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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residences in Texas by climate zone as well as the average statewide electricity price ( /kWh). The ratio of electric/gas and heat pump houses constructed in Texas was determined using the annual surveys, National Association of Home Builders (NAHB... of Home Builders. Upper Marlboro, MD: NAHB Research Center. NREL. 2001. Building America House Performance Analysis Procedures. (NREL/TP-550-27754) Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory. p.34 Paquette, Z., J. Miller, and M. DeWein. 2010...

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium

3

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Automatic CX Tool for Electrical Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under Matlab [MATLAB, 2005]. This environment was selected for its capacity to use complex matrixes. Its goal is to help the designers and Cx providers to test and evaluate energy performance of an electrical building. The objective of the tool... period, the hourly programming of the lighting and the hourly programming of the heating. Results of automatic FTPs are presented in graphs or tables. Electricity tariff structure As first example, the graph on Figure 8 shows the electric load...

Couillaud, N.; Jandon, M.; Viaud, B.; Clemoncon, B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sustainable School Buildings: Some of the Latest Dutch Examples of Nearly zero Emissions Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the Netherlands with respect to sustainable educational building there is a continuous development going on from sustainable building, to Passive House schools, to nearly Zero Emission Buildings to even Energy positive buildings. The Dutch...

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Waard, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy costs, CO 2 emissions, or multiple objectives of providing services to a building microgrid produces technology neutral

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Establishing Standard Source Energy and Emission Factors for Energy Use in Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides source energy factors and emission factors to calculate the source (primary) energy and emissions from a building's annual site energy consumption. This report provides the energy and emission factors to calculate the source energy and emissions for electricity and fuels delivered to a facility and combustion of fuels at a facility. The factors for electricity are broken down by fuel type and presented for the continental United States, three grid interconnections, and each state. The electricity fuel and emission factors are adjusted for the electricity and the useful thermal output generated by combined heat and power (CHP) plants larger than one megawatt. The energy and emissions from extracting, processing, and transporting the fuels, also known as the precombustion effects, are included.

Deru, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Planning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CLEAN-Capacity Building and Training for Low Emissions Development Planning AgencyCompany Organization:...

9

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the world's primary energy and contributes 21% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions (DOE Buildings Data Book 2011). The largest sector of energy consumption is the ~119 million buildings in the US which New, PhD Theodore Chandler Member ASHRAE ABSTRACT Building energy models of existing buildings

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

10

Electric dipole emission by fullerenes and buckyonions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the rotation rates and electric dipole emission of hydrogenated icosahedral fullerenes (single and multishell) in various phases of the interstellar medium. Using the formalism of Draine and Lazarian for the rotational dynamics of these molecules in various astrophysical environments, we find effective rotation rates in the range 1-65 GHz with a trend toward lower rotational frequency as the radius of the molecule increases. Owing to the moderately polar nature of the C--H bond, hydrogenated fullerenes (fulleranes) are expected to have a net dipole moment and produce electric dipole radiation. Adopting the same size distribution proposed for fullerenes in the study of the UV extinction bump (2175 \\AA) we predict the dipole electric emission of mixtures of fulleranes for various levels of hydrogenation. We find that these molecules could be the carriers of the anomalous microwave emission recently detected by Watson et al. in the Perseus molecular complex.

Susana Iglesias-Groth

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to enable demand response or any other building strategy (demand response. By using EVs connected to the buildings for

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and integrated in smart buildings Is it that simple or doesN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Smart buildings with electric vehicleopportunity employer. Smart buildings with electric vehicle

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Using Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from the California Electricity Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise ElectricityEnvironmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricitythe conditions in the emissions permit market for oxides of

Kolstad, Jonathan; Wolak, Frank

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation is: (1) global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (EV) modeling; (2) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (3) presentation summary - how does the number of EVs connected to the building change with different optimization goals (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (3) ongoing EV modeling for California: the California commercial end-use survey (CEUS) database, objective: 138 different typical building - EV connections and benefits; (4) detailed analysis for healthcare facility: optimal EV connection at a healthcare facility in southern California; and (5) conclusions. Conclusions are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions. Why? Stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff - final work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Mendes, Goncalo; Marnay, Chris; M& #233; gel, Olivier; Lai, Judy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reducing Fossil Carbon Emissions and Building Environmental Awareness at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Fossil Carbon Emissions and Building Environmental Awareness at Dartmouth College Summary selected the mission: "To reduce Dartmouth College's fossil carbon emissions." We believe this mission's responsibility to educate others about how it is reducing its fossil carbon emissions and encourage them to do

16

Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Markovian Models for Electrical Load Prediction in Smart Buildings Muhammad Kumail Haider, Asad,13100004,ihsan.qazi}@lums.edu.pk Abstract. Developing energy consumption models for smart buildings is important develop parsimo- nious Markovian models of smart buildings for different periods in a day for predicting

California at Santa Barbara, University of

17

Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

19

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHP system at the commercial building could be used to offset EV charging at home at the residential

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ASSESSMENT OF BUILDING LIFECYLE CARBON EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Even though the Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies (CC & ST) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology initiated carbon emission research in late 1990s (CSI, 2013), carbon emissions has only become a hot topic in the last decade...

Kwok, George

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

Yang, Xudong, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Will Monetized Carbon Emission Reductions Buy Enhanced Building Operations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Policies and Measures International and United State Programs - Kyoto Protocol - European Union Emission Trading Scheme - California Global Warming Solutions Act - Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative #0;z Strategies for Expanding Buildings Role Buildings... Emission Targets in 2008-2012 for 37 Annex I Countries Which Have Ratified It ? Relies Primarily on Policies and Measures ? Flexibility Measures Include CDMs and JIs #0;z European Climate Change Program ? Reflects EU’s Leadership in Implementing Kyoto...

Millhone, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings are at the locus of three trends driving China's increased energy use and emissions: urbanization, growing personal consumption, and surging heavy industrial production. Migration to cities and urban growth create demand for new building construction. Higher levels of per-capita income and consumption drive building operational energy use with demand for higher intensity lighting, thermal comfort, and plug-load power. Demand for new buildings, infrastructure, and electricity requires heavy industrial production. In order to quantify the implications of China's ongoing urbanization, rising personal consumption, and booming heavy industrial sector, this study presents a lifecycle assessment (LCA) of the energy use and carbon emissions related to residential and commercial buildings. The purpose of the LCA model is to quantify the impact of a given building and identify policy linkages to mitigate energy demand and emissions growth related to China's new building construction. As efficiency has become a higher priority with growing energy demand, policy and academic attention to buildings has focused primarily on operational energy use. Existing studies estimate that building operational energy consumption accounts for approximately 25% of total primary energy use in China. However, buildings also require energy for mining, extracting, processing, manufacturing, and transporting materials, as well as energy for construction, maintenance, and decommissioning. Building and supporting infrastructure construction is a major driver of industry consumption--in 2008 industry accounted for 72% of total Chinese energy use. The magnitude of new building construction is large in China--in 2007, for example, total built floor area reached 58 billion square meters. During the construction boom in 2007 and 2008, more than two billion m{sup 2} of building space were added annually; China's recent construction is estimated to account for half of global construction. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed an integrated LCA model to capture the energy and emissions implications of all aspects of new buildings from material mining through construction, operations, and decommissioning. Over the following four sections, this report describes related existing research, the LBNL building LCA model structure and results, policy linkages of this lifecycle assessment, and conclusions and recommendations for follow-on work. The LBNL model is a first-order approach to gathering local data and applying lifecycle assessment to buildings in the Beijing area--it represents one effort among a range of established, predominantly American and European, LCA models. This report identifies the benefits, limitations, and policy applications of lifecycle assessment modeling for quantifying the energy and emissions impacts of specific residential and commercial buildings.

Aden, Nathaniel; Qin, Yining; Fridley, David

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Wireless Electricity Metering of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wireless Electricity Metering of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings, University of California, Berkeley, USA Abstract- Miscellaneous and electronic devices hundreds of miscellaneous and electronic devices where metered for several months

Culler, David E.

26

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”demand response and energy ef?ciency in commercial buildings,”building electricity use with application to demand response,”

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission Murat Celik Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik B.S., Aerospace Engineering and Physics, University;Experimental and Computational Studies of Electric Thruster Plasma Radiation Emission by Murat C¸elik Submitted

28

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case 25 Figure 9 CO2 Emissions from Commercial Buildings (27 Figure 12 CO2 Emissions by Sector (Primary Energy,16 Office Building CO2 Emissions (Reference Case, Primary

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of traditional emergency generator applications, these technologies are integrated in building energy systems to provide some portion of a facility’s electricity and thermal energy needs including space heating and air conditioning. In the event of a power.... These CHP systems provide electricity and utilize waste heat from the generation process in existing building thermal applications such as space heating, domestic water heating. Thermal energy can also be used in an absorption refrigeration cycle...

Jackson, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electricity sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As climate change negotiators from around the world prepared together in 1996 to consider new international targets and policies for greenhouse-gas reductions, the US Department of Energy asked the authors to review the options available to the electricity sector to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The charge was to focus on supply-side options and utility demand-side management (DSM) programs because other researchers were considered energy efficiency options for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. The next section presents the EIA baseline projections of electricity production, use, and CO{sub 2} emissions to the year 2010. Subsequent sections briefly summarize the options available to the electricity industry to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions, speculate on how industry restructuring might affect the ability of the industry and its regulators to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, and discuss the policies available to affect those emissions: research and development, voluntary programs, regulation, and fiscal policies.

Hirst, E.; Baxter, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”demand response systems,” in Proceedings of 16th National Conference on BuildingBuilding Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

35

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Electrical modulation of emissivity S. Vassant,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it is difficult to develop an efficient light emitting diode because the spontaneous emission rate is proportional emitting diodes. Yet, incandescent sources are often the only option in the infrared (IR). Indeed tens of Hz. Hence, for many applications, incandescent light sources can- not compete with light

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation...

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Electricity Use, With Application to Demand Response,”Demand Response Research Center and a Program Manager in the Buildingand demand response. For example: Does the building use too

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary Electricity Coal Final energy use in buildings is9 million tonnes of coal equivalent energy could be saved byproportion of energy consumed from coal, coke, liquid fuels,

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Electrically-Assisted Turbocharger Development for Performance and Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbocharger transient lag inherently imposes a tradeoff between a robust engine response to transient load shifts and exhaust emissions. By itself, a well matched turbocharger for an engine has limited flexibility in improving this transient response. Electrically-assisted turbocharging has been seen as an attractive option to improve response and lower transient emissions. This paper presents the results of a multi-year joint CRADA between DDC and ORNL. Virtual lab diesel simulation models characterized the performance improvement potential of an electrically assisted turbocharger technology. Operating requirements to reduce transient duration between load shift time by up to 50% were determined. A turbomachine has been conceptualized with an integrated motor-generator, providing transient burst boost plus energy recovery capability. Numerous electric motor designs were considered, and a prototype motor was developed, fabricated, and is undergoing tests. Power controls have been designed and fabricated.

Bailey, Milton

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy flows in the building electrical load tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .intrinsic property of energy load trees is additivity - thevisualization of energy flows in the load tree, as shown in

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

45

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coop Inc Beauregard Electric Coop Inc Entergy ArkansasInc Entergy Louisiana Inc Magic Valley Electric Coop Inc

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Semiconductor light source with electrically tunable emission wavelength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor light source comprises a substrate, lower and upper claddings, a waveguide region with imbedded active area, and electrical contacts to provide voltage necessary for the wavelength tuning. The active region includes single or several heterojunction periods sandwiched between charge accumulation layers. Each of the active region periods comprises higher and lower affinity semiconductor layers with type-II band alignment. The charge carrier accumulation in the charge accumulation layers results in electric field build-up and leads to the formation of generally triangular electron and hole potential wells in the higher and lower affinity layers. Nonequillibrium carriers can be created in the active region by means of electrical injection or optical pumping. The ground state energy in the triangular wells and the radiation wavelength can be tuned by changing the voltage drop across the active region.

Belenky, Gregory (Port Jefferson, NY); Bruno, John D. (Bowie, MD); Kisin, Mikhail V. (Centereach, NY); Luryi, Serge (Setauket, NY); Shterengas, Leon (Centereach, NY); Suchalkin, Sergey (Centereach, NY); Tober, Richard L. (Elkridge, MD)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Allocation, incentives and distortions: the impact of EU ETS emissions allowance allocations to the electricity sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in electricity prices (Harrison and Radov 2002) could trigger higher electricity consumption, production, further increasing CO2 emissions. This approach will also have consequences on neighbouring jurisdictions. Figure 2 illustrates a case with two... into the electricity prices limits investment in energy efficiency and results in higher electricity consumption. Thus electricity production and national CO2 emissions increase. If all European countries implement such policies the suggested higher CO2 emissions...

Neuhoff, Karsten; Keats, Kim; Sato, Misato

50

Total energy cycle energy use and emissions of electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total energy cycle analysis (TECA) of electric vehicles (EV) was recently completed. The EV energy cycle includes production and transport of fuels used in power plants to generate electricity, electricity generation, EV operation, and vehicle and battery manufacture. This paper summarizes the key assumptions and results of the EVTECA. The total energy requirements of EVS me estimated to be 24-35% lower than those of the conventional, gasoline-fueled vehicles they replace, while the reductions in total oil use are even greater: 55-85%. Greenhouse gases (GHG) are 24-37% lower with EVs. EVs reduce total emissions of several criteria air pollutants (VOC, CO, and NO{sub x}) but increase total emissions of others (SO{sub x}, TSP, and lead) over the total energy cycle. Regional emissions are generally reduced with EVs, except possibly SO{sub x}. The limitations of the EVTECA are discussed, and its results are compared with those of other evaluations of EVs. In general, many of the results (particularly the oil use, GHG, VOC, CO, SO{sub x}, and lead results) of the analysis are consistent with those of other evaluations.

Singh, M. K.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal Heat Pump Central AC by NG Electric water heaterwater heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boiler Coal Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pumpHeat Pump* *COP Reference Case Alternative Case Table 10 Office Buildings: Water Heating Efficiency Boiler Gas Boiler Small Cogen Electric Water Heater

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Sub-metering to Electricity Use in Large-scale Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;?#0;? Practice??Project example #0;?#0;? Use of data??Analysis Software Sub-metering and statistics to electricity use in commercial buildings 8 Method of sub-metering Whole electric power consumption of a building Hvac system Heating Circulating pump Oter... systems and equipments Equipments on Socket Special function room Electrically driven heating equipment Chiller Fan of cooling tower Chilled pump cooling pump Air hand unit Fresh air hand unit Fan coil unit Air conditioner Heating water system drinking...

Yuan, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Reducing Fossil Carbon Emissions and Building Environmental Awareness at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faiia, Earth Sciences Department, Dartmouth College David Foster, Head Electrical Engineer, Dartmouth

55

Benchmarking Buildings to Prioritize Sites for Emissions Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

When actual energy use by building type is known, benchmarking the performance of those buildings to industry averages can help establish those with greatest opportunities for GHG reduction. Energy intensity can be used as a basis for benchmarking by building type and can be calculated using actual energy use, representative buildings, or available average estimates from agency energy records. Energy intensity should be compared to industry averages, such as the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) or an agency specific metered sample by location.

56

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(GWE) associated with construction and operation of comparable hydroelectric, wind, solar, coal, and land use. The results indicate that a wind farm and a hydroelectric plant in an arid zone (such, solar, and wind power plants do not need fuel inputs for operation, fossil-fueled power plants

Kammen, Daniel M.

57

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Judy Lai, and Vincent Battaglia: “The added economic andMarnay, and Vincent Battaglia: “Plug-in Electric Vehicle

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ELECTRICAL SIMULATION METHODOLOGY DEDICATED TO EMC DIGITAL CIRCUITS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS ON PCB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL SIMULATION METHODOLOGY DEDICATED TO EMC DIGITAL CIRCUITS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS ON PCB Jean integrated on closer structures, and the upsurge of electric/electromagnetic couplings in a large frequency optimise an electrical models library dedicated to the simulations of EMC emissions of digital integrated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Webinar February 17: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications" on Tuesday, February 17, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

65

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables) improves the accuracy of regression models of electric load. 4) A piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence can be derived without the use of a change-point model (which would add complexity to the modeling algorithm) or assumptions about when structural changes occur (which could introduce inaccuracy). 5) A model that includes time-of-week and temperature dependence can be used for weather normalization and can determine whether the building is unusually temperature-sensitive, which can indicate problems with HVAC operation.

Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Lifecycle Energy Management in the Tohoku Electric Power headquarters building-APCBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lifecycle Energy Management in the Tohoku Electric Power Company Head Office Building Hideki Yuzawa (NIKKEN SEKKEI Research Institute) Takeshi Kondo (NIKKEN SEKKEI Research Institute) Shinji Okuda (Tohoku Electric Power) APCBC presentation...th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 ICEBO2014 NSRI Hideki Yuzawa ?2014 yuzawa@nikken.jp Passion for sustainable cities 4 What is “Lifecycle energy management” ? 4 #1 Defined the energy...

Yuzawa, H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Case Studies in Using Whole Building Interval Data to Determine Annualized Electrical Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Copyright ? 2005 by ASME CASE STUDIES IN USING WHOLE BUILDING INTERVAL DATA TO DETERMINE ANNUALIZED ELECTRICAL SAVINGS Mark Effinger James Anthony Lia Webster Engineer Engineer Senior Engineer Portland Energy Conservation, Inc... Portland, OR USA ABSTRACT Whole building interval analysis to determine savings from energy reduction measures is addressed in several guidelines. The whole building method has typically focused on measured savings where baseline regression...

Effinger, M.; Anthony, J.; Webster, L.

69

Federal, state and utility roles in reducing new building greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will explore the role of implementation of building energy codes and standards in reducing US greenhouse gas emissions. It will discuss the role of utilities in supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency in improving the efficiency of new buildings. The paper will summarize Federal policies and programs that improve code compliance and increase overall greenhouse gas emission reductions. Finally, the paper will discuss the role of code compliance and the energy and greenhouse gas emission reductions that have been realized from various Federal, State and utility programs that enhance compliance.

Johnson, J.A.; Shankle, D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Boulin, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foss, B . "Carbon Emissions Trading is New Weapon to BattleBehavior and the Emission Trading Market, Resources andof Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading." The Journal of

Fowlie, Meredith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology at coal-fired power plants, total SO 2 emissionsemission coefficients for electric power and direct-use coal.Coal Similarly, without improvements in sulfur capture at power plants, SO 2 emissions

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings around the world. As photovoltaic (PV) technology continues to improve and costs drop, opportunities for PV will multiply. PV systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote...

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

PROJECT GOALS Use electricity accounts and Building Management System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of altering lighting and computer management, and installing solar panels. Key recommendations The first energy saving option involved installing solar panels. Taking into account the parameters and power - were used to build baseline figures to gauge the impact of variations in temperature on total

79

Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data...

Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and both are regulated under the U.S. Clean Air Act. While emissions from fossil fuel combustion suggests that air quality co-benefits associated with CO2 emission reductions could be significantThe Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy Now Jump to:Development Reports Jump to: navigation,,

82

THE VALUATION OF CLEAN SPREAD OPTIONS: LINKING ELECTRICITY, EMISSIONS RENE CARMONA, MICHAEL COULON, AND DANIEL SCHWARZ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on CO2 by the regulation should be included in the costs of production to set the price of electricity which can be run when it is profitable to do so (namely when the price of electricity is greater thanTHE VALUATION OF CLEAN SPREAD OPTIONS: LINKING ELECTRICITY, EMISSIONS AND FUELS REN´E CARMONA

Carmona, Rene

83

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

84

Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

Not Available

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesBuilding Stock. Golden, Colorado: National Renewable Energy

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 12,Standard for Energy Efficiency of Public Buildings. Energyfor Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings in Hot Summer

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models ofthe National Building Stock. Golden, Colorado: Nationaland Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Methodology of CO{sub 2} emission evaluation in the life cycle of office building facades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction industry is one of the greatest sources of pollution because of the high level of energy consumption during its life cycle. In addition to using energy while constructing a building, several systems also use power while the building is operating, especially the air-conditioning system. Energy consumption for this system is related, among other issues, to external air temperature and the required internal temperature of the building. The facades are elements which present the highest level of ambient heat transfer from the outside to the inside of tall buildings. Thus, the type of facade has an influence on energy consumption during the building life cycle and, consequently, contributes to buildings' CO{sub 2} emissions, because these emissions are directly connected to energy consumption. Therefore, the aim is to help develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. The results, based on the parameters used in this study, show that facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle, followed by brick facades covered with compound aluminum panels or ACM (Aluminum Composite Material), facades using structural glazing and reflective glass and brick facades with plaster coating. On the other hand, the typology of facade that emits less CO{sub 2} is brickwork and mortar because its thermal barrier is better than structural glazing facade and materials used to produce this facade are better than brickwork and ACM. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to verify the accuracy of the results attained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This methodology is based in LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use an uncertainty analysis to verify the accuracy of the results attained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study three typologies of facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle.

Taborianski, Vanessa Montoro; Prado, Racine T.A., E-mail: racine.prado@poli.usp.br

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electricity generation and emissions reduction decisions under uncertainty : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

Morris, Jennifer F. (Jennifer Faye)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric power sector, which accounts for approximately 40% of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, will be a critical component of any policy the U.S. government pursues to confront climate change. In the context of uncertainty ...

Morris, J.

92

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions from this presentation are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions because stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - it's more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; and (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff. Final research work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Gomez, Tomaz; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Megel, Olivier; Mendes, Goncalo; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Use of continuous emission monitoring in the electric utility industry. Paper 81. 48. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam electric generating plants are subject to continuous monitoring regulations. Reliable emission data are recorded to be reported to regulatory agencies. The continuous monitor is being used as a diagnostic tool for optimizing operation of control equipment also. Monitored data identify the magnitude, duration, and time of any emissions exceeding compliance standards so that corrective actions may be taken.

Van Gieson, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Plasmonic Near-Electric Field Enhancement Effects in Ultrafast Photoelectron Emission: Correlated Spatial and Laser Polarization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: Electron emission from single, supported Ag nanocubes excited with ultrafast laser pulses ( = 800 irradiated with ultrafast laser pulses at a photon energy (Eph) below the material work functionPlasmonic Near-Electric Field Enhancement Effects in Ultrafast Photoelectron Emission: Correlated

Mohseni, Hooman

95

Producing Fuel and Electricity from Coal with Low Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing Fuel and Electricity from Coal with Low Carbon Dioxide Emissions K. Blok, C.A. Hendriks of suchan option basedon the use of commercially ready technologies involving coal gasification for power08544,USA June 1991 Abstract. New energytechnologiesare neededto limit CO2 emissions and the detrimental

96

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impact of Vehicle Air-Conditioning on Fuel Economy, Tailpipe Emissions, and Electric Vehicle Range: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicle air-conditioning can significantly impact fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric vehicles and reduce electric vehicle range. In addition, a new US emissions procedure, called the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure, has provided the motivation for reducing the size of vehicle air-conditioning systems in the US. The SFTP will measure tailpipe emissions with the air-conditioning system operating. Current air-conditioning systems can reduce the fuel economy of high fuel-economy vehicles by about 50% and reduce the fuel economy of today's mid-sized vehicles by more than 20% while increasing NOx by nearly 80% and CO by 70%.

Farrington, R.; Rugh, J.

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

99

Emission spectroscopy for the study of electric propulsion plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typical electric propulsion devices rely on the acceleration of highly ionized plasmas to produce thrust at specific impulses unattainable with state-of-the-art chemical systems. This thesis examines the use of a miniaturized ...

Matlock, Taylor Scott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Experimental and computational studies of electric thruster plasma radiation emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric thrusters are being developed for in-space propulsion needs of spacecraft as their higher specific impulse enables a significant reduction in the required propellant mass and allows longer duration missions. Over ...

Çelik, Murat Alp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities – Emissions Management (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

102

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sedimentary basins. 1. Introduction #12;In recent years emissions of carbon dioxide from the UK electricity of these measures for deployment in 2020 depends entirely on final UK carbon emission targets and the abilityScope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment

Haszeldine, Stuart

104

Issues in emissions testing of hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has tested more than 100 prototype HEVs built by colleges and universities since 1994 and has learned that using standardized dynamometer testing procedures can be problematic. This paper addresses the issues related to HEV dynamometer testing procedures and proposes a new testing approach. The proposed ANL testing procedure is based on careful hybrid operation mode characterization that can be applied to certification and R and D. HEVs also present new emissions measurement challenges because of their potential for ultra-low emission levels and frequent engine shutdown during the test cycles.

Duoba, M.; Anderson, J.; Ng, H.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Commercial and Residential Building Site Energy Usagecommercial and residential prototype buildings discussed in the previous section is simulated in EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar radiation, electricity tariff, technology costs, andrequirements, usage patterns, tariffs, and incentives. Toassessment Electricity tariff Natural gas tariff Technology

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bus,  the electric buses’ fraction of energy consumed was Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solely from stored electric energy during the day. With theIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions UsingIn Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Electric Vehicle Charging Impact Review for MultiUser Residential Buildings in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

596 Electric Vehicle Charging ­ Impact Review for Multi User Residential Buildings in British .......................................................................................................................................... 4 3 Electric Vehicles in British Columbia .................................................................................................................................... 27 6.1 City of Vancouver ­ Electric Vehicle Provision Regulations

111

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

112

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Note: PSAT included after-treatment thermal efficiency penalty to the diesel fuel economy · CD ElectricWell-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Amgad engine vehicles (ICEVs) Regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs

114

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the LCA of low energy buildings,” Energy and Buildingsin the LCA of low energy buildings,” Energy and Buildingsof conventional and low-energy buildings: A review article,”

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Central Government Buildings. ” Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Vietnam-Rapid Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of City Emissions (RACE) for Low Carbon Cities: Transport and Building Electricity Use AgencyCompany Organization Clean Air Asia, Chreod Ltd. Partner Asian...

118

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 RadLab as a Green Building Testbed 9.126] Autodesk. Autodesk Green Building Studio. http://David Culler. Enabling green building applications. In The

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Smart-Metering for Monitoring Building Power Distribution Network using Instantaneous Phasor Computations of Electrical Signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart-Metering for Monitoring Building Power Distributionimplementable for smart-meters for a building. Eachcontrol node of a building so as to make smart decisions.

K.R., Krishnanand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlled Electric Springs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Load-side Demand Management in Buildings using Controlleddemand side management has been a keen topic of interest. Buildings,

Soni, Jayantika; Krishnanand, KR; Panda, Sanjib

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

makes CHP system generally not attractive in residentialresidential flat tariffs are generally not attractive for CHP and5 Residential Building DER Technologies Selection City CHP (

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrieved from National Renewable Energy Laboratory: http://Golden, Colorado: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates indoor air quality problems

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as combined heat and power (CHP), photovoltaics (PV),Generation, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), DER-CAMfuel cells, combined heat and power (CHP), and electrical

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: DefiningP. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: Defining

Aden, Nathaniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector: Urgent Need forĽrcan, 2007, Electricity and natural gas sectors in Korea: aand commercial sub-sectors, electricity use is distributed

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

DeLuchi, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the majority of commercial building energy usages. Electricenergy usage inside the building. Fortunately, a commercialcommercial building energy monitoring are insu?cient in identifying waste or guide improvement because they only provide usage

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology, Nationalof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissionsof Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mains Pressure Electric Storage Water Heaters Small MainsElectric Storage Water Heaters (water heaters. The objective is to

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mains Pressure Electric Storage Water Heaters Small MainsPressure Electric Storage Water Heaters (Storage & instantaneous water heaters Storage tanks

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand reduction, demand responsive lighting systems, building systems integration, and feedback for demand-side management.

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office buildings: An agent based approach. Energy Buildings (2011), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2011.07.007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Please cite this article in press as: T. Zhang, et al., Modelling electricity consumption in office behaviour, to simulate the electricity consumption in office buildings. Based on a case study, we use office electricity consumption problems. This paper theoretically contributes to an integration

Aickelin, Uwe

140

California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy" Collectively, energy use. Significant GHG emission reductions can be achieved through the design and construction of new green buildings $56 billion in electricity and natural gas costs. Green buildings provide a cost-effective strategy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water heating Technologies Electric heater Gas boilerCoal Boiler Small cogen Stove District heating Heat pumpElectric water heater Gas boiler Coal Boiler Small cogen Oil

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for electricity waste elimination and energy efficiency. Thefor energy waste reductions and energy efficiency projects,for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CO sub 2 emissions from coal-fired and solar electric power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the lifetime carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired, photovoltaic, and solar thermal electric power plants in the United States. These CO{sub 2} estimates are based on a net energy analysis derived from both operational systems and detailed design studies. It appears that energy conservation measures and shifting from fossil to renewable energy sources have significant long-term potential to reduce carbon dioxide production caused by energy generation and thus mitigate global warming. The implications of these results for a national energy policy are discussed. 40 refs., 8 figs., 23 tabs.

Keith, F.; Norton, P.; Brown, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will allow us to build models of energy usage aggregatedview allows us to build models of energy usage that can beus – it provides localization of the occupant; it provides a screen for visualizing energy usage

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption (EJ) Primary energy consumption and emissions,Total all sectors Primary energy consumption and emissions,

Williams, J.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material intensity, energy intensity of materials, buildingtype’s manufacturing energy intensity (how much energy itthe manufacturing energy intensity of each type of building

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as increasing boiler efficiency from 68% averageBuildings: Water Heating Efficiency Boiler Gas Boiler SmallSpace Heating Efficiency District Heating Boiler Gas Boiler

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,emissions credits) of combined heat and power (CHP), and 2)

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Existing solutions in commercial building energy monitoring are insufficient in identifying energy waste or for guiding improvement. This is because they only provide usage statistics… (more)

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Judy Lai, and Vincent Battaglia: “The added economic andMarnay, and Vincent Battaglia: “Plug-in Electric Vehicle

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washers Dish Driers Rice Cookers Vacuum Cleaners Electricovens 20 Electric rice cookers 21 DVD recorders FY2006: oil-

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is fraction of total electricity consumption for commercialy) ! calculate total electricity consumption for the end-useis fraction of total electricity consumption for residential

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameterin Building Sector Electricity Consumption Appendix 1. WorldElectricity in Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Demand and Emissions in Building in China: Scenarios and Policy Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent rapid growth of energy use in China exerts great pressure on the energy supply and environment. This study provides scenarios of future energy development in buildings, including urban residential, rural residential and service sectors (not...

Kejun, J.; Xiulian, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631616 Top 101

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631616 Top 1012

162

The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bat- teries, smart charging, building shells and appli-buildings to zero by 2030 (25). Structural conservation in the form of “smart

Williams, J.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as buffer for local renewables? Michael Stadler, Gonçaloas buffer for local renewables? *) Michael Stadler Gonçaloowners to integrate renewables and electric vehicles?

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparative Life-cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG, and SNG for Electricity from the LNG life-cycle. Notice that local distribution of natural gas falls outside our analysis boundary. Figure 1S: Domestic Natural Gas Life-cycle. Figure 2S: LNG Life-cycle. Processing Transmission

Jaramillo, Paulina

167

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas the single-family detached homes ana- lyzed. Figure A shows that the energy used on-site during the construction phase of a single story 1,500 ft2 home corresponds to 5.10% the total energy used in the life

Hall, Sharon J.

168

Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings Michaeland Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings 1 Michaelgoal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles trav

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

170

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity consumption ..the total building electricity consumption between measured87 Figure 49 Total electricity consumption end use breakdown

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electric loads to deliver load following and regu- lation,6], and regulation/load following [7]), and as DR is used toload as a function of time-of-week and outdoor air temperature. Following

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Webinar: Material Handling Fuel Cells for Building Electric Peak Shaving Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar, presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will explore the synergy between a facility's use of hydrogen fuel cell forklifts and its reduction of electric grid time of use energy charges.

174

Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ected in an electric ?eld additional radiation is emitted.the e?ect of electric ?elds on the radiation of air showersincludes the radiation of acceleration in the electric ?eld.

Buitink, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The technology path to deep greenhouse gas emissions cuts by 2050: The pivotal role of electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling of California’s electricity sector to 2020: UpdatedFig. 3B). In the electricity sector, three forms of de-options. Residual electricity-sector carbon emis- sions in

Williams, J.H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: MissouriProgramsCentralMWacTampa Electric Co isEnergy

177

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture that provides fine-grained real-time visibility into building energy consumption enables significant and sustainablearchitecture, to create actionable views of energy usages, which lead to significant and sustainablearchitecture for local energy generation, distribution, and sharing. IEEE Conference on Global Sustainable

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, how- ever, whether these techniques can translate to residential buildings, since the energy usage and commercial buildings consitute the largest sec- tor of U.S. primary energy consumption at 40% [1]. Building electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012

Parker, Lynne E.

180

Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A PV mapping tool visually represents a specific site and calculates PV system size and projected electricity production. This report identifies the commercially available solar mapping tools and thoroughly summarizes the source data type and resolution, the visualization software program being used, user inputs, calculation methodology and algorithms, map outputs, and development costs for each map.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPowerRaft River 5 MW Power PlantEnergy

182

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass FacilityArdica Technologies Jump to:Arete Power

183

Electrically driven single photon emission from a CdSe/ZnSSe single quantum dot at 200?K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature operation of an electrically driven single photon emitter based on a single epitaxial quantum dot is reported. CdSe/ZnSSe/MgS quantum dots are embedded into a p-i-n diode architecture providing almost background free excitonic and biexcitonic electroluminescence from individual quantum dots through apertures in the top contacts. Clear antibunching with g{sup 2}(??=?0)?=?0.28?±?0.20 can be tracked up to T?=?200?K, representing the highest temperature for electrically triggered single photon emission from a single quantum dot device.

Quitsch, Wolf; Kümmell, Tilmar; Bacher, Gerd [Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik and CENIDE, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Bismarckstraße 81, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Gust, Arne; Kruse, Carsten; Hommel, Detlef [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Universität Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, 28334 Bremen (Germany)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Estimates of health risks associated with radionuclide emissions from fossil-fueled steam-electric generating plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Title III, Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform a study of the hazards to public resulting from pollutants emitted by electric utility system generating units. Radionuclides are among the groups of pollutants listed in the amendment. This report updates previously published data and estimates with more recently available information regarding the radionuclide contents of fossil fuels, associated emissions by steam-electric power plants, and potential health effects to exposed population groups.

Nelson, C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631 Buildings

186

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631 Buildings2

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631 Buildings23

188

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4146631 Buildings234

189

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through different contractual and organisational arrangements. It argues that significant risk transfers onto governments, consumers, and, vendors are likely to be needed to make nuclear power attractive to investors in liberalised markets, at least... on corporate financing or some form of hybrid arrangement backed by the balance sheet of one or a consortium of large vertically integrated companies. Keywords electricity market, nuclear, financing JEL Classification D24, G3, L38, N7, Q48 Contact finon...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

190

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuels LLCTravel CoolEnergy

191

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appliance: Building 02 Datacenter. Pacific Gas and ElectricAppliance Building 11 Datacenter. Pacific Gas and Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 9 ? Annual electricity consumption comparison of the total annual electricity consumption, Buildings A and B mostly  measure  electricity  consumption,  cooling  loads, 

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small office; and 5) simulated energy savings and peak demand reduction by energy conservation measures using the TMY3 weather data can be significantly underestimated or overestimated. It is crucial to run multi-decade simulations with AMY weather data to fully assess the impact of weather on the long-term performance of buildings, and to evaluate the energy savings potential of energy conservation measures for new and existing buildings from a life cycle perspective.

Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridwith Connection of Electric Vehicles TABLE IV D ECISION V

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onof using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HVAC consumes more electricity in September, the daily trendsHVAC Equipment Figure 44 Building 2 typical weekday electricity consumption trendHVAC Equipment Figure 45 Building 2 typical weekend electricity consumption trend

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preliminary Evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for Sampling Attribution Signatures from Building Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides a preliminary evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for its suitability for sampling building materials for toxic compounds and their associated impurities and residues that might remain after a terrorist chemical attack. Chemical warfare (CW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals were represented by a range of test probes that included CW surrogates. The test probes encompassed the acid-base properties, volatilities, and polarities of the expected chemical agents and residual compounds. Results indicated that dissipation of the test probes depended heavily on the underlying material. Near complete dissipation of almost all test probes occurred from galvanized stainless steel within 3.0 hrs, whereas far stronger retention with concomitant slower release was observed for vinyl composition floor tiles. The test probes displayed immediated permanence on Teflon. FLEC sampling was further evaluated by profiling residues remaining after the evaporation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. This study lays the groundwork for the eventual goal of applying this sampling approach for collection of forensic attribution signatures that remain after a terrorist chemical attack.

Harvey, Scott D.; He, Lijian; Wahl, Jon H.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a silicon nanocrystal light-emitting diode by indium tin oxide nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an enhancement in light emission and electrical efficiencies of a Si nanocrystal (NC) light-emitting diode (LED) by employing indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs). The formed ITO NWs (diameter?electrical characteristics of Si NC LED were significantly improved, which was attributed to an enhancement in the current spreading property due to densely interconnecting ITO NWs. In addition, light output power and wall-plug efficiency from the Si NC LED were enhanced by 45% and 38%, respectively. This was originated from an enhancement in the escape probability of the photons generated in the Si NCs due to multiple scatterings at the surface of ITO NWs acting as a light waveguide. We show here that the use of the ITO NWs can be very useful for realizing a highly efficient Si NC LED.

Huh, Chul, E-mail: chuh@etri.re.kr; Kim, Bong Kyu; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob [IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Chel-Jong [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Oregon's 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires electricity companies and electric service suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions of electric...

202

Emission regulations in the electricity market : an analysis from consumers, producers and central planner perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the first part of this thesis, the objective is to identify optimal bidding strategies in the wholesale electricity market. We consider asymmetric producers submitting bids to a system operator. The system operator ...

Figueroa Rodriguez, Cristian Ricardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Connecting electric storage technologies to smartgrids will have substantial implications in building energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response. Mobile storage devices in electric vehicles (EVs) are in direct competition with conventional stationary sources at the building. EVs will change the financial as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g. PV, or fuel cells). In order to examine the impact of EVs on building energy costs and CO2 emissions in 2020, a distributed-energy-resources adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program with minimization of annual building energy costs or CO2 emissions. The mixed-integer linear program is applied to a set of 139 different commercial buildings in California and example results as well as the aggregated economic and environmental benefits are reported. The research shows that considering second life of EV batteries might be very beneficial for commercial buildings.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Kloess, Maximillian; Cardoso, Goncalo; Mégel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

206

Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Revised maps and associated data show potential mercury, sulfur, and chlorine emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin. Existing coal mining and coal washing practices result in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hot-side ESP, cold-side ESP, or hot-side ESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cold-side ESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum net mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions.

Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrically powered compressor cooling, direct fire oror direct engine powered compressor cooling. DER-CAM solves

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effect of real-time electricity pricing on renewable generators and system emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time retail pricing (RTP) of electricity, in which the retail price is allowed to vary with very little time delay in response to changes in the marginal cost of generation, offers expected short-run and long-run ...

Connolly, Jeremiah P. (Jeremiah Peter)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Responsive and Intelligent Building Information and Control for Low-Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that greatly reduce energy use and peak electric power in buildings while providing or improving the services operations. This paper provides an overview of research on intelligent energy information and control systems for the same percentage of greenhouse gas emissions, and account for about 70 percent of electricity use

211

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions from Hybrid and Plug-In Electric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics to someone by

212

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

workdays. Index Terms-- battery storage, building managementvehicle battery packs for grid storage,” J. of Powerstorage but not to consume any net energy from the battery.

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Proposal for the award of a service contract for the operation, maintenance and other work relating to the low-voltage electrical facilities of CERN’s non- machine buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a service contract for the operation, maintenance and other work relating to the low-voltage electrical facilities of CERN’s non- machine buildings

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle On-Road Emissions Characterization and Demonstration Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and willingness to forgive my work responsibilities, ultimately, allowed me to complete my dissertation. Time is a sacred resource, and if you had not been so generous with yours and mine, I might still be working on Chapter 3. Thank you for giving me more....3.1 Statistical Results………………………………………… 360 9.3.2 EM vs. dICE Use Between Operating Modes……………. 364 9.4 Pollutant Emissions…………………………………………………... 377 9.5 Concluding Remarks…………………………………………………. 400 CHAPTER 10: Diesel Internal Combustion Engine Use in PHEV...

Hohl, Carrie

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Climate Policy and the Long-Term Evolution of the U.S. Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings are the dominant driver of daily and seasonal electric load cycles, and account for 40 percent of U.S. final energy use. They account for roughly 10 percent of direct U.S. CO2 emissions and roughly 40 percent including indirect emissions from electricity generation. This paper explores the possible evolution of this sector over the coming century, its potential role in climate action and response to climate policies, and the potential benefits of advances in building technologies for addressing climate change. The paper presents a set of scenarios based on a detailed, service-based model of the U.S. buildings sector that is embedded within a long-term, global, integrated assessment model, MiniCAM. Eight scenarios are created in total, combining two sets of assumptions regarding U.S. building service demand growth, two sets of assumptions regarding the improvements in building energy technologies, and two assumptions regarding long-term U.S. climate action – a no-climate-action assumption and an assumption of market-based policies to reduce U.S. CO2 emissions consistent with a 450 ppmv global target. Through these eight scenarios, the paper comments on the implications of continued growth in building service demands, the ability of efficiency measures to reduce emissions, and the strong link between decarbonization of electricity generation and building sector emissions.

Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Rong, Fang; Smith, Steven J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar thermal, stationary batteries, thermal storage, andThe model allows the EV batteries to transfer electricity toPV, and stationary batteries as options, e) an everything

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy… (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Well-to-Wheel Energy, Emissions, and Cost Analysis of Electricity and Fuel Used in Conventional and Electrified Vehicles, and Their Connection to a Sustainable Energy Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produced in creating the electricity through a full Life Cycle Analysis. As a result, proper comparison of electrified and conventional vehicles must include a complete Well-to-Wheel (WtW) study including the emissions generated through production and use...

Strecker, Bryan Anthony

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric-and Nuclear Power: A Life-cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted for publication in Energy Policy Greenhouse-gas Emissions from Solar Electric- and Nuclear, photovoltaic, nuclear, life cycle 1 #12;Introduction The production of energy by burning fossil fuels generates, it is envisioned that expanding generation technologies based on nuclear power and renewable energy sources would

224

Accuracy and reliability of CEMS at subpart DA (electric utilities) facilities. [Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPA promulgated minimum quality assurance (QA) requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) in 40 CFR Part 60 Appendix F. Appendix F requires Da source owners to develop site-specific QA plans and report the results of EPA specified QA activities each calendar quarter. The first calendar quarter for which a report was to be submitted is January through March 1988. The report of QA activities under Appendix F is called a Data Assessment Report (DAR). The DAR includes identifying and descriptive information for the CEMS, results of periodic audits, identification of periods when calibration drift exceeds specific criteria, identification of periods when the analyzers of CEMS are out of control (OOC), and descriptions of corrective actions in response to OOC conditions. An OOC period occurs when an analyzer or a CEMS fails to meet criteria specified in Appendix F. The criteria are expressed in terms of CEMS relative accuracy, analyzer accuracy, and analyzer drift. The principle objective of the study is an evaluation of the information in DARs for six quarters from January 1988 through June 1989. Secondary study objectives include the establishment of contacts with agency staff who normally receive the DARs each quarter and identification of facilities for which DARs were apparently not received, for follow-up by the appropriate agency.

Walsh, G.; Mans, K.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding electric generation....

226

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Ohio's 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity suppliers to disclose details regarding their fuel mix and emissions to customers. Electric utilities and...

227

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Maryland’s 1999 electric utility restructuring legislation requires all electric companies and electricity suppliers to provide customers with details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of...

228

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

per kWh), but that CO2 emissions from hydropower plantswill be less than CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel plants.kg/ha) 2. Difference in CO2 emissions vs. control plot (kg/

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially reduce the energy used in buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 KTA@Bath Challenge The only way to achieve low carbon emission targets is to substantially research and lead the education of highly skilled low carbon designers. These Centres will have strong

Burton, Geoffrey R.

230

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

231

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management in the US electricity sector, Energy Policy, 23(deep reductions in electricity sector GHG emissions requireson the electricity sector. 19 Table 3.

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Building Commissioning in the Chinese Mainland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Governmental buildingsGovernmental buildings Building InformationBuilding Information Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 29302930 18001800 39, 60039, 600 JJGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU)burned Heat Absorption Chiller (FCU...)2456245660060041, 51041, 510GGGasGas--burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller burned Heat Absorption Chiller + Electric chiller (FCU)(FCU)65326532>800>80050, 00050, 000HH Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU )Electric chiller ( FCU, AHU ) 47004700 560560 45, 45045...

Zhu, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lai, C. Marnay, and V. Battaglia (2010), “Plug-in ElectricBeer, Judy Lai, and Vincent Battaglia Environmental EnergyLai a) , and Vincent Battaglia a) Ernest Orlando Lawrence

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source...

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Deployment of CCS Technologies across the Load Curve for a Competitive Electricity Market as a Function of CO2 Emissions Permit Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consistent with other published studies, the modelling presented here reveals that baseload power plants are the first aspects of the electricity sector to decarbonize and are essentially decarbonized once CO2 permit prices exceed a certain threshold ($90/ton CO2 in this study). The decarbonization of baseload electricity is met by significant expansions of nuclear power and renewable energy generation technologies as well as the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies applied to both coal and natural gas fired power plants. Relatively little attention has been paid thus far to whether intermediate and peaking units would respond the same way to a climate policy given the very different operational and economic context that these kinds of electricity generation units operate under. In this paper, the authors discuss key aspects of the load segmentation methodology used to imbed a varying electricity demand within the GCAM (a state-of-the-art Integrated Assessment Model) energy and economic modelling framework and present key results on the role CCS technologies could play in decarbonizng subpeak and peak generation (encompassing only the top 10% of the load) and under what conditions. To do this, the authors have modelled two hypothetical climate policies that require 50% and 80% reductions in US emissions from business as usual by the middle of this century. Intermediate electricity generation is virtually decarbonized once carbon prices exceed approximately $150/tonCO2. When CO2 permit prices exceed $160/tonCO2, natural gas power plants with CCS have roughly the same marketshare as conventional gas plants in serving subpeak loads. The penetration of CCS into peak load (upper 6% here) is minimal under the scenarios modeled here suggesting that CO2 emissions from this aspect of the U.S. electricity sector would persist well into the future even with stringent CO2 emission control policies in place.

Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Buildings Centers of Excellence · 40% of total primary energy consumption · 74% of electricity consumption · 56% of natural gas consumption (including gas-generated electricity used in buildings) · 39 the nation accounts for its energy consumption, making the energy savings potential even greater. National

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

238

Energy payback and CO{sub 2} gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES).

Kulcinski, G.L.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

242

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that could be powered entirely by electricity using plug- in vehicles. Thus, plug-in vehicles have assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas

Michalek, Jeremy J.

243

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

244

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

MĂĽller, Jens-Dominik

245

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

246

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

247

An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hour hour Fig. 8. Office Building Jul Electricity Use y Fig.9. Office Building Jul Electricity Load Provision with CHPEnergy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment,

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mechanical and Electrical Systems for the Tallest Building/Man-Made Structure in the World: A Burj Dubai Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Persian Gulf. Its location coincides with the northern edge of the earth’s equatorial region, an area influenced by so-called trade wind patterns. The climate is classified as arid sub-tropical and is characterized by average diurnal temperature... for variable speed fan coil unit is included in the project. Chilled water pumps and air handling unit, where possible, are equipped with variable speed drives. Photovoltaic paneling was considered to be placed on the spire to provide electricity; however...

Frechette, R.; Leung, L.; Boyer, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The economics of investing in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses economics of green buildings. The need to reduce greenhouse gases emissions became clear. Buildings account for a large part of the greenhouse gases emissions, changing the atmosphere's composition. ...

Rizk, Charbel Maroun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion (N2O emissions peak with particle sizes of about 1 mm), and gas residence time within and after the fixed bed (

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SCENARIOS FOR DEEP CARBON EMISSION REDUCTIONS FROM ELECTRICITY BY 2050 IN WESTERN NORTH AMERICA USING THE SWITCH ELECTRIC POWER SECTOR PLANNING MODEL California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used a state-of-the-art planning model called SWITCH for the electric power system to investigate the evolution of the power systems of California and western North America from present-day to 2050 in the context of deep decarbonization of the economy. Researchers concluded that drastic power system carbon emission reductions were feasible by 2050 under a wide range of possible futures. The average cost of power in 2050 would range between $149 to $232 per megawatt hour across scenarios, a 21 to 88 percent increase relative to a business-as-usual scenario, and a 38 to 115 percent increase relative to the present-day cost of power. The power system would need to undergo sweeping change to rapidly decarbonize. Between present-day and 2030 the evolution of the Western Electricity Coordinating Council power system was dominated by implementing aggressive energy efficiency measures, installing renewable energy and gas-fired generation facilities and retiring coal-fired generation. Deploying wind, solar and geothermal power in the 2040 timeframe reduced power system emissions by displacing gas-fired generation. This trend continued for wind and solar in the 2050 timeframe but was accompanied by large amounts of new storage and long-distance high-voltage transmission capacity. Electricity storage was used primarily to move solar energy from the daytime into the night to charge electric vehicles and meet demand from electrified heating. Transmission capacity over the California border increased by 40 - 220 percent by 2050, implying that transmission siting, permitting, and regional cooperation will become increasingly important. California remained a net electricity importer in all scenarios investigated. Wind and solar power were key elements in power system decarbonization in 2050 if no new nuclear capacity was built. The amount of installed gas capacity remained relatively constant between present-day and 2050, although carbon capture and sequestration was installed on some gas plants by 2050.

Collaboration/ University of California, Berkeley; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel; Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Building 32 35 Building 36  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building 10 Building 13 Building 7 LinHall Drive Lot R10 Lot R12 Lot 207 Lot 209 LotR9 Lot 205 Lot 203 LotBuilding30 Richland Avenue 39 44 Building 32 35 Building 36 34 Building 18 Building 19 11 12 45 29 15 Building 5 8 9 17 Building 16 6 Building 31 Building 2 Ridges Auditorium Building 24 Building 4

Botte, Gerardine G.

254

Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 GREENHOUSE GASES FROM THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ELECTRICITYCO2 GREENHOUSE GASES FROM THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ELECTRICITY

Delucchi, Mark

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO and life cycle GHG emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the choice of coal over natural gas. External incentives such as low natural gas prices compared to coalImplications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO 2 , NO X of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG

Jaramillo, Paulina

256

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of the state's 1997 electric utility restructuring legislation, Illinois established provisions for the disclosure of fuel mix and emissions data. All electric utilities and alternative...

257

First evidence of asymmetric cost pass-through of Eu emissions allowances : examining wholesale electricity prices in Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper applies the literature on asymmetric price transmission to the emerging commodity market for EU emissions allowances (EUA). We utilize an error correction model and an autoregressive distributed lag model to ...

Zachmann, Georg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Richmond Electric Vehicle Initiative Electric Vehicle Readiness...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

MO) Vehicles Home About Vehicle Technologies Office Plug-in Electric Vehicles & Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Alternative Fuels Modeling, Testing, Data & Results Education...

260

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)GWh) NG effect (%) carbon emissions (tC) carbon effect (%)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

electricAl engineering College of Engineering and Mines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encompasses telecommunica- tions, electrical power generation, transmission and distribution, control systems power engineers design and oversee the construction, installation and maintenance of electrical systems modern power electronic devices to control power generation and distribution and build electric drives

Hartman, Chris

262

Development of a local carbon dioxide emissions inventory based on energy demand and waste production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the study that led to the development of a carbon dioxide emissions matrix for the Oeiras municipality, one of the largest Portuguese municipalities, located in the metropolitan area of Lisbon. This matrix takes into account the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to an increase of electricity demand in buildings as well as solid and liquid wastes treatment from the domestic and services sectors. Using emission factors that were calculated from the relationship between the electricity produced and amount of treated wastes, the GHC emissions in the Oeiras municipality were estimated for a time series of 6 yr (1998 - 2003). The obtained results showed that the electricity sector accounts for approximately 75% of the municipal emissions in 2003. This study was developed to obtain tools to base options and actions to be undertaken by local authorities such as energy planning and also public information. 11 refs., 12 tabs.

Joao Gomes; Joana Nascimento; Helena Rodrigues [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Cementfor Fuel Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron andElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

PHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management of electricity demand. · PV applications are now being integrated directly into building roofs, Valuation of Demand-Side Commercial PV Systems in the United States, we sought to measure the costPHOTOVOLTAICS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS-- A NATURAL MATCH A study highlighting strategic

Perez, Richard R.

265

15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Savings (lbs/year) Combined Estimated Cost ($) Simple Estimated Payback (yrs) 0.025 11.1 30.1- Combined Ozone Season Period NOx Emissions Savings (lbs/day) 28.5-16.3 6.7 - 34.9 ESL-TR-07-08-02 Energy Systems Laboratory - August 2007 7... individual measures above for specific savings * Energy Cost: Electricity cost = $0.15/kWh Natural gas cost = $1.00/therm 4. Savings depend on fuel mix used. See detailed writeup (Building Description) * Building type: Residential * Gross area: 2...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

266

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light- Dutyreduce their CO2 emissions. The emerging technologiessignificantly reduce their CO2 emissions. These technologies

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Value of Advanced Technologies in the U.S. Buildings Sector in Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a wide body of research focused on the potential of advanced technologies to reduce energy consumption in buildings. How such improvements relate to global climate change, however, is less clear, due to the complexity of the climate change issue, and the implications for the energy system as a whole that need to be considered. This study uses MiniCAM, an integrated assessment model, to examine the contributions of several suites of advanced buildings technologies in meeting national carbon emissions reduction targets, as part of a global policy to mitigate climate change by stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 ppmv. Focal technology areas include building shells, heat pumps for HVAC and water heating applications, solid-state lighting, and miscellaneous electric equipment. We find that advanced heat pumps and energy-efficient miscellaneous electric equipment show the greatest potential to reduce aggregate building sector future energy consumption and policy costs, but that all focal areas are important for reducing energy consumption. Because of assumed availability of low-cost, emissions-reduced electricity generation technologies in these scenarios, heat pumps are especially important for facilitating fuel-switching towards electricity. Buildings sector energy consumption is reduced by 28% and policy costs are reduced by 17% in a scenario with advanced technologies in all focal areas.

Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response in Commercial Buildings 3.1. Demand Response in Commercial Buildings ElectricityDemand Response: Understanding the DR potential in commercial buildings

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PA. 3. DEMAND RESPONSE IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS ElectricityDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial BuildingsDemand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

captured  for  both  diesel  and  electric  vehicles.   The for the urban diesel bus,  the electric buses’ fraction of Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Present Status and Marketing Prospects of the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies to Reduce CO2 Emissions of New Light-Duty Vehicles in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE EMERGING HYBRID-ELECTRIC AND DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES TOof the Emerging Hybrid-Electric and Diesel Technologies tomodern clean diesel engines and hybrid-electric powertrains

Burke, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity can provide, such as heat for homes, lights for commercial buildings, or motors for industrial

277

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Comparative simulations of hybrid...

278

The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 reductions in the electricity sector. As the reader mightcarbon intensity of the electricity sector considerably (seeCommercial Building Sector Electricity Demand (mid value),

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve...

280

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and annual maintenance costs for distributed generation (utility electricity and natural gas purchases plus amortized capital and annual maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall ScenarioElectricity Sector Conditions Assumed for Electricity Sector and Building

Wei, Max

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

FORESTRY BUILDING: BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FORESTRY BUILDING: BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN Date Adopted: August 18, 2009 Date Revised June 17, 2013 Prepared By: Diana Evans and Jennifer Meyer #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN VERSION 3 2 Table Suspension or Campus Closure SECTION 3: BUILDING INFORMATION 3.1 Building Deputy/Alternate Building Deputy

284

Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings. Measured electricity consumption Figure 3 showsthe measured total electricity consumption of the buildingmonths of 2005. The electricity consumption per floor area

Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING PHARMACY AND BANK BUILDING JOHN WOOLEY BUILDING OLD TEARCHER'S BUILDING PHYSICS BUILDING BAXTER'S LODGE INSTITUTE BUILDING CONSERVATION WORKS R.D.WATT BUILDING MACLEAY BUILDING THE QUARANGLE BADHAM BUILDING J.D. STEWART BUILDING BLACKBURN BUILDING MADSEN BUILDING STORE

Viglas, Anastasios

286

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in peak shaving by the battery and PV. Therefore, to satisfylow storage & 60% PV incentive Battery discharging BatteryElectricity input to battery Considering lower PV prices and

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the July 11, 1996, Electrical Shock at Technical Area 53, Building MPF-14, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report is an independent product of an electrical shock accident investigation board appointed by Bruce G. Twining, Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office, Department of Energy.

289

Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regard to emissions, electricity sector contributes aboutthe exception of the electricity sector. With respect tofor Electricity, Pipelines and Organic chemicals sectors but

Rajagopal, Deepak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle (BEV) with an electric motor capable of supplyingmode operation uses the electric motor to run during low-PHEV x can be run on the electric motor only for the first x

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................ 8 Buildings Converting to Electric Space Conditioning or Water Heating Systems......................................................................................................................................... 1 New Site Built Electrically Heated Residential Buildings and New Electrically Heated Manufactured model conservation standards. These include the standard for new electrically heated residential

292

Abstract--Energy efficiency for the buildings is vital for the environment and sustainability. Buildings are responsible for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms-- Green Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Energy Modeling, Smart Energy, Energy1 Abstract--Energy efficiency for the buildings is vital for the environment and sustainability. Buildings are responsible for significant energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in the United

Jain, Raj

293

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School  Buses, Electric for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Life?cycle Model of an Automobile.  Environmental Science & 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Filter Press Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"FILTER PRESS BUILDING" AVON LAKE WATER POLLUTION CONTROL CENTER HEAT PUMP HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEM William M. Bush, P.E. The Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company Cleveland, Ohio ABSTRACT The high heat value of the plant's treated wa..." of the thousands of homes in the com munity, we were able to recommend a system of heat recovery refrigeration cycles that would provide space conditioning at a fraction of the cost of natural gas. The all-electric recommendation was accepted because...

Bush, W. M.

296

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

297

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings AgencyCompany Organization...

298

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency...

299

Moving Toward Zero Energy Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are extremely energy efficient and produce enough of their own power that, over the course of a year, they produce as much as they need to operate.? Some may call them zero emissions, eco-buildings, green buildings, solar buildings. I don?t quibble with a... of Directors U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 00 12 02/ 5 86 - 12 11 mark.ginsberg@ee.doe.gov Moving Toward Zero Energy Buildings When I began discussing the idea of Zero Energy Buildings in the mid...

Ginsberg, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA nursing homes is the constant total NYC heating load. Theand heating demand were performed for the CA nursing home.home meets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases and heating

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edison (SCE) have time-of-use tariffs with stiff demandthe absence of a time of use tariff for electrical energy.the power of the time-of-use tariff. The xix The Effects of

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Building load control and optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on load control by improving the operations in existing building HVAC ...

Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. H. , Hybrid Diesel-Electric Heavy Duty Bus Emissions:use emission benefits of a diesel-electric hybrid tug wereof a multi- powered diesel-electric hybrid system. viii

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Smarter Buildings Survey Consumers Rank Their Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all electricity in the US is consumed by buildings ­ and up to 50 percent of that is wasted will be the single largest energy consumers and emitters of greenhouse gasses on our planet. The skyscrapers and building portfolios: · Operational costs. The combined effect of rising energy costs and a dwindling global

305

Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental impacts of building integrated PV applications in the state public buildings sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If the US is to meet its commitments for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emission reductions, as anticipated by the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change and the Clean air Act Amendments of 1990, it almost certainly must implement policies to increase the use of renewable energy. This paper evaluates the potential of photovoltaic (PV) technologies to deliver high-value electrical services while offsetting SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} emissions. Their study focuses on PV applications in the public buildings sector because of its potential for speeding the commercialization of the technology in a market conducive to long-term return on investment. The study investigates the economic and environmental implications of PV meeting 2% of the energy demand of public buildings. The specific application investigated is a roof-mounted dispatchable peak-shaving system with uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capability. Several previous studies have shown that such a system is cost-effective on the basis of the energy services it provides. The present analysis indicates that this application can play an important role in helping the US meet its CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions targets.

Byrne, J.; Agbemabiese, L.; Kliesch, J.; Eiffert, P.; Hadjilambrinos, C.; Nigro, R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity consumption in India (2012) #12;Growth in electricity consumption by building sector At a conservative 9 % growth rate electricity consumption of building sector by 2020 will be more than 2 times ( Source: DB Research) #12;Electricity Consumption Pattern in Residential Sector (Source: BEE, Figure taken

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

308

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

internal combustion engine is working, it reasonably can be assumed to have similar emissionInternal Combustion Engine (ICE) supplies additional power for high- speed/power operation. Although some studies capture emission

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, Chen, K.S. , et al. , 2003.  Motorcycle Emissions and Fuel On Road  Mopeds and Motorcycles.  Available online at 

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rhode Island requires all entities that sell electricity in the state to disclose details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of their electric generation to end-use customers. This information...

311

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Michigan's Customer Choice and Electric Reliability Act of 2000 (P.A. 141) requires electric suppliers to disclose to customers details related to the fuel mix and emissions, in pounds per megawatt...

312

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2001, Nevada enacted legislation requiring the state’s electric utilities to provide details regarding the fuel mix and emissions of electric generation to their customers. Utilities must...

313

Building Load Simulation and Validation of an Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the model for electricity use were calibrated to match the actual electricity use for the average year of the available data for years 1998, 1999, and 2000. The monthly and annual cooling loads of the building were calculated by using the DOE2.1E. The extra...

Alghimlas, F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Policy, Building loads, Tariff Design, and Technologyof Policy, Building loads, Tariff Design, and Technologygiven prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

10 Kammen and others/p. 1 Cost-Effectiveness of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions from Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that stretches from fossil fuel­powered conventional vehicles (CVs) through hybrid electric vehicles 1-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Daniel M. Kammen1 , Samuel M. Arons, Derek M. Lemoine and Holmes Hummel Cars per year.2 Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles could alter these trends. On a vehicle technology spectrum

Kammen, Daniel M.

316

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations.

317

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT McGILL Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AT McGILL Bachelor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering What is electrical engineering? Our society is powered by electricity and electrical engineering can be found at the core of the rapidly evolving high-tech industry. Electrical engineers design, build, test

Barthelat, Francois

318

Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate Variable costand Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium GHG emissions rate (CO 2 -eq/kWh) Cost

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill....

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A study of time-dependent responses of a mechanical displacement ventilation (DV) system and an underfloor air distribution (UFAD) system : building energy performance of the UFAD system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity demand responses in a building. The remedieselectricity demand responses for a building. An alternativedemand response (DR), is widely suggested for building HVAC

Yu, Jong Keun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC’s enactment, only two states and one territory out of 35 Indian states and union territories formally adopted ECBC and six additional states are in the legislative process of approving ECBC. There are several barriers that slow down the process. First, stakeholders, such as architects, developers, and state and local governments, lack awareness of building energy efficiency, and do not have enough capacity and resources to implement ECBC. Second, institution for implementing ECBC is not set up yet; ECBC is not included in local building by-laws or incorporated into the building permit process. Third, there is not a systematic approach to measuring and verifying compliance and energy savings, and thus the market does not have enough confidence in ECBC. Energy codes achieve energy savings only when projects comply with codes, yet only few countries measure compliance consistently and periodic checks often indicate poor compliance in many jurisdictions. China and the U.S. appear to be two countries with comprehensive systems in code enforcement and compliance The United States recently developed methodologies measuring compliance with building energy codes at the state level. China has an annual survey investigating code compliance rate at the design and construction stages in major cities. Like many developing countries, India has only recently begun implementing an energy code and would benefit from international experience on code compliance. In this paper, we examine lessons learned from the U.S. and China on compliance assessment and how India can apply these lessons to develop its own compliance evaluation approach. This paper also provides policy suggestions to national, state, and local governments to improve compliance and speed up ECBC implementation.

Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Building America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION USE AND CONTROL IN BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROLS DISTRIBUTED GENERATION USE AND CONTROL IN BUILDINGS ABSTRACT The increasing commercial is designed to continuously minimize energy costs by monitoring utility prices and building demand, while.g., thermal energy storage) have been developed. Measurements of building electrical and thermal demand were

Mease, Kenneth D.

326

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG emissions: Supplementary Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/MJ = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions at natural gas plant A in ERCOT: 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Annual = 59 kg CO2 e/MWh / 40% = 148 kg CO2 e/MWh Combustion emissions per MWh = 500 kg CO2 e/MWh Life cycle-level combustion emissions at fossil fuel plants in ERCOT, MISO and PJM. The red lines represent median values

Jaramillo, Paulina

327

Building technologies  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Building technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producing zero emissions. . The EPRI studies mentioned abovetwo technical reports, EPRI (2007) published Environmentalsport utility vehicles (EPRI, 2002) An 80% required safety

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Beardmore Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

331

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by adding additional batteries to the design, allowing theincreases. Advanced Batteries for Electric-Drive Vehicles (generally require larger batteries with correspondingly

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHEV impact on wind energy market (Short et al. , 2006) andVehicles in California Energy Markets, TransportationElectric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets, National Renewable

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Feasibility Study Of Advanced Technology Hov Systems: Volume 2b: Emissions Impact Of Roadway-powered Electric Buses, Light-duty Vehicles, And Automobiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIGHT-DUTY VEHICLES, AND AUTOMOBILES Mark A. Miller Victorand The analysis involves automobiles in California arePowered Electric Automobiles -a---- Range of Estimated

Miller, Mark A.; Dato, Victor; Chira-chavala, Ted

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Cooperative Demand Response Using Repeated Game for Price-Anticipating Buildings in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Demand response with price-anticipating buildings. C.one-stage demand response because all the building managersbuilding electricity use, with application to demand response,”

Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Building Name BuildingAbbr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capture/InstrCam ClassroomCapture/TechAsst SkypeWebcam NOTES for R&R Only Room Detail Building Times Weekend and Evening BldgBuilding Name BuildingAbbr RoomNumber SeatCount DepartmentalPriority SpecialNeedsSeating Special Detail Building Contacts Event Scheduling Detail BI 02010 104 NR Y 52 61 81 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 94

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

336

Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

onward. Table A-4: Carbon Emission Factors of ElectricityAdjustment factor Carbon Emission Factor (kg C/kWh)L ABORATORY Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the  computing  needs for building this smart grid,  and using the cloud for building the smart grid.   4.1 The requirements  for  building  successful  smart  electric 

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if supplied with coal power; at emissions rates equal torates). If coal power Electricity GHG emissions rate (gCOlower GHG emissions rates than coal power supplying non-

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Renewable Energy Applications for Existing Buildings: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces technical opportunities, means, and methods for incorporating renewable energy (RE) technologies into building designs and operations. It provides an overview of RE resources and available technologies used successfully to offset building electrical and thermal energy loads. Methods for applying these technologies in buildings and the role of building energy efficiency in successful RE projects are addressed along with tips for implementing successful RE projects.

Hayter, S. J.; Kandt, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy 101: Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 highlights the benefits of electric vehicles, including improved fuel efficiency, reduced emissions, and lower maintenance costs. For more information on electric vehicles from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Vehicle Technologies Program website: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,12. Global Energy-Related CO2 Emissions by End-Use Sector,2030. Energy-Related CO2 Emissions (GtC) Transport Buildings

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Utility Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV -2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICITY Consumption MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 8 CCF STEAM Consumption CHILLED WATER Consumption GAS Building Analysis Billing Period: NOV - 2013 032 JACKSON HALL: 150,393 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption,550 Square Feet ELECTRICITY Consumption 114,185 KWHRS MUNICIPAL WATER Consumption 1,423 CCF STEAM Consumption

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

346

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Generation Shares Demand Reduction from EE CIS Emissions Powercoal and electricity in demand sectors, and the decarbonization of the power sector. Under AIS, annual emissions

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepower JumpBuildingChangeprovide

348

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs References . . Coal-Electric Generation Technologyon coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissionson coal preparation, coal-electric generation and emissions

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Implementation of California AB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets James Bushnellits Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets James Bushnell *gas emissions from electricity and perhaps other industries.

Bushnell, Jim B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates from the electricity sector to assumed values inrates from the electricity sector to assumed values intend to underestimate electricity sector emissions, and it

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

Radhi, Hassan, E-mail: h_alradhi@yahoo.com [Global Engineering Bureau, P.O Box 33130, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); Sharples, Stephen, E-mail: steve.sharples@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Architecture, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity AgencyCompany...

353

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was no good source of local building stone, rock was usuallyrock-cut shrines and especially tombs, and these are the sources

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in JapaneseBuildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet growing energy demands, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and on-site generation coupled with effective utilization of exhaust heat will all be required. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems (or microgrids). This research investigates a method of choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at the Berkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds the optimal combination of installed equipment from available DER technologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and thermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads can be served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, and cooling. Five prototype Japanese commercial buildings are examined and DER-CAM applied to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Based on the optimization results, energy and emission reductions are evaluated. Furthermore, a Japan-U.S. comparison study of policy, technology, and utility tariffs relevant to DER installation is presented. Significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the DER-CAM results. Savings were most noticeable in the sports facility (a very favourable CHP site), followed by the hospital, hotel, and office building.

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida,Masaru

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy Saving Homes and Buildings, Continuum Magazine, Spring 2014 / Issue 6 (Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue of Continuum focuses on NREL's research to improve the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings. Heating, cooling, and lighting our homes and commercial structures account for more than 70% of all electricity used in the United States. That costs homeowners, businesses, and government agencies more than $400 billion annually, about 40% of our nation's total energy costs. Producing that energy contributes almost 40% of our nation's carbon dioxide emissions.By 2030, an estimated 900 billion square feet of new and rebuilt construction will be developed worldwide, providing an unprecedented opportunity to create efficient, sustainable buildings. Increasing the energy performance of our homes alone could potentially eliminate up to 160 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions and lower residential energy bills by $21 billion annually by the end of the decade.

Not Available

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building Energy Efficiency in China - Status, Trends, Targets, and Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well accepted that the reduction of building energy consumption is one of the most effective actions fro reducing the emission of CO2 and for protection of energy resources world wide. Understanding and comparing the real building energy...

Xia, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in theElectricity Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction in the Iron

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Roseville Electric- Residential New Construction Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Roseville Electric provides financial incentives to encourage local builders to construct energy efficient homes which incorporate solar resources. Participating builders can choose to build...

359

Notice of Publication of Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The guideline describes a risk management process that is targeted to the specific needs of electricity sector organizations. The objective of the guideline is to build upon...

360

Gibson Electric Membership Corporation- Energy Efficiency Rebates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Gibson Electric Membership Corporation, in collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority, promotes energy efficient building design through its [http://www.energyright.com/ ''energy right'']...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Air Emissions and Oil Displacement Benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery packs allow vehicles to travel longer distance on electric power instead of gasoline may (1) produce fewer greenhouse gas emissions when powered by electricity instead of gasoline emissions relative to HEVs, depending on electricity source. Plug-in vehicles with large battery packs

Michalek, Jeremy J.

362

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1:...

363

Empirical Characterization and Modeling of Electrical Loads in Smart Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in data analysis: i) generating device-accurate synthetic traces of building electricity usage, and ii) filtering out loads that generate rapid and random power variations in building electricity data. Keywords--ElectricalEmpirical Characterization and Modeling of Electrical Loads in Smart Homes Sean Barker, Sandeep

Shenoy, Prashant

364

A Study on Design Parameters of Stirling Engines for Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most promising projects in the application of combined heat and power(CHP) lies in energy production for buildings. Stirling engines are very applicable to residential buildings, especially because of the higher electricity...

Ding, G.; Huang, S.; Zhang, C.; Hu, X.; Zhang, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gases (GHG) or carbon footprint, and public education onand lowering the carbon footprint or GHG emissions forby reducing carbon footprint. • Compare buildings’ energy

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Laying the Foundation for Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Find out how the Energy Department is helping commercial building owners and operators throughout America save energy and reduce carbon emissions.

368

City of Asheville- Efficiency Standards for City Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year...

369

Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. and China are the world’s top two economics. Together they consumed one-third of the world’s primary energy. It is an unprecedented opportunity and challenge for governments, researchers and industries in both countries to join together to address energy issues and global climate change. Such joint collaboration has huge potential in creating new jobs in energy technologies and services. Buildings in the US and China consumed about 40% and 25% of the primary energy in both countries in 2010 respectively. Worldwide, the building sector is the largest contributor to the greenhouse gas emission. Better understanding and improving the energy performance of buildings is a critical step towards sustainable development and mitigation of global climate change. This project aimed to develop a standard methodology for building energy data definition, collection, presentation, and analysis; apply the developed methods to a standardized energy monitoring platform, including hardware and software, to collect and analyze building energy use data; and compile offline statistical data and online real-time data in both countries for fully understanding the current status of building energy use. This helps decode the driving forces behind the discrepancy of building energy use between the two countries; identify gaps and deficiencies of current building energy monitoring, data collection, and analysis; and create knowledge and tools to collect and analyze good building energy data to provide valuable and actionable information for key stakeholders.

Hong, Tianzhen; Feng, Wei; Lu, Alison; Xia, Jianjun; Yang, Le; Shen, Qi; Im, Piljae; Bhandari, Mahabir

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

VT Electric Services VTES 601 Energy Dr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VT Electric Services Location VTES 601 Energy Dr. Blacskburg, VA 24061 (540) 231-6437 Office Hours Electric Services is to provide adequate, reliable and economical electric service to the buildings; Street & Sidewalk Illumination Annual Operating Budget $38 million (approx.) Electric Services

Buehrer, R. Michael

371

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References Retrieved from...

372

Experience curves for power plant emission control technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazardous air pollutant removal’, Proceeding of SO 2 Controlto control emissions of harmful air pollutants from electric

Rubin, Edward S.; Yeh, Sonia; Hounshell, David A; Taylor, Margaret R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Large Scale Roll-Out of Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the emissions reduction targets. Within the transport sector, electric vehicles (EV) are considered as one of the important mitigation options. However the effect of EVs on emissions and the electricity sector is subject to debate. We use scenario analysis...

Talaei, Alireza; Begg, Katherine; Jamasb, Tooraj

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Inventory of China's Energy-Related CO2 Emissions in 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China’s 2008 Thermal Electricity Sector CO 2 Emissions byheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissionsheat. Share of thermal electricity sector’s CO 2 emissions

Fridley, David

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House graphic...

376

Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

377

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

378

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Real-Time Optimization Strategies for Building Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our analysis indicates that it is possible to obtain energy savings of more ... building-wide, proactive, optimization, real-time, electricity markets, energy man-.

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Education Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this grant is to educate the public about carbon emissions and the energy-saving and job-related benefits of commercial building energy efficiency. investments in Illinois.

None

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by...

383

Instrumenting Buildings to Determine Retrofit Savings: Murphy's Law Strikes Again  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&M University. Metering typically includes monitoring for the whole-building electric load, chilled and hot water thermal loads and selected submetered electrical loads. The emphasis of the lessons learned was on the instrumentation used and installation...

O'Neal, D. L.; Bryant, J.; Carlson, K.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

CSEM WP 113 Using Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSEM WP 113 Using Environmental Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from Emissions Permit Prices to Raise Electricity Prices: Evidence from the California Electricity Market analyzes the extent to which the conditions in the emissions permit market for oxides of nitrogen (NOx

California at Berkeley. University of

385

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 Are the pyramids of Egypt built of poured concreteel-Anba’ut, Red Sea coast, Egypt. Marmora 6, pp. 45 - 56.building stones of ancient Egypt are those relatively soft,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Building Science  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question ŤHow do we first do no harm with high-r enclosures??

387

Building debris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Healthy buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is covered under the following headings: Healthy building strategies/productivity, Energy and design issues, Ventilation, Contaminants, Thermal, airflow, and humidity issues, School-related issues, Sources and sinks, Filtering, Operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Better Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Challenge National leadership Initiative Better Information MOU with the Appraisal Foundation Better Tax Incentives/Credits New :179d eligibility and tool; Announced in March Better Financing With Small Business...: engaging in ESCO financing with low interest bonds) ?Tenant/Employee behaviors at odds with efficiency goals ?Split incentives ?Not enough/qualified workforce Better Buildings strategies to overcome barriers and drive action 4 Better Buildings...

Neukomm, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Healthy buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This proceedings is of the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Conference held September 4--8, 1991 in Washington, D.C. Entitled the IAQ 91, Healthy Buildings,'' the major topics of discussion included: healthy building strategies/productivity; energy and design issues; ventilation; contaminants; thermal, airflow, and humidity issues; school-related issues; sources and sinks; filtering; and operation and maintenance. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for input into the Energy Data Base. (BN)

Geshwiler, M.; Montgomery, L.; Moran, M. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Building technologies program. 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

393

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

394

Lighting Efficiency Case Study 5 Buildings at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Universities ­ DCU, UCD, Trinity College & DIT - "To reduce carbon emissions in our buildings by 10% by 2010Lighting Efficiency Case Study 5 Buildings at Dublin City University Glasnevin, Dublin 9 Works Carried out October ­ December 2009 Project Partially Funded by Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) ­ SEEEP

Humphrys, Mark

395

Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Residential Buildings (CARB), and discussed ventilation strategies for multifamily buildings, including how to successfully implement those strategies through smart design,...

396

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry ??? ? (1...., "Authority to Construct for Badger Creek Limited," Kern County Air Pollution Control District, Bakersfield.. Ca., June 20, 1989. 3) Wark, K. and Warner, C. F., Air Pollution - Its Origin and Control, Harper and Row, New York, New York, 1976, pp. 453...

Frederick, J. D.

397

Anomalous Microwave Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

A. Kogut

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in Chinese Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particularly emissions from primarily coal power plants andis 98% coal power and 2% hydro power. Using the emissionEmission Factors of Chinese Power Plants (Energy Foundation China 2005) Most of China’s electricity is generated by coal

Cherry, Christopher; Weinert, Jonathan; Ma, Chaktan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies

Marnay, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Better Buildings Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated Energy Systems (IES) combine on-site power or distributed generation technologies with thermally activated technologies to provide cooling, heating, humidity control, energy storage and/or other process functions using thermal energy normally wasted in the production of electricity/power. IES produce electricity and byproduct thermal energy onsite, with the potential of converting 80 percent or more of the fuel into useable energy. IES have the potential to offer the nation the benefits of unprecedented energy efficiency gains, consumer choice and energy security. It may also dramatically reduce industrial and commercial building sector carbon and air pollutant emissions and increase source energy efficiency. Applications of distributed energy and Combined heat and power (CHP) in ''Commercial and Institutional Buildings'' have, however, been historically limited due to insufficient use of byproduct thermal energy, particularly during summer months when heating is at a minimum. In recent years, custom engineered systems have evolved incorporating potentially high-value services from Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) like cooling and humidity control. Such TAT equipment can be integrated into a CHP system to utilize the byproduct heat output effectively to provide absorption cooling or desiccant humidity control for the building during these summer months. IES can therefore expand the potential thermal energy services and thereby extend the conventional CHP market into building sector applications that could not be economically served by CHP alone. Now more than ever, these combined cooling, heating and humidity control systems (IES) can potentially decrease carbon and air pollutant emissions, while improving source energy efficiency in the buildings sector. Even with these improvements over conventional CHP systems, IES face significant technological and economic hurdles. Of crucial importance to the success of IES is the ability to treat the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, water heating, lighting, and power systems loads as parts of an integrated system, serving the majority of these loads either directly or indirectly from the CHP output. The CHP Technology Roadmaps (Buildings and Industry) have focused research and development on a comprehensive integration approach: component integration, equipment integration, packaged and modular system development, system integration with the grid, and system integration with building and process loads. This marked change in technology research and development has led to the creation of a new acronym to better reflect the nature of development in this important area of energy efficiency: Integrated Energy Systems (IES). Throughout this report, the terms ''CHP'' and ''IES'' will sometimes be used interchangeably, with CHP generally reserved for the electricity and heat generating technology subsystem portion of an IES. The focus of this study is to examine the potential for IES in buildings when the system perspective is taken, and the IES is employed as a dynamic system, not just as conventional CHP. This effort is designed to determine market potential by analyzing IES performance on an hour-by-hour basis, examining the full range of building types, their loads and timing, and assessing how these loads can be technically and economically met by IES.

LeMar, P.

2002-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In September 2002, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued an order requiring the state's regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers details on the fuel mix and emissions...

403

Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Iowa adopted regulations in 2003 that generally require rate-regulated electric utilities to disclose to customers the fuel mix and estimated emissions, in pounds per megawatt-hour (MWh), of...

404

Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Impacts of Alternative Patterns of Urbanization on Greenhouse Gas Emissions in an Agricultural County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building emissions somewhat lower, and single- family detached homes producing 33% more GHG (as CO 2 equivalent) from energy

Wheeler, Stephen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

According to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Study (HR Study)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the Canadian Electricity Association's (CEA) 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource and grow the electricity supply. Other industry realities such as the need to build and replace and increase within the electricity sector. The ability of educational and training institutions to adequately

407

Golden Valley Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program for Builders  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Golden Valley Electric Association’s (GVEA) Builder $ense program targets home builders who install electrical energy efficiency measures during construction of residential buildings. Newly...

408

Clean Energy and the Electric System: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and/ or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiatives—such as goals, standards, codes, funds and programs—can generate many benefits including: • Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. ••Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. ••Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on electric system benefits. What’s Inside: • Why assess electric system benefits? • How can state and local governments estimate potential electric system benefits? • Quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in direct energy benefits. • How to find more information. What are clean energy initiatives? Clean energy initiatives are policies and programs that state and local governments are using to save energy, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions, support electric system reliability and security, and improve economic development. Examples include: Energy efficiency policies that reduce demand for energy, such as: Building codes for energy efficiency in both commercial and residential buildings; energy efficiency portfolio standards; public benefit funds for energy efficiency; and appliance efficiency standards. Energy supply policies that increase the use of renewables and clean sources, such as: Clean distributed generation and net metering interconnection standards; output-based environmental regulations; public benefit funds for clean energy supply; combined heat and power; and renewable portfolio standards. Clean energy initiatives reduce demand for fossil-fuel powered electricity and increase electricity generated with clean, renewable energy, contributing to a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system. Specifically, energy efficiency and/or renewable energy are resources that can: Avoid costs typically associated with conventional generation, including: Fuel, variable operation, and maintenance costs; emissions allowances; costs of emission Greenhouse gas (GHG) related policies that measure or limit emissions, such as: GHG registries, mandatory GHG reporting; CO offset requirements;

unknown authors

409

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable battery technology,” Journal of Power Sources,for Energy and Innovative Technologies, Austria ViennaUniversity of Technology, Austria Instituto Superior

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

411

Influence of Air Conditioner Operation on Electricity Use and Peak Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity demand due to occupant controlled room air conditioners in a large mater-metered apartment building is analyzed. Hourly data on the electric demand of the building and of individual air conditioners are used in analyses of annual...

McGarity, A. E.; Feuermann, D.; Kempton, W.; Norford, L. K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optimal Technology Investment and Operation in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings with Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Not Available

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Building technolgies program. 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. We have focused our past efforts on two major building systems, windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed by researchers and designers to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. In addition, we are now taking more of an integrated systems and life cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity-factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout every space in a building, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Window and lighting systems are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermionic electric converter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermionic electric converter is disclosed wherein an externally located heat source causes electrons to be boiled off an electron emissive surface interiorly positioned on one end wall of an evacuated cylindrical chamber. The electrons are electrically focused and accelerated through the interior of an air core induction coil located within a transverse magnetic field, and subsequently are collected on the other end wall of the chamber functioning as a collecting plate. The emf generated in the induction coil by action of the transiting electron stream interacting with the transverse magnetic field is applied to an external circuit to perform work, thereby implementing a direct heat energy to electrical energy conversion.

Davis, E.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Interactions with a Sustainable Community Grid in the Azores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Generation, Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEVs), Energy Management, Multi-Building Modeling and Simulation Introduction The Green Islands

Mendes, Goncalo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solar Applications to Multiple County Buildings Feasibility Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This study was requested by Salt Lake County in an effort to obtain a cursory overview of solar electric and solar thermal application possibilities on the rooftops of existing county buildings. The subject buildings represent various County Divisions: Aging Services, Community Services, County Health, County Library, Parks & Recreation, Public Works, County Sheriff and Youth Services. There are fifty two buildings included in the study.

419

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix J THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings, the standard for utility residential conservation programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation programs, the standard for conversions THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW ELECTRICALLY HEATED RESIDENTIALAND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region

420

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies, integrated design, building operation andperformance,  integrated  building design and operation, Integrated  Design  and  Operation  for  Very  Low  Energy  Buildings

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baseline Scenarios...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

through a consultative process. These sectors are: agriculture (including forestry, soil- based emissions, and livestock), green cities and build- ings, industry, transport,...

422

The future of electric two-wheelers and electric vehicles in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAE Hybrid Vehicle Symposium, San Diego CA, 13–14 February.emissions from a plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) in China has2008. Nissan’s Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Program.

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Ogden, Joan M.; Sperling, Dan; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Simulation of wind driven ventilative cooling systems for an apartment building in Beijing and Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

produce energy for buildings and industry. In order to reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions ventilation, CFD, Energy analysis 1. Introduction Throughout the entire world, buildings are major consumers of energy and major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. In China, buildings consume 17% of the total energy

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

424

The solar electric power outlook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outlook for solar electric power plants is discussed. The following topics are discussed: Amoco/Envon solar vision, multi-megawatt solar power projects, global carbon dioxide emission estimates, pollution and electric power generation, social costs of pollution economies of scale, thin-film power module, rooftop market strategy, regulatory issues regarding rooftop systems, and where do we go from here?

Kemp, J.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Analysis of CO2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel in Korea: 19611994 Ki-Hong Choi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................................7 3.2 Energy Consumption and CO2 Emissions ................................................................8 3.2.1 Energy Consumption Pattern Appendix 3. Emission Coefficient of Electricity

426

Hybrid and Plug-In Electric Vehicles (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid and plug-in electric vehicles use electricity as their primary fuel or to improve the efficiency of conventional vehicle designs. These vehicles can be divided into three categories: hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), all-electric vehicles (EVs). Together, they have great potential to cut U.S. petroleum use and vehicle emissions.

Not Available

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cap-and-Trade Modeling and Analysis: Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011). CO2 emissions from fuel combustion highlights.fuel combustion. In 2009, generation of electricity and heat was the largest contributor of CO2 emissions

Limpaitoon, Tanachai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

10 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results The...

429

FY 2014 Annual Progress Report - Electric Drive Technology Program  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

temperatures," IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, 22-4, pp. 1321 -1329. Chow, Y. (media contact). "AC Propulsion Partners with 7. BMW to Build 500 Electric Vehicles." Press...

430

Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps, building insulation (including windows and doors), and...

431

Modeling Electric Vehicle Benefits Connected to Smart Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tariff-driven demand response in these buildings. By usingbuilding electricity costs distributed energy resources costs fuel costs demand responsebuilding energy systems. Local storage will enable demand response.

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

433

3Building a Business Building a Business  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 3Building a Business Building a Business This section provides direction on the kinds. If you contemplate building a "garage- based" company to sell a product into a niche market, you should-ups conjure up images of future wealth, of building the next Amgen or Microsoft, of launching what will become

Arnold, Jonathan

434

Classification of Energy Consumption in Buildings with Outlier Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Then a canonical variate analysis is employed to describe latent variables of daily electricity consumption is used to predict the daily electricity consumption profiles. A case study, based on a mixed use consumption data within a buildings energy management system. Electrical peak load forecasting plays

Yao, Xin

435

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepower JumpBuildingChangeprovideHome

436

Building America Building Science Translator  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1,Energy ForBryanR BUILDING AMERICA

437

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentialsand Its Impact on CO2 Emission," Iron & Steel, 2010, 45(5):Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction PotentialsModel Inputs Emissions Factors CO2 Emission factor for grid electricity (tonne CO2/MWh)  CO2 Emission factor for fuel (

Morrow III, William R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electric and Hydrogen Vehicles Past and Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

status and TSRC research ­ Future? · Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles ­ 20 years ago ­ 10 years ago ­ Current · Transportation Propulsion, Fuels, & Emissions ­ Electric-drive vehicles (including plug-in hybrid and fuel-cell Electric and Fuel Cell Vehicles?Why Electric and Fuel Cell Vehicles? · Transportation accounts for about 33

Kammen, Daniel M.

440

International Comparison of Energy Labeling and Standards for Energy Efficient and Green Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the approaches of the European Union, Germany and India to reduce GHG- emissions and mitigate climate change impacts from buildings through the establishment of energy performance standards and green building...

Hennicke, P.; Shrestha, S.; Schleicher, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

442

Building and Buildings, Scotland: Draft Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations, 1961   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These regulations, made under the Building (Scotland) Act, 1959, prescribe standards for buildings for the purposes of Part II of that Act. The matters in relation to which standards have been prescribed are described in ...

Her Majesty's Stationary Office

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Office Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Office Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in office spaces are poorly understood.

Not Available

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

Not Available

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

BUILDING EFFECTIVENESS COMMUNICATION RATIOS FOR IMPROVED BUILDING LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING EFFECTIVENESS COMMUNICATION RATIOS FOR IMPROVED BUILDING LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT Elmer building energy performance assessment frameworks, quantifying and categorising buildings post occupancy a performance-based strategy utilising building effectiveness communication ratios stored in Building

446

Building safeguards infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcclelland - Kerr, John [NNSA/NA-242

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Overview of PIER-Funded Existing Building Commissioning and Diagnostics Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Pacific Gas and Electric ? Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) outdoor air economizer module and whole building energy module, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ? Performance And Continuous Recommissioning Analysis Tool (PACRAT), Facility...

Jenkins, N.; Brook, M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cooperative Demand Response Using Repeated Game for Price-Anticipating Buildings in Smart Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price-Anticipating Buildings in Smart Grid Kai Ma Guoqiangprice-anticipating buildings in smart grid. The cooperativebuilding electricity use, with application to demand response,” IEEE Transactions on Smart

Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Better Buildings Webinar: Making Utility Energy Efficiency Funds Work for You  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings will host a webinar on innovative collaborations with utilities to bring big energy savings to their building portfolios and help reduce utility peak electricity demand.

450

Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dimming controls for electric lighting have been one of the mainstays of the effort to use daylighting to reduce annual lighting energy consumption. The coincidence of daylighting with electric utility peak demand makes daylighting controls an effective strategy for reducing commercial building peak electric loads. During times of energy shortage, there is a greatly increased need to reduce electricity use during peak periods, both to ease the burden on electricity providers and to control the operating costs of buildings. The paper presents a typical commercial building electric demand profile during summer, and shows how daylighting-linked lighting controls and load shedding techniques can reduce lighting at precisely those times when electricity is most expensive. We look at the importance of dimming for increasing the reliability of the electricity grid in California and other states, as well as examine the potential cost-effectiveness of widespread use of daylighting to save energy and reduce monthly electricity bills.

Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Academic Buildings Student & Admin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Academic Buildings Student & Admin. Services Residence Public Parking Permit Parking GatheringCampusRoad Shrum Science Centre South Sciences Building Technology & Science Complex 2 Greenhouses Science Research AnnexBee Research BuildingAlcan Aquatic Research Technology & Science Complex 1 C Building B Building P

452

and Pollutant Safeguarding Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial buildings, these flows are driven primarily by the building's ventilation system, but natural2004 Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group Safeguarding Buildings Against Chemical and Biological research since 1998 to protect buildings and building occupants from threats posed by airborne chemical

453

Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on...

454

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance Building America Top...

455

Building America Webinar: Building America Research Tools | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building America Research Tools Building America Webinar: Building America Research Tools This webinar was held on March 18, 2015, and reviewed Building America research tools,...

456

Building America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

458

Report of Energy Efficiency Study and Metering/Utilities Profile for Electricity Deregulation at Texas A&M International University (TAMIU) Laredo, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Targets Ranked by Potential Energy Savings 1. Plant 2. Library 3. Building C 4. Building B 5. Gym 6. Building E 7. Building F 8. Building H Metering Recommendations for Electric Deregulation Several options exist -split the signal from the main meter... and the Commissioning Targets 2 Summary of Building Information and Major Recommended Energy Measures.... 2 Killam Library 2 Bullock Hall 3 Building C 4 Kinesiology Building 5 Pellegrino Hall 5 Canseco Hall-Building F 6 Physical Plant Building-Building H 7 Electricity...

Zhu, Y.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Efficiency in Buildings- the Utilities View  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAGE 1 Energy Efficiency in Buildings - the Utilities View U. K?nig RWE Energy AG The energy to lead ESL-IC-08-10-27 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 RWE... International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 RWE Energy / Energieeffizienz bei Immobilien / U. K?nig / ICEBO '08 SEITE 3 RWE ? One of the five leading Energy Companies in Europe > Nr 1 producer of electricity...

Konig, U.

460

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a future with  very low energy buildings resulting in very consumption  of  low  energy  buildings,  with  site  EUI design and operation of low energy buildings through better 

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Thick Buildings [Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Occupant Behavior in Buildings, New Directions forSacramento, is a thin building that surrounds an atrium. (Performance of a Green Building," Urban UndQune 1992): 23-

Coffin, Christie Johnson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Bonneville Power Ampere Annex Z-995 Building  

High Performance Buildings Database

Vancouver, WA The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a federal agency headquartered in Portland, Oregon, provides about half of the electricity used in the Pacific Northwest and operates more than three-fourths of the region's high-voltage transmission. Because BPA markets power at cost from 31 federal dams, its rates are among the least expensive electricity in the country. The Ampere Annex project is a renovation of an exisiting 60-year-old standard warehouse building located within the Ross Complex.

463

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for emissions from purchased electricity, transport or mobile sources, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References 1.0 1.1...

464

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions index, we use conversion factors. To determine theof Energy. 11 This conversion factor includes only thebe using different conversion factors for electricity in

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and howbuildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity)commercial building, energy intensity, energy efficiency,

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Preparing for the Arrival of Electric Vehicle Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best...

467

Why are allowance prices so low? : an analysis of the SO2 emissions trading program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an analysis of the reduction in SO2 emissions by electric utilities between 1985 and 1993. We find that emissions have been reduced for reasons largely unrelated to the emission reduction mandate ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

BUILDING PROCTOR rev. April 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING PROCTOR MANUAL rev. April 2014 #12;Building Proctor Manual rev. April 2014 2 TABLE.........................................................................................................................................5 Role of a Building Proctor ..............................................................................................................5 Authority of Building Proctor

469

Building a Molecule Building Structures in Moe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

14 Chapter 3 Building a Molecule #12;15 Building Structures in Moe Dorzolamide Exercise 1 #12;16 Open the Molecule Builder · Open the Molecule Builder panel using MOE | Edit | Build | Molecule, the chiral center will be either R or S, and one of the two will be highlighted in green. The green

Fischer, Wolfgang

470

Central Electric Coop. Oregon Trail Electric Coop. Douglas Electric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Central Electric Coop. Oregon Trail Electric Coop. Douglas Electric Coop. Blachly- Lane Co. Coop Umatilla Electric Coop. Hermiston Milton- Freewater Idaho Co Light & Power Coop....

471

Plug-in electric vehicle introduction in the EU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) could significantly reduce gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU's transport sector. However, PEV well-towheel (WTW) emissions depend on improvements in vehicle ...

Sisternes, Fernando J. de $q (Fernando José Sisternes Jiménez)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Folsom CA, Integration of Renewable Resources: OperationalOffice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, BuildingOffice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

Marnay, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Office Buildings - Full Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1). Table 1. Totals and means of of floorspace, number of workers, and hours of operation for office buildings, 2003 Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.)...

474

Energy Savings with Energy-Efficient HVAC Systems in Commercial Buildings of Hong Kong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hong Kong has seen a dramatic increase in energy consumption in recent years, particularly electricity use in commercial buildings. The growth of electricity demand in future years is crucial both economically and environmentally. As over half...

Yang, J.; Chan, K.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System Simulations of Hybrid Electric Vehicles with Focus on Emissions Zhiming Gao Veerathu K. Chakravarthy Josh Pihl C. Stuart Daw Maruthi Devarakonda Jong Lee...

476

Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1% of building electricity, inUSA energy use, we estimated the average per capita electricityelectricity and is growing at roughly 6% per year in the USA.

Lanzisera, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

can be used for demand limiting to allow building managers to reduce lighting loads when electricity demand costs are high. Some types of lighting are not well suited to certain...

478

New Jersey SmartStart Buildings- New Construction and Retrofits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New Jersey SmartStart Buildings is a program sponsored by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities in partnership with New Jersey’s gas and electric utilities. The program has three main project...

479

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling, heating, and power, CCHP, commercial buildings,bln $ CAA CAISO Cal/EPA CARB CCHP CEUS CHP CSI CPP DER DER-heating, and electric power (CCHP) adoption in California’s

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

MEASUREMENT OF VOC EMISSIONS FROM WOOD REMEDIAL TREATMENT: CHAMBER TESTS AND FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products on indoor air quality. The emissions of two wood remedial treatment products (water in real conditions during a roof renovation work in an old building. A petroleum-based solvent product of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from building products. Simple models can be applied to emission

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings electricity emission" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Electrical Engineer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Office of Electric Reliability. The Office of Electric Reliability helps protect and improve the reliability and security of the nation's bulk power system through...

482

Future Cities Existing Buildings Solving the Conundrum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of return on investment, both in terms of cost and carbon reduction, than by acting alone.' For more are not present, close loop borehole systems can be used. #12;The Problem of Existing Building Stock Substantial and over cladding would destroy the heritage Driving down carbon emissions in historic city centres

Painter, Kevin

483

Allowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Allowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector Karen Palmer Resources for the Future of Earthweek #12;Allocation and Electricity · Prior cap-and-trade programs grandfather (GF) allowances on electricity markets depends on CO2 emissions rates · Different regional effect of GF on electricity markets

484

Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007) Impacts of Electric-drive Vehicles on California'sInteractions between electric-drive vehicles and the powerin emissions found for electric- drive vehicles is a result

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Experimental and Simulation Study on the Performance of Daylighting in an Industrial Building and its Energy Saving Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity consumption in Hong Kong [3]. For industrial buildings, the percentage varies widely depending-34% of the total building electricity consumption in Dongguan, China [4]. To reduce the energy consumption reduce building energy consumption effectively. Studies on this topic have been mostly conducted

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

486

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

487

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

deYoung, Brad

488

Community Development Building Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Energy Commission 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance of Los Altos Energy Efficiency Ordinance, Green Building Regulations under the 2005 California Building by the Board on that date. The Green Building Regulation, Chapter 12.66 of the City Municipal code, will ensure

489

Building Technology MSc Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this programme is on the design of innovative and sustainable building components and their integration

Langendoen, Koen

490

NIST Preliminary Reconnaissance, Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIST Preliminary Reconnaissance, Building Performance and Emergency Communications, Joplin)): Support R&D to improve building codes and standards and practices for design and construction of buildings of and data collection on the impact of severe wind on buildings, structures, and infrastructure ­ Section 204

Magee, Joseph W.

491

RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;"Our new Biomedical Research Building-intensive medical schools. Perkins+Will has designed a building that will be superbly functional and have great a magnificent 12-story Biomedical Research Building to address this priority. The new 600,000 square foot

Engman, David M.

492

BUILDING MANAGEMENT & RESTRICTED ACCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUILDING MANAGEMENT & RESTRICTED ACCESS Plan Annex 2014 VIII #12;#12;#12;The University of Texas at Austiniv #12;Building Management & Restricted Access Plan Annex v CONTENTS RECORD OF CHANGES .......................................................................................................15 J. BUILDING SECURITY OPERATIONS RESTRICTED ACCESS PROCEDURES FOR BUILDINGS ON ELECTRONIC ACCESS

Johnston, Daniel

493

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Procedure for Measuring and Reporting Commercial Building Energy Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure is intended to provide a standard method for measuring and characterizing the energy performance of commercial buildings. The procedure determines the energy consumption, electrical energy demand, and on-site energy production in existing commercial buildings of all types. The performance metrics determined here may be compared against benchmarks to evaluate performance and verify that performance targets have been achieved.

Barley, D.; Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Buildings That Think Green (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Buildings are the SUVs of U.S. energy consumption, gobbling up 71 percent of the nation's electricity. In this Sept. 22, 2008 talk, Arun Majumdar, Director of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses how scientists are creating a new generation of net-zero energy, carbon-neutral buildings.

Majumdar, Arun

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

Exploiting Home Automation Protocols for Load Monitoring in Smart Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reduce consumption is also impor- tant. Smart buildings use demand-side energy management to self consumption with renewable generation [17]. Demand- side management requires buildings to 1) continuously mon@cs.williams.edu Abstract Monitoring and controlling electrical loads is crucial for demand-side energy management in smart

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

497

Instrumenting Buildings to Determine Retrofit Savings: Murphy's Law Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the whole building electric load, building thermal loads and selected submetered loads. The emphasis of the lessons learned is on the instrumentation used and installation problems encountered during this project. INTRODUCTION During the past three and one..." should be able to avoid them. However, even experienced installers of building energy metering systems seem to struggle with some of these "obvious" problems and if a solution is developed, often there is no written record left for future reference...

Boecker, C. L.; Bohmer, C.; O'Neal, D. L.; Bryant, J.

498

An integrated assessment of the energy savings and emissions-reduction potential of combined heat and power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems, or cogeneration systems, generated electrical/mechanical and thermal energy simultaneously, recovering much of the energy normally lost in separate generation. This recovered energy can be used for heating or cooling purposes, eliminating the need for a separate boiler. Significant reductions in energy, criteria pollutants, and carbon emissions can be achieved from the improved efficiency of fuel use. Generating electricity on or near the point of use also avoids transmission and distribution losses and defers expansion of the electricity transmission grid. Several recent developments make dramatic expansion of CHP a cost-effective possibility over the next decade. First, advances in technologies such as combustion turbines, steam turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells. and heat-recovery equipment have decreased the cost and improved the performance of CHP systems. Second, a significant portion of the nation's boiler stock will need to be replaced in the next decade, creating an opportunity to upgrade this equipment with clean and efficient CHP systems. Third, environmental policies, including addressing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, have created pressures to find cleaner and more efficient means of using energy. Finally, electric power market restructuring is creating new opportunities for innovations in power generation and smaller-scale distributed systems such as CHP. The integrated analysis suggests that there is enormous potential for the installation of cost-effective CHP in the industrial, district energy, and buildings sectors. The projected additional capacity by 2010 is 73 GW with corresponding energy savings of 2.6 quadrillion Btus, carbon emissions reductions of 74 million metric tons, 1.4 million tons of avoided SO{sub 2} emissions, and 0.6 million tons of avoided NO{sub x} emissions. The authors estimate that this new CHP would require cumulative capital investments of roughly $47 billion over ten years.

Kaarsberg, T.M.; Elliott, R.N.; Spurr, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Planning an itinerary for an electric vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The steady increase in oil prices and awareness regarding environmental risks due to carbon dioxide emissions are promoting the current interest in electric vehicles. However, the current relatively low driving range ...

Chale-Gongora, Hugo G.

500

Electroluminescence from isolated defects in zinc oxide, towards electrically triggered single photon sources at room temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography and quantum communications. However, so far majority of room temperature emitters are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically triggered light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit at the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open up possibilities to build new ZnO based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

Choi, Sumin; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z