Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this...

2

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

3

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003: Energy Source and Year: Building Characteristics

4

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

5

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

6

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Note: Data are estimates. Statistics for individual fuels are for all buildings using each fuel. ... "Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption

7

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Table C4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Aug. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators...

9

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5HVLGHQWLDO (QHUJ\\ &RQVXPSWLRQ 6XUYH\\V 1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables Appliances Consumption Tables (17 pages, 60 kb) Contents Pages CE5-1c.

11

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

2005 RECS Consumption and Expenditures Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Detailed Consumption and Expenditures (C&E) tables containing Space Heating, Air-Conditioning, Water Heating, and Appliance residential energy data are now available.

13

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

14

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Figure on Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Source, 1992 Divider Line The 49 tables present detailed energy consumption and expenditure data for buildings in the commercial sector. This section provides assistance in reading the tables by explaining some of the headings for the data categories. It will also explain the use of row and column factors to compute both the confidence levels of the estimates given in the tables and the statistical significance of differences between the data in two or more categories. The section concludes with a "Quick-Reference Guide" to the statistics in the different tables. Categories of Data in the Tables After Table 3.1, which is a summary table, the tables are grouped into the major fuel tables (Tables 3.2 through 3.13) and the specific fuel tables (Tables 3.14 through 3.29 for electricity, Tables 3.30 through 3.40 for natural gas, Tables 3.41 through 3.45 for fuel oil, and Tables 3.46 through 3.47 for district heat). Table 3.48 presents energy management and DSM data as reported by the building respondent. Table 3.49 presents data on participation in electric utility-sponsored DSM programs as reported by both the building respondent and the electricity supplier.

15

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE5-1e. Appliances1 Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 1997 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone2 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and --

17

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE4-1e. Water-Heating Energy Expenditures in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 1997 RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD ...

18

1997 Consumption and Expenditures-Detailed Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Resdiential Energy Consumption Survey(RECS)-1997 Consumption and Expenditures-1997 Detailed Tables, Energy Information Administration

19

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Expenditures include taxes where data are available. 5 In chained (2005) dollars. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption.

22

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Part 1: Housing Unit Characteristics and Energy Usage Indicators Energy Consumption 2 Energy Expenditures 2 Total U.S. (quadrillion Btu) Per Household (Dollars) Per

23

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption per Capita: Energy Expenditures 1: Energy ... 2009. 94,559,407 [R] 308 : 1,061,220 [R] ... 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption. See Table 11.1.

24

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1993 -- Executive ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

national level data on energy-related issues on households and energy expenditures in the residential sector.

25

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

26

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

27

DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration...

28

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace and per Building, by Building Type ($2010) ($2010) Food Service 4.88 27.2 Mercantile 2.23 38.1 Food Sales 4.68 26.0 Education 1.43 36.6 Health Care 2.76 68.0 Service 1.39 9.1 Public Order and Safety 2.07 32.0 Warehouse and Storage 0.80 13.5 Office 2.01 29.8 Religious Worship 0.76 7.8 Public Assembly 1.73 24.6 Vacant 0.34 4.8 Lodging 1.72 61.5 Other 2.99 65.5 Note(s): Source(s): Mall buildings are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table 4; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. Per Square Foot Per Building

29

Energy Consumption and Expenditures RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating. Space Heating. Appliances. Air-Conditioning. About the Data. Tables: Total Energy Consumption in U.S ...

30

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 FY 2007 Federal Buildings Energy Prices and Expenditures, by Fuel Type ($2010) Fuel Type Electricity (1) Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane Other Average Total Note(s): Source(s): 17.05 6028.63 Prices and expenditures are for Goal-Subject buildings. 1) $0.0776/kWh. 2) Energy used in Goal-Subject buildings in FY 2007 accounted for 33.8% of the total Federal energy bill. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-4, p. 93 for prices and expenditures, and Table A-9, p. 97 for total energy expenditures; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 24.30 318.35 17.06 43.87 16.19 36.64 9.37 1138.21 15.25 419.30 3.62 62.87 Average Fuel Prices Total Expenditures ($/million BTU) ($ million) (2) 23.68

31

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot...

32

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

33

1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Return to: Residential Home Page . Changes in the 1997 RECS: Housing Unit Type Per Household Member Per Building Increase. Residential Energy Consumption ...

34

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

35

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

36

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

Table CE2-5.1u. Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Demographics, 2001 Household ... Total Households Using a Major Space-Heating

38

Table CE4-6.1u. Water-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE4-6.1u. Water-Heating Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

39

Table CE5-5.1u. Appliances Energy Consumption and Expenditures by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE5-5.1u. Appliances1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Demographics, 2001 Household Demographics RSE Column Factor:

40

Table CE5-6.1u. Appliances Energy Consumption and Expenditures by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE5-6.1u. Appliances1 Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Total Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (3) Total Expenditures 1980 89.1 40.5 28.9 158.5 70.9 20.5 17.2 108.6 267.2 1981 94.9 41.3 27.8 164.0 79.4 21.4 16.5 117.3 281.3 1982 99.9 47.9 24.5 172.3 83.4 25.1 13.7 122.2 294.5 1983 103.6 51.0 21.4 176.1 83.6 26.1 14.6 124.3 300.4 1984 103.3 51.6 23.6 178.5 87.6 25.9 14.7 128.2 306.7 1985 105.4 48.8 22.6 176.8 90.0 24.0 12.6 126.6 303.4 1986 106.9 44.2 18.1 169.2 90.5 20.7 9.1 120.2 289.4 1987 108.2 40.9 18.0 167.1 88.7 19.8 9.2 117.7 284.7 1988 110.3 41.8 18.0 170.1 89.9 20.4 8.2 118.5 288.7 1989 110.2 42.9 19.7 172.8 91.5 20.5 8.4 120.4 293.2 1990 110.9 39.0 18.2 168.2 92.9 19.4 9.2 121.5 289.7 1991 113.7 39.2 17.0 169.9 93.9 19.5 7.7 121.1 291.0

42

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2035 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 63.4 13.0 1.6 7.7 0.8 23.1 0.2 20.6 107.2 20.9% Water Heating 23.8 2.2 1.2 3.4 35.8 63.0 12.3% Space Cooling 0.4 55.7 56.1 10.9% Lighting 47.8 47.8 9.3% Electronics (4) 27.2 27.2 5.3% Refrigeration (5) 27.0 27.0 5.3% Computers 14.8 14.8 2.9% Cooking 5.8 0.8 0.8 5.4 12.1 2.3% Wet Clean (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 2.2% Ventilation (7) 2.4 2.4 0.5% Other (8) 9.3 0.4 12.6 2.0 15.0 88.8 113.2 22.0% Adjust to SEDS (9) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 6.2% Total 108.2 21.0 1.6 22.3 2.8 47.6 0.2 357.8 513.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.8 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 4) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($3.0

43

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 53.7 14.2 0.9 8.0 0.6 23.7 0.1 23.2 100.8 23.4% Space Cooling 0.4 61.3 61.7 14.3% Lighting 59.3 59.3 13.8% Water Heating 18.3 2.6 2.0 4.6 17.8 40.7 9.4% Refrigeration (4) 26.9 26.9 6.2% Electronics (5) 26.1 26.1 6.1% Ventilation (6) 15.9 15.9 3.7% Cooking 4.0 0.8 0.8 8.8 13.6 3.2% Computers 12.1 12.1 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 11.0 11.6 2.7% Other (8) 2.7 0.3 7.7 1.2 9.2 27.3 39.2 9.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 6.2 5.2 5.2 11.9 23.4 5.4% Total 86.0 22.3 0.9 18.5 1.8 43.5 0.1 301.6 431.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.6 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($24.1 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($11.0

44

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2015 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (3) 49.5 15.9 1.3 8.1 0.7 25.9 0.2 18.7 94.3 22.7% Space Cooling 0.3 48.0 48.3 11.6% Lighting 45.9 45.9 11.0% Water Heating 17.6 2.6 1.5 4.1 18.3 40.0 9.6% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 6.0% Electronics (5) 19.8 19.8 4.7% Ventilation (6) 15.1 15.1 3.6% Computers 11.6 11.6 2.8% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.8 11.4 2.7% Cooking 3.9 0.9 0.9 4.4 9.1 2.2% Other (8) 2.9 0.3 8.9 1.4 10.6 54.1 67.6 16.3% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 6.7% Total 80.6 23.3 1.3 19.4 2.1 46.1 0.2 289.3 416.2 100% Note(s): Source(s): Petroleum Electricity 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.6 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9

45

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2025 Buildings Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (3) 56.7 14.3 1.5 7.8 0.7 24.3 0.2 19.5 100.7 22.0% Space Cooling 0.3 50.5 50.9 11.1% Lighting 45.2 45.2 9.9% Water Heating 21.3 2.3 1.3 3.6 19.6 44.4 9.7% Refrigeration (4) 24.9 24.9 5.4% Electronics (5) 23.2 23.2 5.1% Computers 13.2 13.2 2.9% Wet Clean (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 2.3% Cooking 4.8 0.8 0.8 4.9 10.5 2.3% Ventilation (7) 16.6 16.6 3.6% Other (8) 4.8 0.4 10.6 1.7 12.7 69.8 87.4 19.1% Adjust to SEDS (9) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 6.6% Total 94.6 21.9 1.5 20.6 2.5 46.4 0.2 316.3 457.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.7 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 4) Includes refrigerators ($22.3 billion) and freezers ($2.6 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12.0

46

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

47

Residential energy-consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1978-March 1979  

SciTech Connect

Tables present data on energy consumption and expenditures for US households during a 12-month period. The total amount of energy consumed by the residential sector from April 1978 through March 1979 is estimated to have been 10,563 trillion Btu with an average household consumption of 138 million Btu. Table 1 summarizes residential energy consumption for all fuels (totals and averages) as wells as total amounts consumed and expenditures for each of the major fuel types (natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, and liquid petroleum gas). Tables 2 and 3 give the number of households and the average energy prices, respectively, for each of the major fuel types. In Tables 4 to 9, totals and averages for both consumption and expenditures are given for each of the major fuels. The consumption of each fuel is given first for all households using the fuel. Then, households are divided into those that use the fuel as their main source of heat and those using the fuel for other purposes. Electricity data (Tables 5 to 7) are further broken down into households that use electricity for air conditioning and those not using it for this purpose. Limited data are also presented on households that use each of the major fuels for heating water. Each of the consumption tables is given for a variety of general household features, including: geographical, structural and physical, and demographic characteristics. Tables 10 to 18 present the same information for the subgroup of households living in single-family owner-occupied detached houses. The third set of tables (19 to 27) is limited to households that paid directly for all of the energy they used. Tables 28 to 36 provide variance estimates for the data.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

49

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

50

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

51

Table CE1-6.2u. Total Energy Consumption and Expenditures by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE1-6.2u. Total Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Square Feet and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor: Total End-Use Energy

52

1997 Consumption and Expenditures-Data Tables RECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

53

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 2, Regional data. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

Included here are data at the Census region and division level on consumption of and expenditures for the major fuels used in residential households - electricity, natural gas, fuel oil/kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on wood consumption. Section 1 of this report contains data on the average amount of energy consumed per household for space heating in 1984 and the corresponding expenditures. Sections 2 through 7 summarize the energy consumption and expenditure patterns. Appendices A through D contain information on how the survey was conducted, estimates of the size of the housing unit in square feet and the quality of the data. Procedures for calculating relative standard errors (RSE) are located in Appendix C, Quality of the Data. Procedures for estimating the end-use statistics are located in Appendix D. Census and weather maps, and related publications are located in Appendices E through G.

Not Available

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

2001 Consumption and Expenditures-Detailed Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This section contains the data collection forms used in 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Also included are the U.S. Census regions and climate zone ...

55

2001 Consumption and Expenditures -- Electric Air-Conditioning ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

CE3-1c. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Climate Zone, 2001 : 2: CE3-2c. ...

56

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of black and nonblack households in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by black and nonblack households are presented by Census region and for the nation based on the Energy Information Administration's 1982-83 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Black households were found to have significantly lower levels of electricity consumption at both the national and regional level. Natural gas is the dominant space heating fuel used by black households. Natural gas consumption was typically higher for black households. However, when considering natural gas consumption conditional on natural gas space heating no significant differences were found. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Vyas, A.D.; Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

58

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures March 2012 3.3.3 Commercial Buildings Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Total 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 148.6 37.0 17.0 202.6 148.9 37.2 17.1 203.2 145.9 36.2 16.7 198.9 147.5 36.8 16.9 201.2 143.8 35.1 16.4 195.2 145.0 35.5 16.6 197.0 141.1 34.0 16.0 191.1 142.5 34.6 16.2 193.3 136.9 32.1 15.7 184.8 139.1 33.0 15.9 188.0 133.5 31.0 15.4 179.9 135.0 31.6 15.6 182.2 131.0 29.7 15.1 175.8 131.9 30.3 15.3 177.5 128.1 28.7 14.5 171.3 130.0 29.3 15.0 174.4 129.4 29.7 15.4 174.5 127.7 29.2 13.8 170.7 134.8 29.9 14.5 179.2 134.5 28.5 16.9 180.0 141.1

59

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Residential Buildings Commercial Buildings Building Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (2) Avg. Avg. (3) 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 37.22 7.70 13.06 18.52 17.99 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 39.06 8.29 14.78 20.56 19.68 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 40.15 9.40 13.28 21.21 20.48 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 39.51 10.43 12.53 21.55 21.23 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 38.68 10.00 12.04 21.14 20.58 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 38.29 9.60 11.68 21.41 20.63 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 37.09 8.69 7.85 20.17 19.70 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 34.93 7.93 8.16 19.14 18.90 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 33.60 7.45 7.47 18.24 18.11 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 33.06 7.34 8.13 18.29 18.07 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 32.49 7.20 9.31 18.62 18.63 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31

62

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWhsquare foot)...

63

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Public Use Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data Public Use Files: yellow indicator arrow 2003 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1999 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1995 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1992 CBECS The Public Use Files are microdata files that contain more than 5,000 records, representing commercial buildings from the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Each record corresponds to a single responding, in-scope sampled building and contains information for that building about the building size, year constructed, types of energy used, energy-using equipment, conservation features, energy consumption and expenditures, and the amount of energy used for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other end uses.

64

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

65

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Building Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) (cents/therm) (cents/gal) ($/gal) 1980 12.42 83.51 1.53 2.24 12.70 77.01 1.43 2.05 1981 13.14 88.83 1.47 2.51 13.33 82.90 1.63 2.32 1982 13.70 100.83 1.54 2.30 13.70 93.95 1.40 2.11 1983 13.79 113.04 1.51 2.14 13.48 104.33 1.30 1.75 1984 13.24 110.16 1.46 2.10 13.20 100.01 1.37 1.68 1985 13.28 106.80 1.37 1.96 13.06 95.96 1.21 1.56 1986 13.05 99.76 1.25 1.54 12.66 86.86 0.71 1.01 1987 12.72 92.16 1.22 1.42 11.92 79.32 0.79 1.05 1988 12.36 87.96 1.15 1.39 11.46 74.52 0.62 0.95 1989 12.17 87.08 1.39 1.48 11.28 73.39 0.70 1.07 1990 12.01 86.28 1.40 1.69 11.08 72.04 0.78 1.26 1991 11.90 83.77 1.34 1.56 10.97 69.49 0.58 1.11 1992 11.87 82.80 1.24 1.40 10.93 68.64 0.58 1.01 1993 11.78 84.73 1.19 1.33 10.81 71.91 0.58 0.96 1994 11.62 86.30 1.25 1.27 10.57 74.09 0.60 0.90 1995 11.41 79.96 1.22 1.22 10.32 66.99 0.64 0.88 1996 11.13 82.07 1.36 1.37

66

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Commercial Floorspace, by Year ($2010) Year $/SF 1980 (1) 2.12 1981 2.22 (2) 1982 2.24 1983 2.21 1984 2.25 1985 2.20 1986 2.06 1987 2.00 1988 1.99 1989 2.01 1990 1.98 1991 1.92 1992 1.86 1993 1.96 1994 2.05 1995 2.12 1996 2.10 1997 2.08 1998 1.97 1999 1.88 2000 2.06 2001 2.20 2002 2.04 2003 2.13 2004 2.16 2005 2.30 2006 2.36 2007 2.35 2008 1.71 2009 2.43 2010 2.44 2011 2.44 2012 2.35 2013 2.28 2014 2.27 2015 2.29 2016 2.29 2017 2.28 2018 2.29 2019 2.29 2020 2.29 2021 2.31 2022 2.32 2023 2.32 2024 2.32 2025 2.32 2026 2.32 2027 2.33 2028 2.32 2029 2.31 2030 2.31 2031 2.32 2032 2.35 2033 2.37 2034 2.39 2035 2.42 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data Prices and Expenditures Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Summary Reference Case Tables, Table A2, p. 3-5 and Table A5, p. 11-12 for consumption, Table A3, p. 6-8 for prices for 2008-2035; EIA, Annual Energy Review

67

A Look at Commercial Buldings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE/EIA-0625(95) DOE/EIA-0625(95) Distribution Category UC-950 A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures October 1998 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion Of fice of En ergy Mar kets and End Use U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and ana lytic agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion and should not be con strued as ad vo cat ing or re flect ing any pol icy po si tion of the De part ment of En ergy or any other or gani za tion. Contacts The En ergy In for ma tion Ad min istra tion (EIA) pre pared this pub li ca tion un der the gen eral di rec tion of W. Cal vin

68

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Annual Energy Expenditures per Gross Square Foot of Federal Floorspace Stock, by Year ($2010) FY 1985 2.13 FY 2000 1.36 FY 2001 1.58 FY 2002 1.49 FY 2003 1.45 FY 2004 1.54 FY 2005 1.59 FY 2006 2.01 (1) FY 2007 2.01 Note(s): Source(s): Total Federal buildings and facilities energy expenditures in FY 2006 were $5.79 billion (in $2010). 1) Increase due to change in FEMP categorization of Federal buildings. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table A-9, p. 97 and Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2008, Table A-9, p. 78 for energy costs, and Table 1, p. 12 for floorspace for 2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2006, Table A-12, p. 158 for energy costs for 1985-2005; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report on FEMP, Dec. 2002, Table 8-A, p. 61 for 2000; DOE/FEMP, Annual

71

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Average Annual Energy Expenditures per Household, by Year ($2010) Year 1980 1,991 1981 1,981 1982 2,058 1983 2,082 1984 2,067 1985 2,012 1986 1,898 1987 1,846 1988 1,849 1989 1,848 1990 1,785 1991 1,784 1992 1,729 1993 1,797 1994 1,772 1995 1,727 1996 1,800 1997 1,761 1998 1,676 1999 1,659 2000 1,824 2001 1,900 2002 1,830 2003 1,978 2004 2,018 2005 2,175 2006 2,184 2007 2,230 2008 2,347 2009 2,173 2010 2,201 2011 2,185 2012 2,123 2013 2,056 2014 2,032 2015 2,030 2016 2,007 2017 1,992 2018 1,982 2019 1,973 2020 1,963 2021 1,961 2022 1,964 2023 1,962 2024 1,959 2025 1,957 2026 1,959 2027 1,960 2028 1,953 2029 1,938 2030 1,932 2031 1,937 2032 1,946 2033 1,956 2034 1,967 2035 1,978 Source(s): Average Expenditure EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2, p. 3-

72

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

73

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4.4: Power consumption of a desktop PC + 3 LCDChapter 2 Trends in Building Consumption 2.1 UCSD as abreakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- use

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by income quintile on the basis of the Annual Energy Outlook 1997 forecast  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the base-case scenario used in the Annual Energy Outlook 1997, published by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, on income quintile groups. Projected energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1993 to 2015 are reported. Projected consumption of electricity, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas over this period is also reported for each income group. 33 figs., 11 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Allison, T.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

78

Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys the present situation of building energy consumption in Shanghai and points out the problems of insufficient energy consumption statistics based on the survey data. We analyze the relationships of energy consumption between the building and the whole society, and between the building and the air conditioning system. Eight public buildings in Shanghai have been chosen for analyzing the characteristics of energy consumption of the air conditioning system in real time.

Yang, X.; Tan, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

80

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 28.4 28.4 16.3% Space Heating 14.6 2.9 1.3 0.1 4.3 0.1 4.7 23.7 13.6% Ventilation 15.1 15.1 8.6% Space Cooling 0.3 14.2 14.5 8.3% Refrigeration 9.9 9.9 5.7% Electronics 8.8 8.8 5.1% Water Heating 4.1 0.7 0.7 2.5 7.3 4.2% Computers 5.3 5.3 3.0% Cooking 1.7 0.6 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.9 0.3 3.7 1.4 5.4 22.8 31.1 17.8% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.8 4.5 4.5 17.7 28.1 16.1% Total 29.3 8.4 1.3 3.7 1.5 14.9 0.1 130.0 174.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.4 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

82

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

83

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 35.4 35.4 19.7% Space Heating 15.0 2.9 0.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 8.5 27.5 15.3% Space Cooling 0.4 25.0 25.3 14.1% Ventilation 15.9 15.9 8.9% Refrigeration 11.6 11.6 6.5% Water Heating 4.0 0.6 0.6 2.7 7.3 4.1% Electronics 7.8 7.8 4.3% Computers 6.3 6.3 3.5% Cooking 1.6 0.7 2.3 1.3% Other (4) 2.7 0.3 3.3 1.2 4.8 20.4 28.0 15.6% Adjust to SEDS (5) 6.2 5.2 5.2 0.6 12.0 6.7% Total 29.9 9.0 0.9 3.3 1.3 14.5 0.1 134.8 179.4 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.2 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

84

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

85

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 30.1 30.1 15.2% Space Heating 17.1 2.8 1.5 0.1 4.4 0.2 4.5 26.1 13.3% Electronics 11.2 11.2 5.7% Space Cooling 0.3 14.3 14.6 7.4% Water Heating 5.2 0.8 0.8 2.5 8.5 4.3% Computers 5.5 5.5 2.8% Refrigeration 9.4 9.4 4.8% Ventilation 16.6 16.6 8.4% Cooking 2.1 0.6 2.7 1.4% Other (4) 4.8 0.3 4.3 1.7 6.3 31.2 42.3 21.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 5.9 4.9 4.9 19.2 30.0 15.2% Total 35.5 8.9 1.5 4.3 1.9 16.5 0.2 145.0 197.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.1 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($1.7 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2011 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

86

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 Commercial Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal (3) Electricity Total Percent Lighting 32.3 32.3 14.4% Space Heating 19.0 2.7 1.6 0.2 4.5 0.2 4.6 28.2 12.5% Water Heating 6.3 1.0 1.0 18.1 25.4 11.3% Space Cooling 0.4 15.1 15.5 6.9% Electronics 13.0 13.0 5.8% Refrigeration 10.0 10.0 4.4% Computers 6.0 6.0 2.7% Cooking 2.6 0.6 3.2 1.4% Ventilation 2.4 2.4 1.1% Other (4) 9.3 0.4 4.9 2.0 7.2 40.9 57.5 25.5% Adjust to SEDS (5) 4.6 5.3 5.3 21.7 31.6 14.0% Total 42.2 9.4 1.6 4.9 2.2 18.0 0.2 164.8 225.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes kerosene space heating ($0.2 billion) and motor gasoline other uses ($2.0 billion). 3) Coal average price is from AEO 2012 Early Release, all users price. 4) Includes service station equipment, ATMs, medical equipment,

87

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

89

Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis on the annual energy outlook 2000 forecast.  

SciTech Connect

The changes in the patterns of energy use and expenditures by population group are analyzed by using the 1993 and 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Surveys. Historically, these patterns have differed among non-Hispanic White households, non-Hispanic Black households, and Hispanic households. Patterns of energy use and expenditures are influenced by geographic and metropolitan location, the composition of housing stock, economic and demographic status, and the composition of energy use by end-use category. As a consequence, as energy-related factors change across groups, patterns of energy use and expenditures also change. Over time, with changes in the composition of these factors by population group and their variable influences on energy use, the impact on energy use and expenditures has varied across these population groups.

Poyer, D. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

91

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

92

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

93

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

94

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

95

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

96

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

97

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

98

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

99

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

100

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

102

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

103

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

104

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

105

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

106

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

107

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

108

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

109

The impact of the Persian Gulf crisis on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Iraqi invasion of the Kingdom of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered first immediate and then fluctuating world petroleum prices. Increases in petroleum prices and in U.S. petroleum imports resulted in increases in the petroleum prices paid by U.S. residential, commercial, and industrial consumers. The result was an immediate price shock that reverberated throughout the U.S. economy. The differential impact of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raised immediate, significant, and potentially long-term research, policy, and management issues for a variety of federal, state, and local government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Among these issues are (1) the measurement of variations in the impact of petroleum price changes on poor, nonpoor, minority, and majority households; (2) how to use the existing policy resources and policy innovation to mitigate regressive impacts of petroleum price increases on lower-income households; and (3) how to pursue such policy mitigation through government agencies severely circumscribed by tax and expenditure limitations. Few models attempt to assess household energy consumption and energy expenditure under various alternative price scenarios and with respect to the inclusion of differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. This paper provides a preliminary analysis of the nature and extent of potential impacts of petroleum price changes attributable to the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath on majority, black, and Hispanic households and on overlapping poor and nonpoor households. At the time this was written, the Persian Gulf War had concluded with Iraq`s total surrender to all of the resolutions and demands of the United Nations and United States.

Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States); Poyer, D.; Teotia, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Energy consumption in commerical buildings: a comparison with BEPS budgets  

SciTech Connect

Metered energy consumption data have been collected on existing commercial buildings to help establish the proposed Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS). The search has identified 84 buildings whose metered energy consumption is equal to or less than that proposed for their BEPS budgets and another 7 buildings whose metered consumption is less than 20% above their BEPS budgets. The methodology used to identify the buildings and to collect their metered energy consumption data are described. The data are analyzed and summarized and conclusions are drawn.

1980-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

112

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure Quality, Management, and Contract Incentives Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager...

113

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within… (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year

115

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 2003 Commercial Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type Consumption Percent of Total | Consumption Percent of Total Building Type (thousand BtuSF)...

117

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous challenge. Buildings account for 40% of the nation's carbon emissions and the consumption of 40% of our

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

120

Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

Schmidt, Justin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

2003 CBECS Building Characteristics and Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

MAINT8 Regular HVAC maintenance 188- 188 $YESNO. EMCS8 Energy management and control system 190- 190 $YESNO. ADJWT8 Final full sample building ...

122

DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

/1 /1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D! Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 1111? This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office |GPO). Make check or money order payable to the Superintendent of Documents. You may send your order to the U.S. Government Printing Office or the National Energy Information Center. GPO prices are subject to change without advance notice. An order form is enclosed for your convenience. StockNumber: 061-003-00298-6 Price: $9.50 Questions on energy statistics and the availability of other EIA publications and orders for EIA publications available for sale from the Government Printing Office may be directed to the National Energy Information Center.

123

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Title Domestic Hot Water Consumption in Four Low-Income Apartment Buildings Publication Type Conference...

124

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Study: Window % of Consumption 1. Categorize component loads

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Type Definitions Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined

127

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China* Nan Zhou, 1whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

129

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Age (years) Average Hours Open per Week Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) All Commercial Buildings 30.5 62 5,321 69,618 Building...

130

Energy consumption of building 39; Energy consumption of building thirty-nine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further… (more)

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Simulating the impact of building occupant peer networks on inter-building energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed an integrated inter-building physical and human network model to predict the energy conservation for an assumed urban residential block. We utilized an Artificial Neural Network to predict hourly energy consumption in both the first physical ...

Xiaoqi Xu; Anna Laura Pisello; John E. Taylor

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Direct Appropriations on Federal Buildings Energy Conservation Retrofits and Capital Equipment ($2010 Million) FY 1985 FY 1986 FY 1987 FY 1988 FY 1989 FY 1990 Source(s): DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 11-B, p. 31; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Nov. 2007, Table 9-B, p. 26 for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000-2006; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sep. 2004, Table 4-B, p. 38 for 1986-1989, 1991-1994, 1996-1999; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators. 349,350 102,135 FY 1996 238,232 FY 2002 147,895 83,340 FY 1995 438,943 FY 2001 162,488 FY 2007 321,686 108,705 FY 1994 318,739 FY 2000 150,900 FY 2006 301,222 98,708 FY 1993 170,826 FY 1999 261,784 FY 2005 201,156 342,653 FY 1992 209,973

134

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Policy Act of 2005, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Energy Management Requirements - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and requires increasing percentage reductions in energy consumption through FY 2015, with a final energy consumption reduction goal of 20 percent savings in FY 2015, as compared to the baseline energy consumption of Federal buildings in FY 2003. (These goals were superseded by Section 431 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.) [Section 102] Energy Use Measurement and Accountability - Requires that all Federal buildings be metered to measure electricity use by 2012. [Section 103] Procurement of Energy Efficient Products - Requires all Federal agencies to procure ENERGY STAR qualified products, for product

135

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ Consumption & Efficiency ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2003 1999 1995 1992 Previous Analysis & Projections Maps U. S. Census Regions and Divisions U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? U. S. Census Regions and Divisions: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA

136

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation.

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100.

138

Improved Building Energy Consumption with the Help of Modern ICT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kyoto process and the global combat against climate change will require more intensive energy saving efforts especially in all developed countries. Key for the success in building sector is the energy efficiency of the existing building stock. Reliable information on realised energy consumption is the basis for all kind of improvements. Monitoring and targeting systems based on modern information and communication technologies can support daily building operations and saving actions. Based on the internet technologies information and benchmarking services can be developed in order to improve the dissemination of best practices and the networking both on national and international level. Some results of the latest developments carried out at VTT in Finland (www.vtt.fi) will be discussed.

Pietilainen, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Standard Relating to Solar Hot Water - Requires new Federal buildings, or Federal buildings undergoing major renovations, to meet at least 30 percent of hot water demand through the use of solar hot water heaters, if cost-effective. [Section 523] Federally-Procured Appliances with Standby Power - Requires all Federal agencies to procure appliances with standby power consumption of less than 1 watt, if available and cost-effective. [Section 524] Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, enacted December 19, 2007 Energy Reduction Goals for Federal Buildings - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and

140

Research on the Statistical Method of Energy Consumption for Public Buildings in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to develop a national statistical system for energy consumption data for public buildings in China, in order to provide data support for building energy efficiency work. The framework for a national statistical system of energy consumption for public buildings is presented in this paper. The statistical index system of energy consumption constitutes three aspects: general characteristics of public buildings, opposition and utilization of energy consumption equipment, and energy consumption quantities. On this basis, a set of statistical reports is derived to measure the energy consumption of cities, provinces and the country.

Chen, S.; Li, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Scenario analysis of retrofit strategies for reducing energy consumption in Norwegian office buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model buildings were created for simulation to describe typical office buildings from different construction periods. A simulation program was written to predict the annual energy consumption of the buildings in their ...

Engblom, Lisa A. (Lisa Allison)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

143

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

144

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

145

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Housing Characteristics; Consumption & Expenditures; Microdata; Consumption & Expenditures Tables + EXPAND ALL. Summary Statistics (revised January 2009) PDF (all tables)

146

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 9,470 113.98 108.4 1.31 11.45 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q

148

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

149

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's Buildings and Energy in the 1980's Overview Full Report Tables Analysis of energy consumption, expenditures, and other energy-related data for...

150

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

151

Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy consumption structure and building conditions, living customs, family income, and thermal environment, as well as local climatic conditions, etc., is analyzed. Measures to optimize the energy utilization consumption are proposed, and further improvements to the energy efficiency of current residential buildings is also discussed.

Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 7% 25% 4% 64% | 10% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 7% 24% 4% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 7% 26% 3% 65% | 9% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 7% 25% 3% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 6% 25% 3% 65% | 8% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 6% 25% 2% 67% | 8% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 6% 25% 2% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 6% 26% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 5% 25% 4% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 6% 25% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 6% 24%

153

An Operational Energy Consumption Evaluation Index System for Large Public Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large public buildings have been the emphasis of energy conservation in China. In this paper, the design and operational energy consumption evaluation indices for large public buildings are generalized, their differences and deficiencies are analyzed, and the evaluation indices of each kind of key equipment and the whole heating and air-conditioning system are put forward from the point of view of usage efficiency of energy. The energy consumption evaluation index system for large public buildings is primarily established. The calculation method of each kind of energy consumption evaluation index is given, which provides the foundation for further studies on energy consumption for large public buildings.

Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

U.S. Energy Consumption in Buildings by Energy Source, 1970 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

An analysis of trends in energy consumption and energy-related carbon emissions in U.S. buildings, 1970-1998.

155

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- useFigure 3.7: The energy consumption of HVAC during ourSpring 2011 tests - Energy consumption for electricity and

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

158

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

159

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

160

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Federal Building Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year (1) Year Year FY 1985 123.0 FY 1997 111.9 FY 1986 131.3 FY 1998 107.7 FY 1987 136.9 FY 1999 106.7 FY 1988 136.3 FY 2000 104.8 FY 1989 132.6 FY 2001 105.9 FY 1990 128.6 FY 2002 104.6 FY 1991 122.9 FY 2003 105.2 FY 1992 125.5 FY 2004 104.9 FY 1993 122.3 FY 2005 98.2 FY 1994 120.2 FY 2006 (2) 113.9 FY 1995 117.3 FY 2007 (3) 112.9 FY 1996 115.0 FY 2015 (4) 89.5 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption per Gross Consumption per Gross Square Foot (10^3 Btu/SF) Square Foot (10^3 Btu/SF) 1) See Table 4.3.1 for floorspace. 2) Increase due to change in categorization of Federal buildings. 3) Adjusted for renewable energy purchases and source savings. 4) Executive Order 13423 goal. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sept. 2006, Table

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy conservation. At present, the large public buildings have been the emphasis of building energy conservation in China. The functions and the basic construction of energy consumption database management system (ECDBMS) for large public buildings are introduced. The ECDBMS is developed by using SQL Server 2000 as the database and PowerBuilder10.0 as the developing tool. It includes five parts such as the basic information of public buildings, the designing parameters of energy-consuming equipments, the operational parameters of energy-consuming equipments, the electric and fuel consumption of buildings, the evaluation of energy efficiency for equipments. The energy consumption database can be accumulated and some functions can be realized by using this database such as the management of building designing parameters and energy consumption data, the evaluation and analysis of building energy consumption.

Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Kartläggning av energianvändning under byggfasen vid nyproduktion av flerbostadshus; Investigation of the energy consumption during production of apartment buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The energy consumption in the sectors of residential and public buildings is 40 % of the total energy consumption in Sweden. The main part,… (more)

Hatami, Valid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

real-time power consumption. More modern devices come withpower consumption of laptop with time, and the difference in startup power draw of both devices.devices are turned on at different times, their characteristic waveforms can be distinguished from the overall power consumption

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

165

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window to wall. The integrated influence result will be different when the building is in different climate zone. This paper studies the variation rule of some aggregative indicators and building energy efficiency rates by simulation and analysis of the same building in different climate zones by eQuest, in order to determine how building energy efficiency works in different climate zones.

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simulation and Analysis of Energy Consumption of Public Building in Chongquig  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculation and analysis of energy consumption must be on the base of simulation of building load. DeST is adopted to calculate dynamic cooling load of the main building in Chongqing city. Then water chilling unit's plant capability is checked and energy consumption of the building is calculated. After energy efficiency potency analyzed, optimum running-program is put out and some suggestions are given.

Chen, G.; Lu, J.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption March 2012 8.1.2 Average Energy Intensity of Public Water Supplies by Location (kWh per Million Gallons) Location United States (2) 627 437 1,363 United States (3) 65 (6) 1,649 Northern California Indoor 111 1,272 1,911 Northern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Southern California Indoor (5) 111 1,272 1,911 Southern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Iowa (6) 380 1,570 Massachusetts (6) (6) 1,750 Wisconsin Class AB (4) - - Wisconsin Class C (4) - - Wisconsin Class D (4) - - Wisconsin Total (4) - - Note(s): Source(s): 836 3,263 Sourcing Treatment (1) Distribution Wastewater Total 2,230 2,295 2,117 5,411 2,117 3,500 - not included 1,850 9,727 13,021 9,727 11,110 2390 4,340 1,500 3,250 - not included 1,510 1) Treatment before delivery to customer. 2) Source: Electric Policy Research Institute (EPRI) 2009. Wastewater estimated based on EPRI

168

Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Conservation Evaluation of a Commercial Building in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents a model of a commercial building in Shanghai with energy simulation software, and after calibration, the energy consumption of this building is calculated. On the basis of the simulation and calculation, a series of energy saving measures are suggested and their effects are evaluated. The paper verifies the application of computer simulation in building energy analysis and energy saving evaluation.

Chen, C.; Pan, Y.; Huang, Z.; Wu, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Virtual sensors for estimation of energy consumption and thermal comfort in buildings with underfloor heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating a building's performance usually requires a high number of sensors especially if individual rooms are analyzed. This paper introduces a simple and scalable model-based virtual sensor that allows analysis of a buildings' heat consumption down ... Keywords: Building performance analysis, Energy efficiency, Hybrid HVAC systems, Virtual sensors

Joern Ploennigs; Ammar Ahmed; Burkhard Hensel; Paul Stack; Karsten Menzel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Household Expenditures Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Expenditures Module Household Expenditures Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Household Expenditures Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and demographic characteristics, and consumption and expenditures for fuels for various end-uses. These data are combined with NEMS forecasts of household disposable income, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures by end-use and household type. The HEM disaggregation algorithm uses these combined results to forecast household fuel consumption and expenditures by income quintile and Census Division (see

171

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation 1980 37% 41% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 36% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 40% 39% 18% 3% | 51% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 40% 39% 17% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 39% 40% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 39% 40% 18% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 41% 40% 16% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 39% 41% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 40% 42% 15% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 39% 41% 16% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 36% 43% 17% 3% | 47% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 38% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 36% 42% 18% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 35% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 36% 43% 18% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 34% 43% 20% 3% | 47% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 35% 41% 21% 3% | 49% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 35% 40% 22% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 23.66 2001

172

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

173

Analysis of the Effects of the Application of Solar Water Heater in Building Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy, civilian construction in the Changjiang River delta region is rapidly expanding. The boom in the construction industry definitely results in that the proportion of building energy consumption to whole energy consumption in the national economy will increase. The energy consumption of the air conditioning system, lighting system and hot-water system are the main components of the building energy consumption. Theoretically, solar energy can meet the requirements for these systems by changing the technology of photo-electricity and photo-thermal. However, the application of these technologies is on the basis of demand of space and atmospheric clarity conditions. This paper focuses on the specific conditions of city and building construction in the Changjiang River delta region, discusses the applying condition of photo-thermal transformation technology of solar energy, then analyzes the influence of mature applications of this technology on energy consumption.

Wang, J.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

175

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: All Buildings. 167: 481: 436: 88: 1,340: 24: 381: 69: 156: 418: 3,559: ... "Commercial ...

176

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

177

Analysis of electricity consumption profiles in public buildings with dimensionality reduction techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the daily electricity consumption profile of a building and its correlation with environmental factors makes it possible to examine and estimate its electricity demand. As an alternative to the traditional correlation analysis, a new ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Electricity consumption profiles, Energy efficiency, Information visualization

Antonio MoráN, Juan J. Fuertes, Miguel A. Prada, SerafíN Alonso, Pablo Barrientos, Ignacio DíAz, Manuel DomíNguez

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy Expenditures | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures Expenditures Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

179

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfaces to Reduce PC Energy Usage. In Proceedings of46.2% of this primary energy usage[9]. Since buildings havecontributors to the total energy usage. Then, we can study

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that...

184

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Implementation of Simple Measures for Savings Water and Energy Consumption in Kuwait Government Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives in details the efforts made by the Public Services Department (PSD) to reduce water and energy consumptions in the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour's (MOSAL) buildings in Kuwait. PSD manages around 125 buildings distributed over 6 governorates. PSD's efforts included the installation of programmable thermostats for A/C units, urging MOSAL's staff to switch off lighting after working hours, replacement of old A/C and lighting systems by newer systems and installation of shutters and solar films for windows, insulation materials for walls and roofs and low-flow water tools for faucets. These efforts reduced the overall water and energy consumptions by 15 and 25%, respectively, in all MOSAL's buildings. Additionally, MOSAL is planning to collaborate with Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research (KISR) to further reduce water and energy consumptions in MOSAL's buildings by optimizing operation strategies and utilizing new water and energy technologies.

Albaharani, H.; Al-Mulla, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption (Percent) Total Industry Transportation Total | (quads) 1980 34% 27% | 61% 39% 0% 100% | 7.15 1981 34% 28% | 61% 38% 0% 100% | 7.33 1982 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.12 1983 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.34 1984 34% 29% | 63% 37% 0% 100% | 7.80 1985 34% 30% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.93 1986 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.08 1987 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.38 1988 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.80 1989 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.03 1990 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.26 1991 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.42 1992 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.43 1993 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.76 1994 34% 31% | 65% 34% 0% 100% | 10.01 1995 35% 32% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 10.28 1996 35% 32% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.58 1997 34% 33% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.73 1998 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.14 1999 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.30 2000 35% 34% | 69% 31% 0% 100% | 11.67 2001 35% 35% | 70% 29% 0% 100% | 11.58 2002 37% 35% | 71% 29% 0% 100% | 11.82

188

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

189

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

190

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Buildings Share of U.S. Primary Energy Consumption (Percent) Total Consumption Total Industry Transportation Total (quads) 1980(1) 20.1% 13.5% | 33.7% 41.1% 25.2% 100% | 78.1 1981 20.0% 13.9% | 33.9% 40.4% 25.6% 100% | 76.1 1982 21.2% 14.8% | 36.0% 37.9% 26.1% 100% | 73.1 1983 21.1% 15.0% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.3% 100% | 72.9 1984 20.8% 14.9% | 35.7% 38.7% 25.7% 100% | 76.6 1985 21.0% 15.0% | 35.9% 37.8% 26.3% 100% | 76.5 1986 20.8% 15.1% | 35.9% 37.0% 27.1% 100% | 76.6 1987 20.5% 15.1% | 35.6% 37.2% 27.2% 100% | 79.0 1988 20.7% 15.2% | 35.9% 37.2% 27.0% 100% | 82.8 1989 20.9% 15.5% | 36.5% 37.0% 26.5% 100% | 84.8 1990 20.0% 15.7% | 35.8% 37.7% 26.5% 100% | 84.5 1991 20.6% 16.0% | 36.5% 37.3% 26.2% 100% | 84.4 1992 20.2% 15.6% | 35.8% 38.0% 26.1% 100% | 85.8 1993 20.8% 15.8% | 36.6% 37.4% 26.0% 100% | 87.5 1994 20.3% 15.8% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.2% 100% | 89.1 1995 20.3% 16.1% | 36.4% 37.4% 26.2% 100% | 91.1 1996 20.7%

192

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Million Barrels per Day) Buildings Residential Commercial Total Industry Transportation Total 1980 2.62 2.01 l 4.63 10.55 19.01 34.19 1981 2.26 1.73 l 3.98 9.13 18.81 31.93 1982 1.96 1.49 l 3.45 8.35 18.42 30.23 1983 1.87 1.61 l 3.48 7.97 18.60 30.05 1984 1.95 1.60 l 3.55 8.48 19.02 31.05 1985 1.92 1.40 l 3.32 8.13 19.47 30.92 1986 2.03 1.60 l 3.62 8.39 20.18 32.20 1987 2.04 1.51 l 3.54 8.50 20.82 32.86 1988 2.20 1.57 l 3.77 8.88 21.57 34.22 1989 2.23 1.56 l 3.79 8.71 21.71 34.21 1990 1.81 1.38 l 3.20 8.73 21.63 33.55 1991 1.77 1.30 l 3.07 8.40 21.38 32.85 1992 1.73 1.19 l 2.92 8.93 21.68 33.52 1993 1.81 1.16 l 2.97 8.80 22.07 33.84 1994 1.75 1.15 l 2.90 9.16 22.61 34.67 1995 1.61 1.00 l 2.62 8.87 23.07 34.56 1996 1.74 1.04 l 2.78 9.33 23.65 35.76 1997 1.71 1.04 l 2.75 9.60 23.92 36.27 1998 1.73 1.13 l 2.86 9.54 24.54 36.93 1999 1.85 1.10 l 2.96 9.78 25.22 37.96

193

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

194

State energy price and expenditure report 1994  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68

196

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

197

Energy consumption characterization as an input to building management and performance benchmarking - a case study PPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper aims at describing the methodology and presents some final results of a work developed in the field of building energy benchmarking applied to the buildings of the Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, based on a thorough energy performance characterization of each of its buildings, looking specifically at the typology of canteen. Developing building energy performance benchmarking systems enables the comparison of actual consumption of individual buildings against others of the same typology and against targets previously defined. The energy performance indicator was computed based on two different relevant elements, the net floor area and number of served meals. Then, the results were ranked according to the percentile rules previously established, and compared. An environmental analysis based on equivalent CO2 emissions was also performed for each building.

Bernardo, H.; Neves, L.; Oliveira, F.; Quintal, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 7.42 28.2% 3.04 11.5% 0.15 0.6% 0.87 3.3% 4.35 10.47 14.82 56.4% 26.29 100% - 1981 7.11 27.5% 2.63 10.2% 0.17 0.6% 0.89 3.5% 4.50 10.54 15.03 58.2% 25.84 100% - 1982 7.32 27.8% 2.45 9.3% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.57 10.80 15.37 58.4% 26.31 100% - 1983 6.93 26.4% 2.50 9.5% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.68 11.01 15.68 59.6% 26.30 100% - 1984 7.20 26.4% 2.74 10.0% 0.21 0.8% 1.00 3.7% 4.93 11.24 16.17 59.2% 27.31 100% - 1985 6.98 25.4% 2.62 9.5% 0.18 0.6% 1.03 3.8% 5.06 11.59 16.65 60.6% 27.47 100% - 1986 6.74 24.5% 2.68 9.7% 0.18 0.6% 0.95 3.4% 5.23 11.75 16.98 61.7% 27.52 100% - 1987 6.87 24.4% 2.73 9.7% 0.17 0.6% 0.88 3.1% 5.44 12.04 17.48 62.2% 28.13 100% - 1988 7.44 25.0%

199

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 U.S. Buildings Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GSHP (4) Total 2010-Year 1980 0.867 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.867 - 1981 0.894 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.894 - 1982 0.993 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.993 - 1983 0.992 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.992 - 1984 1.002 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.002 - 1985 1.034 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.034 - 1986 0.947 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.947 - 1987 0.882 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.882 - 1988 0.942 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.942 - 1989 1.018 0.052 N.A. 0.008 1.078 - 1990 0.675 0.056 N.A. 0.008 0.739 - 1991 0.705 0.057 N.A. 0.009 0.771 - 1992 0.744 0.059 N.A. 0.010 0.813 - 1993 0.657 0.061 N.A. 0.010 0.728 - 1994 0.626 0.063 N.A. 0.010 0.700 - 1995 0.633 0.064 N.A. 0.011 0.708 - 1996 0.669 0.065 N.A. 0.012 0.746 - 1997 0.559 0.064 N.A. 0.013 0.636 - 1998 0.498 0.064 N.A. 0.015 0.577 - 1999 0.521 0.063 N.A. 0.016 0.599 - 2000 0.549 0.060 N.A. 0.016 0.625 - 2001

200

Estimating building consumption breakdowns using ON/OFF state sensing and incremental sub-meter deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of estimating the power breakdowns for the main appliances inside a building using a small number of power meters and the knowledge of the ON/OFF states of individual appliances. First we solve the breakdown estimation ... Keywords: electric load estimation, electricity consumption monitoring, energy breakdowns

Deokwoo Jung; Andreas Savvides

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vapnik's learning theory applied to energy consumption forecasts in residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of energy conservation, we present in this paper an introduction to the use of support vector (SV) learning machines used as a data mining tool applied to buildings energy consumption data from a measurement campaign. Experiments using ... Keywords: data mining, energy conservation, energy efficiency, predictive modelling, statistical learning theory

Florence Lai; Frederic Magoules; Fred Lherminier

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

SEDS CSV File Documentation: Price and Expenditure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices and Expenditures Prices and Expenditures The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain the price and expenditure estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are three files that contain estimates for all states and years. Prices contains the price estimates for all states and Expenditures contains the expenditure estimates for all states. The third file, Adjusted Consumption for Expenditure Calculations contains adjusted consumption estimates used in calculating expenditures (see Appendix E below). Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named with the two-letter U.S. Postal Code listed in Appendix A, as well as a file for the United States.

203

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... per Household3 1997 Cooling Degree-Days per Household Total U.S. Households ..... 1,274 1,166 1,562 1,010 6.6 No/Don’t Use Air-Conditioning ...

204

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of one ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any ...

205

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appliances ... include the small number of households where the fuel for central air-conditioning equipment was something other than electricity; ...

206

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

207

Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the consumption cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.6 Optimal consumption, expenditures and1.3.2 Optimal nondurable consumption and durable

Issler, Paulo Floriano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

State energy price and expenditure report, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 FY 2007 Federal Building Energy Use Shares, by Fuel Type and Agency Site Primary | Primary | FY 2007 Fuel Type Percent Percent | Agency Percent | (1015 Btu) Electricity 49.4%...

210

Field Measurements of Cooling Energy Consumption in a Multi-Zone Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses cooling energy use in a small office building with the objective of developing an understanding of where energy is used and identifying relationships between cooling energy and other energy end uses. Attributes of the building metered are discussed to provide a perspective for the data presented on energy performance of the building with an emphasis on the cooling energy use. The data are reviewed to develop an understanding of cooling loads in the building as well as the HVAC system's response. Despite the detailed instrumentation of the building it is evident that collection of additional data is required to go beyond quantifying the building's energy consumption and explain why the building exhibits its characteristic cooling behavior. Additional data needed are suggested to assist other researchers in developing metering programs. The final section of the paper summarizes a comparison of the metered data with a calibrated DOE 2.1 energy simulation. The results of the calibrated simulation highlight the limitations of simulations in understanding building energy use as well as the need for metering to develop realistic operating schedules.

Heidell, J. A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWh/square foot) 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 226 14.9 3.8 8.8 18.1 17.9 1.18 0.079 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 48 17.8 3.8 9.0 20.0 4.4 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 96 12.9 4.0 8.2 15.5 9.2 1.23 0.096 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 178 11.4 3.1 7.2 15.0 15.2 0.97 0.086

212

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Heating Energy Consumption in a Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In winter, much of the building energy is used for heating in the north region of China. In this study, the heating energy consumption of a residential building in Tianjin during a heating period was simulated by using the EnergyPlus energy simulation program. The study showed that the heat loss from exterior walls, exterior windows and infiltration took three main parts of the total heat loss. Furthermore, the results of on-site measurement are presented with the conclusion that the EnergyPlus program provides sufficient accuracy for this energy simulation application.

Liu, J.; Yang, M.; Zhao, X.; Zhu, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

214

Energy Consumption Status of Public Buildings and the Analysis of the Potential on Energy Efficiency in Xiamen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the survey on the preset and applied situation of the central air conditioning systems in public buildings in Xiamen, this paper analyzes the status of energy consumption, and indicates the irrational aspects of operation and management of the central air conditioning system in public buildings. At the same time, this paper comments on energy economization in Xiamen, and presents proposals and advice for energy efficiency. Presently, energy efficiency is relatively low in Xiamen, and energy consumption is a little too high, especially in public buildings. The energy consumption of central air conditioning system is very significant, and therefore energy conservation has much potential.

Pei, X.; Zhang, S.; Chen, L.; Zhang, X.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 • Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth • Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade • Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards • The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s • U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is focused on the analysis of indoor conditions for a new commercial building that will be constructed in an East-European country. Based on the initial HVAC design parameters the surface of the building was divided in thermal zones that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A dynamic variation of the PMV (Predicted Mean Vote Index) was obtained for different thermal zones of the building (retails stores, mall circulation, corridors) and in most of the cases the acceptable values of plus/minus 0.5 are exceeded. Among the most important energy efficiency measures it is mentioned a decrease of the heating set point temperature, increase of the walls and roof thermal resistance and the use of a heat recovery on the ventilation system. In this work it is demonstrated how simple measures can enhance the indoor conditions and reduce the energy consumption for this kind of construction.

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).section entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

219

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Use of Wastewater Treatment Plants by Capacity and Treatment Level (kWh per Million Gallons) 1 - 5 - 10 - 20 - 50 - 100 - Note(s): Source(s): 673 1,028 1,188 1,558 The level of treatment indicates the amount of processing involved before water is released from the treatment facility. Primary treatment removes solids and oils from wastewater. Secondary treatment uses biological processes to remove organic material from the water. Tertiary treatment includes additional processes to further refine the water. Nitrification is a process to remove nitrogen from water. Electric Power Research Institute, Water & Sustainability (Volume 4): U.S. Electricity Consumption for Water Supply & Treatment - The Next Half Century,

220

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

222

Use of Computer Simulation to Reduce the Energy Consumption in a Tall Office Building in Dubai-UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are a major consumer of energy and thus have a significant impact on the environment. The use of artificial lights is a major contributor to the energy usage in a typical office building using electricity to run the lights and also increasing the cooling load due to its heat dissipation. Proper design for the maximization of natural light helps reduce the use of artificial lights and results in reduction in the buildings energy consumption. Computer simulation of the lighting and energy consumption in a typical tall office building in Dubai-UAE is used to optimize the effectiveness of natural lighting penetration and calculate the associated energy savings. Two alternative building designs are proposed and tested. The overall energy savings for the whole building reached 31.4 % for the proposed oval shaped design. This represents a significant reduction in the buildings electricity load and thus its impact on the environment.

Abu-Hijleh, B.; Abu-Dakka, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on available data and commercial percentage in 1995. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1990, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1081, 1993; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1995, U.S. Geological

224

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Shares of U.S. Buildings Generic Quad (Percent) (1) Renewables (2) Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydroelectric Other Total Nuclear Total 1980 37% 18% 29% 7% 3% 10% 6% 100% 1981 37% 15% 31% 6% 4% 10% 7% 100% 1982 36% 13% 31% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1983 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1984 34% 13% 33% 8% 4% 12% 8% 100% 1985 33% 12% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1986 31% 13% 35% 7% 4% 11% 10% 100% 1987 31% 13% 36% 6% 3% 9% 11% 100% 1988 31% 13% 35% 5% 3% 9% 12% 100% 1989 31% 12% 34% 6% 4% 10% 12% 100% 1990 31% 11% 36% 6% 4% 10% 13% 100% 1991 31% 10% 35% 6% 4% 10% 14% 100% 1992 32% 10% 35% 5% 4% 9% 14% 100% 1993 32% 9% 36% 6% 4% 9% 13% 100% 1994 33% 9% 36% 5% 3% 9% 14% 100% 1995 33% 8% 35% 6% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1996 32% 8% 36% 7% 3% 10% 14% 100% 1997 32% 8% 37% 7% 3% 10% 13% 100% 1998 31% 8% 38% 6% 3% 9% 14% 100% 1999 31% 8% 37% 6% 3% 9% 14% 100% 2000 32% 8% 37% 5% 3% 8% 14% 100% 2001 32% 9% 38% 4% 2% 7% 15% 100% 2002 32% 7% 37% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2003 32% 8% 38% 5% 3% 8% 15% 100% 2004 31%

225

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 World Primary Energy Consumption and Population, by Country/Region 1990-2000 2000-2010 Region/Country 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 Energy Pop. Energy Pop. United States 85.0 99.8 97.8 18.7% 250 282 311 4.6% 1.6% 1.2% -0.2% 1.0% China 27.0 36.4 104.6 20.0% 1,148 1,264 1,343 20.0% 3.0% 1.0% 11.1% 0.6% OECD Europe 69.9 76.8 79.6 15.2% 402 522 550 8.2% 0.9% 2.6% 0.4% 0.5% Other Non-OECD Asia 12.5 20.6 31.3 6.0% 781 1,014 1,086 16.2% 5.1% 2.6% 4.2% 0.7% Russia (1) 61.0 27.2 29.9 5.7% 288 147 140 2.1% -7.7% -6.5% 0.9% -0.5% Central & S. America 14.5 20.8 28.1 5.4% 359 422 462 6.9% 3.7% 1.6% 3.0% 0.9% Middle East 11.2 17.3 27.6 5.3% 135 173 213 3.2% 4.5% 2.5% 4.8% 2.1% Japan 18.8 22.4 20.8 4.0% 124 127 127 1.9% 1.8% 0.3% -0.8% 0.0% India 7.9 13.5 23.8 4.6% 838 1,006 1,214 18.1% 5.5% 1.8% 5.9% 1.9% Canada 11.0 13.1 14.3 2.7% 28 31 34 0.5% 1.8% 1.1% 0.9% 0.9% Oth. Non-OECD Europe 6.4 17.6

226

Influence of Transfer Efficiency of the Outdoor Pipe Network and Boiler Operating Efficiency on the Building Heat Consumption Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the influence of transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and operating efficiency of the boiler on the building heat consumption index, on the premise of saving up to 65 percent energy in different climates. The results show that transfer efficiency is not influenced by the climate, and the influence is in accordance with that in other climates. The article also presents data on the energy consumption caused by the improvement of the transfer efficiency of the outdoor pipe network and the operating efficiency of the boiler, and the calculated formula for the building heat consumption index on the condition of saving 65 percent energy.

Fang, X.; Wang, Z.; Liu, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard

228

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2015 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.10 0.68 0.26 0.09 0.55 0.59 7.27 35.9% | 1.77 8.45 21.5% Lighting 1.52 1.52 7.5% | 4.65 4.65 11.8% Space Cooling 0.04 0.54 0.57 2.8% | 4.60 4.63 11.8% Water Heating 1.79 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.57 2.55 12.6% | 1.71 3.70 9.4% Refrigeration (6) 0.81 0.81 4.0% | 2.43 2.43 6.2% Electronics (7) 1.54 1.54 7.6% | 1.94 1.94 4.9% Ventilation (8) 0.14 0.14 0.7% | 1.62 1.62 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.14 1.14 2.9% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.64 0.70 3.5% | 0.98 1.04 2.7% Cooking 0.41 0.03 0.33 0.76 3.8% | 0.41 0.85 2.2% Other (10) 0.33 0.01 0.31 0.05 0.06 1.76 2.52 12.4% | 5.30 6.06 15.4% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.19 0.63 1.50 7.4% | 1.90 2.77 7.1% Total 8.40 0.98 0.65 0.14

229

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2025 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.96 0.57 0.24 0.09 0.57 0.63 7.05 33.2% | 1.89 8.31 19.6% Space Cooling 0.03 1.64 1.67 7.9% | 4.94 4.97 11.7% Lighting 1.55 1.55 7.3% | 4.68 4.68 11.0% Water Heating 1.84 0.08 0.04 0.05 0.62 2.63 12.4% | 1.86 3.88 9.1% Refrigeration (6) 0.82 0.82 3.9% | 2.47 2.47 5.8% Electronics (7) 0.78 0.78 3.7% | 2.34 2.34 5.5% Ventilation (8) 0.60 0.60 2.8% | 1.80 1.80 4.2% Computers 0.44 0.44 2.0% | 1.31 1.31 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.30 0.37 1.7% | 0.91 0.98 2.3% Cooking 0.43 0.03 0.15 0.61 2.9% | 0.46 0.92 2.2% Other (10) 0.48 0.01 0.34 0.05 0.08 2.32 3.28 15.5% | 7.00 7.96 18.7% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.58 0.18 0.69 1.46 6.9% | 2.09 2.85 6.7% Total 8.39 0.84 0.65 0.15

230

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2010 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Fuel Other Renw. Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 5.14 0.76 0.30 0.10 0.54 0.72 7.56 37.0% | 2.24 9.07 22.5% Space Cooling 0.04 1.92 1.96 9.6% | 5.94 5.98 14.8% Lighting 1.88 1.88 9.2% | 5.82 5.82 14.4% Water Heating 1.73 0.13 0.07 0.04 0.54 2.51 12.3% | 1.67 3.63 9.0% Refrigeration (6) 0.84 0.84 4.1% | 2.62 2.62 6.5% Electronics (7) 0.81 0.81 3.9% | 2.49 2.49 6.2% Ventilation (8) 0.54 0.54 2.6% | 1.66 1.66 4.1% Computers 0.38 0.38 1.9% | 1.19 1.19 2.9% Cooking 0.39 0.03 0.21 0.63 3.1% | 0.64 1.06 2.6% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.06 0.33 0.38 1.9% | 1.01 1.06 2.6% Other (10) 0.30 0.01 0.30 0.05 0.02 0.89 1.58 7.7% | 2.76 3.45 8.6% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.68 0.25 0.44 1.37 6.7% | 1.35 2.28 5.7% Total 8.35 1.14 0.70 0.15 0.59 9.49 20.43

231

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2035 U.S. Buildings Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Primary Gas Oil (1) LPG Fuel(2) En.(3) Electric Total Percent Electric (4) Total Percent Space Heating (5) 4.84 0.49 0.22 0.09 0.57 0.66 6.87 30.5% | 1.93 8.15 17.9% Space Cooling 0.03 1.79 1.82 8.1% | 5.27 5.30 11.7% Lighting 1.63 1.63 7.3% | 4.81 4.81 10.6% Water Heating 1.81 0.07 0.03 0.06 0.63 2.60 11.6% | 1.86 3.83 8.4% Electronics (6) 0.90 0.90 4.0% | 2.66 2.66 5.8% Refrigeration (7) 0.88 0.88 3.9% | 2.60 2.60 5.7% Ventilation (8) 0.65 0.65 2.9% | 1.91 1.91 4.2% Computers 0.49 0.49 2.2% | 1.43 1.43 3.1% Wet Cleaning (9) 0.07 0.32 0.39 1.7% | 0.95 1.01 2.2% Cooking 0.45 0.02 0.17 0.65 2.9% | 0.50 0.98 2.2% Other (10) 0.81 0.01 0.38 0.06 0.08 2.94 4.28 19.0% | 8.65 9.99 21.9% Adjust to SEDS (11) 0.40 0.18 0.77 1.36 6.0% | 2.28 2.86 6.3% Total 8.41 0.75 0.66 0.15

232

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Miscellaneous equipment in commercial buildings: The inventory, utilization, and consumption by equipment type  

SciTech Connect

The nature of the miscellaneous equipment (devices other than permanently installed lighting and those used for space conditioning) in commercial buildings is diverse, comprising a wide variety of devices that are subject to varied patterns of use. This portion of the commercial load is frequently underestimated, and widely hypothesized to be growing. These properties make it a particularly difficult load to characterize for purposes of demand-side management. In the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP), over 100 commercial sites in the Pacific Northwest have been metered at the end-use level for several years. Detailed inspections of the equipment in them have also been conducted. This paper describes how the ELCAP data have been used to estimate three fundamental properties of the various types of equipment in several classes of commercial buildings: (1) the installed capacity per unit floor area, (2) utilization of the equipment relative to the installed capacity, and (3) the resulting energy consumption by building type and for the Pacific Northwest commercial sector as a whole. Applications for the results include assessment of conservation potential, prediction of equipment loads from survey data, estimating equipment loads for energy audits, targeting of conservation technology development, and disaggregating building total or mixed end-use data. 4 tabs., refs.

Pratt, R.G.; Williamson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions 3.5 Commercial Builders and Construction 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies 3.8 Hospitals and Medical Facilities 3.9 Educational Facilities 3.10 Hotels/Motels 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 3 focuses on energy use in the commercial sector. Section 3.1 covers primary and site energy consumption in commercial buildings, as well as the delivered energy intensities of various building types and end uses. Section 3.2 provides data on various characteristics of the commercial sector, including floorspace, building types, ownership, and lifetimes. Section 3.3 provides data on commercial building expenditures, including energy prices. Section 3.4 covers environmental emissions from the commercial sector. Section 3.5 briefly addresses commercial building construction and retrofits. Sections 3.6, 3.7, 3.8, 3.9, and 3.10 provide details on select commercial buildings types, specifically office and retail space, medical facilities, educational facilities, and hotels and motels.

236

Table SH5. Total Expenditures for Space Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space Heating Fuel 4 (millions) Fuel Oil U.S. Households ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Natural Gas

237

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison o f energy consumption i n housing (1998) (Trends i n household energy consumption (Jyukankyo Research4) Average (N=2976) Energy consumption [GJ / household-year

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 3% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 3% 25% 4% 64% | 4% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 3% 24% 4% 65% | 4% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 3% 26% 3% 65% | 4% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 2% 25% 3% 65% | 3% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 2% 25% 2% 67% | 3% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 2% 25% 2% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 2% 26% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 2% 25% 4% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 2% 25% 3% 66% | 3% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 2% 24% 3% 67% | 3% 25%

240

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 15% 42% 15% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 14% 41% 16% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 14% 42% 18% 3% | 19% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 14% 42% 19% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 14% 43% 17% 3% | 19% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 14% 43% 18% 3% | 20% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 13% 43% 20% 3% | 20% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 14%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 1 provides an overview of energy use in the U.S. buildings sector, which includes single- and multi-family residences and commercial buildings. Commercial buildings include offices, stores, restaurants, warehouses, other buildings used for commercial purposes, and government buildings. Section 1.1 presents data on primary energy consumption, as well as energy consumption by end use. Section 1.2 focuses on energy and fuel expenditures in U.S. buildings. Section 1.3 provides estimates of construction spending, R&D, and construction industry employment. Section 1.4 covers emissions from energy use in buildings, construction waste, and other environmental impacts. Section 1.5 discusses key measures used throughout the Data Book, such as a quad, primary versus delivered energy, and carbon emissions. Section 1.6 provides estimates of embodied energy for various commercial building assemblies. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

242

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that per-capita energy consumption increases significantly wi n an increase per-capita energy consumption (Hasegawa and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2003 Commercial Buildings Delivered Energy End-Use Intensities, by Building Activity (Thousand Btu per SF) (1) Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other Total Note(s): Source(s): 43.5 45.2 164.4 20.9 1) Due to rounding, end-uses do not sum to total. EIA, 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, Energy End-Uses, Oct. 2008, Table E.2A. 0.3 0.6 3.0 N.A. 4.9 4.8 18.9 3.1 1.7 3.5 6.0 N.A. 0.1 0.2 N.A. N.A. 4.4 13.1 34.1 1.7 0.8 N.A. N.A. N.A. 1.4 2.0 6.1 0.4 0.8 0.6 2.1 0.1 26.2 19.3 79.4 14.4 2.9 1.3 10.5 0.6 Religious

244

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. The CBECS was first conducted in 1979; the tenth, and most recent survey, will be fielded starting in April 2013 to provide data for calendar year

245

Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data visualization, basically long-term and short-term time series plots serves as a preliminary quality check of the data available. A preliminary inspection of the data was performed, by viewing the channels to provide a clear identification of creep, missing data gaps, turned-off periods, and sudden big changes that suggest changes in the building operation or an addition to the building.

Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Table 1a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Site Energy Consumption b  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 1a

247

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

248

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Terminology CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999 and 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," and "Residential." Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in CBECS. In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Activities with Large Amounts of Hot Water: An energy-related space

249

Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use forTotal) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use for

Konopacki, S.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

OpenEI - Energy Expenditures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Energy Data State Energy Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/883 The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates.

License
Type of

251

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Central Government Buildings. ” Available at: http://Energy Commission, PIER Building End-Use Energy Efficiencythe total lifecycle of a building such as petroleum and

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. Thisin the construction and decommissioning of buildings. Thesethe building, and the decommissioning or demolition of the

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

construction,” Energy and Buildings 20: 205–217. Chau 2007.management in China,” Energy and Buildings (forthcoming).addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters were installed. however a gas flow meters is hardly installed for individual heater. in this study, a simple method to estimate gas consumption of such appliances form temperature of exhaust gas and electric current was presented. experiments of japanese major hot water gas heaters were conducted change under conditions of various water flow rate at constant output temperature. the empirical equations, which related gas consumption to exhaust gas temperature and operative current, were obtained for each type of water heaters, each manufacturer and overall heaters. verification of the method was conducted at a commercial building. some thresholds to decide status of operation, such as anti-freeze operation, were set, and sufficient accuracy of around 10 % error was achieved.

Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

256

Application Study of the Pump Water Flow Station for Building Energy Consumption Monitoring and Control Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new building energy monitoring and pump speed control method. The pump speed is controlled to maintain the system resistance at an optimized value to approach the best pump efficiency and save pump power. The system resistance can be obtained by the pump head and the water flow rate calculated by the pump water-flow station (PWS), which was recently developed. The PWS measures the water flow rate using the pump head, pump speed, and pump performance curve. This method has been experimentally proved in real HVAC systems. A case study was demonstrated in this paper for application of this new method in a Continuous Commissioning (CC) practice. The case study shows that the PWS can control the pump speed to maintain the optimized system operating point. It can also measure the water flow rate and monitor energy consumption continuously with low installation and almost no maintenance cost. The results show that the new technology can save pump power and increase pump efficiency significantly.

Liu, G.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004, "Household Energy Consumption Reported o n A National2006, "Household Energy consumption Reported i n a Nationalconsumption for different uses i n housing and energy usage analysis based on national

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Consumption per Year Constructed Square Foot (thousand BtuSF) Prior to 1960 84.4 23% 1960 to 1969 91.5 12% 1970...

260

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumed. Total energy consumption for hotels and hospitalshotels and hospitals, by contrast, the hot-water supply accounts for the majority o f total energyenergy consumption ratio per certain floor area is larger for hotels,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Table 1a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Site Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3 Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category. ... For questions about the "Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Tables," please contact: Behjat Hojjati

263

Scenario analysis of retrofit strategies for reducing energy consumption in Norwegian office buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Model buildings were created for simulation to describe typical office buildings from different construction periods. A simulation program was written to predict the annual energy… (more)

Engblom, Lisa A. (Lisa Allison)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

265

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Continuous Energy Management of the HVAC&R System in an Office Building System Operation and Energy Consumption for the Eight Years after Building Completion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors continuously studied the energy consumption of a heating, ventilating, air- conditioning and refrigerating (HVAC&R) system in an office for the operation of the system in terms of its expected performance. A fault in the system control setting was detected, and the system performance improved significantly as a result of correcting the fault. Recently, however, problematic issues, such as the malfunction of chillers and deteriorated performance of the heat exchangers, have emerged, resulting in the degradation of overall system performance. This paper describes (a) changes in the energy consumption of the building over a period of eight years during which the HVAC&R system was operated, and (b) problematic issues that arose during system operation in order to identify the energy-saving effects of the system found when energy management of the building is continuously practiced. In this HVAC&R system, about 25% of electric power consumption for wintertime could be saved by checking the system operation during the first two years. After that, the electric power consumption gradually increased due to the system deterioration until 2004, but it decreased again by properly dealing with the problems.

Akashi, Y.; Shinozaki, M.; Kusuda, R.; Ito, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar gains with highly insulating windows, which leads to windows with positive heating energy flows offsetting buildingBuilding Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Year Made Number of Buildings (Thousands, 1993) U Factor SHGC Window Window SolarSolar Window Cond Window Infiltration Non-Window Infiltration Other Loads Total Loads Total Loads Window Properties Total Building Heating

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005)

270

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

component of China’s total energy consumption mix. However,China-specific factors were used to calculate the energy mix

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usage and analysis o f operations data to enable effective management o f lighting andlighting Rated powe consumption and standby power consumptio: . ofrelevantequipment Usage

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adding thermal insulation to buildings and i m p r o v i n grespect to insulation for residential buildings, the reportbuildings; these calculations include fluorocarbon emissions from thermal insulation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

274

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

275

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

276

Energy end-use intensities in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report examines energy intensities in commercial buildings for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other. The objective of this analysis was to increase understanding of how energy is used in commercial buildings and to identify targets for greater energy efficiency which could moderate future growth in demand. The source of data for the analysis is the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption survey (CBECS), which collected detailed data on energy-related characteristics and energy consumption for a nationally representative sample of approximately 6,000 commercial buildings. The analysis used 1989 CBECS data because the 1992 CBECS data were not yet available at the time the study was initiated. The CBECS data were fed into the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system, a building energy simulation program developed by the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to derive engineering estimates of end-use consumption for each building in the sample. The FEDS estimates were then statistically adjusted to match the total energy consumption for each building. This is the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) first report on energy end-use consumption in commercial buildings. This report is part of an effort to address customer requests for more information on how energy is used in buildings, which was an overall theme of the 1992 user needs study. The end-use data presented in this report were not available for publication in Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1989 (DOE/EIA-0318(89), Washington, DC, April 1992). However, subsequent reports on end-use energy consumption will be part of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures series, beginning with a 1992 data report to be published in early 1995.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desktop usage is also highly correlated with lighting loads.usage, as one might expect since most o?ce buildings do not adjust lighting

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (2005).Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. : http://for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Management of building energy consumption and energy supply network on campus scale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Building portfolio management on campus and metropolitan scale involves decisions about energy retrofits, energy resource pooling, and investments in shared energy systems, such as district… (more)

Lee, Sang Hoon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy consumption evaluation of United States Navy LEED certified buildings for fiscal year 2009 .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As of October 1, 2008, the Department of the Navy inserted the requirement that all new buildings constructed for the United States Navy and United… (more)

Mangasarian, Seth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Establishment and Experimental Investigation of Energy Consumption Classification Index of Hotel Buildings in Taiwan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to the economic booms, power demand has been increasing significantly in Taiwan, and become the main cause for power shortages. Therefore, building energy conservation… (more)

Chiang, Ching-Ling

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

283

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Categories of Data in the Table Rows. The row categories classify data by specific features of the households. The following, listed in alphabetical order, are ...

284

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in suburban areas fell between 5.85 and 6.21 per million Btu. If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA Webmaster at wmaster@eia.doe.gov...

285

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gas estimates, the difference is statistically significant. If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA Webmaster at wmaster@eia.doe.gov...

286

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

287

Energy Consumption Measuring and Diagnostic Analysis of Air-conditioning Water System in a Hotel Building in Harbin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces an air-conditioning water system in a hotel building in Harbin, finishes its air-conditioning energy consumption measurement in summer conditions, and presents an estimation index of performance of chiller, pump and motor. By means of testing data analysis, it is indicated that several problems such as unsuitable operation schedule of the chiller, low COP, irrational matching of pump and motor, unbalanced conditions of chilled water flow, and low working stability and efficiency ratio of the pump are existent. The paper presents suggestions for improvement with relevance based on the induction and analysis of system fault found in measurements.

Zhao, T.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building Methodology Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Report Main Report | Methodology Report Main Report | Methodology | FAQ | List of Tables CBECS 2007 - Release date: August 17, 2012 Data Collection The data in the Energy Characteristics and Energy Consumed in Large Hospital Buildings in the United States in 2007 report and accompanying tables were collected in the 2007 round of the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). CBECS is a quadrennial survey is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in United States commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey was conducted in two phases, the Building Characteristics Survey and the Energy Supplier Survey. The Building Characteristics Survey collects information about selected

289

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

291

Comparison of the prediction accuracy of daily and monthly regression models for energy consumption in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measured energy savings from retrofits in commercial buildings are generally determined as the difference between the energy consumption predicted using a baseline model and the measured energy consumption during the post retrofit period. Most baseline models are developed by regressing the daily energy consumption versus the daily average temperature (daily models) or by regressing the monthly energy consumption versus the monthly average temperature (monthly models). Since the post-retrofit weather is generally different from the weather used for model development, the prediction error of the baseline model may be different from the fitting error. Daily and monthly baseline models were developed for a midsize commercial building with (i) dual-duct CAV and VAV systems, (ii) office and university occupancy schedules, and (iii) different operating practices using the weather of a mild weather year. The prediction errors were identified as the difference between the energy use predicted by the regression models and the values simulated by a calibrated simulation program when both models use weather from a year very different from the weather year used to develop the regression model. The major results are summarized below: 1. When the AHUs operate 24 hours per day, annual energy prediction errors of daily regression models were found to be less than 1.4%. The errors of monthly regression models were found to be in the same range as the error of the daily models. 2. When the AHUs were shut down during unoccupied periods, annual prediction errors for both daily and monthly regression models were as high as 15%. However, the prediction error of daily regression models can be decreased to a range of 2% to 3% if the daily average energy consumption is regressed versus the average temperature during the operation period. Based on these findings, we suggest use of daily or monthly regression models when the AHUs are operated 24 hours per day. When shut-down is performed during unoccupied hours, daily energy consumption should be regressed versus the average ambient temperature during operating hours to develop the baseline model.

Wang, Jinrong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cases. In the alternative case, space cooling sees a shiftAlternative Case Table 8 Office Buildings: Space CoolingCooling Tables 4-10 detail the assumptions of technology change for each end use between the reference and alternative

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build an open appliance power signature database, which willdevice in a database, such as its type of appliance, wherebased on appliance type and stores the results in a database

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

295

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

296

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

297

Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression models of measured energy use in buildings are widely used as baseline models to determine retrofit savings from measured energy consumption. It is less expensive to determine savings from monthly utility bills when they are available than to install hourly metering equipment. However, little is known about the impact of nighttime shut off on the accuracy of savings determined from monthly data. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of this question by comparing the heating and cooling energy use predicted by regression models based on monthly data against the predictions of calibrated hourly simulation models when applied to a medium-sized university building in Texas with (i) DDCAV system operating 24 hours per day, (ii) DDCAV system with nighttime shut down, (iii) DDVAV system operating 24 hours per day, and (iv) DDVAV system with nighttime shut down. The results of the four cases studied indicate : 1) when the AHUs are operated 24 hours/day, the annual prediction error of the cooling regression models is less than 0.5% of the annual cooling energy consumption; however, 2) when the AHUs are operated with nighttime shut down, the annual prediction error of the cooling models becomes as high as 6% of annual energy consumption. It should be noted that the cases considered here include only single end-uses of energy and have not investigated energy-use data which includes multiple end-uses. Modified regression models are therefore recommended when AHUs are not operated 24 hours per day and the temperature pattern is significantly different between pre and post retrofit years.

Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Supermarkets in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use Toilets/Urinals Other/Misc. Indoor (2) Cooling Total Building Size (SF) Benchmarking Values for Supermarkets (3) N Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/year 38 Indoor Use with Cooling, gal./SF/daily transaction 38 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 52 - 64 9 - 16 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Includes water for sinks, spraying vegetables, cleaning, etc. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of

299

Proposed simplified methods for predicting thermal behaviour and energy consumption of buildings. Technical memo  

SciTech Connect

The paper which is based on the exhaustive measurements taken to assess the energy requirements and the associated thermal comfort of a large hotel in Scotland shows that while bulk metering can provide an indication of building and system performance, the only reliable way to assess thermal performance is to undertake an energy audit on a microscopic level. Such an audit should be part of a continuous monitoring program and may be used to provide the necessary date from which a simple model of the building may be constructed. From the analysis presented, general laws governing the energy requirements for process, meeting building heat loss and maintaining services, etc. are expressed in simple forms for monitoring purposes.

Humphries, M.R.; Saluja, S.N.; Missenden, J.F.; Flynn, D.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experiences on the Implementation of the 'Energy Balance' Methodology as a Data Quality Control Tool: Application to the Building Energy Consumption of a Large University Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the energy costs have been increasing the more energy efficient measures have been promoted in the buildings sector, the reliability of energy consumption data has been attracting significant attention. For example, the reliability of the determination of energy savings depends on that of the energy consumption data, which has to be verified before and after any efficiency measure is applied. From other perspective, verifying energy use data on a regular basis would allow the engineers to identify and assess commissioning opportunities confidently. This paper presents the application of an innovative data screening methodology as a data quality control tool for energy consumption data. The methodology has been applied to a large university campus where the monthly energy consumption, of approximately 100 buildings, must be verified. One of the main responsibilities of the Energy Management Office of the university is to provide monthly utility consumption and cost information to accounting for utility billing of individual buildings. The methodology, which is based on the first law of thermodynamics, or energy conservation, has proved to be an effective data quality screening method for verification of metering sensors when heating, cooling and electricity consumption are separately metered in a building. The methodology is anticipated to be suitable for automated application. In some cases, the methodology could also help to rehabilitate energy use data.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Sakurai, Y.; Masuda, H.; Feinauer, D.; Liu, J.; Ji, J.; Claridge, D. E.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand BtuSF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A....

302

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Restaurants in Western United States (1) Fixture/End Use (2) Faucets Dishwashing Toilets/Urinals Ice Making Total Indoor Use (3) (4) (4) Building Size (SF) Seats: Meals: Benchmarking Values for Restaurants (6) N Gal./SF/year 90 Gal./meal 90 Gal./seat/day 90 Gal./employee/day 90 Note(s): Source(s): American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000. 25th Percentile of Users 130 - 331 6 - 9 20 - 31 86 - 122 Familiy-style dine-in establishments. Four restaurants in southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and

303

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Two California High Schools Fixture/End Use Toilet Urinal Faucet Shower Kitchen Misc. uses (2) Cooling Leaks Swimming Pool Total Use Benchmarking Values for Schools (3) N Indoor Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 142 Indoor Use, Gal./school day/student 141 Cooling Use, Gal./sq. ft./year 35 Note(s): Source(s): 8 - 20 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) One high school. 3) The study derived efficiency benchmarks by analyzing measured data and audit data. The benchmark was set at the lower 25th percentile of users. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Commercial and Institutional End Uses of Water, 2000.

304

The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The summer in Guangzhou, China, is hot and long. Heat proofing is very important for the energy efficiency of buildings and improvement of the indoor thermal environment. The residential buildings in the southern region are cooled by air conditioning mainly with the increase of the live level. This study investigates the influence of the thermal dynamic performance on the yearly cooling load and yearly maximum cooling demand in typical residential flats by employing KVALUE and DeST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated.

Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet.

306

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Aggregate Commercial Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.103 12% 0.014 1% Walls (2) -0.174 21% -0.008 - Foundation -0.093 11% -0.058 - Infiltration -0.152 18% -0.041 - Ventilation -0.129 15% -0.045 - Windows (conduction) -0.188 22% -0.085 - Windows (solar gain) 0.114 - 0.386 32% Internal Gains Lights 0.196 - 0.505 42% Equipment (electrical) 0.048 - 0.207 17% Equip. (non-electrical) 0.001 - 0.006 1% People 0.038 - 0.082 7% NET Load -0.442 100% 0.963 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Loads represent the thermal energy losses/gains that, when combined, will be offset by a building's heating/cooling system to maintain a set interior temperature (which equals site energy). 2) Includes common interior walls between buildings. LBNL, Commercial Heating and Cooling Loads Component Analysis, June 1998, Table 24, p. 45 and Figure 3, p. 61

307

Behavioral determinants of energy consumption in a centrally-heated apartment building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses tenant perceptions and behavior regarding heating and ventilation in multifamily buildings. Data were collected at a 60-unit subsidized housing complex for senior citizens. The building has central steam heating and the fuel is neither billed nor metered to individual apartments. Winter indoor temperatures average 26/sup 0/C (79/sup 0/F). In order to explain behavior more fully than the simple statement ''tenants don't pay for the heat,'' we show how the tenants and maintenance staff act as a self-regulating system that determines heating system operation through local optimization. Using data from ethnographic interviews and a questionnaire survey of all the residents, the authors give quantitative measures of reported comfort and strategies for controlling comfort. They also discuss thee factors which tenants consider important for thermal comfort and their choices among various heat control strategies. For examples, why do only 35% use radiator valves to control the heat while 84% use windows. Implications are discussed for new construction and retrofit, as well as for equity and management policies. The authors argue that a proper understanding of the behavioral context in multifamily buildings is essential, both to avoid ineffective and costly retrofits and to suggest low-cost measures which address the behavioral determinants of energy use.

De Cicco, J.M.; Kempton, W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Principal Commercial Building Types, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Office 17% 17% 19% Mercantile 16% 14% 18% Retail 6% 9% 5% Enclosed & Strip Malls 10% 4% 13% Education 14% 8% 11% Warehouse and Storage 14% 12% 7% Lodging 7% 3% 7% Service 6% 13% 4% Public Assembly 5% 6% 5% Religious Worship 5% 8% 2% Health Care 4% 3% 8% Inpatient 3% 0% 6% Outpatient 2% 2% 2% Food Sales 2% 5% 5% Food Service 2% 6% 6% Public Order and Safety 2% 1% 2% Other 2% 2% 4% Vacant 4% 4% 1% Total 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): Total Floorspace Total Buildings Primary Energy Consumption 1) For primary energy intensities by building type, see Table 3.1.13. Total CBECS 2003 commercial building floorspace is 71.7 billion SF. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, Oct. 2006, Table C1A

309

Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. The data was collected as part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the United States. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the data. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB)

310

wf01 - Energy_Expenditures.xlsx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-07 6-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 % Change Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 73.6 74.2 79.6 74.7 79.7 65.6 75.2 77.5 3.1 Price ($/mcf) 14.74 15.18 15.83 13.31 12.66 12.23 11.75 13.38 13.8 Expenditures ($) 1,085 1,127 1,260 994 1,010 802 883 1,036 17.3 Midwest Consumption (mcf) 74.5 78.2 80.8 78.6 80.1 65.4 77.5 77.9 0.5 Price ($/mcf) 11.06 11.40 11.47 9.44 9.23 8.96 8.23 9.15 11.2 Expenditures ($) 824 892 927 742 740 586 638 713 11.8 South Consumption (mcf) 45.3 44.8 47.0 53.4 49.5 41.1 46.6 47.5 1.9 Price ($/mcf) 13.57 14.19 14.08 11.52 11.03 11.47 10.69 11.78 10.3 Expenditures ($) 615 635 661 615 546 472 498 560 12.4 West Consumption (mcf) 46.4 48.1 46.2 47.7 47.2 47.6 46.9 46.5 -0.8 Price ($/mcf) 11.20 11.31 10.86 9.91 9.67 9.38 9.15 9.90 8.1 Expenditures ($) 520 544 502 473 457 447 429

311

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

20 20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 4% 25% 4% 64% | 5% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 4% 24% 4% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 4% 26% 3% 65% | 5% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 4% 25% 2% 67% | 5% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 4% 25% 2% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 4% 26% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 3% 25% 4% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 4% 25% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.4 2001 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.3 2002 4% 24% 3% 68% | 5% 25% 68% 38.4 2003

312

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Annual Capital Expenditures Survey BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Annual Capital Expenditures Survey Dataset Summary Description Provides national estimates of investment in new and used buildings and other structures, machinery, and equipment by U.S. nonfarm businesses with and without employees. Data are published by industry for companies with employees for NAICS 3-digit and selected 4-digit industries. Data on the amount of business expenditures for new plant and equipment and measures of the stock of existing facilities are critical to evaluate productivity growth, the ability of U.S. business to compete with foreign business, changes in industrial capacity, and measures of overall economic performance. In addition, ACES data provide industry analysts with capital expenditure data for market analysis, economic forecasting, identifying business opportunities and developing new and strategic plans. The ACES is an integral part of the Federal Government's effort to improve and supplement ongoing statistical programs. Private companies and organizations,, educators and students, and economic researchers use the survey results for analyzing and conducting impact evaluations on past and current economic performance, short-term economic forecasts, productivity, long-term economic growth, tax policy, capacity utilization, business fixed capital stocks and capital formation, domestic and international competitiveness trade policy, market research, and financial analysis.

313

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

314

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Normalized Annual End Uses of Water in Select Hotels in Western United States (Gallons per Room per Year) (1) Fixture/End Use Bathtub (2) Faucets Showers Toilets Leaks Laundry Ice making (3) Other/misc. indoor Total Indoor Use Number of Rooms Logged average daily use, kgal: Peak instantaneous demand, gpm: Benchmarking Values for Hotels N Indoor Use, gal./day/occupied room 98 Cooling Use, gal./year/occupied room 97 Note(s): Source(s): 25th Percentile of Users 60 - 115 7,400 - 41,600 Based on four budget hotels and one luxury hotel. Three budget hotels in Southern California, one in Phoenix, AZ. Luxury hotel in Los Angeles, CA. 1) Water use data for the buildings was collected over a few days. Estimates of annual use were created by accounting for seasonal use and other variables, billing data, and interviews with building managers. 2) Based on one hotel. 3) Based on three hotels. 5) The

315

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 1999 Single-Family Home Daily Water Consumption by End Use (Gallons per Capita) (1) Fixture/End Use Toilet 18.5 18.3% Clothes Washer 15 14.9% Shower 11.6 11.5% Faucet 10.9 10.8% Other Domestic 1.6 1.6% Bath 1.2 1.2% Dishwasher 1 1.0% Leaks 9.5 9.4% Outdoor Use (2) 31.7 31.4% Total (2) 101 100% Note(s): Source(s): Average gallons Total Use per capita per day Percent 1) Based analysis of 1,188 single-family homes at 12 study locations. 2) Total Water use derived from USGS. Outdoor use is the difference between total and indoor uses. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Residential End Uses of Water, 1999; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 2000, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1268, 2004, Table 6, p. 17; and Vickers, Amy, Handbook of Water Use and Conservation, June 2002, p. 15.

316

State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables. Table E1. Primary Energy, Electricity, ... Ranked by State, 2010 Rank Prices Expenditures Expenditures per Person State

317

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

319

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Average Water Use of Commercial and Institutional Establishments (Gallons per Establishment per Day) Average Variation % Total % of CI % Seasonal Daily Use In Use (1) CI Use Customers Use (2) Hotels and Motels 7,113 5.41 5.8% 1.9% 23.1% Laundries/Laundromats 3,290 8.85 4.0% 1.4% 13.4% Car Washes 3,031 3.12 0.8% 0.4% 14.2% Urban Irrigation 2,596 8.73 28.5% 30.2% 86.9% Schools and Colleges 2,117 12.13 8.8% 4.8% 58.0% Hospitals/Medical Offices 1,236 78.5 3.9% 4.2% 23.2% Office Buildings 1,204 6.29 10.2% 11.7% 29.0% Restaurants 906 7.69 8.8% 11.2% 16.1% Food Stores 729 16.29 2.9% 5.2% 19.4% Auto Shops (3) 687 7.96 2.0% 6.7% 27.2% Membership Organizations (4) 629 6.42 2.0% 5.6% 46.2% Total 77.6% 83.3% Note(s): Source(s): 23,538 Estimated from 24 months of water utility billing data in five Western locations: four locations in Southern California and one in Arizona. 1)

320

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total Total(3) 2010-Year 1980 2.63 24.9% 1.31 12.4% 0.12 1.1% 0.02 0.2% 1.91 4.58 6.49 61.4% 1981 2.54 23.9% 1.12 10.5% 0.14 1.3% 0.02 0.2% 2.03 4.76 6.80 64.1% 1982 2.64 24.3% 1.03 9.5% 0.16 1.4% 0.02 0.2% 2.08 4.91 6.99 64.5% 1983 2.48 22.7% 1.16 10.7% 0.16 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.12 4.98 7.09 65.0% 1984 2.57 22.5% 1.22 10.7% 0.17 1.5% 0.02 0.2% 2.26 5.17 7.43 65.1% 1985 2.47 21.6% 1.08 9.4% 0.14 1.2% 0.02 0.2% 2.35 5.39 7.74 67.6% 1986 2.35 20.3% 1.16 10.0% 0.14 1.2% 0.03 0.2% 2.44 5.47 7.91 68.3% 1987 2.47 20.8% 1.13 9.5% 0.13 1.1% 0.03 0.2% 2.54 5.62 8.16 68.5% 1988 2.72 21.6% 1.09 8.7% 0.13 1.0% 0.03 0.3% 2.68 5.92 8.60 68.4% 1989 2.77 21.0% 1.04 7.9% 0.12 0.9% 0.10 0.8% 2.77 6.39 9.16 69.5% 1990 2.67 20.1%

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5 18.19 186.1 1994 98.7 N.A. 105.2 18.08 183.2 1995 100.0 N.A. 104.6 18.49 185.0 1996 101.0 N.A. 110.2 19.48 192.9 1997 102.2 N.A. 104.4 18.94 185.3 1998 103.5 N.A. 98.9 18.93 182.8 1999 104.9 N.A. 101.5 19.53 186.1 2000 105.7 N.A. 105.6 20.37 192.7 2001 107.0 1.7% 102.1 20.01 187.0 2002 105.0 3.3% 106.6 20.75 197.7 2003 105.6 5.2% 109.2 21.07 199.6 2004 106.6 7.1% 106.6 21.06 197.6 2005 108.8 9.0% 105.7 21.59

323

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GHP Total 2010-Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 0.110 0.035 0.010 N.A. 0.155 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.154 0.4% 0.110 0.035 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.153 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.009 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.152 0.4% 0.110 0.034 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.151 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.008 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.033 0.007 N.A. 0.150 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.4% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.149 0.5% 0.110 0.032 0.007 N.A. 0.148 0.6%

324

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2003 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics In the 2003 CBECS, the survey procedures for strip shopping centers and enclosed malls ("mall buildings") were changed from those used in previous surveys, and, as a result, mall buildings are now excluded from most of the 2003 CBECS tables. Therefore, some data in the majority of the tables are not directly comparable with previous CBECS tables, all of which included mall buildings. Some numbers in the 2003 tables will be slightly lower than earlier surveys since the 2003 figures do not include mall buildings. See "Change in Data Collection Procedures for Malls" for a more detailed

325

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Key Assumptions Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2000 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2000 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and transportation sectors as inputs to the disaggregation algorithm that results in the direct fuel expenditure analysis. Household end-use and personal transportation service consumption are obtained by HEM from the NEMS Residential and Transportation Demand Modules. Household disposable income is adjusted with forecasts of total disposable income from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module.

326

The frequency of total use of manual and automatic low-consumption fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 mandated that bathroom plumbing fixtures manufactured in the United States after January 1, 1994 meet standards for maximum water consumption. Manufacturers have developed low-consumption valves to meet these standards. The performance of low-consumption fixtures has become an important issue for facilities managers because the water saving by retrofitting low-consumption fixtures is significant. The fixtures in the Langford Architecture Building A, Texas A&M University were used to conduct this study. An acoustic information retrieval system was utilized to collect the sound signals of each fixture and a speech recognition system was utilized to identify which fixture was in use. The data from this study were analyzed to determine whether location of fixture and type of fixture�manual or automatic�caused a significant difference in frequency of use.

Chung, Woo Sung

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

's > Overview 's > Overview Overview Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. divider line Introduction The Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects data on energy consumption, expenditures, and other energy-related topics in the major energy-consuming sectors of the U.S. economy. The residential and commercial sectors are two major sectors that many energy analysts like to consider together, as energy use is primarily related to the building shell and the stock of energy-consuming goods within the shell in these sectors. EIA conducts separate surveys for the two sectors, the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS).1 Prior to the first CBECS, there was a very poor understanding of the complexities of energy use in commercial buildings, or the amount of energy consumed in the commercial sector. This report summarizes and synthesizes energy data that were collected by these two surveys during the 1980Â’s, when major changes in energy policy were implemented following the energy crisis decade of the 1970Â’s.

328

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures 2.4 Residential Environmental Data 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market 2.6 Residential Home Improvements 2.7 Multi-Family Housing 2.8 Industrialized Housing 2.9 Low-Income Housing 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 2 focuses on energy use in the U.S. residential buildings sector. Section 2.1 provides data on energy consumption by fuel type and end use, as well as energy consumption intensities for different housing categories. Section 2.2 presents characteristics of average households and changes in the U.S. housing stock over time. Sections 2.3 and 2.4 address energy-related expenditures and residential sector emissions, respectively. Section 2.5 contains statistics on housing construction, existing home sales, and mortgages. Section 2.6 presents data on home improvement spending and trends. Section 2.7 describes the industrialized housing industry, including the top manufacturers of various manufactured home products. Section 2.8 presents information on low-income housing and Federal weatherization programs. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

329

State energy price and expenditure report 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average price paid by US consumers for energy in 1984 was $8.43 per million Btu, down 0.5% from the 1983 average price of $8.47 per million Btu. While the average price changed very little, total expenditures rose 5% from $418 billion in 1983 to $438 billion in 1984 due to increased energy consumption. By energy source, prices showed the most change in petroleum and electricity: the average price paid for petroleum products fell from $7.79 per million Btu in 1983 to $7.62 per million Btu in 1984, and the average price paid for electricity increased from $18.62 per million Btu in 1983 to $19.29 per million Btu in 1984. Expenditures in 1984 hit record high levels for coal, natural gas, nuclear fuel, and electricity, but were 16% below the 1981 peak for petroleum.

Not Available

1986-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

331

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Completed Copy in PDF Format Completed Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Household Expenditures Module Key Assumptions The historical input data used to develop the HEM version for the AEO2001 consists of recent household survey responses, aggregated to the desired level of detail. Two surveys performed by the Energy Information Administration are included in the AEO2001 HEM database, and together these input data are used to develop a set of baseline household consumption profiles for the direct fuel expenditure analysis. These surveys are the 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). HEM uses the consumption forecast by NEMS for the residential and

332

Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey – Surveytheir building’s energy consumption to that of similarfor evaluating building energy consumption and can lead to

Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

State energy price and expenditure report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The average price paid for energy in the United States in 1986 was $7.19 per million Btu, down significantly from the 1985 average of $8.42 per million Btu. While total energy consumption increased slightly to 74.3 quadrillion Btu from 1985 to 1986, expenditures fell from $445 billion to $381 billion. Energy expenditures per capita in 1986 were $1578, down significantly from the 1985 rate. In 1986, consumers used only 94 percent as much energy per person as they had in 1970, but they spent 3.9 times as much money per person on energy as they had in 1970. By state, energy expenditures per capita in 1986 ranged from the lowest rate of $1277 in New York to the highest of $3108 in Alaska. Of the major energy sources, electricity registered the highest price per million Btu ($19.00), followed by petroleum ($5.63), natural gas ($3.97), coal ($1.62), and nuclear fuel ($0.70). The price of electricity is relatively high because of significant costs for converting energy from various forms (e.g., fossil fuels, nuclear fuel, hydroelectric energy, and geothermal energy) into electricity, and additional, somewhat smaller costs for transmitting and distributing electricity to end users. In addition, electricity is a premium form of energy because of its flexibility and clean nature at energy consumers' sites.

Not Available

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Results discussed include whole building air change rates, energy consumption and contaminant concentrations. The ...

335

c38a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Energy Information Administration 2003...

336

c37a.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Energy Information Administration 2003...

337

Analysis of Energy Consumption and Research on Energy-Saving Technology of Rural Residential Buildings in Southern Shaanxi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article was to grasp trends of energy consumption of village in southern Shaanxi province. Selecting Huangjiagou village of Mian county in Hanzhong city as the investigation base ¡£Respectively, in January 2009 and July2010, investigation was conducted ... Keywords: rural region, investigation, residential dwellings, energy consumption, energy conservation

Yang Liu; Xia Fang; Meng Dan; An Yungang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

339

Do Households Smooth Small Consumption Shocks? Evidence from Anticipated and Unanticipated Variation in Home Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Erik Hurst. 2004. “Consumption vs. Expenditure. ” National14: Attanasio, Orazio. 1999. “Consumption. ” In J.Taylor andThe Life-Cycle Model of Consumption and Saving. ” Journal of

Cullen, Julie Berry; Friedberg, Leora; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Building technolgies program. 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. We have focused our past efforts on two major building systems, windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed by researchers and designers to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. In addition, we are now taking more of an integrated systems and life cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity-factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout every space in a building, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Window and lighting systems are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption...

342

Business Models for Code Compliance | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center Business Models for Code Compliance The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to demonstrate, quantify, and monetize energy code compliance and coordinate deployment at the local, state, and regional levels. Consumer Assurance through Code Compliance Energy efficiency measures in the buildings sector, if properly realized and captured, provide a tremendous opportunity to reduce energy consumption and expenditures. Yet currently there is a lack of assurance that buildings as designed realize the levels of energy efficiency established in the

343

Research on Regional Differences of Urban Resident Consumption Structure in China Based on Fuzzy Matter Element Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Study of residents’ consumption structure plays an important role in macroeconomic policy formulation. Based on per capita annual consumption expenditure of urban households, the fuzzy matter element model is used to evaluate urban resident consumption ... Keywords: comsumption structure, fuzzy matter-element, Euclid approach degree, government consumption expenditure

Hong Li; Bo Zhou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

345

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

346

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

347

A method of forming China's meteorological data used for analyzing building annual energy consumption  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of forming meteorological data for a standard year, which conforms to Chinese climatic characteristics, after analyzing theoretically the interrelation between the air-conditioning load and meteorological parameters. All these are used for drawing up The Standard for Chinese Hotel Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption.

Baizhan, L.; Shengyuan, T. (Chongqing Inst. of Architecture and Engineering (CN))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

349

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

350

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Square Feet and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

351

Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ho ...

352

Table 3. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ...

353

Buildings and energy in the 1980`s  

SciTech Connect

Many energy programs were put into place during the 1970`s and 1980`s to lessen the dependence upon foreign oil supplies and to improve how all forms of energy are used. A significant percent of total energy consumption occurred in the residential and commercial sectors. This report concentrates on the physical makeup of the residential and commercial buildings sectors and their use of energy, and examines changes that occurred during the 1980`s. Chapter 1 presents a summary of major findings. The following three chapters focus on different aspects of the overarching theme of buildings and energy in the 1980`s. Chapter 2 discusses major characteristics of residential and commercial buildings. Chapter 3 considers the major energy sources and end uses in terms of number of buildings and floorspace. Chapter 4 focuses on energy consumption and expenditures. Chapters 2, 3, and 4 contain tables at the end of each chapter that summarize data from detailed tables that are available separately on diskette or via EIA`s Electronic Publishing System (EPUB). Following the body of the report, appendices and a glossary provide additional information on the methodologies used in this report and on the residential and commercial building consumption surveys on which this report is based. 62 figs., 30 tabs.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Personalized building comfort control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating an appropriate indoor climate is essential to worker productivity and personal happiness. It is also an area of large expenditure for building owners. And, with rising fuel costs, finding ways of reducing energy ...

Feldmeier, Mark Christopher, 1974-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

356

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

357

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

358

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

359

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

360

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and NationalBuilding Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and 2) Nationalnational survey of energy-related building characteristics, energy consumption,

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

362

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in...

363

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Figure 21. Sample building energy use label expressed inanalyses of actual buildings energy consumption data confirm1983. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Leonard W. Wall

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Square Foot of Office Floorspace, by Function and Class (1) | | Medical Offices | Financial Offices | Corporate Facilities(2) | Class A | Class B | Class C | | All Buildings | Note(s): Source(s): 2006 2004 Energy Intensity Energy Energy Intensity Energy (thousand Btu/SF) Expenditures ($2010/SF) (thousand Btu/SF) Expenditures ($2010/SF) 90.79 2.56 N.A. 2.36 N.A. 3.12 N.A. 3.32 96.78 2.74 89.38 2.72 81.88 2.44 78.84 2.08 74.87 2.30 N.A. 2.04 1) Categories are not mutually exclusive. 2) Corporate Facilities are any building that the owner occupies at least 75% of the rentable space. BOMA International, The Experience Exchange Report 2007, Aug. 2007; BOMA International, The Experience Exchange Report 2005, Aug. 2005; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price deflators.

365

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Household Expenditures...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Expenditures Module The Household Expenditures Module (HEM) constructs household energy expenditure profiles using historical survey data on household income, population and...

366

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These estimates, and other analyses of energy consumption in office buildings, are based on building energy analysis programs such as DOE-2. ...

367

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

368

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

369

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

370

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

371

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

372

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

373

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

374

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

375

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

376

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

377

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

378

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

379

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

380

Construction and Building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in building sector energy consumption by improving ... housing construction: improving energy efficiency and ... Reinforced Soil Bridge Pier Load Test ...

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential energy consumption. Field Study of the Effect of Wall Mass on the Heating and Cooling Loads of Residential Buildings. ...

382

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption (million BTUs per person) in year t.electricity consumption of 2.09-4.98% for the year 2006.electricity consumption - ranging from 3-5% in the year

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System: Noncombustible Renewable Energy for 2011 ...

384

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for 2006 by five-digit zipelectricity consumption by zip code for the periods 2020 toSummary statistics for zip codes in and out of

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China. ” Energy&China Building Energy Consumption: Situation, Challenges andOverview Building energy consumption accounts for 25% of the

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China. ” Energy&China Building Energy Consumption: Situation, Challenges and2. Overview Building energy consumption accounts for 25% of

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Table 3. Electricity Consumption and Expenditures in U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. • Because of rounding, data may ...

389

Table US1. Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quadrillion British Thermal Units (Btu) U.S. Households (millions) Other Appliances and Lighting Space Heating (Major Fuels) 4 Air-Conditioning 5 Water Heating 6 ...

390

Table C37. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ..... 60 5,154 86 612 6,987 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ..... 18 2,782 158 320 3,636 Equipment Usage Reduced When ...

391

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over ... • To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply ...

392

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1993 -- Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http:www.eia.govemeurecs1d.html If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA Webmaster at wmaster@eia.doe.gov...

393

1993 Consumption and Expenditures-Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acrobat Reader for viewing PDF file If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or...

394

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and Nationalnational survey of energy-related building characteristics, and energy consumption,

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Cybernetic Building Systems Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Achieving national goals of net zero energy buildings requires substantial reduction in the energy consumption of commercial building systems. ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

397

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

398

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

399

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

400

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

402

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

403

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

404

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

405

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

406

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

407

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

408

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

409

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

410

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

411

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

412

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

413

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

414

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

415

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

416

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

417

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

418

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

419

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

420

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

422

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

423

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

424

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

425

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

426

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey website.Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings;

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trend & Dummy Building Code Intensity Building Code Construction Share Heating Degree Days Cooling Degree Days Per Capita Income Natural Gas Price

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

429

State energy price and expenditure report 1992  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Interactions between lighting and space conditioning energy use in U.S. commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling and heating energy consumption. In general, lighting energy reductions increase heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. The net change in a building`s annual energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on the building characteristics, operating conditions, and climate. This paper characterizes the effects of lighting/HVAC interactions on the annual heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using the DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Twelve building types of two vintages and five climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination of building type, vintage, and climate, a prototypical building is simulated with varying lighting power densities, and the resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. These loads are used together with market information on the saturation of the different HVAC equipment in the commercial buildings to determine the changes i energy use and expenditures for heating and cooling. Results are presented by building type for the US as a whole. Therefore, the data presented in this paper can be utilized to assess the secondary effects of lighting-related federal policies with widespread impacts, like minimum efficiency standards. Generally, in warm climates the interactions will induce monetary savings and in cold climates the interactions will induce monetary penalties. For the commercial building stock in the US, a reduction in lighting energy that is well distributed geographically will induce neither significant savings nor significant penalties from associated changes in HVAC primary energy and energy expenditures.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

State energy price and expenditure report 1991  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

User-needs study for the 1993 residential energy consumption survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a user-needs study for the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Every 3 years, the RECS collects information on energy consumption and expenditures for various classes of households and residential buildings. The RECS is the only source of such information within EIA, and one of only a few sources of such information anywhere. EIA sent letters to more than 750 persons, received responses from 56, and held 15 meetings with users. Written responses were also solicited by notices published in the April 14, 1992 Federal Register and in several energy-related publications. To ensure that the 1993 RECS meets current information needs, EIA made a specific effort to get input from policy makers and persons needing data for forecasting efforts. These particular needs relate mainly to development of the National Energy Modeling System and new energy legislation being considered at the time of the user needs survey.

Not Available

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

434

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

435

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

436

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

437

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Building Officials (CABO) (Howard and Prindle 1991). In 1992, the enactment of the Energy Policy

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

439

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Nonresidential Window Stock and Sales, by Glass Type Existing U.S. Stock Vision Area of New Windows (Million Square Feet) Type (% of buildings) 1995 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Single Pane 56 57 48 56 60 48 Insulating Glass (1) 294 415 373 407 476 389 Total 350 472 421 463 536 437 Clear 36% 49% 43% 44% 38% 33% Tinted 40% 24% 17% 15% 11% 10% Reflective 7% 8% 6% 4% 3% 3% Low-e 17% 19% 34% 37% 48% 54% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): (2) 1) Includes double- and triple-pane sealed units and stock glazing with storm windows. 2) Included as part of the Tinted category. EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures: Consumption and Expenditures Tables, June 2006, Table B1 for stock data; AAMA/NWWDA, 1996 Study of the U.S. Market for Windows and Doors, Table 27, p. 60 for 1995 usage values; 2003 AAMA/WDMA Study of the U.S. Market

442

Table 8: Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Table H8. RSEs for Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Number of Large Hospital Buildings

443

Specification of an Information Delivery Tool to Support Optimal Holistic Environmental and Energy Management in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building operations. ” Energy and Buildings 33, (8):783–791.Laboratory Buildings. ” Energy and Buildings 34 Geoghegan,consumption data. ” Energy and Buildings 24, Hampton, Dave.

O'Donnell, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Building the case for automated building energy management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy consumption in buildings comprises a significant fraction of total worldwide energy consumption and is strongly influenced by occupant behavior. To explore the quantitative effect of particular occupant actions on building energy consumption, ... Keywords: building automation, energy saving behaviors, in-home display

Alan Marchiori; Qi Han; William C. Navidi; Lieko Earle

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further, participation in local utility rebate programs to reduce electrical consumption will enhance funding of energy efficient programs.

Gialanella, V.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission building climateseries=summary. California Energy Commission (2005).Research Program, California Energy Commission. Reiss, P.

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Table F18: Coal Price and Expenditure Estimates and Imports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F18: Coal Price and Expenditure Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Prices Expenditures Prices ...

449

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

450

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

451

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

452

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

453

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

454

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

455

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

456

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 107,897 22.2 1.51 16.54 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 13,083 5.1 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 10,443 11.0 1.48 18.56 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 15,689 19.4 1.24 17.46 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 11,898 45.6 1.27 16.04

457

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (million dollars) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Million Btu (dollars) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44

458

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

459

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

460

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

462

Project: Intelligent Building Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... agents to achieve a common goal, such as minimizing energy consumption and ... it possible to solve the problem of building system optimization in a ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

463

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

464

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the estimated national energy consumption for residentialand cooling energy consumption of the national building

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen. Release Date: ... and water consumption for hospital buildings greater than 200,000 squar ...

466

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

467

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

may not sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Form EIA-871A of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

468

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission building climate zones . . . . . . . . . Share ofclimate response functions for CEC climate zones 1 to 8. .response functions for CEC climate zones 9 to 16. Change in

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... New 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) ...

471

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data; ... The major users are residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, and electric power generators.

472

CoNNECT: Analytics for Energy Consumption Data  

• Ability to correlate data with weather patterns • Ability to benchmark consumption with peers – ... solar energy potential on individual building ...

473

Building condition monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building sector of the United States currently consumes over 40% of the United States primary energy supply. Estimates suggest that between 5 and 30% of any building's annual energy consumption is unknowingly wasted ...

Samouhos, Stephen V. (Stephen Vincent), 1982-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Estimated U.S. gasoline consumption low compared to five-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA ... Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

475

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 A. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 24,395 23,398 38,398 21,706 17.47 13.01 16.95 20.42 1.74 1.29 1.44 1.69 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,398 3,255 4,899 2,530 19.47 15.75 19.77 23.46 2.26 1.71 1.87 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,978 1,887 3,761 2,816 18.42 14.71 18.44 22.90 1.69 1.13 1.32 2.10 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 3,015 3,667 5,526 3,482 18.15 14.22 18.72 19.37 1.42 1.11 1.14 1.47

476

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars) Electricity Expenditures (dollars) per kWh per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 16,907 15,677 31,849 18,350 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.22 0.88 1.22 1.46 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,685 2,415 4,257 2,190 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.63 1.39 1.77 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,364 1,347 3,064 2,424 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.21 0.86 1.16 1.84 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,126 2,539 4,651 2,856 0.10 0.08 0.08 0.10 1.02 0.77 0.98 1.22

477

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (million dollars) Sum of Major Fuel Expenditures (dollars) per Million Btu per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings* ............................ 21,344 21,521 31,595 18,118 16.79 12.74 16.22 19.88 1.65 1.26 1.35 1.60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 2,298 3,235 4,752 2,526 19.47 15.74 19.77 23.48 2.24 1.71 1.88 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 1,806 1,694 3,368 2,529 17.72 14.50 18.24 22.49 1.61 1.08 1.27 2.04 10,001 to 25,000 ......................... 2,606 3,157 4,530 2,846 17.56 13.85 18.09 19.03 1.32 1.02 1.03 1.36

478

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 6A. Natural Gas Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Expenditures (million dollars) Natural Gas Expenditures (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet per Square Foot North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings ................................ 3,883 5,215 4,356 2,557 8.66 7.16 8.53 7.31 0.38 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 489 788 632 318 9.87 8.58 9.30 7.95 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 358 485 632 356 9.16 7.67 9.14 7.69 0.54 0.46 0.44 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 576 1,060 760 500 9.85 7.97 9.40 7.10 0.45 0.40 0.33 0.32

479

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buildings consumption expenditures" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C11A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

482

Energy and household expenditure patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since households account, either directly or indirectly, for two-thirds of the energy consumed in the US, changes in household activities will affect energy use. Expected changes in prices, personal income, and family spending over the next 20 years are looked at as well as the implications for energy consumption. The analysis shows that direct energy purchases will break with past trends, dropping from 2.6% to 0.2% annual growth for the rest of the century. Growth in spending on energy-using goods is also likely to slow down. The year 2000 will see a marked decrease in the growth of national energy consumption. 58 references, 3 figures, 35 tables.

Lareau, T.J.; Darmstadter, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... energy management features, energy consumption, and water consumption for hospital buildings greater than 200,000 square feet.

484

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

485

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

486

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

487

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 C2A. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 107,897 82,783 16,010 1,826 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 13,083 10,547 2,227 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 10,443 8,199 1,830 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15,689 12,172 2,897 238 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 11,898 9,179 2,054 134 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 15,171 11,694 2,140 229 Q

488

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q

489

Nonlinear Dynamics in an OLG Growth Model with Young and Old Age Labour Supply: The Role of Public Health Expenditure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyses the dynamics of a two-dimensional overlapping generations economy with young and old age labour supply. We show that the public provision of investments in health, which, in turn, affects the demand for material consumption of the ... Keywords: C62, C68, Chaos, I18, J22, Labour supply, O41, OLG model, Public health expenditure

Luca Gori; Mauro Sodini

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for building electric and gas usage Overall building energyGas Emissions (CO2) Building total steam consumption (therm/(ft 2 -yr)) and peak demand Metering data for building electric and steam usage

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

492

Introduction to the Buildings Sector Module of SEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ma. CBECS, Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey,R. , and Lai, J. – A Buildings Module for the Stochasticon Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 17 – 22, 2008,

DeForest, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Household Expenditures  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIAÂ’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

494

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) Electricity Natural Gas Distillate Oil Residual Oil ($/gal) ($/gal) 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 9.39 104.50 2.79 3.78 9.35 104.74 2.81 3.81 9.47 101.25 2.73 3.69 9.40 103.22 2.76 3.75 9.54 99.28 2.67 3.60 9.51 100.49 2.70 3.64 9.52 94.53 2.66 3.52 9.55 97.45 2.64 3.55 9.46 90.92 2.61 3.46 9.48 92.13 2.63 3.49 9.49 87.65 2.54 3.41 9.47 89.48 2.58 3.42 9.58 85.91 2.41 3.28 9.54 86.36 2.49 3.34 9.57 87.02 2.07 2.97 9.52 84.58 2.26 3.14 10.09 86.14 2.34 3.55 9.76 87.22 2.37 3.57 10.27 97.87 1.49 2.03 10.14 90.95 1.66 2.86 10.04 114.33 1.51 2.47 10.56 121.16 2.01 3.34 9.59 121.45 1.24 2.07 10.13 124.31 1.39 2.32 9.44 94.94 0.93 1.23

495

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

496

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Commercial Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Average 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 (2) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 27.39 10.47 27.48 21.15 27.10 10.45 27.73 21.01 27.56 10.32 27.04 21.10 27.52 10.45 27.28 21.18 27.86 10.05 26.41 21.06 27.74 10.12 26.73 21.07 28.00 9.75 25.85 20.90 27.96 9.93 26.16 21.01 27.78 9.21 25.46 20.46 27.90 9.45 25.69 20.67 27.76 8.95 24.95 20.23 27.72 9.09 25.24 20.32 27.96 8.64 24.34 20.11 27.81 8.77 24.80 20.14 27.91 8.46 23.15 19.90 28.07 8.59 24.07 20.11 28.61 8.72 23.94 20.36 28.05 8.70 22.00 19.99 29.73 9.10 20.28 20.99 29.57 8.61 24.24 21.03 30.95 12.12 23.75 23.21 30.09 9.79 15.83 21.13 29.70

497

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry Activity ($Million Nominal) (1) Low High 1990 143 342 Market Segment Share 1991 218 425 MUSH (2) 69% 1992 331 544 Federal 15% 1993 505 703 Commercial & Industrial 7% 1994 722 890 Residential 6% 1995 1,105 1,159 Public Housing 3% 1996 1,294 1,396 1997 1,394 1,506 1998 1,551 1,667 2008 Revenues by Project/Technology Type 1999 1,764 1,925 2000 1,876 2,186 Market Segment Share 2001 - - Energy Efficiency 75% 2002 - - Onsite Renewables 14% 2003 - - Engine/Turbine Generators 6% 2004 2,447 2,507 Consulting/Master Planning 3% 2005 2,949 3,004 Other 2% 2006 3,579 3,627 2007 - - 2008 4,087 4,171 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Revenue ($Million Nominal) (1) 2008 Revenue Sources 1) Estimates based on surveys of major ESCOs and input from industry experts. 2) Includes municipal and state governments, universities

498

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

West National Space Heating 1,050 721 371 352 575 Air-Conditioning 199 175 456 262 311 Water Heating 373 294 313 318 320 Refrigerators 194 145 146 154 157 Other Appliances and...

499

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The...

500

Building Technologies Office: Operate and Maintain Efficient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

strategy for improving energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Every building's energy consumption can benefit from rigorous operations and maintenance (O&M) practices....