National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for buildings electricity emission

  1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado capacity by 39% but resulted in a mere 1% of the CO2 emissions from the initial construction and came with no additional emissions from the reservoir, which accounts for the majority of the GWE. Introduction In2001

  2. Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide...

  3. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis Jennifer Morris* , Mort Webster* and John Reilly* Abstract The electric power sector, which

  4. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  5. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    greenhouse effect, and electric vehicles," Proceedingso/9thInternational Electric Vehicles Symposium, 1988. 14. R. M.of 9th International Electric Vehicles Sympo- sium, 1988.

  6. Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

  7. Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, George

    2014-05-31

    .......................................................................................................................... 62 4.2.3 Construction Equipment and Installation .................................................................... 71 4.3 Building Embodied Carbon Emissions Modeling ............................................................ 73 CHAPTER 5: DATA... ............................................... 94 Figure 23 Solar Factor vs. Latitude (Hui & Chu, 2009) ................................................... 98 Figure 24 Schematic Diagram of Cooling Tower ........................................................... 101 Figure 25 Summary of Energy...

  9. Sustainable School Buildings: Some of the Latest Dutch Examples of Nearly zero Emissions Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Waard, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands with respect to sustainable educational building there is a continuous development going on from sustainable building, to Passive House schools, to nearly Zero Emission Buildings to even Energy positive buildings. The Dutch...

  10. Emission Impacts of Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; DeLuchi, Mark A.; Sperling, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    category includes California-owned power plants out- sideCalifornia Air ResourcesBoard, "Uncontrolled and controlled power-plantsCalifornia. First, we include emissions from out-state coal power plants.

  11. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Smart buildings with electric vehicleopportunity employer. Smart buildings with electric vehicleand integrated in smart buildings Is it that simple or does

  12. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Mendes, Goncalo; Marnay, Chris; Mé gel, Olivier; Lai, Judy

    2011-04-01

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (EV) modeling; (2) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (3) presentation summary - how does the number of EVs connected to the building change with different optimization goals (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (3) ongoing EV modeling for California: the California commercial end-use survey (CEUS) database, objective: 138 different typical building - EV connections and benefits; (4) detailed analysis for healthcare facility: optimal EV connection at a healthcare facility in southern California; and (5) conclusions. Conclusions are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions. Why? Stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff - final work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

  13. System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Comparative simulations of hybrid electric vehicles with gasoline and diesel engines will be conducted with focus on emissions control.

  14. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onNM, USA. [37] Electricity Storage Association, Morgan Hill,dimensionless d. electricity storage loss factor for the EV

  15. Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings Muhammad Kumail Haider, Asad,13100004,ihsan.qazi}@lums.edu.pk Abstract. Developing energy consumption models for smart buildings is important develop parsimo- nious Markovian models of smart buildings for different periods in a day for predicting

  16. Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

  17. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  18. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  19. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Referenceimpact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Reference

  20. Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission Murat Celik Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik B.S., Aerospace Engineering and Physics, University;Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik Submitted

  1. Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

    2003-06-01

    Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

  2. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    2010, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings,” IEEEIravani, and C. Marnay, “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoing

  3. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium &progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage foronsite energy production (e.g. fuel cells, PV) at different

  4. Chapter 9: Commissioning the Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the con- struction materials such as durability and VOC emission content. It can improve power quality for the overall building by verifying that electrical building support and...

  5. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01

    -sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies. This paper evaluates the physical requirements and costs of preemptively installing these new building- sited electric generation technologies to insure reliable long-term power for critical... source of emergency power available with new building-sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies (see US Department of Energy, 2000 and 2002 for descriptions of these technologies). Instead of traditional emergency...

  6. Building Electricity Load Forecasting via Stacking Ensemble Learning Method with Moving Horizon Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, Eric M.; Moura, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    K. W. Yau, “Predicting electricity energy con- sumption: Afor building-level electricity load forecasts,” Energy andannealing algorithms in electricity load forecasting,”

  7. Automatic CX Tool for Electrical Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couillaud, N.; Jandon, M.; Viaud, B.; Clemoncon, B.

    2007-01-01

    programming The second example shown in this section is the hourly programming of lighting (Figure 9). This graph shows the coherence between the hourly programming of lighting implemented in BEMS (grey patched) and the real utilization of lighting (blue... of the building. Figure 9: Hourly programming of lighting system Heating hourly programming The third example details the hourly programming of heating (Figure 10). The grey-patched part corresponds to the minimum indoor temperature to reach implemented...

  8. Thermal Systems Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Thermal Systems Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  9. Non-Intrusive Electric Load Monitoring in Commercial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norford, L. K.; Mabey, N.

    1992-01-01

    W'S) Figure 2. Electric power at the building HVAC service entrance, July 23, 1991. A chiller and associated pumps were turned on at 7 am. To quantify the resolution that can be obtained with a 5 kW standard deviation, we apply statistics appropriate..., heuristic identification Table 3 Changes in electrical power due to turning fans on and off, as determined by application of three different filters. Summary statistics are for the first two trials, which involved the same fan. Trial 1 2 3 Average...

  10. Electrical modulation of emissivity S. Vassant,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , it is difficult to develop an efficient light emitting diode because the spontaneous emission rate is proportional emitting diodes. Yet, incandescent sources are often the only option in the infrared (IR). Indeed tens of Hz. Hence, for many applications, incandescent light sources can- not compete with light

  11. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

    2013-01-01

    Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

  12. Electric power plant emissions and public health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, A.B.; Roy, C.

    2008-02-15

    The generation of electric power is one important source of pollutants such as mercury, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and fine particulate matter that can affect the respiratory, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and cause pregnancy complications. But protecting people from environmental health hazards has become increasingly complex. Air pollutants are often invisible and travel many miles virtually undetected. Nurses can play a critical role in preventive strategies, as well as in the national debate on energy production and dependence on fossil fuels.

  13. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  14. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  15. Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

  16. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    refrigeration generation type coal nuclear ngcc renewableby fuel type. %TWh Reduction Commercial coal ngcc nuclearType and Technology : Electricity : Electric Power Electric Power Projections for EMM Region : Electricity : Emissions Quantity Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Steam Coal

  17. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

  18. Electrically-Assisted Turbocharger Development for Performance and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Milton

    2000-08-20

    Turbocharger transient lag inherently imposes a tradeoff between a robust engine response to transient load shifts and exhaust emissions. By itself, a well matched turbocharger for an engine has limited flexibility in improving this transient response. Electrically-assisted turbocharging has been seen as an attractive option to improve response and lower transient emissions. This paper presents the results of a multi-year joint CRADA between DDC and ORNL. Virtual lab diesel simulation models characterized the performance improvement potential of an electrically assisted turbocharger technology. Operating requirements to reduce transient duration between load shift time by up to 50% were determined. A turbomachine has been conceptualized with an integrated motor-generator, providing transient burst boost plus energy recovery capability. Numerous electric motor designs were considered, and a prototype motor was developed, fabricated, and is undergoing tests. Power controls have been designed and fabricated.

  19. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

  20. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  1. Public Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Public Opinions of Building Additional High-Voltage Electric Power Lines A Report to the National-Voltage Electric Power Lines: A Report to the National Science Foundation and the Electric Power Research Center to build new power lines. Residents living in counties with planned routes for new transmission lines

  2. Building Work: Allocation of Contract for the Electric Sub-Station 18 kV, NPA Building, Technological Workshop and Lab. 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1963-01-01

    Building Work: Allocation of Contract for the Electric Sub-Station 18 kV, NPA Building, Technological Workshop and Lab. 13

  3. Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation...

  4. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    . With buildings being the largest single sector of energy consumption, building efficiency is one of the fastest of energy efficiency for buildings is being able to realistically model specific building types; however

  5. Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, W.

    2006-01-01

    -metering and statistics ???? Method to actualize sub-metering ???? Practice??Project example ???? Use of data??Analysis Software Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 3 Situation?? 4 types of large-scale commercial building Shopping mall... in commercial buildings ???? Significanceof sub-metering and statistics ???? Method to actualize sub-metering ???? Practice??Project example ???? Use of data??Analysis Software Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 8 Method...

  6. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Megel, Olivier; Gomez, Tomás; Marnay, Chris; Beer, Sebastian; Lai, Judy; Battaglia, Vincent

    2010-08-25

    Connection of electric storage technologies to smartgrids or microgrids will have substantial implications for building energy systems. In addition to potentially supplying ancillary services directly to the traditional centralized grid (or macrogrid), local storage will enable demand response. As an economically attractive option, mobile storage devices such as plug-in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources and storage at the building. In general, it is assumed that they can improve the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of renewable and fossil based on-site generation (e.g. PV, fuel cells, or microturbines operating with or without combined heat and power). Also, mobile storage can directly contribute to tariff driven demand response in commercial buildings. In order to examine the impact of mobile storage on building energy costs and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a microgrid/distributed-energy-resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs applying CO2 taxes/CO2 pricing schemes. The problem is solved for a representative office building in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2020. By using employees' EVs for energy management, the office building can arbitrage its costs. But since the car battery lifetime is reduced, a business model that also reimburses car owners for the degradation will be required. In general, the link between a microgrid and an electric vehicle can create a win-win situation, wherein the microgrid can reduce utility costs by load shifting while the electric vehicle owner receives revenue that partially offsets his/her expensive mobile storage investment. For the California office building with EVs connected under a business model that distributes benefits, it is found that the economic impact is very limited relative to the costs of mobile storage for the site analyzed, i.e. cost reductions from electric vehicle connections are modest. Nonetheless, this example shows that some economic benefit is created because of avoided demand charges and on-peak energy. The strategy adopted by the office building is to avoid these high on-peak costs by using energy from the mobile storage in the business hours. CO2 emission reduction strategy results indicate that EVs' contribution at the selected office building are minor.

  7. Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

    2011-01-25

    A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

  8. Transmission and Grid Integration: Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Transmission and Grid Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  9. Transmission and Grid Integration: Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-01

    Factsheet developed to describe the activities of the Transmission and Grid Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  10. RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications".

  11. Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

  12. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01

    the electricity demand forecast, and the energy and CO 2Base Case Scenario Energy demand through 2030 is forecast byforecast of electricity demand in the buildings sector developed by LBNL, called the Bottom-up Energy

  13. CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (LEDS): Capacity Building and Training to explore activity design, lessons learned, future capacity building plans, major ongoing needs and opportunities for enhanced...

  14. Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Dan

    Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

  15. Allocation, incentives and distortions: the impact of EU ETS emissions allowance allocations to the electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuhoff, Karsten; Keats, Kim; Sato, Misato

    -intensive technologies (e.g. coal). Moreover, if the demand for electricity is price elastic, any resulting drop in electricity prices (Harrison and Radov 2002) could trigger higher electricity consumption, production, further increasing CO2 emissions... externality into the electricity prices limits investment in energy efficiency and results in higher electricity consumption. Thus electricity production and national CO2 emissions increase. If all European countries implement such policies the suggested...

  16. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

  17. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

    2011-01-12

    The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

  18. CIV498 Design Project Winter 2016 Project Title: Building Science (Sustainable building design and energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    emissions from burning fossil fuels at buildings and at thermal electrical generation for building in the building's thermal envelope and electrical consuming systems up front to minimize thermal and electrical Building-as-a-System principles. Using a basic architectural design provided the students will work

  19. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Gonçalocommercial building microgrids *) Michael Stadler GonçaloSVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-

  20. Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

    2012-12-01

    To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

  1. Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

  2. Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    2005-01-01

    Foss, B . "Carbon Emissions Trading is New Weapon to BattleBehavior and the Emission Trading Market, Resources andof Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading." The Journal of

  3. State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  4. Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-11-17

    We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

  5. Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A.

    2011-08-11

    The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

  6. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

  7. Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.Nasar S. A. (1982) electric vehicle technology. John Wiley &batteries fornia. for electric vehicles. Argonne National

  8. Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

    2008-01-01

    4.2 E?ective Marginal Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Average

  9. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    building has a peak electricity demand of 373 kW, and yearlyWinter (Nov. – Apr. ) )Electricity electricity demandelectricity demand (US$/kWh) (US$/kW) (US$/kWh) (US $/kW)

  10. A Look at Health Care Buildings - How do they use electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Usage Return to: A Look at Health Care Buildings How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them?...

  11. Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use Jump to: navigation, search Name Sri Lanka-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions...

  12. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  13. Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-07-01

    Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables) improves the accuracy of regression models of electric load. 4) A piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence can be derived without the use of a change-point model (which would add complexity to the modeling algorithm) or assumptions about when structural changes occur (which could introduce inaccuracy). 5) A model that includes time-of-week and temperature dependence can be used for weather normalization and can determine whether the building is unusually temperature-sensitive, which can indicate problems with HVAC operation.

  14. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  15. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  16. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    USA http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity

  17. Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings around the world. As photovoltaic (PV) technology continues to improve and costs drop, opportunities for PV will multiply. PV systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

  18. Electricity price impacts of alternative Greenhouse gas emission cap-and-trade programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelston, Bruce; Armstrong, Dave; Kirsch, Laurence D.; Morey, Mathew J.

    2009-07-15

    Limits on greenhouse gas emissions would raise the prices of the goods and services that require such emissions for their production, including electricity. Looking at a variety of emission limit cases and scenarios for selling or allocating allowances to load-serving entities, the authors estimate how the burden of greenhouse gas limits are likely to be distributed among electricity consumers in different states. (author)

  19. Regional versus global? -- Will strategies for reduction of sulfur dioxide emissions from electric utilities increase carbon dioxide emissions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, J.C.; Dolsak, N.

    1996-12-31

    Electric utilities, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal are expected to reduce their SO{sub 2} emissions. The strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions may result in increased CO{sub 2} emissions. Thereby decrease of regional pollution may cause increase of global pollution. Environmental, political, moral, and economic consequences of the two types of pollution differ significantly. Midwestern electric utilities, USA, which are dependent on high-sulfur coal, are analyzed in the paper. However, the same problem is relevant for some European coal fueled power plants. Strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions, employed by Midwestern electric utilities to comply with the clean Air Act amendments (CAAA) of 1990 and their possible affects on CO{sub 2} emissions, are presented. The paper focuses on two general strategies for reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions. First is coal-switching or blending with a low-sulfur coal. Second is construction and use of flue-gas desulfurization devices (scrubbers). A combination of both strategies is also a viable option. Switching to low-sulfur coal may result in larger CO{sub 2} emissions because that coal has different characteristics and has to be transported much greater distances. Scrubbers require significant amounts of energy for their operation which requires burning more coal. This increases the level of CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote...

  1. Using Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from the California Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolstad, Jonathan; Wolak, Frank

    2003-01-01

    Restructured Wholesale Electricity Market, American Economic2001) “California’s Electricity Market,” April, availableIn California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer

  2. Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data...

  3. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment-emission electricity within one or two decades. Renewable generation is also planned to increase over similar time, it is therefore possible that large (~45%) reductions in CO2 emissions from UK electricity generation could

  4. Calculation of Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.; Verdict, M.

    2004-01-01

    severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction in non...,000 ft2 single-family residence. ESL Code Traceable DOE-2 Simulation (Residential, Commercial, Industrial, Renewables) County-wide Electricity Use (w/ and w/o code) E-GRID Database Model For ERCOT, SERC, SPP, and WSCC Regions 1999 Building...

  5. Democratic Republic of Congo-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta Electric PowerSupport | Open(LECBP) |

  6. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    of Public Buildings. Energy and Buildings (41), 426–435.and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

  7. 308 Building electrical load list and panel schedules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giamberardini, S.J.

    1994-09-13

    This report contains two lists. The first lists equipment, load location, source of power, and breaker identification. The second compiles the same information but in a different format, namely, for each power source, the breaker, equipment, and location is given. Building 308 is part of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility which houses the Secure Automated Fabrication process line for fabrication of reactor fuels and the Breeder Processing Engineering Test for processing Fast Flux Test Facility fuel to demonstrate closure of the fuel cycle.

  8. Building a 21st Century Electric Grid | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiency | Department of EnergyBuilding orPhoto

  9. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J.

    The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

  10. Electricity generation and emissions reduction decisions under uncertainty : a general equilibrium analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jennifer F. (Jennifer Faye)

    2013-01-01

    The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

  11. Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.

    2012-06-01

    This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

  12. Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koprinska, Irena

    to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function

  13. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Emission type", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur...

  14. Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

  15. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric options is an important step in formulating a cohesive strategy to abate U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG

  16. Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-08-01

    The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

  17. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekinen, A.; Tikkala, H.; Aksela, H.; Niskanen, J.

    2013-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  18. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models ofthe National Building Stock. Golden, Colorado: Nationaland Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

  19. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Standard for Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings. EnergySummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 12,for Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings in Hot Summer

  20. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    promotes CHP application in commercial buildings with4 Retail Building DER Technologies Selection City CHP (kW)5 Residential Building DER Technologies Selection City CHP (

  1. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    use for optimal building energy performance. One retail andstudy. The optimal building energy performance is calculatedorder to understand building energy performance in different

  2. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31

    The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  3. Experimental and computational studies of electric thruster plasma radiation emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çelik, Murat Alp

    2007-01-01

    Electric thrusters are being developed for in-space propulsion needs of spacecraft as their higher specific impulse enables a significant reduction in the required propellant mass and allows longer duration missions. Over ...

  4. Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities – Emissions Management (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

  5. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    To assist reporters in estimating emissions and emission reductions, The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has made available in the instructions to Forms EIA-1605 and EIA-1605EZ emission coefficients for most commonly used fossil fuels and electricity. These coefficients were based on 1992 emissions and generation data. In 1999, updated coefficients were prepared based on the most recent data (1998) then available; however, the updated coefficients were not included in the instructions for the 1999 data year. This year, they have been updated again, but based on three years worth of data (1997, 1998, and 1999) rather than a single year.

  6. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Gomez, Tomaz; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Megel, Olivier; Mendes, Goncalo; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2011-05-01

    Some conclusions from this presentation are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions because stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - it's more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; and (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff. Final research work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  8. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

  9. Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    bus,  the electric buses’ fraction of energy consumed was Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric 

  10. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    solely from stored electric energy during the day. With theIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions UsingIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using

  11. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, Will; Walker, Iain; Roux, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  12. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  13. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

  14. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    such as PV, and electricity storage devices, the table showsMaintenance ratio 2 Electricity Storage Heat Storage Flowsubsidies, PV and electricity storage devices are found to

  15. Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Facilities

    2013-11-12

    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES BUILDING. BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN. Date Adopted: Sept 20, 2013. Date Revised: Sep 20. 2013. Prepared By: Kelly ...

  16. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellart, P; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  17. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    426–435. LBNL. (2012). Distributed Energy Resources CustomerATIONAL L ABORATORY Building Distributed Energy Performanceemployer. Building Distributed Energy Performance

  18. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Electric Vehicle Charging Impact Review for MultiUser Residential Buildings in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    596 Electric Vehicle Charging ­ Impact Review for Multi User Residential Buildings in British .......................................................................................................................................... 4 3 Electric Vehicles in British Columbia .................................................................................................................................... 27 6.1 City of Vancouver ­ Electric Vehicle Provision Regulations

  20. Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle On-Road Emissions Characterization and Demonstration Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohl, Carrie

    2012-12-31

    On-road emissions and operating data were collected from a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) over the course of 6months spanning August 2007 through January 2008 providing the first comprehensive on-road evaluation of the PHEV drivetrain...

  1. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants with Advanced Technology

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request of Senators James M. Jeffords and Joseph I. Lieberman. This report describes the impacts of technology improvements and other market-based opportunities on the costs of emissions reductions from electricity generators, including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, mercury, and carbon dioxide.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  3. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs,solar radiation data, electricity and natural gas tariffs, and the performance and cost

  4. Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01

    complex building energy consumption data. ” in Proceedingscomplex building energy consumption data,” Energy and

  5. Building-Level Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  6. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    maintaining building energy performance (and other benfits,traditional buildings, energy performance per se is usuallypertains to energy performance in buildings, although other

  7. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    construction,” Energy and Buildings 20: 205–217. Chau 2007.management in China,” Energy and Buildings (forthcoming).addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy

  8. Plug-in vs. wireless charging: Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an electric bus system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    Plug-in vs. wireless charging: Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for an electric bus t In this study, plug-in and wireless charging for an all-electric bus system are compared from the life cycle t Wireless charging, as opposed to plug-in charging, is an alternative charging method for electric vehicles

  9. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage intensity is shownResidential Building Site Energy Usage Intensity in ChinaGas Residen>al Building Energy Usage Intensity Comparison

  10. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    ratio 2 Electricity Storage Heat Storage Flow BatteryEnergy Flow Battery Power Absorption Chiller Abs.

  12. Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

    2005-06-15

    Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

  13. Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  14. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

    2012-04-01

    This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

  15. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-16

    Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

  16. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    those described by the Electricity Storage Association (see also Electricity Storage Association). The installationtechnologies. References Electricity Storage Association,

  17. Please cite this article in press as: Graff Zivin, J.S., et al., Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other electricity-shifting policies. J. Econ. Behav. Organ. (2014),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other electricity-shifting policies. J. Econ. Behav.elsevier.com/locate/jebo Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of marginal emissions: Implications for electric cars and other emissions per mile than the average car currently on the road. Underlying many of our results

  18. Smart-Metering for Monitoring Building Power Distribution Network using Instantaneous Phasor Computations of Electrical Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K.R., Krishnanand

    2013-01-01

    Smart-Metering for Monitoring Building Power Distributionimplementable for smart-meters for a building. Eachcontrol node of a building so as to make smart decisions.

  19. Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.

    2004-09-04

    This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

  20. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    program) for PV system makes PV cost-wise promising in allPV and electricity storage devices are found to be not cost-PV, and electricity storage devices, the table shows the final user cost

  1. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    load profile, city’s solar radiation data, electricity andOther data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff,solar radiation and its impact on PV systems, PVWatts (NREL, 2011) data

  2. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

  3. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2009-07-16

    The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

  4. Penetration and air-emission-reduction benefits of solar technologies in the electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study of four solar energy technologies and the electric utility industry are reported. The purpose of the study was to estimate the penetration by federal region of four solar technologies - wind, biomass, phtovoltaics, and solar thermal - in terms of installed capacity and power generated. The penetration by these technologies occurs at the expense of coal and nuclear power. The displacement of coal plants implies a displacement of their air emissions, such as sulfur dioxide, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter. The main conclusion of this study is that solar thermal, photovoltaics, and biomass fail to penetrate significantly by the end of this century in any federal region. Wind energy penetrates the electric utility industry in several regions during the 1990s. Displaced coal and nuclear generation are also estimated by region, as are the corresponding reductions in air emissions. The small-scale penetration by the solar technologies necessarily limits the amount of conventional fuels displaced and the reduction in air emissions. A moderate displacement of sulfur dioxide and the oxides of nitrogen is estimated to occur by the end of this century, and significant lowering of these emissions should occur in the early part of the next century.

  5. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buitink, S.; Huege, T.; Falcke, H; Kuijpers, J.

    2010-02-25

    We study the effect of atmospheric electric fields on the radio pulse emitted by cos- mic ray air showers. Under fair weather conditions the dominant part of the radio emission is driven by the geomagnetic field. When the shower charges are accelerated and deflected in an electric field additional radiation is emitted. We simulate this effect with the Monte Carlo code REAS2, using CORSIKA-simulated showers as input. In both codes a routine has been implemented that treats the effect of the electric field on the shower particles. We find that the radio pulse is significantly altered in background fields of the order of ~100 V/cm and higher. Practically, this means that air showers passing through thunderstorms emit radio pulses that are not a reliable measure for the shower energy. Under other weather circumstances significant electric field effects are expected to occur rarely, but nimbostratus clouds can harbor fields that are large enough. In general, the contribution of the electric field to the radio pulse has polarization properties that are different from the geomagnetic pulse. In order to filter out radio pulses that have been affected by electric field effects, radio air shower experiments should keep weatherinformation and perform full polarization measurements of the radio signal.

  6. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology, Nationalof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissionsof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions

  7. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momber, Ilan; Gomez, Tomás; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Beer, Sebastian; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Battaglia, Vincent

    2010-06-01

    It is generally believed that plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer environmental and energy security advantages compared to conventional vehicles. Policies are stimulating electric transportation deployment, and PEV adoption may grow significantly. New technology and business models are being developed to organize the PEV interface and their interaction with the wider grid. This paper analyzes the PEVs' integration into a building's Energy Management System (EMS), differentiating between vehicle to macrogrid (V2M) and vehicle to microgrid (V2m) applications. This relationship is modeled by the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which finds optimal equipment combinations to meet microgrid requirements at minimum cost, carbon footprint, or other criteria. Results derive battery value to the building and the possibility of a contractual affiliation sharing the benefit. Under simple annual fixed payments and energy exchange agreements, vehicles are primarily used to avoid peak demand charges supplying cheaper off-peak electricity to the building during workdays.

  8. Dates of Orders Placed with Messrs Düllmann, Dortmund for High Power Installations in the Various Buildings and for the Supply of Electrical Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1958-01-01

    Dates of Orders Placed with Messrs Düllmann, Dortmund for High Power Installations in the Various Buildings and for the Supply of Electrical Equipment

  9. Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of a Building for the Electricity Sub-Station of the 300 GeV Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1973-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of a Building for the Electricity Sub-Station of the 300 GeV Accelerator

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract for undertaking the industrial electrical installations in the LEP surface buildings, shafts and access tunnels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for undertaking the industrial electrical installations in the LEP surface buildings, shafts and access tunnels

  11. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    energy assessment." Energy and Buildings 41: 1263-1268.Canada, and USA,” Energy and Buildings 36, no. 12 (Decemberbuildings (LC-ZEB),” Energy and Buildings 42, no. 6 (June

  12. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    IZ, et al. 2009. “Life cycle assessment in buildings: State-S, et al. 2006. "Life-cycle Assessment of Office BuildingsA. (2006) "Life-cycle Assessment of Office Buildings in

  13. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    as combined heat and power (CHP), photovoltaics (PV), andCombined Heat and Power (CHP), DER-CAM Introduction Chinacombined heat and power (CHP), and electrical storage in

  14. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    such as combined heat and power (CHP), photovoltaics (PV),Generation, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), DER-CAMfuel cells, combined heat and power (CHP), and electrical

  15. Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    electricity tariff, technology costs, and governmenttariff Natural gas tariff Technology costs and financialand estimated the technology costs in the current Chinese

  16. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    P. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: DefiningP. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: Defining

  17. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    with higher operation and maintenance costs. In some casescontractors, onsite operations and maintenance staff, and,a building’s operations and maintenance (O&M) procedures to

  18. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies Michaelwith Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies 1 Michael2006). Electrical and thermal storage is added as an option

  19. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

  20. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

  1. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01

    Developments in Electricity Demand Management – Lessons24 Table 4. Electricity Demand Projections, Energy and3. APP Base Case Electricity Demand Forecast –Residential

  2. Smart-Metering for Monitoring Building Power Distribution Network using Instantaneous Phasor Computations of Electrical Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K.R., Krishnanand

    2013-01-01

    phase smart meter . in Electrical and Control Engineering (Phasor Computations of Electrical Signals Krishnanand K.R. ,Panda* Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,

  3. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01

    Washing Machines Televisions Space Cooling Electric Waterheaters 16 Electric toilet seats 17 Vending machines (alsoMachines Dish Washers Dish Driers Rice Cookers Vacuum Cleaners Electric

  4. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01

    owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

  5. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

  6. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  7. Nitrogen oxides emission control options for coal-fired electric utility boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravi K. Srivastava; Robert E. Hall; Sikander Khan; Kevin Culligan; Bruce W. Lani

    2005-09-01

    Recent regulations have required reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from electric utility boilers. To comply with these regulatory requirements, it is increasingly important to implement state-of-the-art NOx control technologies on coal-fired utility boilers. This paper reviews NOx control options for these boilers. It discusses the established commercial primary and secondary control technologies and examines what is being done to use them more effectively. Furthermore, the paper discusses recent developments in NOx controls. The popular primary control technologies in use in the United States are low-NOx burners and overfire air. Data reflect that average NOx reductions for specific primary controls have ranged from 35% to 63% from 1995 emissions levels. The secondary NOx control technologies applied on U.S. coal-fired utility boilers include reburning, selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Thirty-six U.S. coal-fired utility boilers have installed SNCR, and reported NOx reductions achieved at these applications ranged from 15% to 66%. Recently, SCR has been installed at 150 U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. Data on the performance of 20 SCR systems operating in the United States with low-NOx emissions reflect that in 2003, these units achieved NOx emission rates between 0.04 and 0.07 lb/106 Btu. 106 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. The development of Comprehensive Community NOx Emissions Reduction Toolkit (CCNERT) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Yong Hoon

    2004-11-15

    -17 Residential Sector?s Total Energy............................................................................. 131 Table 5-18 Comparison of Annual Electric Sales vs. Estimated Electricity Use........................ 133 Table 5-19 2001 College Station... successfully reduce the production of NOx emissions by adopting electricity efficiency programs in its buildings, another community might be equally successful by changing the mix of fuel sources used to generate electricity, which is consumed...

  9. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    a building optimize its energy usage without knowing itsa building optimize its energy usage without knowing itshardly optimize its energy usage and models for estimating

  10. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01

    Administration. Buildings energy data book, 2008. http: //process flow for energy data analysis and visualization,and accessible is the building energy data provided by this

  11. Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    to assess how building energy performance varies with time.monitoring of whole-building energy performance should bebuilding operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance.

  12. Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

  13. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    water heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boilerCoal Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pumpElectric water heater Gas boiler Coal Boiler Small cogen Oil

  14. Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office buildings: An agent based approach. Energy Buildings (2011), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.07.007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office behaviour, to simulate the electricity consumption in office buildings. Based on a case study, we use office electricity consumption problems. This paper theoretically contributes to an integration

  15. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Distribution of Building-Level...

  16. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    construction costs inflation-corrected using Engineering News Record (McGraw-Hill), Engineering News Record, Building Cost Index.

  17. Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas required for building the structure; and 2) the operational energy required for habitation energy used for space heating and cooling during the life of the building. Similar ratios are found

  18. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use...

  19. Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-01-01

    U.S. EPA. 2000. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generationfor Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Combustion ofUS EPA), 2000. “Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation

  20. Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

    1997-01-01

    are for total full fuel cycle emissions. References l.Light Duty Vehicle Full Fuel Cycle Emissions Analysis,AND FUEL ECONOMY FULL FUEL CYCLE EMISSIONS REGULATORY

  1. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    2007. “Reducing U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions: How Much atDepartment of Energy. 2009. “Greenhouse gas abatement in thefor Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Evan

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America solar home research that has demonstrated the ability to reduce peak demand by 75%. Numerous field studies have monitored power production and system effectiveness.

  3. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01

    Energy Monitoring and 2.2.1 Building Management Systems .energy flows in buildings and an overview of existing monitoring and management solutions in the previous chapter, we now take a more systems

  4. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    hourly loads and energy management system (EMS) data.the building energy management system (EMS) can manage (

  5. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    electricity, oil and coal consumption, offset by increasedsaved in electricity, oil and gas consumption, offset by 2.4energy consumption by fuel type. Natural gas, oil and some

  6. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    is fraction of total electricity consumption for commercialy) ! calculate total electricity consumption for the end-useis fraction of total electricity consumption for residential

  7. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

  8. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    al. 2006. “Research and development of Chinese LCA databaseand LCA software,” Rare Metals 25, no. 6 (December 2006):recent developments based on LCA,” Construction and Building

  9. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    and today generally not monetized; We assume energyCommissioning is today used to save energy in ordinaryemissions in buildings today. Energy savings tend to persist

  10. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2010-01-01

    of Building Faults and Energy Savings Potential: FinalGOLDEN OPPORTUNITY FOR SAVING ENERGY, MONEY, AND GREENHOUSEis an underutilized strategy for saving energy and money and

  11. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

    2007-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,emissions credits) of combined heat and power (CHP), and 2)

  13. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    bat- teries, smart charging, building shells and appli-buildings to zero by 2030 (25). Structural conservation in the form of “smart

  14. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    total energy use and carbon footprint of a Chinese officeestimated energy and carbon footprint of Chinese commercialbuilding’s carbon and other emissions footprints. The aim of

  15. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

  16. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-to commercial building microgrids,“ 2nd European Conference2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,

  17. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

  18. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01

    building. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .SCADA is a supervisoryInc. http://www.campbellsci.com/scada. [6] DOE-2. http://BIBLIOGRAPHY [17] SCADA Group. http://www.scadagroup.com/

  19. Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01

    data from commercial build- ings,” Journal of Solar Energybuilding energy data: Part I-II,” Journal of Solar Energydata. ” in Proceedings of ASME International Solar Energy

  20. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields J. E. Bailey, A. B. Filuk, A. L. Carlson, D. J. Johnson, P. Lake, E. J. McGuire, T. A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields J. E. Bailey, A. B. Filuk, A. L. Carlson, D. J.76.50.6 On: Wed, 12 Mar 2014 07:27:49 #12;Atomic Emission Spectroscopyin HighElectricFields LE. Bailey, A, each driven with a high-power (~100 TW), ~30-nsec-duration pulse. Present experiments at the Particle

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential and69 Energy74714463456

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential and69 Energy747144634562

  3. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    component selection. 13 EnergyPlus is a building envelope,program. 14 The roots of EnergyPlus are in the BLAST (weather patterns) and interfaces. EnergyPlus version 5.0 was

  4. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    in emissions, primary energy, capacity and composition ofin primary energy use, emissions and capacity and the changei.e. energy, upper plots) and capacity variables. The plots

  5. Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-14

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

  6. Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

    1997-01-01

    OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR HYBRID-ELECTRIC VEHICLES 4.1EnginesG.H. , SIMPLEV: Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-G.H, SIMPLEV: Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-

  7. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  8. Costs and Emissions Associated with Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging in the Xcel Energy Colorado Service Territory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Denholm, P.; Markel, T.

    2007-05-01

    The combination of high oil costs, concerns about oil security and availability, and air quality issues related to vehicle emissions are driving interest in plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). PHEVs are similar to conventional hybrid electric vehicles, but feature a larger battery and plug-in charger that allows electricity from the grid to replace a portion of the petroleum-fueled drive energy. PHEVs may derive a substantial fraction of their miles from grid-derived electricity, but without the range restrictions of pure battery electric vehicles. As of early 2007, production of PHEVs is essentially limited to demonstration vehicles and prototypes. However, the technology has received considerable attention from the media, national security interests, environmental organizations, and the electric power industry. The use of PHEVs would represent a significant potential shift in the use of electricity and the operation of electric power systems. Electrification of the transportation sector could increase generation capacity and transmission and distribution (T&D) requirements, especially if vehicles are charged during periods of high demand. This study is designed to evaluate several of these PHEV-charging impacts on utility system operations within the Xcel Energy Colorado service territory.

  9. Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

    2008-11-01

    This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

  10. Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    renewable energy powered microgrids. It is illustrated, inenergy source powered microgrids. Electric Spring, a smartproblem associated with such microgrids. In this paper, an

  11. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    as buffer for local renewables? Michael Stadler, Gonçaloas buffer for local renewables? *) Michael Stadler Gonçaloowners to integrate renewables and electric vehicles?

  12. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electricelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  13. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

  14. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    lost per hour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not alland energy ratings of a flow battery are independent of eacha) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar

  15. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America Using the SWITCH Electric Power Sector Planning Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, James Henry

    2013-01-01

    City,   UT:  Western  Electricity  Coordinating  Council.  of   generators.   Western   Electricity   Coordinating  catalog.   Western   Electricity   Coordinating   Council,  

  16. Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-31

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

  17. Calculation of NOx Emissions Reductions From Energy Efficient Residential Building Construction in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Muns, S.

    2006-05-23

    . These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. This paper provides an overview of the procedures that have been developed and used to calculate the electricity savings and NOx reductions from code-compliant residential construction...

  18. Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    L. Goel, "Demand side load management of smart grids usingP. Shenoy, "Demand-side load management in smart homes," inLoad-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled

  19. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings Michaeland Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings 1 Michaelgoal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (

  20. Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    electricity consumption ..the total building electricity consumption between measured87 Figure 49 Total electricity consumption end use breakdown

  1. A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treadway, N.

    1987-01-01

    Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

  2. Building a wireless mesh networked real-time electricity metering system in an MIT dormitory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oehlerking, Austin L

    2009-01-01

    A competitive, closed-loop information feedback system of wireless electricity meters was designed, tested, and implemented in seven MIT dormitory rooms. The meters utilized Allegro Hall Effect current sensors as well as ...

  3. Resource Information and Forecasting Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    Researchers in the Resource Information and Forecasting group at NREL provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help characterize renewable energy resources and facilitate the integration of these clean energy sources into the electricity grid.

  4. Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

    2005-08-30

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

  5. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Research Institute. Building CHP While this paper hashence analysis of CHP applications in buildings is a centraland power (CHP) technology, especially for building heating

  6. Simulated comparisons of emissions and fuel efficiency of diesel and gasoline hybrid electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents details and results of hybrid and plug-in hybrid electric passenger vehicle (HEV and PHEV) simulations that account for the interaction of thermal transients from drive cycle demands and engine start/stop events with aftertreatment devices and their associated fuel penalties. The simulations were conducted using the Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) combined with aftertreatment component models developed at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). A three-way catalyst model is used in simulations of gasoline powered vehicles while a lean NOx trap model in used to simulated NOx reduction in diesel powered vehicles. Both cases also use a previously reported methodology for simulating the temperature and species transients associated with the intermittent engine operation and typical drive cycle transients which are a significant departure from the usual experimental steady-state engine-map based approach adopted often in vehicle system simulations. Comparative simulations indicate a higher efficiency for diesel powered vehicles but the advantage is lowered by about a third (for both HEVs and PHEVs) when the fuel penalty associated with operating a lean NOx trap is included and may be reduced even more when fuel penalty associated with a particulate filter is included in diesel vehicle simulations. Through these preliminary studies, it is clearly demonstrated how accurate engine and exhaust systems models that can account for highly intermittent and transient engine operation in hybrid vehicles can be used to account for impact of emissions in comparative vehicle systems studies. Future plans with models for other devices such as particulate filters, diesel oxidation and selective reduction catalysts are also discussed.

  7. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01

    architecture that provides fine-grained real-time visibility into building energy consumption enables significant and sustainablearchitecture, to create actionable views of energy usages, which lead to significant and sustainablearchitecture for local energy generation, distribution, and sharing. IEEE Conference on Global Sustainable

  8. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    gas, and hydro- electricity, plus high storage capacity toelectricity supply: generating capacity, energy storage, andand storage (CCS)—each have the potential to become the principal long-term electricity

  9. The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    generation, on-grid energy storage, transmission capacity,biofuels, CCS, on-grid energy storage, electric vehicle bat-

  10. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information Administration projections of net efficiency (electricity energy leaving power planthigher heating value HHV of fuel input) for the year 2000 in Annual Outlook for...

  11. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America Using the SWITCH Electric Power Sector Planning Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, James Henry

    2013-01-01

    power  cost  and  electricity  demand  by  investment  transmission,   and   electricity   demand   in   2030  transmission,   and   electricity   demand   in   2050  

  12. Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

    2009-01-01

    % to 114% when compared to the measured method results. INTRODUCTION The use of whole building data to develop energy models as a method to ascertain energy savings has been researched for many years. This method has been detailed in the IPMVP... adoption of Option C is the length of monitoring time required to develop reliable regression models. To be IPMVP adherent, both pre- and post-implementation data must be collected over a period that covers the full reporting period (IPMVP, 2007...

  13. Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A PV mapping tool visually represents a specific site and calculates PV system size and projected electricity production. This report identifies the commercially available solar mapping tools and thoroughly summarizes the source data type and resolution, the visualization software program being used, user inputs, calculation methodology and algorithms, map outputs, and development costs for each map.

  14. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

  15. Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments IncMississippi:Delta Electric PowerSupport | Open

  16. Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, searchEgegik LightEnergy

  17. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Golden, CO, USA. 12. Electricity Storage Association, MorganEffect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability ondescribed by the Electricity Storage Association [12]. The

  18. Reducing Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Mercury from Electric Power Plants

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This analysis responds to a request from Senators Bob Smith, George Voinovich, and Sam Brownback to examine the costs of specific multi-emission reduction strategies.

  19. Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehabi, Arman

    2010-01-01

    Appliance: Building 02 Datacenter. Pacific Gas and ElectricAppliance Building 11 Datacenter. Pacific Gas and Electric

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement U.S. Residential and69 Energy747144 Electric

  1. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01

    pdf. ———. 2011b. Residential Demand Module of the Nationaland the Commercial and Residential Demand Modules (DOE EIAcommercial and residential electricity demand projections

  2. Emissions from Medium-Duty Conventional and Diesel-Electric Hybrid Vehicles; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragatz, A.; Duran, A.; Thornton, M.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-04-02

    This presentation discusses the results of emissions testing for medium-duty conventional and diesel-electric hybrid vehicles. Testing was based on a field evaluation approach that utilized the Fleet DNA drive cycle database and NREL’s Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory chassis dynamometer. Vehicles tested included parcel delivery (Class 6 step vans), beverage delivery (Class 8 tractors), and parcel delivery (Class 7 box trucks) vehicles, all with intended service class medium/heavy heavy-duty diesel (MHDD).
    Results for fuel economy and tailpipe NOx emissions included: diesel hybrid electric vehicles showed an average fuel economy advantage on identified test cycles: Class 6 Step Vans: 26%; Class 7 Box Trucks: 24.7%; Class 8 Tractors: 17.3%. Vehicle miles traveled is an important factor in determining total petroleum and CO2 displacement. Higher NOx emissions were observed over some test cycles: highly drive cycle dependent; engine-out differences may result from different engine operating point; and selective catalyst reduction temperature may play a role, but does not explain the whole story.

  3. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong; Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D.; Ma Hao; Yan Ping

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30-40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  4. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    by crediting against full fuel cycle emissions from theuse” process fuel -- is the full fuel cycle emission factor,where the full fuel cycle includes emissions from

  5. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Figure 9 ? Annual electricity consumption comparison of the total annual electricity consumption, Buildings A and B mostly  measure  electricity  consumption,  cooling  loads, 

  6. Implications of High Renewable Electricity Penetration in the U.S. for Water Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land-Use, and Materials Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent work found that renewable energy could supply 80% of electricity demand in the contiguous United States in 2050 at the hourly level. This paper explores some of the implications of achieving such high levels of renewable electricity for supply chains and the environment in scenarios with renewable supply up to such levels. Transitioning to high renewable electricity supply would lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and water use, with only modest land-use implications. While renewable energy expansion implies moderate growth of the renewable electricity supply chains, no insurmountable long-term constraints to renewable electricity technology manufacturing capacity or materials supply are identified.

  7. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridL ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a

  8. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    load electricity (kW) thermal storage storage charging non-avoidable electrical and thermal storage costs are set tototal electric load thermal storage solar thermal storage

  9. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridwith Connection of Electric Vehicles TABLE IV D ECISION V

  10. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onIn the case of electricity storage, depending on storagea special case of electricity storage, already included in

  11. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

  12. Enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a silicon nanocrystal light-emitting diode by indium tin oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huh, Chul, E-mail: chuh@etri.re.kr; Kim, Bong Kyu; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob [IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chel-Jong [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-21

    We report an enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a Si nanocrystal (NC) light-emitting diode (LED) by employing indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs). The formed ITO NWs (diameter?electrical characteristics of Si NC LED were significantly improved, which was attributed to an enhancement in the current spreading property due to densely interconnecting ITO NWs. In addition, light output power and wall-plug efficiency from the Si NC LED were enhanced by 45% and 38%, respectively. This was originated from an enhancement in the escape probability of the photons generated in the Si NCs due to multiple scatterings at the surface of ITO NWs acting as a light waveguide. We show here that the use of the ITO NWs can be very useful for realizing a highly efficient Si NC LED.

  13. Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-01-01

    the thermal plants, excluding cogeneration, in each region.will be thermal plants that are not cogeneration facilities,plant and contract data for modeling emissions from cogeneration and

  14. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    source or CHP system at the office building could be used toand CHP technologies installed in the office building areCHP during the morning or early afternoon and send it back to the office building

  15. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingto commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Ilanto commercial building microgrids 1 Michael Stadler a,b) ,

  16. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (NO), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

  17. Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

    2002-01-01

    Planning Assumption Report (ESPAR) materials, which areElectricity Reports and the ESPAR reports that support them.CEC, 1995). Thus, we used ESPAR as our main data source,

  18. Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lynne E.

    2012-01-01

    electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model ENB-3661; No.of Pages13 Energy and Buildings xxx (2012) xxx­xxx Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings journal homepage: www

  19. Scenarios for Deep Carbon Emission Reductions from Electricity by 2050 in Western North America Using the SWITCH Electric Power Sector Planning Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, James Henry

    2013-01-01

    California   to   build   in-­?state   solar   power.    is   a   large   build-­?out   of   solar   thermal   with  solar   thermal   is   likely   to   be   correlated   with   that   of   PV.     This   scenario   builds  

  20. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  2. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  3. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Thin-film Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  4. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  5. Estimation of Annual Reductions of NOx Emissions in ERCOT for the HB3693 Electricity Savings Goals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diem, Art; Mulholland, Denise; Yarbrough, James; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Im, Piljae; Haberl, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    reductions are small compared to the total emission reductions needed to bring the state?s non-attainment areas into attainment of the national ambient air quality standards for ozone, they can be a part of an overall strategy to reduce emissions.... In this step, plants that have a capacity factor of 0.8 or greater are considered to be baseload units and none of their generation would be affected by energy efficiency measures. In addition, plants that have a capacity factor of 0.2 or less are considered...

  6. Impact of Component Sizing in Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Energy Resource and Greenhouse Emissions Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Widespread use of alternative hybrid powertrains currently appears inevitable and many opportunities for substantial progress remain. The necessity for environmentally friendly vehicles, in conjunction with increasing concerns regarding U.S. dependency on foreign oil and climate change, has led to significant investment in enhancing the propulsion portfolio with new technologies. Recently, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have attracted considerable attention due to their potential to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. PHEVs are especially appealing for short daily commutes with excessive stop-and-go driving. However, the high costs associated with their components, and in particular, with their energy storage systems have been significant barriers to extensive market penetration of PEVs. In the research reported here, we investigated the implications of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions in a medium duty PHEV. An optimization framework is proposed and applied to two different parallel powertrain configurations, pre-transmission and post-transmission, to derive the Pareto frontier with respect to motor/generator and battery size. The optimization and modeling approach adopted here facilitates better understanding of the potential benefits from proper selection of motor/generator and battery size on fuel economy and GHG emissions. This understanding can help us identify the appropriate sizing of these components and thus reducing the PHEV cost. Addressing optimal sizing of PHEV components could aim at an extensive market penetration of PHEVs.

  7. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2011-07-01

    Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

  8. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

  9. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

  10. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio Segrè About the LabEmission

  11. Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

    2008-01-01

    Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

  12. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    home January and July weekday electricity 22 and total heat (space + water heating) 23 demand source: [

  13. Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lynne E.

    2012-01-01

    electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.elsevier.com/locate/enbuild Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study Richard E electrical consumption data. In this article, we report on the evaluation of seven different machine learning

  14. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    electric load thermal storage solar thermal storage chargingcombustion solar thermal CHP heat storage charging generateof solar thermal collectors, 1100 kWh of electrical storage,

  15. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

  16. Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1997-01-01

    2 0 Emissions form a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor," Fuelcontrol SO emissions bubbling fluidized-bed coal combustor

  17. Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1997-01-01

    control SO emissions bubbling fluidized-bed coal combustorN 2 0 Emissions form a Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor,"

  18. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    factors means the carbon footprint of commercial buildingscan accelerate lowering the carbon footprint of electricity

  19. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    systems, power quality assessment and regulation, and economic and regulatory issues in the electrical

  20. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management 3.of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management 15.

  1. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun

    2013-01-01

    months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

  2. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    in California Energy Markets, Transportation Research BoardEnergy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATIONCalifornia Transportation Center UCTC-FR-2010-14 An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy

  3. Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear., 2002). However, all anthropogenic means of energy production, including solar and nuclear, generate Power: A Life-cycle Study Vasilis M. Fthenakis1,2, * and Hyung Chul Kim1 1 Energy Sciences

  4. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Motor-vehicle flows Uranium enrichment Agriculture Fuel production Nitrogen deposition Multi-modal emissions Corn-ethanol

  5. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01

    In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

  6. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and laying of false floors in the rectifier buildings and the electricity sub-stations serving five LEP access points

  7. Proposal for the award of a service contract for the operation, maintenance and other work relating to the low-voltage electrical facilities of CERN’s non- machine buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a service contract for the operation, maintenance and other work relating to the low-voltage electrical facilities of CERN’s non- machine buildings

  8. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEPE.ELECTRIC

  9. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    and P. Chapman, “Using Microgrids as a Path Towards Smartof Commercial Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onsources and sinks, or microgrids. In prior research, many

  10. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Momber, Ilan

    2010-01-01

    workdays. Index Terms-- battery storage, building managementvehicle battery packs for grid storage,” J. of Powerstorage but not to consume any net energy from the battery.

  11. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers,displaced) n/a solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  12. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    CEC (2009) Statewide Electricity Rates by Utility, Class andrates if the marginal electricity rate from the LCFS isestimated marginal electricity emissions rate in California’

  13. CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

  14. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    C (data from DME, 2001). EF E = the fuel cycle emissionDME = dimethyl ether. The feedstocks from which the fuels

  15. Deployment of CCS Technologies across the Load Curve for a Competitive Electricity Market as a Function of CO2 Emissions Permit Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

    2011-04-18

    Consistent with other published studies, the modelling presented here reveals that baseload power plants are the first aspects of the electricity sector to decarbonize and are essentially decarbonized once CO2 permit prices exceed a certain threshold ($90/ton CO2 in this study). The decarbonization of baseload electricity is met by significant expansions of nuclear power and renewable energy generation technologies as well as the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies applied to both coal and natural gas fired power plants. Relatively little attention has been paid thus far to whether intermediate and peaking units would respond the same way to a climate policy given the very different operational and economic context that these kinds of electricity generation units operate under. In this paper, the authors discuss key aspects of the load segmentation methodology used to imbed a varying electricity demand within the GCAM (a state-of-the-art Integrated Assessment Model) energy and economic modelling framework and present key results on the role CCS technologies could play in decarbonizng subpeak and peak generation (encompassing only the top 10% of the load) and under what conditions. To do this, the authors have modelled two hypothetical climate policies that require 50% and 80% reductions in US emissions from business as usual by the middle of this century. Intermediate electricity generation is virtually decarbonized once carbon prices exceed approximately $150/tonCO2. When CO2 permit prices exceed $160/tonCO2, natural gas power plants with CCS have roughly the same marketshare as conventional gas plants in serving subpeak loads. The penetration of CCS into peak load (upper 6% here) is minimal under the scenarios modeled here suggesting that CO2 emissions from this aspect of the U.S. electricity sector would persist well into the future even with stringent CO2 emission control policies in place.

  16. The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    could be used to offset EV charging at home. It is assumedcan be expected by charging EV batteries at home during theoffice building EV battery charging efficiency EV battery

  17. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    home, results in adoption of PV panels, solar thermaladoption of a 200 kW on-site, gas-fired generation system with CHP along with electric storage and PV.

  18. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and energy ratings of a flow battery are independent of eachcapacity electrical flow battery thermal n/a n/a source:$/kWh) thermal storage 30 flow battery 220$/kWh and 2125$/kW

  19. Mechanical and Electrical Systems for the Tallest Building/Man-Made Structure in the World: A Burj Dubai Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, R.; Leung, L.; Boyer, J.

    2006-01-01

    , such as reverse stack effect mitigation, will also be addressed. Integral to best design practice was the integration of sustainable strategies to the base building services. These strategies include a condensate recovery system, heat pipes, heat wheels... for energy recovery, use of high performance glass, and a ventilated double wall facade in the entry pavilions were all integral aspects of the final design. GENERAL BUILDING DESCRIPTION Upon completion, the Burj Dubai designed and engineered...

  20. Public Assembly Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    as "primary energy," which includes the energy consumed during the generation and transmission of electricity. Public assembly buildings used 577 trillion Btu of primary...

  1. Building & Fire Assist Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buren Physical Safety (Electrical, Confined Space, Machinery, Fall Prevention) Construction & Remodel Design Review Lab / Shop Safety Surveys Regulated Building Materials Public Health (Food, Water, Pests

  2. Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Facilities

    2013-11-12

    Aug 30, 2013 ... the building for electricity to be restored, they can move near a window where there is natural light and access to a working telephone. During ...

  3. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    to find some other market for the lignin). I have assumedmarkets for electricity affected by the generation of power from excess lignin

  4. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    in nuclear-power and hydro-power case are g/MMBtu of netmethanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [

  5. Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01

    highest marginal electricity emissions rates. This thresholdmode occurs when electricity emissions rates equal PHEVthe required electricity sector emissions rate to achieve a

  6. Building Commissioning in the Chinese Mainland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Governmental buildingsGovernmental buildings Building InformationBuilding Information Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 29302930 18001800 39, 60039, 600 JJGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU)burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU...)2456245660060041, 51041, 510GGGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller (FCU)(FCU)65326532>800>80050, 00050, 000HH Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 47004700 560560 45, 45045...

  7. Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1997-01-01

    965-976 (1987). Arthur D. Little, Inc. , Methane EmissionsAlphatania Group (1989) Arthur D. Little (1989) European gas

  8. Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    T S Electrified vehicle life cycle emissions and cost depend on driving conditions. GHGs can triple in NYC cycle, hybrid and plug-in vehicles can cut life cycle emissions by 60% and reduce costs up to 20 vehicles offer marginal emissions reductions at higher costs. NYC conditions with frequent stops triple

  9. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Venkataramanan, 2006, Microgrids in the Evolving ElectricityN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Microgrids: An emerging paradigm forFrance, 4-9 June 2007 Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for

  10. A Statistical Model to Assess Indirect CO2 Emissions of the UAE Residential Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhi, H.; Fikry, F.

    2010-01-01

    and increasing economic expenditure with huge architectural projects and population growth rates and a fairly low energy cost, the UAE?s energy consumption has increased tremendously, making it one of the highest energy consumers per capita in the world [1... ) Electricity CO2 emissions Figure 2 Increase in CO2 emissions relative to the use of energy [3] To tackle with CO2 emissions and global warming issues, UAE began planning regulation energy efficiency and environmental codes for buildings. Therefore, new...

  11. Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabors, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

  12. RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications RESCHEDULED: Webinar on Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak...

  13. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

  14. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    DB. Weather data for building performance simulation.forecast models, weather data, and building prototypes havethe TMY3 weather data in building simulations to evaluate

  15. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    14   4   Charging Scenarios and Electricity Demand17   4.2   Electricity Demand34   Electricity Demand

  16. Building Technologies Research and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Impact of Buildings Centers of Excellence · 40% of total primary energy consumption · 74% of electricity consumption · 56% of natural gas consumption (including gas-generated electricity used in buildings) · 39 the nation accounts for its energy consumption, making the energy savings potential even greater. National

  17. Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water...

  18. Whether it's designing rehabilitation strategies involving electricity to `retrain' damaged nerves, developing optical imaging systems to build

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whether it's designing rehabilitation strategies involving electricity to `retrain' damaged nerves-ready rehabilitation products is only part of the equation. As part of her CARE (CREATE Academic Rehabilitation in the commercialization of two important rehabilitation products for the Staxi Corporation.Working out of the iDAPT `Home

  19. SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

  20. Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    reflect the benefit of electricity demand displacement bystorage electricity supplied by EVs electricity demand fromthe building electricity demand from local storage

  1. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DuctAir sealing Building Insulation Other EE LED Lighting Maximum Rebate Contact Baltimore Gas and Electric Program Info Sector Name Utility Website http:...

  2. Economic and Emissions Implications of Load-Based, Source-based and First-seller Emissions Trading Programs under California AB32

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yihsu; Liu, Andrew L.; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    emissions trading programs for the electric power sector:power markets, transmission limitations, and emissions trading,

  3. Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee, the Energy Information Administration prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, and CO2 emissions. The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector mercury emissions and introducing renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements.

  4. An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

    1994-01-01

    Sections . . . . 85 4. 7 Daycare Center . . . . . . . 86 4, 8 Sun Angle Calculator and Altitude Measurement Device . . . 4. 9 Photovoltaic and Domestic Hot Water Solar Panels. . . . . . . . . . 92 4. 10 Heating, Ventilating, and Air... and Daily Minutes of Sunshine . . . . . . . I 1 5 4. 18 Sky Clearness and Daily Percent Possible Sunshine . . . . . . . . 116 4. 19 Hourly Photovoltaic Electricity and Hourly Solar Radiation. . . . . . . . . . 1 1 8 4. 20 Solar Data Example . . . . . 121...

  5. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Projections (UEP) [1] show a decrease over the next two decades, but at a reduced rate compared to the 1990's represent electricity supplies with no (historically) or low (UEP projections) UK CO2 reduction targets of alternative options to deliver at a lower price. Additional costs for the 'decarbonised electricity' options

  6. Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO and life cycle GHG emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO 2 , NO X of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG to projections of low natural gas prices and increased supply. The trend of increasing natural gas use

  7. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-03-10

    Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

  8. The economics of investing in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizk, Charbel Maroun

    2010-01-01

    This thesis discusses economics of green buildings. The need to reduce greenhouse gases emissions became clear. Buildings account for a large part of the greenhouse gases emissions, changing the atmosphere's composition. ...

  9. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    reduction of peak electricity demand, and percentage savingsvariables and monthly electricity demand. Applied Energychanges of peak electricity demand. (a) large office, 90.1-

  10. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

  11. First evidence of asymmetric cost pass-through of Eu emissions allowances : examining wholesale electricity prices in Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Georg

    2007-01-01

    This paper applies the literature on asymmetric price transmission to the emerging commodity market for EU emissions allowances (EUA). We utilize an error correction model and an autoregressive distributed lag model to ...

  12. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    How do alternative vehicle emissions compare on a well-to-1970s it established vehicle emissions and building energyplatforms. Well-to-wheels vehicle emissions rates (gCO 2 /

  13. Buildings Stock Load Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Clemoncon, B.; Rosenstein, F.

    2006-01-01

    , Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-9-4 Buildings Stock Load Control Ms H. Amrani Joutey Mr H. Vaezi-Nejad Mr B. Clemonçon Mr F.Rosenstein PHD student Research engineer Research... electricity consumption and curtail peak demand but in local form: building by building. Few developments are carried out for multi sites management. Multi sites management is essential in crisis and/or peak periods (large energy demand in particular during...

  14. Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Study - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) provides...

  15. Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment, September 2002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This market assessment confirms that the current IES research and development projects targeting the commercial building sector have the potential to dramatically reduce fossil fuel use and air pollutant emissions, improve the electric grid’s power quality, efficiency, reliability and return on investment, and enhance energy security.

  16. Frey, H.C., H.W. Choi, E. Pritchard, and J. Lawrence, "In-Use Measurement of the Activity, Energy Use, and Emissions of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle," Paper 2009-A-242-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Use, and Emissions of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle," Paper 2009-A-242-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd. 1 In-Use Measurement of the Activity, Energy Use, and Emissions of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Emission Inventory data. An engine load-based model based on vehicle-specific power (VSP) was developed

  17. TO: Deans, Directors and Building Coordinators FROM: Dennis Kamite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yingfei

    to perform maintenance and repair electrical switchgear providing power to the Art Building and Sakamaki Hall

  18. Model Predictive Control for Energy Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yudong

    2012-01-01

    solar radiation, occupancy, and electrical devices in the buildings as a function of weather information, time, and date.solar radiation, occupancy, and electrical devices in the buildings as a function of weather information, time, and date.

  19. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As clean energy increasingly becomes part of the national dialogue, lenders, utilities, and lawmakers need the most comprehensive and accurate information on GHG emissions from various sources of energy to inform policy, planning, and investment decisions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that gives decision makers and investors more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions for renewable and conventional generation, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature, and reducing uncertainty.

  20. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  1. Energy & Environmental Benefits from Steam & Electricity Cogeneration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratheal, R.

    2004-01-01

    -site powerhouses (one coal-fired and one natural gas-fired) and from gas-fired and waste heat boilers in its four hydrocarbon cracking plants. The challenge was to find a way to reduce costs and improve reliability of procuring and/or producing electricity... and steam while maintaining or reducing TEX air emissions. TEX entered into an agreement with Eastex Cogeneration to build, own and operate a 440 MW gas-fired steam and electric cogeneration facility on site. Implementation of the project was complex...

  2. Cooling the greenhouse effect: Options and costs for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from the American Electric Power Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helme, N.; Popovich, M.G.; Gille, J. [Center for Clean Air Policy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    A recent report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the earth is likely to face a doubling of preindustrial greenhouse gases in the next half century. This doubling could be expected to push average global temperatures. up from between 1.8 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Much of the potential for human impacts on the global climate is linked to fossil fuel consumption. Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption in the US totals about one-quarter of the world`s total emissions from energy consumption. Global warming is different from other environmental problems because CO{sub 2} emissions can be captured naturally by trees, grasses, soil, and other plants. In contrast, acid rain emissions reductions can only be accomplished through switching to lower-polluting fuels, conserving energy, or installing costly retrofit technologies. Terrestrial biota, such as trees, plants, grasses and soils, directly affect the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the atmosphere. A number of reports have concluded that forestry and land-use practices can increase CO{sub 2} sequestration and can help reduce or delay the threat of global warming.

  3. Transmission grid extensions during the build-up of a fully renewable pan-European electricity supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Spatio-temporal generation patterns for wind and solar photovoltaic power in Europe are used to investigate the future rise in transmission needs with an increasing penetration of these variable renewable energy sources (VRES) on the pan-European electricity system. VRES growth predictions according to the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU countries are used and extrapolated logistically up to a fully VRES-supplied power system. We find that keeping today's international net transfer capacities (NTCs) fixed over the next forty years reduces the final need for backup energy by 13% when compared to the situation with no NTCs. An overall doubling of today's NTCs will lead to a 26% reduction, and an overall quadrupling to a 33% reduction. The remaining need for backup energy is due to correlations in the generation patterns, and cannot be further reduced by transmission. The main investments in transmission lines are due during the ramp-up of VRES from 15% (as planned for 2020) to 80%. Add...

  4. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01

    solar generation can reduce costs and emissions associated with supplying vehicle electricity demand dramatically. Sensitivity Analysis of Long-term

  5. OVERVIEW OF CAMPUS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERVIEW OF CAMPUS ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS University of Minnesota #12;Energy Management Principles 4 Electrical Engineers Buildings Services (~220) Manholes (~400) Cable Ductbank 130 Generators efficient opportunities and balance upfront investment costs with long-term savings potential 1 #12;Electric

  6. Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodologies and Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    emissions from electricity consumption. This paper examinesmainly from electricity consumption for cement production,CO 2 emissions from electricity consumption are usually

  7. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    and compared emissions and energy usages. HEVs were found toforecasting emission and energy usages. Time frames play ansimilar emission and energy usage as current ICV operation.

  8. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Consumption and Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels, Electricity, and Natural Gas in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Sum of Sum of Major Major Electricity Natural...

  9. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    TK Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability oninclude both heat and electricity storage, and 3. to make anIn this case, electricity storage costs are reduced from 193

  10. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    forms/instr63a.pdf Electricity Storage Association, MorganEffect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onEffect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on

  11. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-17

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

  12. Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Mé gel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

    2011-03-18

    In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analyzed.

  13. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies”, ACEEE 2008CAM 5 decoupling by thermal storage decoupling by electric2007. Please note that thermal storage contains also heat

  14. Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

  15. Optimizing Building Energy Use Objective: Perform a comprehensive energy audit of a targeted New York City building,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Optimizing Building Energy Use Objective: Perform a comprehensive energy audit of a targeted New York City building, identify inefficiencies, recommend modifications to improve energy efficiency, electricity-generation method, and the energy efficiency of buildings. Building energy efficiency determines

  16. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs.

  17. System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Comparative simulations of hybrid...

  18. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

  19. Electrically pumped single-photon emission at room temperature from a single InGaN/GaN quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshpande, Saniya; Frost, Thomas; Hazari, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Pallab, E-mail: pkb@eecs.umich.edu [Center for Photonics and Multiscale Nanomaterials, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate a semiconductor quantum dot based electrically pumped single-photon source operating at room temperature. Single photons emitted in the red spectral range from single In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dots exhibit a second-order correlation value g{sup (2)}(0) of 0.29, and fast recombination lifetime ?1.3 ±0.3 ns at room temperature. The single-photon source can be driven at an excitation repetition rate of 200?MHz.

  20. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  1. Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

    1993-01-01

    Reactivity Scale for Low- Emission Vehicles and Clean Fuelsgas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates includedtype in controlling vehicle emissions. DedLicated methanol

  2. Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve...

  3. EMCS and time-series energy data analysis in a large government office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Friedman, Hannah

    2001-01-01

    and analyze building performance data (Sebald and Pietteevaluating the building's operations data. The objective offrom the whole-building electric data is the temperature

  4. Proceedings of the Research Students' Conference on "Buildings Don't Use Energy, People Do?" Domestic Energy Use and CO2 Emissions in Existing Dwellings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    , to minimise usage during peak periods) or to increase efficiencies in the electricity supply chain in meeting, electricity markets, demand-side 1 Introduction The UK electricity market is moving towards having the ability including maximising the efficiency of the supply process. (DECC, 2009) shows that the provision of Smart

  5. Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strecker, Bryan Anthony

    2012-12-31

    's ability to perform proper emissions reductions. This chapter additionally demonstrates an improvement in the fuel use emissions profiles of Argonne National Laboratories' Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model...

  6. EESRD | Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Division...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting Organizations Biosciences Division Energy and Transportation Science Division Electrical and Electronics Systems Research Division Building Technologies Program...

  7. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

  8. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

  9. Intergrated Nox Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs across State Agencies in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.

    2014-01-01

    CONFERENCE FOR ENHANCED BUILDING OPERATIONS TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY – 2014 BEIJING, CHINA – SEPTEMBER 14 -17 Calculation of Integrated NOx Emissions Reductions from Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Programs across State Agencies in Texas... TSINGHUA UNIVERSITY – 2014 BEIJING, CHINA – SEPTEMBER 14 -17 Savings (2002 to 2011) Electricity - $1,082 million Demand - $1,245 million Total - $2,327 million Emissions Reduction in 2011 466 tons-NOx/year, (About 158,923 cars) Demand Reduction in 2011...

  10. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

  11. Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy

    2004-01-01

    modern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrainsare advanced, clean diesel engines and hybrid-electricmarkets for diesel powered and hybrid-electric vehicles in

  12. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    space temperature, occupant thermal comfort, cooling and heating loads, HVAC equipment sizes, energy consumption, utility cost, air emissions, water usage, renewable

  13. Comparison of building energy use data between the United States and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia Ph.D., Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    pipes, etc. Annual Electricity Consumption Comparison OtherFig. 7. Annual electricity consumption comparison of case-the total annual electricity consumption, Buildings A and B

  14. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

  15. Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the July 11, 1996, Electrical Shock at Technical Area 53, Building MPF-14, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

  16. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R

    1991-09-01

    In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

  17. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    vs. synthesized energy modeling weather files. Journal ofHong TZ, Jiang Y. Stochastic weather model for building HVAC1. [9] Crawley DB. Which weather data should you use for

  18. Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Rice University Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering Learn more at ece Electrical and Computer Engineering Neuroengineering Faculty Learn more at ece.rice.edu Caleb Kemere, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering Research Interests: Building interfaces with memory

  19. Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction...

  20. South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and...

  1. TOLEDO BETTERS BUILDINGS WITH FINANCING OPTIONS | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    drop in business activity associated with the nationwide recession. With utility prices for electricity and natural gas at record lows, building energy efficiency...

  2. 10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    -in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1

  3. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies”, ACEEE 2008DER-CAM decoupling by thermal storage decoupling by electricor $/kWh) lifetime (a) thermal storage 1 flow battery 220$/

  4. Building load control and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on load control by improving the operations in existing building HVAC ...

  5. Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. A new breakthrough by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Lab could help...

  6. BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    P18$ P16 BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building AC Recreation and Athletics Centre AH Alumni Hall AP Azrieli Pavillion AT Azrieli Theatre CB Canal Building CO Residence Commons DT Dunton Tower FH Interaction Building (HCI) HP Herzberg Laboratories IH Ice House LA Loeb Building LE Leeds House LH Lanark

  7. SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    SOCIALLY OPTIMAL CHARGING STRATEGIES FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ELENA YUDOVINA AND GEORGE MICHAILIDIS Abstract. Electric vehicles represent a promising technology for reducing emissions and dependence. This pa- per studies decentralized policies that assign electric vehicles to a network of charging

  8. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  9. An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    regarding demand or emission, they can forecast energy orenergy efficiency with increased PHEV charging demand, the previous results can be used to forecast

  10. Estimation of Building Parameters Using Simplified Energy Balance Model and Metered Whole Building Energy Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masuda, H.; Claridge, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and evaluates an indirect data-driven method to estimate influential building parameters: air exchange rates and overall heat transfer coefficients of building envelopes from the separately metered energy use for electricity...

  11. Commissioning-Oriented Building Loads Calculations. Application to the CA-MET Building in Namur (Belgium) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, C.; Andre, P.; Aparecida Silva, C.; Hannay, J.; Lebrun, J.

    2004-01-01

    The parallel use of whole building simulation and monitoring of building energy consumptions (heating, cooling, lighting and other electricity consumptions) represents a potential “high-level” commissioning tool in order to verify, either as a one...

  12. Electrical Demand Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill....

  13. West Lafayette Campus Building names and aBBreviations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Wen

    aerospace science laboratory C11 AGAD agricultural administration Building G8 AHF animal Holding Facility G Clubhouse C1 EE electrical engineering Building H6 EEL entomology environmental laboratory G8 EHSA equine Flight operations Building B11 FORS Forestry Building G8 FPRD Forest Products Building G8 FREH Freehafer

  14. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................................. 2 Utility Conservation Programs for New Residential Buildings buildings, the standard for utility residential conservation programs, the standard for all new commercial......................................................................................................................................... 1 New Site Built Electrically Heated Residential Buildings and New Electrically Heated Manufactured

  15. Modeling analyses of the effects of changes in nitrogen oxides emissions from the electric power sector on ozone levels in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edith Gego; Alice Gilliland; James Godowitch

    2008-04-15

    In this paper, we examine the changes in ambient ozone concentrations simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for summer 2002 under three different nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission scenarios. Two emission scenarios represent best estimates of 2002 and 2004 emissions; they allow assessment of the impact of the NOx emissions reductions imposed on the utility sector by the NOx State Implementation Plan (SIP) Call. The third scenario represents a hypothetical rendering of what NOx emissions would have been in 2002 if no emission controls had been imposed on the utility sector. Examination of the modeled median and 95th percentile daily maximum 8-hr average ozone concentrations reveals that median ozone levels estimated for the 2004 emission scenario were less than those modeled for 2002 in the region most affected by the NOx SIP Call. Comparison of the 'no-control' with the '2002' scenario revealed that ozone concentrations would have been much higher in much of the eastern United States if the utility sector had not implemented NOx emission controls; exceptions occurred in the immediate vicinity of major point sources where increased NO titration tends to lower ozone levels. 13 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Allowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on electricity markets depends on CO2 emissions rates · Different regional effect of GF on electricity marketsAppalachia Indiana CO2EmissionsRate(tons/MWh) ElectricityPrice Baseline (BL) EmissionsRate Policy % Increase from BLAllowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector Karen Palmer Resources for the Future

  17. $18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations.

  18. High Efficiency Low Emission Refrigeration System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Low Emission Refrigeration System 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Brian Fricke, frickeba@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline:...

  19. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahrl, Fredrich James

    2011-01-01

    Analysis for Electricity Consumption and Carbon IntensityAnalysis for Electricity Consumption and Carbon IntensityCO 2 intensity of net electricity consumption Total emission

  20. BEETIT: Building Cooling and Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s BEETIT Project, short for “Building Energy Efficiency Through Innovative Thermodevices,” are developing new approaches and technologies for building cooling equipment and air conditioners. These projects aim to drastically improve building energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2) at a cost comparable to current technologies.

  1. Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier emission from deep levels in semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganichev, Sergey

    Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier of the defects. However, only a limited number of defects can be satisfac- torily described by the Poole-Frenkel theory. An electric field dependence different from that expected from the Poole-Frenkel theory has been

  2. Analysis of Emissions Calculators for the National Center of Excellence on Displaced Emission Reductions (CEDER): Annual Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Bahman; Culp, Charles; Haberl, Jeff; Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Do, Sung Lok

    2010-01-01

    Calculators According to Annual CO2 Emissions from N.G. Use ................................................................................................................................................ 15 Figure 5. Annual NOx Emissions from the N.G.... Use of a Residential Building ........................ 16 Figure 6. Annual SOx Emissions from the N.G. Use of a Residential Building ......................... 16 LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Review of Emissions Calculators in the 2008...

  3. Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

    2014-02-01

    Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

  4. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC’s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

  5. Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadel, Alexander; Gursel, Petek; Masanet, Eric

    2012-01-18

    Structural materials in commercial buildings in the United States account for a significant fraction of national energy use, resource consumption, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Robust decisions for balancing and minimizing these various environmental effects require that structural materials selections follow a life-cycle, systems modeling approach. This report provides a concise overview of the development and use of a new life-cycle assessment (LCA) model for structural materials in U.S. commercial buildings?the Berkeley Lab Building Materials Pathways (B-PATH) model. B-PATH aims to enhance environmental decision-making in the commercial building LCA, design, and planning communities through the following key features: (1) Modeling of discrete technology options in the production, transportation, construction, and end of life processes associated U.S. structural building materials; (2) Modeling of energy supply options for electricity provision and directly combusted fuels across the building life cycle; (3) Comprehensiveness of relevant building mass and energy flows and environmental indicators; (4) Ability to estimate modeling uncertainties through easy creation of different life-cycle technology and energy supply pathways for structural materials; and (5) Encapsulation of the above features in a transparent public use model. The report summarizes literature review findings, methods development, model use, and recommendations for future work in the area of LCA for commercial buildings.

  6. How Green Will Electricity beHow Green Will Electricity be When Electric Vehicles Arrive?When Electric Vehicles Arrive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transportation (a) End-Use Energy Sectors PercentofU.S.CO2Emissions Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity 20, Carnegie Mellon 800Natural Gas (turbines) 0Wind 0Hydro 0Nuclear 400Natural Gas (comb. cycle) 800Coal (new · How "green" is U.S. electricity today in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? · What has been

  7. Energy 101: Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

  8. Cap-and-Trade Modeling and Analysis: Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpaitoon, Tanachai

    2012-01-01

    in Emission Permits Oligopolistic Electricity Markets 3.1Regulation on Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium 2.1in California’s electricity market. Journal of Industrial

  9. International Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicles: Policies, Markets, and Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Lipman, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    D. (1995), Future Drive Electric Vehicles and Sustainable1996), "The Case for Electric Vehicles," Sclent~c American,Emissions Impacts of Electric Vehicles," Journal of the Alr

  10. The Implementation of California AB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B

    2007-01-01

    its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets James Bushnellits Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets James Bushnell *gas emissions from electricity and perhaps other industries.

  11. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    the  computing  needs for building this smart grid,  and using the cloud for building the smart grid.   4.1 The requirements  for  building  successful  smart  electric 

  12. Fact #753: November 12, 2012 Sources of Electricity by State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    all across the nation. Because each plant that generates electricity can use a different mix of energy sources, the emissions associated with electric vehicle charging can vary...

  13. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1:...

  14. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

    2014-04-09

    The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

  15. Fact #737: July 23, 2012 Upstream Emissions for Nissan Leaf

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The all-electric Nissan Leaf does not emit tailpipe emissions like an internal combustion engine, but there are emissions associated with the production of electricity to fuel the Leaf, called...

  16. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

  17. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  18. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  19. Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhi, Hassan; Sharples, Stephen

    2013-01-15

    On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

  20. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  1. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  2. Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House...

  3. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  4. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References Retrieved from "http:...

  5. Generators for Small Electrical and Thermal Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    build and test improved electric-power generators for use in residential Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, which capture the generator's heat output for space and water...

  6. Notices ADDRESSES: National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of Energy, Forrestal Building, Room 8G-017, 1000 Independence Avenue SW., Washington, DC 20585; Telephone:...

  7. Energy Saving Homes and Buildings, Continuum Magazine, Spring 2014 / Issue 6 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    This issue of Continuum focuses on NREL's research to improve the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings. Heating, cooling, and lighting our homes and commercial structures account for more than 70% of all electricity used in the United States. That costs homeowners, businesses, and government agencies more than $400 billion annually, about 40% of our nation's total energy costs. Producing that energy contributes almost 40% of our nation's carbon dioxide emissions.By 2030, an estimated 900 billion square feet of new and rebuilt construction will be developed worldwide, providing an unprecedented opportunity to create efficient, sustainable buildings. Increasing the energy performance of our homes alone could potentially eliminate up to 160 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and lower residential energy bills by $21 billion annually by the end of the decade.

  8. Renewable Energy Applications for Existing Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayter, S. J.; Kandt, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces technical opportunities, means, and methods for incorporating renewable energy (RE) technologies into building designs and operations. It provides an overview of RE resources and available technologies used successfully to offset building electrical and thermal energy loads. Methods for applying these technologies in buildings and the role of building energy efficiency in successful RE projects are addressed along with tips for implementing successful RE projects.

  9. Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

  10. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous challenge. Buildings account for 40% of the nation's carbon emissions and the consumption of 40% of our

  11. Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector BUILDING FOR ECOLOGICALLY RESPONSIVE of effective green building policy for legislators; · skills upgrade for construction workers; · green building to 40% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, 30 to 40% of solid waste generation, 25 to 40% of total energy

  12. Building Energy Efficiency in China - Status, Trends, Targets, and Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well accepted that the reduction of building energy consumption is one of the most effective actions fro reducing the emission of CO2 and for protection of energy resources world wide. Understanding and comparing the real building energy...

  13. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in reducingFigure 13. Adopted CHP Capacities by Building Types for the

  14. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.of medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in GHGbased CHP systems is wrong and large office buildings,

  15. Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marini, Kyle

    2011-01-01

    gases (GHG) or carbon footprint, and public education onand lowering the carbon footprint or GHG emissions forby reducing carbon footprint. • Compare buildings’ energy

  16. Washington: Community Power Works is Building a More Efficient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CPW helps existing residential, commercial, and institutional buildings across the city lower their energy use by 15%-50% and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. Seattle also...

  17. Laying the Foundation for Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping commercial building owners and operators throughout America save energy and reduce carbon emissions.

  18. Storage-centric Sensor Networks for Smart Buildings Baobing Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baras, John S.

    Storage-centric Sensor Networks for Smart Buildings Baobing Wang Department of Electrical of Smart Buildings, and introduces a system de- sign flow to compose both continuous-time and event role in future Smart Buildings. It is possible to retrofit old buildings to enable sensing

  19. City of Asheville- Efficiency Standards for City Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year...

  20. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO 2 Emissions, ACEEEDistributed   Energy  Costs  and  CO 2  Abatement:     A  of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO 2 Abatement: A

  1. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  2. A Study on Design Parameters of Stirling Engines for Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, G.; Huang, S.; Zhang, C.; Hu, X.; Zhang, X.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most promising projects in the application of combined heat and power(CHP) lies in energy production for buildings. Stirling engines are very applicable to residential buildings, especially because of the higher electricity...

  3. Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

  4. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  5. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Sum of Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" ,,,,"Primary","Site" "All Buildings...

  6. Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Education Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-13

    The primary objective of this grant is to educate the public about carbon emissions and the energy-saving and job-related benefits of commercial building energy efficiency. investments in Illinois.

  7. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates the potentials of energy-saving and mitigation of green-house gas (GHG) emission offered by implementation of building energy efficiency policies in China. An overview of existing literature regarding long-term energy...

  8. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01

    of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

  9. Database Aids Building Owners and Operators in Energy-Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (BPD). Currently, residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption in the United States. One of the primary challenges to expanding...

  10. Building Energy Management Open-Source Software Development ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in small- and medium-sized commercial buildings. BEMOSS will be able to optimize electricity usage to reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR)....

  11. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the energy consumed (elsewhere) to generate and transmit the electricity supplied to the building (see Site and Primary Energy for additional information). The primary consumption...

  12. DOE Announces Webinars on Buildings of the Future, Overcoming...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cleansing Data for Benchmarking, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Next Generation Electric Machines, Zero Energy Buildings, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Deployment of...

  13. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

    2013-06-01

    U.S. and China are the world’s top two economics. Together they consumed one-third of the world’s primary energy. It is an unprecedented opportunity and challenge for governments, researchers and industries in both countries to join together to address energy issues and global climate change. Such joint collaboration has huge potential in creating new jobs in energy technologies and services. Buildings in the US and China consumed about 40% and 25% of the primary energy in both countries in 2010 respectively. Worldwide, the building sector is the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas emission. Better understanding and improving the energy performance of buildings is a critical step towards sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

  14. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  15. Instrumenting Buildings to Determine Retrofit Savings: Murphy's Law Strikes Again 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D. L.; Bryant, J.; Carlson, K.

    1998-01-01

    &M University. Metering typically includes monitoring for the whole-building electric load, chilled and hot water thermal loads and selected submetered electrical loads. The emphasis of the lessons learned was on the instrumentation used and installation...

  16. Building Interoperability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Page 3 20XX-XX-XX Market Place Needs - Data Fatigue Carbon Emissions Alternative Energy Demand Response Distributed Power IAQ Personal UI Mobile Cloud IT Convergence Charging...

  17. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving...

  18. Electrical Engineering & Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    competing robots, building and racing NU's solar car, creating games and numerous other exciting projectsElectrical Engineering & Computer Science Department Undergraduate Study Manual 2014-2015 McCormick Northwestern Engineering #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Welcome from the Chair 3 1.1 Message from the Associate Chair

  19. Building technologies program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

  20. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

  1. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary report and...

  2. Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    . Caulfield DAMTP & BP Institute for Multiphase Flow Univ. of Cambridge, UK Univ. of New Hampshire, Dept radiation, external wind forcing and internal heat gains e.g. due to electrical equipment or building

  3. According to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Study (HR Study)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    According to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource and grow the electricity supply. Other industry realities such as the need to build and replace and increase within the electricity sector. The ability of educational and training institutions to adequately

  4. The Fifth Northwest Electric Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on an effort to build major new generating resources, including several nuclear power plants. Many- generating resources would soon be unable to keep up with the demand for electricity. In the 1970s of under-investment in generation and conservation; a deeply flawed electricity market design in Califor

  5. Diesel hybridization and emissions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

    2004-04-21

    The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

  6. Building debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

  7. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  8. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  9. Rethinking development assistance for renewable electricity sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozloff, K.L.

    1995-11-01

    According to US DOE projections, the developing world`s demand for electricity will grow by 50% by 2010. While nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to decline in North America and Europe over the next 25 years, they will more than double in the rest of the world. This article attempts to explore ways in which developing countries can be motivated to develop renewable energy sources to meet their capacity needs. It outlines how multilateral lenders and donor nations can make renewably generated electricity more economically appealing for developing countries. Greater use of renewable technology would allow developing nations to build the capacity they need without endangering human and environmental health. An examination of the history of official development assistance for renewable technologies, however, reveals the necessity of a change in strategy if this shift is to ever take place. Looking at how different renewable electricity technologies - photovoltaics, geothermal, wind, hydropower, and biomass - have been implemented in projects around the world demonstrates the benefits of that change, as well as the price paid by mistakes.

  10. Technologies for Energy Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Technologies for Energy Security Subtask 8.4 Deliverable By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York.4.2.3 Total electrical energy consumption 33 3.4.2.4 Consumer alert messages 33 3.5 Laboratory TestingTechnologies for Energy Efficient Buildings Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office

  11. Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual...

  12. Department of Energy Announces 22 New Projects to Enable Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MONITOR program focuses on reducing methane emissions associated with energy production to build a more sustainable energy future. The program plans to provide 30 million...

  13. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Wax, cleansers, cloths, etc.) 7. CONTRACT SERVICES (Window washing, waste and snow removal) B. HEATING a share of building support/common areas such as elevator lobbies, building corridors, and floor service areas. Floor service areas typically include restrooms, janitor rooms, telephone closets, electrical

  14. Analysis of CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel in Korea: 19611994 Ki-Hong Choi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................7 3.2 Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions ................................................................8 3.2.1 Energy Consumption Pattern Appendix 3. Emission Coefficient of Electricity

  15. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  16. Building America System Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  17. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  18. Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Driving Smart Growth: Electric Vehicle Adoption and OffPeak Electricity Rates Peter with either flat or variable electricity rates. Michigan's Detroit Edison Energy (DTE) early experience recharging units, free parking commensurate with lower emissions, and offpeak or flat electricity rates

  19. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  20. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    be used to offset EV charging at home at the residentialthe different EV and home charging constraints. Decisiondimensionless EV battery charging efficiency, dimensionless

  1. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    system (EMS) to enable demand response or any other buildingfor tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected tobased technologies, $ demand response costs for other non-

  2. Office Buildings - Full Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17...

  3. Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2012-01-01

    buildings [GW] stationary storage [GWh] combined heat and power (CHP) andenergy source or CHP system at the building could be used toon CHP, they feed electricity back to the building.

  4. VT Electric Services VTES 601 Energy Dr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VT Electric Services Location VTES 601 Energy Dr. Blacskburg, VA 24061 (540) 231-6437 Office Hours Electric Services is to provide adequate, reliable and economical electric service to the buildings and sidewalk lighting. Functional Areas Customer Support; Powerline Repair & Maintenance; Power Transmission

  5. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01

    Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-04-07

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

  7. Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

  8. Optimal investment and scheduling of distributed energy resources with uncertainty in electric vehicles driving schedules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Goncalo

    2014-01-01

    price of electric vehicle electricity exchange at home, $/kWh marginal carboncarbon emissions rate from generation technology j, kg/kWh price

  9. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5129E Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities;Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR

  10. Solar Applications to Multiple County Buildings Feasibility Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study was requested by Salt Lake County in an effort to obtain a cursory overview of solar electric and solar thermal application possibilities on the rooftops of existing county buildings. The subject buildings represent various County Divisions: Aging Services, Community Services, County Health, County Library, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, County Sheriff and Youth Services. There are fifty two buildings included in the study.

  11. Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

  12. Reduction of NOx Emissions in Alamo Area Council of Government Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Zhu, Y.; Im, P.

    2004-01-01

    This reports summarizes the electricity, natural gas and NOx emissions reductions from retrofit measures reported as part of the AACOG emissions reduction effort. The electricity and natural gas savings were collected by ...

  13. Buildings & Connective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Signage Program Complete New Signage, Wayfinding, Campus Identity Program 2 4 4 0 2 2 0 4 2 4 2 5 16 47 Sciences Greenway Interim Landscape New Green Pathway Connecting Parking, Building Entrances Courtyard 2 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 4 2 2 0 16 34 Ashland/Taylor Lot G/K Interim Green Gate Provide New Green

  14. Better Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neukomm, M.

    2012-01-01

    replicable programs/solutions. Emphasis on home energy improvement Federal Performance-based Contracting Challenge ?Leverage ARRA ?Overcome Barriers ?Drive Action/Change ?Grow Partnerships Better Buildings promotes energy efficiency as top... Senior Executive --Announce innovations/market solutions Take Action -Showcase project within 9 months -Organization wide plan, schedule and milestones within 9 months Report Results -Share information and implementation models -Share...

  15. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. BuildingB7. Building6.

  16. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. BuildingB7. Building6.8.

  17. Electricity Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

  18. Solar Electric Grid Integration - Advanced Concepts (SEGIS-AC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Electric Grid Integration - Advanced Concepts (SEGIS-AC) program, DOE is funding solar projects that are targeting ways to develop power electronics and build smarter, more...

  19. Energy Department and Edison Electric Institute Sign Agreement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    between the Department and EEI, strengthening collaborative action to accelerate plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) and charging infrastructure deployment. Building on the President's...

  20. As Electric Vehicles Take Charge, Costs Power Down | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department, General Motors has been able to develop the capacity to build electric and hybrid motors internally. That capacity has made cars like the upcoming Chevy Spark EV...