

474

Abstract--Energy efficiency for the buildings is vital for the environment and sustainability. Buildings are responsible for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Index Terms-- Green Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Energy Modeling, Smart Energy, Energy1 Abstract--Energy efficiency for the buildings is vital for the environment and sustainability. Buildings are responsible for significant energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the United

Jain, Raj

475

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector ( kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capture solar radiation and convert it into thermal energy.solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric storage (kWh) flow battery - energy (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'S BUILDING PHYSICS BUILDING BAXTER'S LODGE INSTITUTE BUILDING CONSERVATION WORKS R.D.WATT BUILDING MACLEAYBUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING PHARMACY AND BANK BUILDING JOHN WOOLEY BUILDING OLD TEARCHER BUILDING THE QUARANGLE BADHAM BUILDING J.D. STEWART BUILDING BLACKBURN BUILDING MADSEN BUILDING STORE

Viglas, Anastasios

478

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

479

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was slightly above average. Lodging buildings were one of the few...

480

Comparison of building energy use data between the United States and China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pipes, etc. Annual Electricity Consumption Comparison OtherFig. 7. Annual electricity consumption comparison of case-the total annual electricity consumption, Buildings A and B

Xia Ph.D., Jianjun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Estimated airborne release of plutonium from the 102 Building at the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of damage from severe wind and earthquake hazard  

SciTech Connect

This report estimates the potential airborne releases of plutonium as a consequence of various severities of earthquake and wind hazard postulated for the 102 Building at the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center in California. The releases are based on damage scenarios developed by other specialists. The hazard severities presented range up to a nominal velocity of 230 mph for wind hazard and are in excess of 0.8 g linear acceleration for earthquakes. The consequences of thrust faulting are considered. The approaches and factors used to estimate the releases are discussed. Release estimates range from 0.003 to 3 g Pu.

Mishima, J.; Ayer, J.E.; Hays, I.D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle (BEV) with an electric motor capable of supplyingmode operation uses the electric motor to run during low-PHEV x can be run on the electric motor only for the first x

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EV's, roadway-powered electric automobiles, and light dutyFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles -a---- Range ofFor Roadway-Powered Electric Automobiles Range of Estimated

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the automobile market, Plug- In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (electric vehicles. Because of these factors, the automobileELECTRIC ONLY Figure 5.5c Temporal Trip Distribution Source Energy Profiles Conclusions and Future Research Commercial PHEV release in the automobile

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Filter Press Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"FILTER PRESS BUILDING" AVON LAKE WATER POLLUTION CONTROL CENTER HEAT PUMP HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM William M. Bush, P.E. The Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company Cleveland, Ohio ABSTRACT The high heat value of the plant's treated wa..." of the thousands of homes in the com munity, we were able to recommend a system of heat recovery refrigeration cycles that would provide space conditioning at a fraction of the cost of natural gas. The all-electric recommendation was accepted because...

Bush, W. M.

486

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection Title Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5251E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Stadler, Michael, Chris Marnay, Maximillian Kloess, Gonçalo Cardoso, Gonçalo Mendes, Afzal S. Siddiqui, Ratnesh Sharma, Olivier Mégel, and Judy Lai Journal Journal of Energy Engineering, Special Issue: Challenges and opportunities in the 21st century energy infrastructure Volume 138 Start Page 95 Issue 2 Pagination 95-108 Date Published 06/2012 Publisher LBNL ISSN ISSN (print): 0733-9402, ISSN (online): 1943-7897 Keywords carbon emissions, combined heat and power, commercial buildings, distributed energy resources, distributed generation, electric vehicle, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, load shifting, microgrid, microgrids, optimization, smart grid, storage technologies

487

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

488

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Oklahoma Department of Central Services In June 2008, the governor of Oklahoma signed [http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/2007-08bills/HB/hb3394_enr.rtf HB 3394] requiring the state to develop a high-performance building certification program for state construction and renovation projects. The standard, which

489

City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing a requirement for all new occupied city buildings larger than 5,000 square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level

490

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than