Sample records for building requirement california

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  2. California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy" Collectively, energy use. Significant GHG emission reductions can be achieved through the design and construction of new green buildings $56 billion in electricity and natural gas costs. Green buildings provide a cost-effective strategy

  3. Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Part 11 of the California Building Code (also known as CalGreen) Patrick Saxton, P.E. patrick.saxton@energy.ca.gov 916-651-0489 High Performance Buildings and Standards Development Office California Energy Commission September 20

  4. Modeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis -Western Cooling Efficiency Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Modeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis Efficiency Center Garth Torvestad, Benningfield Group, inc. ABSTRACT Proper ventilation is an essential that require special consideration in order to avoid excessive ventilation and energy waste. Two issues

  5. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling, heating, and power, CCHP, commercial buildings,bln $ CAA CAISO Cal/EPA CARB CCHP CEUS CHP CSI CPP DER DER-heating, and electric power (CCHP) adoption in California’s

  6. Cook County- LEED Requirements for County Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2002, Cook County enacted an ordinance requiring all new county buildings and all retrofitted county buildings to be built to LEED standards. Specifically, all newly constructed buildings and...

  7. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fresh in California for power could plant require coolingCapacity in California for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricityfor the mix of power plants the California pro;ected by the

  8. City of Bloomington- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2009, the City of Bloomington passed an ordinance establishing the Green Buildings Program. It requires that all new construction and major renovations of city buildings be built to...

  9. New York City- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the...

  10. Harris County- LEED Requirement for County Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, the Harris County Commissioners Court approved a measure that requires all new county buildings to meet minimum LEED certification standards. Buildings do not have to register with the the...

  11. Building HVAC Requirements Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building HVAC Requirements ­ Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements 4.1 Overview 4 conditioning (HVAC) systems. The requirements are presented in this chapter so that it may serve as a single. 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009 #12;Page 4-2 Building HVAC Requirements ­ Overview 4

  12. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing: California Building Industry Association et al....

  13. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During building cooling the chillers supply 42 °P water towith 42°P supply air always reduced cooling and totalpart-load) cooling with cold air supply. In most California

  14. Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

  15. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Green Building Certification Systems...

  16. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to enable demand response or any other building strategy (demand response. By using EVs connected to the buildings for

  17. City of Dallas- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003 the Dallas City Council passed a resolution requiring that all new municipal buildings larger than 10,000 square feet be constructed to meet LEED Silver Certification standards. In 2006...

  18. Showcasing California Better Buildings Challenge Partners' Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    impressive energy and monetary savings. The partners, including Albertson's of Carpinteria, University of California Irvine, and HEI Hotels & Resorts' La Jolla Marriott near...

  19. San Bernardino County- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was...

  20. Guam- Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Guam Energy Code, which became effective in October of 2000, requires that piping stub outs be provided for water heaters installed in low-rise residential buildings to enable the future inst...

  1. Post Office Building, Rancho Mirage, California | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post Office in California The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) has been making an effort to add solar power to its offices as part of the Million Solar Roofs Initiative. They have been...

  2. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHP system at the commercial building could be used to offset EV charging at home at the residential

  3. California Energy Commission CONSULTANT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and its subcontractors prepared this impact analysis on the 2013 Title 24, Building Energy Efficiency impacts of proposed changes to the California 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards on a regional requirements. Keywords: California Energy Commission, Building Energy Efficiency Standards, Architectural

  4. Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 3 APPENDIX A4, RESIDENTIAL VOLUNTARY MEASURES APPENDIX A4 of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 4 1. Night lights which comply with Title 24, Part 6 Section

  5. Office Buildings: Developer's Requirements- Consultant's Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, P.; Arndt, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ein Kooperationsvortrag von Office Buildings: Developer?s Requirements ? Consultant?s Solutions Dipl.-Ing. (TU) Jens Arndt Vivico Real Estate GmbH, Frankfurt a. M., Germany Dipl.-Ing. (TU) Peter Forster Ebert-Ingenieure Berlin GmbH 8. Kongress f...?r Geb?ude- und Betriebsoptimierung - ICEBO?08 October 20/21/22 2008 ESL-IC-08-10-35a Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Seite 2 Dipl.-Ing (TU) Jens Arndt; Vivico...

  6. Identification of Market Requirements of Smart Buildings Technologies for High Rise Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reffat, R. M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the findings on the identification of market requirements of smart buildings technologies for high rise office buildings in Saudi Arabia including: levels of importance of smart building technologies for office buildings, current...

  7. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    greenblgcert.docx More Documents & Publications EA-1991: Final Environmental Assessment Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major...

  8. 42 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA -CAPITAL FINANCIAL PLAN 2012-22 Coastal Biology Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    42 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - CAPITAL FINANCIAL PLAN 2012-22 Coastal Biology Building University&Figures SANTA CRUZ Coastal Biology Building Site #12;43UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA - CAPITAL FINANCIAL PLAN 2012 C ­ multiple locations Coastal Biology Building - (Marine Science Campus) Infrastructure

  9. DOE Challenge Home, California Program Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    not required. b. Location, based on zip code, has at least 5 kWhm 2 day average daily solar radiation based on annual solar insolation using this online tool: http:...

  10. California DOT 1. Briefly summarize your current pavement smoothness requirements.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California DOT 1. Briefly summarize your current pavement smoothness requirements. For HMA pavement to OGFC placed on existing pavement not constructed under the same project. If concrete pavement is placed ordered. 39-1.12B Straightedge The top layer of HMA pavement must not vary from the lower edge of a12-foot

  11. City of Grand Rapids- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2006, the City of Grand Rapids approved a resolution detailing the city's sustainability policy for public buildings. The resolution directed city personnel to implement the principles...

  12. Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To control the construction and design costs associated with new buildings meeting this standard, the goal of Gold can be reduced to Silver for projects where the payback period for earning Gold...

  13. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  14. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for implementing the Comprehensive Energy Efficiency Program for Existing Buildings as required by Assembly Bill Commission/American Recovery and Reinvestment Act investments in the existing building energy efficiency Buildings Scoping Report. California Energy Commission, Efficiency and Renewable Energy Division

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  16. Sustainable Transportation on Campus and in the Community Keynote Address: "University of California Builds Green and Goes Solar"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    of California Builds Green and Goes Solar" Matthew St. Clair, University of California Office of the President which I helped lead: perhaps the most comprehensive, ambitious clean energy, green building policy energy, working on green buildings, in charge of buildings on the campus, in charge of maintaining

  17. Benefits of Radial Build Minimization and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    #12;6 Breeder Multiplier Structure FW/Blanket Shield VV Coolant Coolant Coolant ARIES-CS: Internal VV TOFE Meeting September 14 - 16, 2004 Madison, WI #12;2 · Define radial builds for proposed blanket shielding function: ­ Blanket protects shield ­ Blanket & shield protect VV ­ Blanket, shield & VV protect

  18. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested changes in specifications were developed in consultation with staff from the Iowa Energy Center who evaluated the accuracy of new CO{sub 2} sensors in laboratory-based research. In addition, staff of the California Energy Commission, and their consultants in the area of DCV, provided input for the suggested changes in specifications.

  19. City of Greensburg- Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities...

  20. Town of Chapel Hill- Energy Conservation Requirements for Town Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Town of Chapel Hill’s energy-conservation ordinance requires that all town-owned buildings be designed to achieve a goal of achieving a Silver level certification as defined by the Green...

  1. City of Chamblee- LEED Requirement for Public and Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2008, the Chamblee City Council voted unanimously to require all private development 20,000 square feet or greater to become LEED certified. Additionally, all future municipal buildings...

  2. CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one of the biggest changes to Title 24 standards. The latest of controls commissioning. All lighting control systems with two or more components --in both residential

  3. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    A Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University.Cerpa, University of California, Merced Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 35% energy usage in the United and Prediction for Building Energy Management and Auditing. ACM Trans. Sensor Netw. V, N, Article A (August 2012

  4. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  5. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIAREQUIREMENTS POR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  6. More Requirements Engineering Adventures with Building Contractors Daniel M. Berry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Daniel M.

    requirements engineering I learned while being a customer in a house remodeling. The main lesson. The lessons he learned concerned the inordinate complexity of building houses and software, the relentlessness additional lessons learned about requirements engineering and life cycles learned while being a customer

  7. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

  8. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

  9. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  10. STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    , University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260. #12;plate shear wall design and use of light-gage cold form platesSTEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr areas. This paper provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in steel plate shear wall design

  11. Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where we’re going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

  12. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

  13. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  14. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code not pertain to energy) Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;139 Chapter 13C GREEN BUILDING REQUIREMENTS shall be known as the California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code and may be cited

  15. *** KEEP FOR REFERENCE *** CALIFORNIA PATIENT ABUSE AND NEGLECT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    or unjustifiable punishment abuse or neglect in out of home care Where to report Police Dept. (PD *** KEEP FOR REFERENCE *** CALIFORNIA PATIENT ABUSE AND NEGLECT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS sexual abuse neglect, including self neglect abandonment, abduction, isolation financial abuse

  16. 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 1722, 2008 Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 17­22, 2008 · Asilomar Conference Center · Pacific Grove, California 1 Targeting Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings Using Advanced-parameter change-point regression model of energy use versus weather for each building and type of energy

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KLEM, M.J.

    2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, a major change in the technical strategy for managing Multi Canister Overpacks (MCO) while stored within the Canister Storage Building (CSB) occurred. The technical strategy is documented in Baseline Change Request (BCR) No. SNF-98-006, Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing) (FDH 1998). This BCR deleted the hot conditioning process initially adopted for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) as documented in WHC-SD-SNF-SP-005, Integrated Process Strategy for K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (WHC 199.5). In summary, MCOs containing Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from K Basins would be placed in interim storage following processing through the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility. With this change, the needs for the Hot Conditioning System (HCS) and inerting/pressure retaining capabilities of the CSB storage tubes and the MCO Handling Machine (MHM) were eliminated. Mechanical seals will be used on the MCOs prior to transport to the CSB. Covers will be welded on the MCOs for the final seal at the CSB. Approval of BCR No. SNF-98-006, imposed the need to review and update the CSB functions and requirements baseline documented herein including changing the document title to ''Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Canister Storage Building Functions and Requirements.'' This revision aligns the functions and requirements baseline with the CSB Simplified SNF Project Baseline (MCO Sealing). This document represents the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Subproject technical baseline. It establishes the functions and requirements baseline for the implementation of the CSB Subproject. The document is organized in eight sections. Sections 1.0 Introduction and 2.0 Overview provide brief introductions to the document and the CSB Subproject. Sections 3.0 Functions, 4.0 Requirements, 5.0 Architecture, and 6.0 Interfaces provide the data described by their titles. Section 7.0 Glossary lists the acronyms and defines the terms used in this document. Section 8.0 References lists the references used for this document.

  18. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each specific outcome threshold are estimated; and the highest of these MVRs, which would then meet all outcome thresholds, is selected as the target MVR. In a second step, implemented only if the target MVR from step 1 is judged impractically high, costs and benefits are estimated and this information is used in a risk management process. Four human outcomes with substantial quantitative evidence of relationships to VRs are identified for initial consideration in setting MVR standards. These are: building-related symptoms (sometimes called sick building syndrome symptoms), poor perceived indoor air quality, and diminished work performance, all with data relating them directly to VRs; and cancer and non-cancer chronic outcomes, related indirectly to VRs through specific VR-influenced indoor contaminants. In an application of step 1 for offices using a set of example outcome thresholds, a target MVR of 9 L/s (19 cfm) per person was needed. Because this target MVR was close to MVRs in current standards, use of a cost/benefit process seemed unnecessary. Selection of more stringent thresholds for one or more human outcomes, however, could raise the target MVR to 14 L/s (30 cfm) per person or higher, triggering the step 2 risk management process. Consideration of outdoor air pollutant effects would add further complexity to the framework. For balancing the objective and subjective factors involved in setting MVRs in a cost-benefit process, it is suggested that a diverse group of stakeholders make the determination after assembling as much quantitative data as possible.

  19. Better Building Alliance, Plug and Process Loads in Commercial Buildings: Capacity and Power Requirement Analysis (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that can help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. This brochure should be used to make these decisions so systems can operate more energy efficiently; upfront capital costs will also decrease. This information can also be used to drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands. It should enable brokers and tenants to agree about lower PPL capacities. Owner-occupied buildings will also benefit. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems.

  20. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Sean Maxwell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation is included in the Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014.

  1. Prediction of Regulation Reserve Requirements in California ISO Control Area based on BAAL Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Ma, Jian; Loutan, Clyde

    2013-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new methodologies developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to estimate regulation capacity requirements in the California ISO control area. Two approaches have been developed: (1) an approach based on statistical analysis of actual historical area control error (ACE) and regulation data, and (2) an approach based on balancing authority ACE limit control performance standard. The approaches predict regulation reserve requirements on a day-ahead basis including upward and downward requirements, for each operating hour of a day. California ISO data has been used to test the performance of the proposed algorithms. Results show that software tool allows saving up to 30% on the regulation procurements cost .

  2. California Waste Discharge Requirements Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16Association Jump to:InventoryCalifornia

  3. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would future urban therefore Cooling and agricultural waterwater a higher than of future power cooling in 1975. WATERa larger portion the cooling of the future requirements.

  4. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial-sector distributed energy resources (DER) with combined heat and power (CHP) in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. Historically, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. In our research, we examine how these medium-sized commercial buildings might implement DER and CHP. The buildings are able to adopt and operate various technologies, e.g., photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, batteries and thermal storage systems. We apply the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs and/or CO2 emissions. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California, existing tariffs of major utilities, and expected performance data of available technologies in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for these buildings. We compare different policy instruments, e.g., a CO2 pricing scheme or a feed-in tariff (FiT), and show their contributions to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goals of additional 4 GW CHP capacities and 6.7 Mt/a GHG reduction in California by 2020. By applying different price levels for CO2, we find that there is competition between fuel cells and PV/solar thermal. It is found that the PV/solar thermal adoption increases rapidly, but shows a saturation at high CO2 prices, partly due to limited space for PV and solar thermal. Additionally, we find that large office buildings are good hosts for CHP in general. However, most interesting is the fact that fossil-based CHP adoption also increases with increasing CO2 prices. We will show service territory specific results since the attractiveness of DER varies widely by climate zone and service territory.

  5. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this fresh water for cooling Supply-Demand Relationships now1806) represent cooling supply water statewide freshwatersupply, it is unclear if 560,000 would be required for cooling

  6. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricity Generation (1015BTU)Electricity Generation and Capacity for Po'". :cr Plant Typeelectricity generation energy will form the major por- tion of water requirements Since coast, almost all the power for future plants

  7. City of Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed...

  8. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Certified Water Heater §111, §113 (a) Water Heater Efficiency §113 (b) Service Water Heating Installation/A" in the column next to the measure. 2: For each water heater, pool heat and domestic water loop (or groupsSTATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C

  9. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Using the CEUS Database to Benchmark Commercial Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2006 Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS) database developed by the California Energy Commission is a far richer source of energy end-use data for non-residential buildings than has previously been available and opens the possibility of creating new and more powerful energy benchmarking processes and tools. In this article--Part 2 of a two-part series--we describe the methodology and selected results from an action-oriented benchmarking approach using the new CEUS database. This approach goes beyond whole-building energy benchmarking to more advanced end-use and component-level benchmarking that enables users to identify and prioritize specific energy efficiency opportunities - an improvement on benchmarking tools typically in use today.

  10. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  11. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Joe Lstiburek

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation will be delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014. Joe...

  12. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  13. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  14. City of Los Angeles- Green Building Retrofit Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2009, Los Angeles enacted [clkrep.lacity.org/onlinedocs/2006/06-1963_ord_180633.pdf Ordinance 180636], known as the Green Building Retrofit Ordinance. This ordinance was later amended by...

  15. New York City- Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In December 2009 the New York City Council enacted a series of bills intended to improve the energy efficiency of existing buildings in the city. Each of the four bills addresses a different aspect...

  16. Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California-Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California quality. We have made progress towards achieving deep demand response of 30% reduction of peak loads modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless

  17. City of Austin- Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the...

  18. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements for energy-efficient design and construction,technologies used for energy-efficient design. Being able toand engineers design energy efficient buildings. Currently

  19. City of Houston- Green Building Requirements for New Municipal Structures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2004 the Houston City Council passed a resolution requiring adherence to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines in the construction or renovation of municipal...

  20. Proceedings of the 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. August 22 -27, 2004 Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, California.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the 2004 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. August 22 - 27, 2004 · Asilomar Conference Center · Pacific Grove, California. Developing a Next-Generation Community College

  1. Analysis of Plug Load Capacities and Power Requirements in Commercial Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug and process load power requirements are frequently overestimated because designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' data, or design assumptions are high because information is not available. This generally results in oversized heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; increased initial construction costs; and increased energy use caused by inefficiencies at low, part-load operation. Rightsizing of chillers in two buildings reduced whole-building energy use by 3%-4%. If an integrated design approach could enable 3% whole-building energy savings in all U.S. office buildings stock, it could save 34 TBtu of site energy per year.

  2. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cooling Strategies and Building Features on EnergyPerformance of Office Buildings. ”Energy and Buildings 34(2002): Braun, J. E. 1990. “Reducing

  3. Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements IncorporatingSolar Assisted Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

    2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper expands on prior Berkeley Lab work on integrated simulation of building energy systems by the addition of active solar thermal collecting devices, technology options not previously considered (Siddiqui et al 2005). Collectors can be used as an alternative or additional source of hot water to heat recovery from reciprocating engines or microturbines. An example study is presented that evaluates the operation of solar assisted cooling at a large mail sorting facility in southern California with negligible heat loads and year-round cooling loads. Under current conditions solar thermal energy collection proves an unattractive option, but is a viable carbon emission control strategy.

  4. Quantifying the Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Co-Benefits of Green Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozingo, Louise; Arens, Ed

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Change  Scoping  Plan:  Building   on  the  Framework.  Cities.   California  Building  Standards  Commission.    California  Green  Building  Standards  Code,   2010.    

  5. City of Denver- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order 123, signed in October 2007, established the Greenprint Denver Office and the Sustainability Policy for the city. The Sustainability Policy includes several goals and requirements...

  6. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  7. Presented at the International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, July 16-19, 2001 in Austin, TX This work was partially supported by the U.S. General Services Administration, the California Energy Commission,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings Satkartar Kinney, Mary Ann Piette;Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings Satkartar Kinney of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however

  8. Al Azhar International Conference, Cairo 2008 Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings: Amman as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in residential buildings: Amman as a case study Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings in the Jordanian residential buildings, in general, and in Amman particularly, considering the healthy problems requested for a healthy environment in the modern buildings, especially regarding the natural aeration

  9. California Energy Commission REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission REGULATIONS NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY Disclosure Program California Code of Regulations Title 20. Public Utilities and Energy Division 2. State USE DISCLOSURE PROGRAM California Code of Regulations, Title 20, Division 2

  10. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards W.J. Fisk,s Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards Report toCommission, 2008 Building energy efficiency standards for

  11. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

  12. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implement demand-response programs involving buildingthan the building envelope in demand response effectiveness.demand response, thermal mass, hot climates, office buildings

  13. EA-1991: 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435: Green Building Certification Program Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA originally addressed the sustainable design requirements contained in the Federal building rule. Since the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR), however, the DOE has modified and downscaled this rule to a procedural rule that only addresses only the green building certification requirements. While the final rule is significantly downscaled from the proposed rule, due to the fact that the previous EA was put out for public review, is tied to this rulemaking, and in order to maintain the integrity of the NEPA process, we continue to use the EA process for this rulemaking.

  14. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California building energy efficiency standards for the  California Building energy Efficiency Standards (CEC 2008 California  building energy efficiency standards (CEC 

  15. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008).  California building energy efficiency  standards California  building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) 2008 California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 

  16. Installation Practices of California HVAC Contractors: Implications for Residential Building Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, S. S.; Koved, M. D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a study that was conducted by XENERGY. Inc. for the CEC and a consortium of California utilities. The utilities primarily involved in the study were Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E), Sacramento Municipal Utility...

  17. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

  18. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildingscommercial buildings. Introduction Demand response (DR) is ademand response quick assessment tool – DRQAT – was developed for evaluating DR strategies in commercial buildings.

  19. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Xu, Peng; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how to optimize pre-cooling strategies for buildings in a hot California climate zone with the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), a building energy simulation tool. This paper outlines the procedure used to develop and calibrate DRQAT simulation models, and applies this procedure to eleven field test buildings. The results of a comparison between the measured demand savings during the peak period and the savings predicted by the simulation model indicate that the predicted demand shed match well with measured data for the corresponding auto-demand response (Auto-DR) days. The study shows that the accuracy of the simulation models is greatly improved after calibrating the initial models with measured data. These improved models can be used to predict load reductions for automated demand response events. The simulation results were compared with field test data to confirm the actual effect of demand response strategies. Results indicate that the optimal demand response strategies worked well for most of the buildings tested in this hot climate zone.

  20. Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Douglas E.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

  1. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intercept) independent of installed capacity that representsof statewide incremental installed CHP capacity in 2020. 2.0during the day. Installed CHP capacity in midsized buildings

  2. Monitoring-Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 University Buildings in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Evan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. “Monitoring-Based Commissioning: Early Results from aConference on Building Commissioning. Portland, Ore. : PECI.2011. “Monitoring-Based Commissioning”. Website: http://uc-

  3. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Electricity and Natural Gas Use for the Forecasting34 Figure B4. Natural Gas Use by Building38 Figure B6. Natural Gas by End-

  4. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of California's Underground Storage Tank Annual Inspection Rate Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, W. Bowman

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive. Thefor the lion’s share of MTBE contamination, as well asIn response to the MTBE crisis, California increased the

  6. Doing Well By Doing Good? Green Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pp. 99-124. California’s Sustainable Building Taskforce.Benefits of Green Buildings , October 2003. Eichholtz, Pietin a Name? Reputation Building and Corporate Strategy." The

  7. LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -top units and their associated ductwork. These simple systems use similar duct materials and construction, restaurants and professional buildings. First-cost dominates construction practices in these buildings. This potentially leads to short-cuts in construction practices and/or using lower grade materials. Often resulting

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyls in the exterior caulk of San Francisco Bay Area buildings, California, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray fluorescence (XRF). PCBs were detected in 88% of the caulk samples collected from the study area buildings in concrete and masonry buildings built between 1950 and 1980. Portable XRF was not a good predictor of the PCB content in caulk and the results indicate that portable XRF analysis may only be useful

  9. California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Case Study PIER Buildings Program Research Powers the Future www.energy.ca.gov/research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    valves. While a system may still be able to provide adequate cooling capacity, low and Automated FaultCalifornia Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Case Study PIER Buildings Program Research Powers the Future www.energy.ca.gov/research The Problem Maintenance for rooftop packaged

  10. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, S.; Piette, M. A.; Gu, L.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an aggregate reduction of 1 Megawatt (MW) during a curtailment period, for any number of meters, can participate as a load aggregator in the California Independent System Operator (ISO) Summer Demand Reduction Program (DRP; see Load Reduction Incentives). The U... ISO Summer Demand Relief Program is offering an incentive of $20,000 per MW each month in addition to $500 per MWhour for actual curtailment. Participants who fail to meet the target will be paid on a sliding scale, and must achieve at least 25...

  11. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  12. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial buildings participating in a demand?response (buildings participating in an Automated Demand Response buildings  participating  in  an  event?driven  demand?response  (

  13. Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

  14. Building America Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  15. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Building Standards Code 2010 California Residential Code Operative date: January 1, 2011 #12;2 #121 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Building Code 2010 California;3 CHAPTER 1 SCOPE AND ADMINISTRATION DIVISION I CALIFORNIA ADMINISTRATION No San Francisco Building Code

  16. Proceedings of the 2000 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 20-25, 2000, Pacific Grove, California.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and laboratories. These buildings are four to one hundred times more energy-intensive than typical office buildings

  17. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    achieve goals of zero energy buildings in 2020 fornet zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020

  18. Community Development Building Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance of Los Altos Energy Efficiency Ordinance, Green Building Regulations under the 2005 California Building by the Board on that date. The Green Building Regulation, Chapter 12.66 of the City Municipal code, will ensure

  19. Added Value of Reliability to a Microgrid: Simulations of Three California Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model is used to estimate the value an Oakland nursing home, a Riverside high school, and a Sunnyvale data center would need to put on higher electricity service reliability for them to adopt a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Microgrid (CM) based on economics alone. A fraction of each building's load is deemed critical based on its mission, and the added cost of CM capability to meet it added to on-site generation options. The three sites are analyzed with various resources available as microgrid components. Results show that the value placed on higher reliability often does not have to be significant for CM to appear attractive, about 25 $/kWcdota and up, but the carbon footprint consequences are mixed because storage is often used to shift cheaper off-peak electricity to use during afternoon hours in competition with the solar sources.

  20. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements laser {ampersand} target area building (LTAB) SSDR 1.2.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempel, P.; Hands, J.

    1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Subsystem Design Requirements (SSDR) document establishes the performance, design, and verification requirements for the conventional building systems and subsystems of the Laser and Target Area Building (LTAB), including those that house and support the operation of high-energy laser equipment and the operational flow of personnel and materials throughout the facility. This SSDR addresses the following subsystems associated with the LTAB: Building structural systems for the Target Bay, Switchyards, Diagnostic Building, Decontamination Area, Laser Bays, Capacitor Bays and Operations Support Area, and the necessary space associated with building-support equipment; Architectural building features associated with housing the space and with the operational cleanliness of the functional operation of the facilities; Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems for maintaining a clean and thermally stable ambient environment within the facilities; Plumbing systems that provide potable water and sanitary facilities for the occupants, plus stormwater drainage for transporting rainwater; Fire Protection systems that guard against fire damage to the facilities and their contents; Material handling systems for transporting personnel and heavy materials within the building areas; Mechanical process piping systems for liquids and gases that provide cooling and other service to experimental laser equipment and components; Electrical power and grounding systems that provide service and standby power to building and experimental equipment, including lighting distribution and communications systems for the facilities; Instrumentation and control systems that ensure the safe operation of conventional facilities systems, such as those listed above. Detailed requirements for building subsystems that are not addressed in this document (such as specific sizes, locations, or capacities) are included in detail-level NIP Project Interface Control Documents (ICDS).

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Energy Savings from Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013 California Building Energy Efficiency Standards.2013 California Building Energy Efficiency Standards.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings 3:309-322.

  2. agency building energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: TO THE CALIFORNIA BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS and GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS CODE CALIFORNIA CODE and...

  3. Singapore's Zero-Energy Building's daylight monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grobe, Lars

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Singapore’s Zero-Energy Building’s daylight monitoringof California. Singapore’s Zero-Energy Building's daylightchambers in BCAA's Zero Energy Building in Singapore. These

  4. Quantifying the Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Co-Benefits of Green Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mozingo, Louise; Arens, Ed

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010.     California  Green  Building  Standards  Code,  Team].    2008.   Green  Building  Sector  Subgroup:  cellular  data.  Green  Building  Information   Gateway  (

  5. California Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brook, Municipal and Commercial Building Targeted Measure Program Larry Rillera, Clean Energy BusinessCalifornia Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM GUIDELINES FIFTH EDITION CALIFORNIA ENERGY;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Robert Weisenmiller Chairman James D. Boyd Vice Chair Commissioners: Karen

  6. VSP VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL CONFIRMATION FORM For your protection, California law requires the following to appear on this form: Any person who knowingly presents a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    VSP VIDEO DISPLAY TERMINAL CONFIRMATION FORM For your protection, California law requires to use a video display terminal four or more hours per day on a regular, ongoing basis. I understand on the plan allowances. VSP PO Box 997105 Sacramento, CA 95899-7105 Attn: Out-of-Network Claims The VSP Video

  7. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and build-up of hydrogen infrastructure in California areand high-volume hydrogen infrastructure. The least costof California’s hydrogen infrastructure. There are currently

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY California Outdoor Lighting Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems Author Sonoma, California Managed By: New Buildings Institute Cathy Higgins, Program Director White Jenkins, PIER Buildings Program Manager Terry Surles, PIER Program Director Robert L. Therkelsen Executive

  9. CALIFORNIA ENERGY California Outdoor Lighting Baseline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems Analytics, Inc. Dr. Roger Wright, Lead Author Sonoma, California Managed By: New Buildings Institute Cathy, Contract Manager Nancy Jenkins, PIER Buildings Program Manager Terry Surles, PIER Program Director Robert L

  10. California Commissioning Collaborative: 2007 Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Commissioning Collaborative: 2007 Program Plan Presented by: Jim Parks, Chair CCC Board of Directors November 1, 2007 © California Commissioning Collaborative © California Commissioning Collaborative Mission and Organization • Improve... building and system performance by developing and promoting viable building commissioning practices in California – Make commissioning standard practice • Organized in 2000; non-profit status in 2004 • Board of Directors: utilities, state and federal...

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team sought to create a well-documented design and implementation strategy for air sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings that would assist in compliance with new building infiltration requirements of the 2012 IECC.

  12. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , infrastructure, buildings research, distributed generation, smart grid enacted Assembly Bill 1890 (Brulte, Chapter 854, Statutes of 1996), California's electric utility, development, and demonstration (RD&D) from California's investorowned utilities to state government--a major

  13. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , advanced electricity generation, renewable energy, infrastructure, buildings research, distributed (Brulte, Chapter 854, Statutes of 1996), California's electric utility restructuring legislation, and demonstration (RD&D) from California's investorowned utilities to state government; a major change intended

  14. California Energy Commission PROPOSED REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission PROPOSED REGULATIONS MARCH 2012 CEC-400-2010-004-SD3 NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY USE DISCLOSURE PROGRAM Proposed Regulations Title 20, Division 2, Chapter 4 PREFACE The California Energy Commission is releasing proposed regulations for implementing Assembly

  15. Community Development Department Building & Safety Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING, RESIDENTIAL AND GREEN BUILDING CODES, AMENDING FREMONT MUNICIPAL CODE TITLE vn (BUILDING TO ENERGY REGULATIONS THE 2010 CALIFORNIA,GREEN BUILDING CODE The City of Fremont proposed to adopt local................ Community Development Department Building & Safety Division 39550 Liberty Street

  16. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ERC, is 448.3 trillion Btu (TBtu). The total CaliforniaBecause the cost of an electrical Btu is roughly 4 timesthat of a source fuel Btu, industrial categories that use

  17. Revised?Confirmatory Survey Report for Portions of the Auxiliary Building Structural Surfaces and Turbine Building Embedded Piping, Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, Herald, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of October 15 and 18, 2007, ORISE performed confirmatory radiological survey activities which included beta and gamma structural surface scans and beta activity direct measurements within the Auxiliary Building, beta or gamma scans within Turbine Building embedded piping, beta activity determinations within Turbine Building Drain 3-1-27, and gamma scans and the collection of a soil sample from the clay soils adjacent to the Lower Mixing Box.

  18. Water Heating Requirements Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Heating Requirements ­ Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements 5.1 Overview 5.1.1 Water Heating Energy Water heating energy use is an important end use in low-rise residential buildings. Roughly 90 percent of California households use natural gas fueled water heaters, typically storage gas

  19. EA-1065: Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to...

  20. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT 2008 Building Energy the evaporator coil by drilling of Temperature Measurement Access Holes for the placement of temperature sensors

  1. Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Options for the Supreme Court and Attorney General Buildings Final Report, Prepared for the Energy Efficiency Division, Texas Public Utility Commission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and electric energy for base buildings and buildings with California standards. Because the California standards restrict the total glazing to 50% of the exterior wall area, lighting levels to 1.5 w/sf and requires a heat pump for heating, the average total... of heat pumps. Appendix D provides the cooling and heating peak load components of each building as well as system monthly loads for each floor. Implementing the California standards would reduce the Energy Use Index for the buildings. However...

  2. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricityand heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energyquality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The first major paradigm shift in electricity generation,delivery, and control is emerging in the developed world, notably Europe,North America, and Japan. This shift will move electricity supply awayfrom the highly centralised universal service quality model with which weare familiar today towards a more dispersed system with heterogeneousqualities of service. One element of dispersed control is the clusteringof sources and sinks into semi-autonomous mu grids (microgrids).Research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RD3) of mu gridsare advancing rapidly on at least three continents, and significantdemonstrations are currently in progress. This paradigm shift will resultin more electricity generation close to end-uses, often involvingcombined heat and power application for building heating and cooling,increased local integration of renewables, and the possible provision ofheterogeneous qualities of electrical service to match the requirementsof various end-uses. In Europe, mu grid RD3 is entering its third majorround under the 7th European Commission Framework Programme; in the U.S.,one specific mu grid concept is undergoing rigorous laboratory testing,and in Japan, where the most activity exists, four major publiclysponsored and two privately sponsored demonstrations are in progress.This evolution poses new challenges to the way buildings are designed,built, and operated. Traditional building energy supply systems willbecome much more complex in at least three ways: 1. one cannot simplyassume gas arrives at the gas meter, electricity at its meter, and thetwo systems are virtually independent of one another; rather, energyconversion, heat recovery and use, and renewable energy harvesting mayall be taking place simultaneously within the building energy system; 2.the structure of energy flows in the building must accommodate multipleenergy processes in a manner that permits high overall efficiency; and 3.multiple qualities of electricity may be supplied to various buildingfunctions.

  3. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ivesrateresponse.pdf More Documents & Publications California Energy Incentive Programs Demand Response In California Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal...

  4. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Santa Barbara County, California. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data More Documents &...

  5. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Appendices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems. Roger Wright, Lead Author Sonoma, California Managed By: New Buildings Institute Cathy Higgins, Program Nancy Jenkins, PIER Buildings Program Manager Terry Surles, PIER Program Director Robert L. Therkelsen

  7. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maximize demand response savings for these buildings, wereDemand Response Infrastructure, in 16th National Conference on Buildingbuilding control strategies and techniques for demand response,

  8. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . KEY WORDS: Renewable, state buildings, state properties, photovoltaic, wind, biomass, geothermalCalifornia Energy Commission STAFF REPORT DEVELOPING RENEWABLE GENERATION ON STATE PROPERTY Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings and Other State- Owned Property APRIL 2011 CEC-150

  9. LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more on imported supplies, including liquefied natural gas (LNG). Currently, the U.S. has four LNG have proposed to site LNG import facilities in California, in other locations in the U.S, and in Baja California, Mexico. In the early 1970s, California's gas utilities were planning to build an LNG import

  10. Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to the influence of Indoor Environmental Quality, [IEQ] requirements associated with occupation regimes on the criterion of energy demand s for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning) central systems that were...

  11. EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct...

  12. EA-1087: Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments...

  13. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Lucas, Robert G.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current Utah code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $168 to $188 for an average new house in Utah at recent fuel prices.

  14. 1999 Board of Trustees Leland Stanford Junior University. All rights reserved Laboratory Code Requirement Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and conditions create a fire or explosion potential; occupancies with a quantity of material in the building Requirement Matrix Based on the 1998 California Building Standards Code (Stanford University Fire Marshal in excess of those listed in Table 3-D, which present a moderate explosion hazard or a hazard from

  15. Monitoring-based HVAC Commissioning of an Existing Office Building for Energy Efficiciency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. [28] California Commissioning Collaborative .Existing Building Commissioning Toolkit. 2012. Retrievedof Commerical-Buildings Commissioning. A Meta-Analysis of

  16. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads account for the majority of electricity usage – these loads significantly influenced the whole building power profile.power under extreme cold weather conditions to estimate the actual lighting and equipment end use load profiles.power profile during the peak period. The “Pre-cooling with linear temp set up” strategy load

  17. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Stadler

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UCD USDOE WAPA WECC Building Automation System CaliforniaSiemens’ Apogee Building Automation System (BAS). Figure 6.

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CEC-RWH-INST (Revised 08 # BUILDING TYPE Refrigerated Warehouse PHASE OF CONSTRUCTION New Construction Addition Alteration If more By the Enforcement Agency #12;STATE OF CALIFORNIA REFRIGERATED WAREHOUSE INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CEC

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE CEC-RWH-1C (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY Project Name: Climate Zone: Conditioned Floor Area: Project Address: Date: General Information Building Warehouse space is Efficiency Regulations (Title 20) for walk

  20. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of about $145 a year for an average new house. Construction cost increases are estimated at $655. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of close to $100 a year because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --THE RESOURCES PROVIDER Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF REGULATIONS, TITLE 24, PART 1 and PART 6 (CALIFORNIA ENERGY CODE) 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS of the California Energy Commission's proposed amendments to its energy efficiency standards for buildings, which ways, e.g., "2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards," "proposed standards," and "2013 Standards

  2. Biotic communities and brachiopod paleoecology of the Early Permian McCloud Formation, northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanger, Rex Alan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    terrene, the shallow water carbonate build-ups are represented by the Early Permian McCloud Formation. Location of Study Area The McCloud Formation crops out discontinuously for about 60 kilometers within Shasta County, California (Figure 2). Effort...BIOTIC COMMUNITIES AND BRACHIOPOD PALEOECOLOGY OF THE EARLY PERMIAN McCLOUD FORMATION, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. A Thesis by REX ALAN HANGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  3. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    02-001F. CEC. 2005. Energy Demand Forecast Methods Report.CEC. 2007. California Energy Demand 2008-2018, Staff RevisedT. Gorin. 2009. California Energy Demand 2010-2020, Adopted

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (collectively also known as the California Energy Code), and portions of the Green Building Code, Part 11 (also known as CalGreen), of the California Building Code. The Energy Commission will also consider to the California Energy Code and CalGreen that the Energy Commission will consider adopting. #12;2 May 31, 2012 9

  5. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

  6. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARBI

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  7. Santa Barbara County, California Data Dashboard | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Santa Barbara County, California, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Santa Barbara County Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications...

  8. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA ­ THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy United States Department of Energy Section 327 Petitions, Appliance Efficiency Standards Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D

  9. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  10. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  12. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  13. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Development of Energy Balances for the State ofIEA). 2010. World Energy Balance, 1971 to 2008. Paris: IEA.REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition

  14. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

  15. California Energy Commission SUPPLEMENTAL STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    testing and data collection, and establish reach codes for "green buildings." The Energy CommissionCalifornia Energy Commission SUPPLEMENTAL STAFF REPORT SUPPLEMENTAL INITIAL STUDY/PROPOSED NEGATIVE DECLARATION FOR THE 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL

  16. California Energy Commission LEAD COMMISSIONER REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the country. KEY WORDS: Renewable, state buildings, state properties, photovoltaic, wind, biomass California Energy Commission LEAD COMMISSIONER REPORT DEVELOPING RENEWABLE GENERATION ON STATE PROPERTY Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings and Other State Owned Property NOVEMBER 2011 CEC

  17. High-performance commercial building systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

  18. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building SectorsEnergy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building SectorsEnergy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors.

  19. Residential California adobe : mud form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daymond, Diana Leigh

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern California has a rich tradition of adobe architecture . Formed with earth, defined by site, climate and use, the adobe structures exemplify a building methodology in harmony with nature and the lifestyle of it's ...

  20. SCE- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Edison offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new...

  1. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cooling loads by reflecting and emitting energy from the sun, reducing roof temperatures on hot sunnyCalifornia Energy Commission STAFF REPORT DRAFT EVALUATION REPORT 2008 Building Energy Layer DECEMBER 2012 CEC4002012018SD CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor #12

  2. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    a boulder for an outdoor class in the new California Naturalist Program, which integrates citizen science is building opportunities for environmental job training and volunteerism, and a new age for citizen science with ambitious goals 18 the New Naturalists UC's California Naturalist Program is integrating citizen science

  3. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land area in California. Wind farms only directly displacewill be required: about 1 wind farm, 1 central solar plant,

  4. Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

  5. Redistricting Reform Will Not Solve California's Budget Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchler, Justin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Will Not Solve California's Budget Crisis Figure 9. FigureWill Not Solve California's Budget Crisis Figure 21. Figuretwo-thirds supermajority budget requirement is dangerous in

  6. CALIFORNIA COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 2008 BEST PERMITTING PRACTICES GUIDELINES FOR LIQUID Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Eugenia Laychak Project Manager of the California Energy Commission prepared this report. It does not necessarily represent the views of the Energy

  7. Campus Parking Map University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    Campus Parking Map University of California BERKELEY #12;Campus Building Locations Parking Lots/Garages Building Name Grid Building Name(Continued) Grid Building Name(Continued) Grid Grid Parking Information parking spaces are located throughout the campus; areas are indicated on the map on reverse. Bicycles

  8. Building Commissioning in the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, N.; Friedman, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Commissioning in the USA Natascha Castro, Annex 47- US Team Leader National Institute of Standards and Technology Hannah Friedman, Cost-Benefit Subtask Leader Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Asian Pacific Conference on Building... Program (PIER)? Utility programs and non-profit organizations ? Energy Efficiency Mandates ? California, New York, Vermont, Minnesota, City of Portland Oregon ? Building Energy Codes include Cx ? California, State of Washington, Massachusetts US Team...

  9. Presented at the 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings. This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  10. Presented at the ACEEE 2002 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings. The Integration of Engineering and Architecture: A Perspective on Natural Ventilation for the New

  11. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ALLIANCE, CALIFORNIA SOLAR ENERGY for Sustainable Energy, California Environmental Justice Alliance, California Solar Energy Industries Association OF AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION IN CALIFORNIA, ASIAN PACIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK, BRIGHTLINE DEFENSE PROJECT

  12. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Demand Response in Commercial Buildings, Californiain peak building load (a key concern for Demand ResponseBuilding Energy Code Requirements: Title 24 .. 30 Demand Response..

  13. Thermal mass assessment: an explanation of the mechanisms by which building mass influences heating and cooling energy requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, K.W.; Courville, G.E.; Bales, E.L.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence that building mass has on energy consumption for heating and cooling has been the subject of some controversy. This controversy is, in part, due to a lack of understanding of the heat transfer mechanics occurring within a building and of how they affect energy usage. This report offers a step-by-step development of the principles of heat transfer in buildings as they pertain to thermal mass. The report is targeted for persons who are unfamiliar with the topic of thermal mass, but who possess some technical background. It is concluded that for the mass of a building to reduce energy usage, the building must undergo alternating periods of net energy gain and loss. In other words, during the heating season the indoor temperature must at times float above the thermostat set point temperature to reduce energy consumption. During the cooling season, the indoor temperature must occasionally drop below the set point temperature. Other issues addressed include the effects of mass on peak loads, equipment cycling, thermostat setback, and comfort. Strategies to maximize benefits of mass are discussed.

  14. California's Housing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Cynthia; Singa, Krute

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only improve California’s housing opportunities but produce2004: California’s Affordable Housing Crisis. 2004. http://Raising the Roof: California Housing Development Projections

  15. MODELING PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS WITH HAND CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, David B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California ABSTRACT Passive solar design can be encouragedpassive solar buildings and the a b i l i t y to predict the thermal response of various designs.

  16. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability Developing Renewable Generation on State Property Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings

  17. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    land area in California. Wind farms only directly displacewill be required: about 1 wind farm, 1 central solar plant,

  18. Energy Analysis and Energy Conservation Options for the Supreme Court and Attorney General Buildings Final Report, Prepared for the Energy Efficiency Division, Texas Public Utility Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farzad, M.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's For The Supreme Court and Attorney General Buildings (KBtu/sf-yr) ABSTRACT The energy use and peak load requirement of the Supreme Court & Attorney General Buildings in Austin, Texas were analyzed using the DOE 2.IB building energy simulation program. An analysis... Energy Commission, September, 1984. [4] Handbook of Fundamentals, ASHRAE 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329. [5] DOE-2, Reference Manual, Version 2.IB, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA. 94720, January 19 83. [6...

  19. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to help reduce building cooling loads by reflecting and emitting energy from the sun. These propertiesCalifornia Energy Commission STAFF REPORT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT Compliance Option for the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Default Cool Roof Performance Values for LowSloped Roofs That Use

  20. AB 2160 GREEN BUILDING REPORT FOR SUBMISSION TO THE GOVERNOR'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION AB 2160 GREEN BUILDING REPORT FOR SUBMISSION TO THE GOVERNOR'S GREEN and Resource-Efficient (Green Building) Projects to the Governor's Green Action Team on several topics related to the 2004 Green Building Initiative

  1. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  2. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

  3. California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research Program Case Study PIER Buildings Program Research Powers the Future www.energy.ca.gov/research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    envelope. The Solution Aeroseal is a cost effective method to seal leaks in ducts; it uses a vinyl polymer adhesive sprayed into the duct as an aerosol. Developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Aeroseal reduce heating and cooling by 20%. Demonstration Results University of California, Davis Aeroseal

  4. Modeling to predict positive pressurization required to control mold growth from infiltration in a building in College Station, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge,D.; Chen,W.J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Likewise, it happens to exfiltrating air when the temperature relationship is reversed. Hence, in hot and humid climates, mold ESL-IC-14-09-27 Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14... = 1 7 ? exp?(?0.68 ln T ? 13.9 ln RH + 0.14W? 0.33SQ+ 66.02) ? k1k2 (Per day) Where: T is temperature (°C) RH is relative humidity k1 is intensity of growth k2?is?calculated?based?on?Mmax W is a wood species factor SQ is a surface...

  5. Presented at the ACEEE 2002 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 18-23, 2002, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California, and published in the proceedings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs of energy simulation tools, but none has brought a significant increase in the consideration of energy of the building industry in energy performance and environmental impact, current practice trends, modeling

  6. CALIFORNIA COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 2: LAND USE AND ENERGY: TRENDS AND DRIVERS ...........................17 Vehicle Miles Traveled................................................................................................................... 20 Residential Energy Consumption CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN MEETING CALIFORNIA'S ENERGY

  7. California Energy Commission BLOCK GRANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bill X4 114 . This state law requires the Energy Commission to prioritize grants based on costCalifornia Energy Commission BLOCK GRANT GUIDELINES (FORMULA-BASED GRANTS) ENERGY EFFICIENCY CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM ADOPTED BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION OCTOBER 7, 2009 CEC-150

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

  9. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Resource Needs for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies,hydrogen storage is not yet technically feasible, and fuel cellFuels cells can be used in both vehicles and buildings, and California has major hydrogen

  10. California Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission COMMITTEE FINAL STATE ENERGY PROGRAM GUIDELINES AUGUST 28, 2009 CEC Building Targeted Measure Program Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Melissa Jones Executive State Energy Program Guidelines 7 A. Background

  11. California Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission COMMITTEE FINAL STATE ENERGY PROGRAM GUIDELINES AUGUST 28, 2009 CEC and Commercial Building Targeted Measure Program Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director Melissa Jones and Reinvestment Act State Energy Program Guidelines 7 A. Background

  12. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission Dustin Davis Contract Manager Chris Scruton Program Area Lead PIER institutions. PIER funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy PIERFINALPROGRAMREPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By

  13. California Energy Commission REVISED DRAFT REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission REVISED DRAFT REGULATIONS AUGUST, 2011 CEC-400-2010-004-SD2 Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program Draft Regulations Title 20, Division 2, Chapter 4 of the California Energy Commission is releasing draft regulations for implementing Assembly Bill (AB) 1103 (Saldańa

  14. California Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Targeted Measure Program Larry Rillera, Clean Energy Business Financing Program Valerie T. HallCalifornia Energy Commission STATE ENERGY PROGRAM GUIDELINES PROPOSED THIRD EDITION SECOND EDITION PROPOSED TO ADOPTED BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION AUGUST 6, FEBRUARY 10, 2010 CEC-150-2009-004-CMF

  15. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plants) that produce the electricity required to recharge EVs, given the fuel generat~tng mix of Southern California,

  16. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deputy Project Director, Energy and Environmental Security,Security Principal Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Lab California’s Energy

  17. BUILDING EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN [Medical Sciences Building, Building # 192] / [506 S. Mathews, Urbana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    BUILDING EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN [Medical Sciences Building, Building # 192] / [506 S. Mathews requires the BUILDING EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TEAM: Building Command Post1 1. M2 classroom, Carle Forum This Building Emergency Action Plan (BEAP) is to be used in conjunction with the Emergency Response Guide (ERG

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS California Energy Commission Docket No. 12-BSTD-01 The Notice Energy Commission of the proposed update to the Energy Efficiency Building Standards of Title 24 Part 6 directed Energy Commission staff to develop revisions to the proposed 2013 Building Energy Efficiency

  19. BUILDING ENERGY 1987 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    changes in lighting control and HVAC requirements. The lighting control requirements in Section 2-5319(a, are required for all alterations. The HVAC requirements of new buildings are requ ired for some HVAC alterat for a wide variety of building shapes. "SECOND GENERATioN" ALTERNATIVE HVAC COMPLIANCE CODIFIED 4

  20. Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requirements in building codes, energy efficiency policiesto improve the building’s energy efficiency. Lease contractsimprove the building’s energy efficiency. We focus first on

  1. California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report January 2008 #12;California Solar Initiative, CPUC Staff Progress Report, January 2008 This page intentionally left blank. #12;California Solar Initiative, CPUC Staff Progress Report, January 2008 Table of Contents

  2. City of Scottsdale- Green Building Policy for Public Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, Scottsdale approved a green building policy for new city buildings and remodels. The resolution requires all new, occupied city buildings of any size to be designed, contracted and built...

  3. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    California More Documents & Publications Building America Webinar: Deep Energy Retrofit Case Studies: Lessons Learned Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate...

  4. Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aebischer, A. Huser, 2003: Energy Consumption of InformationCalifornia Commercial Building Energy Benchmarking Database.Architekt Nr. 50, p. The Energy Data and Modelling Center,

  5. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet) In this project, IBACOS, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, assessed a strategy for providing conditioned air to...

  6. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fans, Pittburgh, Pennsylvania Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California...

  7. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Evluating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fans - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California...

  8. 167 Prospectus California Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Each of the three transects across the California Current will compare deep-water sites near the core), for those sites that require it, can be obtained from the following World Wide Web site: http margin, Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 63, occurred immediately before the first deployment

  9. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manager California Energy Commission 1516 9th Street, MS 2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Comments may are routinely monitored with a continuous emission monitoring system. An averaging time requirement is standardSTATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  10. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Resource Needs for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies,hydrogen storage is not yet technically feasible, and fuel cellFuels cells can be used in both vehicles and buildings, and California has major hydrogen

  11. Incentive Pass-through for Residential Solar Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has grown rapidly over the last decade, partly because of various government incentives. In the United States, those established in California are among the largest and longest-running incentives. Building on past research, this report addresses the still-unanswered question: to what degree have the direct PV incentives in California been passed along from installers to consumers? This report addresses this question by carefully examining the residential PV market in California and applying both a structural-modeling approach and a reduced-form regression analysis to estimate the incentive pass-through rate. The results suggest an average pass-through rate of direct incentives of nearly 100%, but with regional differences among California counties. While these results could have multiple explanations, they suggest a relatively competitive market and well-functioning subsidy program. Further analysis is required to determine whether similar results broadly apply to other states, to other customer segments, to all third-party-owned PV systems, or to all forms of financial incentives for solar.

  12. BUILDING PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING DURING CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toole, T. Michael

    1 BUILDING PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING DURING CONSTRUCTION T. Michael Toole1 and Matthew Hallowell2 of building performance engineering tasks on design-bid-build projects are typically provided by entities building construction projects. Twenty four building performance engineering tasks were required

  13. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustin Davis Contract Manager Chris Scruton Program Area Lead PIER Buildings End-Use Energy on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Managed By

  14. Team Building Toolkit KEYS -Keys to Enhance Your Supervisory Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Team Building Toolkit KEYS - Keys to Enhance Your Supervisory Success University of California to Enhance Your Supervisory Success 2 | P a g e Table of Contents Stages of Team Development ................................................................................................ 4 Team Building at a Glance

  15. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editors, The

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Form 3579” to California Agriculture at the address above. ©Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewour Writing CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 66 , NUMBER 4

  16. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 2Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  17. About California Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Editor, The

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Submissions. California Agriculture manages the peer reviewread our CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 1Carol Lovatt California Agriculture (ISSN 0008-0845, print,

  18. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  19. Chapter 3: Building Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and up, especially at doors and loading docks, requires loading docks on the south side of buildings. significant effort and energy for snow removal. Desirable locations of...

  20. California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report January 2009 #12;2 California Solar Initiative CPUC Staff Progress Report - January 2009 The California Public progress on the California Solar Initiative, the country's largest solar incentive program. In January 2007

  1. California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report October 2008 #12;2 California Solar Initiative CPUC Staff Progress Report - October 2008 The California Public progress on the California Solar Initiative, the country's largest solar incentive program. In January 2007

  2. California Geothermal Energy Collaborative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Geothermal Energy Collaborative Geothermal Education and Outreach Guide of California Davis, and the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We specifically would like to thank support of the California Geothermal Energy Collaborative. We also thank Charlene Wardlow of Ormat for her

  3. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) and for commercial buildings is the American Society of Heating Energy Conservation Code and from the commercial requirements encompassed in ASHRAEIIESNA Standard 90 SACRAMENTO, CA 95814-551 2 www.energy.ca.gov Buildings Technologies Program Building Energy Codes Program

  4. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Buidling Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) describes rate-responsive building operations for cost and energy savings in California federal facilities.

  5. Singapore's Zero-Energy Building's Daylight Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-3708E Singapore's Zero-Energy Building's Daylight Monitoring System Author(s), L. Grobe; S thereof or The Regents of the University of California. #12;Singapore's Zero-Energy Building's daylight, 94720 California, USA 1. Abstract A setup to monitor the daylighting performance of different glazing

  6. California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Solar Initiative California Public Utilities Commission Staff Progress Report July 2008 #12;California Solar Initiative, CPUC Staff Progress Report, July 2008 Cover Photo Credits: Photographer: Andrew McKinney Name of Installer: Marin Solar System owner

  7. Building Performance Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, A.; Harris, J.; Mbentin, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Performance Evaluation Anne King and Jo Harris, MBEKTN and BSRIA Agenda ? Background to funding and programme ? The Building Performance Evaluation Programme in the UK ? Requirements ? Results ? Impact ? Discussion ? Do you/ How do... you do Building Performance Evaluation? ? What gaps are there and what could research do to fill them? Background ? The Technology Strategy Board ? the funders ? Low Impact Building programme ? BSRIA and others ? evaluators ? Soft Landings...

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Field and Baseline Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems Kolderup, Lead Author San Francisco, California Managed By: New Buildings Institute Cathy Higgins, Program Nancy Jenkins, PIER Buildings Program Manager Terry Surles, PIER Program Director Robert L. Therkelsen

  9. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this Compliance Option application. Purpose Many air conditioners in California fail to achieve their rated problems. To reduce air conditioner energy consumption and peak demand, the Building Energy Efficiency the correct refrigerant charge and proper air conditioner system operation in residential buildings

  10. Memorandum of American High-Performance Buildings Coalition DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major...

  11. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

  12. Building Design Advisor: Automated integration of multiple simulation tools K. Papamichael, J. LaPorta, H. Chauvet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-40591 Preprint Building Design Advisor: Automated integration of multiple simulation tools K. Papamichael, J. LaPorta, H. Chauvet Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 Abstract The Building

  13. Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan Rev 11/12 Page 1 Northern California Nanotechnology Center Chemical Hygiene Plan 1.0 Introduction Cal-OSHA (Title 8 CCR 5191) and campus regulations require that all laboratories have a written Chemical Hygiene Plan. The Chemical

  14. Implementation of Title V in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, B.; Cook, B.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides information on California`s Title V operating permit programs for stationary sources mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. It covers background, applicability, regulatory history, requirements, and issues. In addition, specific information is provided on the progress of Title V implementation in California, including: the roles of implementing agencies, the status of district Title V programs, number and distribution of Title V sources, cost of Title V implementation, and highlights of Title V implementation in the State. The question and answer format is intended to facilitate easy access to specific information related to the Title V operating permit programs in California.

  15. Five-Year NRHP Re-Evaluation of Historic Buildings Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R A; Heidecker, K R

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 'Draft Programmatic Agreement among the Department of Energy and the California State Historic Preservation Officer Regarding Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory' requires a review and re-evaluation of the eligibility of laboratory properties for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) every five years. The original evaluation was published in 2005; this report serves as the first five-year re-evaluation. This re-evaluation includes consideration of changes within LLNL to management, to mission, and to the built environment. it also determines the status of those buildings, objects, and districts that were recommended as NRHP-eligible in the 2005 report. Buildings that were omitted from the earlier building list, those that have reached 50 years of age since the original assessment, and new buildings are also addressed in the re-evaluation.

  16. Negotiations with the landscape : a winery in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Greta, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the design of a winery in the hills of northern California. The winer program was specifically chosen to ensure and illuminate the close partnership between landscape and building. While the industrial ...

  17. University of California Shared Image Collections: Convergence and Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zentall, Lena; Burns, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marmor, “ArtSTOR: A Digital Library for the History of Art,”Lena Zentall, California Digital Library, and Maureen Burns,to painstakingly build a digital library of over 120,000

  18. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONCOMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONCOMMISSION California Clean Energy Jobs Act: Proposition 39 Draft MEETINGMEETING AGENDA · Summary of California Clean Energy Jobs Act· Summary of California Clean Energy Jobs Act and Questions W U· Wrap Up #12;THE CALIFORNIA CLEAN ENERGY JOBS ACTENERGY JOBS ACT · Combination of two recent

  19. California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California "Title 24" Energy Code requiring filter manufacturers, HVAC designers, and HERS raters to make changes that will encourage the use of higher MERV filters without...

  20. "We retrofitted mechanical systems in 8 buildings!"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "We retrofitted mechanical systems in 8 buildings!" LOW INTEREST RATE LOANS AVAILABLE NOW! County of Contra Costa California Energy Commission Apply Today! See Case Study on Back of Flyer "Our low interest and cooling systems in eight buildings. The energy efficient measures include replacing pneumatic controls

  1. Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ® program online tool for managing building energy use data. (hk) "Prospective buyer" means a person who has)"Data Verification Checklist" means a report generated by Portfolio Manager that summarizes a property's physical· ·/ Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program California Code of Regulations Title

  2. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California In this project, U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen Castanos Hybrid...

  3. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumption Patterns in Chinese Households,” in the Proceedings of 2002 ACEEE Summer Studies on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Asilamor, California, USA,

  4. Riverside County- Sustainable Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects...

  5. Energy Standards for State Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State is still required by statute to adopt planning and construction standards for state buildings that conserve energy and optimize the energy performance of new buildings. The standards mu...

  6. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Energy Outlook Air Resources Board Business-As-Usualbusiness as usual ( BAU) and median scenarios (Based upon Caltrans 2008, AEO 2011 but extended to 2050) California’s Energy

  7. FORESTRY BUILDING: BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTRY BUILDING: BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN Date Adopted: August 18, 2009 Date Revised June 17, 2013 Prepared By: Diana Evans and Jennifer Meyer #12;PURDUE UNIVERSITY BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN VERSION 3 2 Table Suspension or Campus Closure SECTION 3: BUILDING INFORMATION 3.1 Building Deputy/Alternate Building Deputy

  8. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    since offshore oil production is expected to peak by 1990,a peak in production within California of both crude oil andis expected to peak in 1990. Additional oil requirements

  9. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , electricity generation, photovoltaic, PV, PV Calculator, energy efficiency, guidelines, eligibilityCalifornia Energy Commission GUIDELINES GUIDELINES FOR CALIFORNIA'S SOLAR-300-2012-008-ED5-CMF CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr., Governor

  10. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , photovoltaic, PV, PV Calculator, energy efficiency, guidelines, eligibility criteria, conditionsCalifornia Energy Commission GUIDELINES GUIDELINES FOR CALIFORNIA'S SOLAR ELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAMS (SENATE BILL 1) Fourth Edition CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor

  11. California Energy Commission GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , electricity generation, photovoltaic, PV, PV Calculator, energy efficiency, guidelines, eligibility criteriaCalifornia Energy Commission GUIDELINES GUIDELINES FOR CALIFORNIA'S SOLAR ELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAMS (SENATE BILL 1) Third Edition JUNE 2010 CEC3002010004CMF #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  12. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  13. Building and Buildings, Scotland: The Building Standards Advisory Committee (Scotland) Regulations, 1959 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclay, John.S.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These regulations make provision for the constitution and procedure of the Building Standards Advisory Committee which the Secretary of State is required to appoint under section 12 of the Building (Scotland) Act, 1959

  14. Page 1 of 1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Commission Buildings Program Building Natural Gas Technology Grant Program PON13503 Stage 1 not represent ranking of the submitted abstracts #12;California Energy Commission Buildings Program Building Pass 15 UC Davis Natural Gas Systems Innovations for Zero Net Energy Homes Not Pass 16 Ingen Systems He

  15. BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING PHARMACY AND BANK BUILDING JOHN WOOLEY BUILDING OLD TEARCHER'S BUILDING PHYSICS BUILDING BAXTER'S LODGE INSTITUTE BUILDING CONSERVATION WORKS R.D.WATT BUILDING MACLEAY BUILDING THE QUARANGLE BADHAM BUILDING J.D. STEWART BUILDING BLACKBURN BUILDING MADSEN BUILDING STORE

  16. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity costs (energy and demand charges), $ C EVTOU pricing for both energy and power (demand) charges. Themicrogrid to avoid high demand and energy charges during

  17. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  18. University of California, Berkeley Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    , Plumbing or Steam Line Failure 12. Natural Gas Release or Leak 13. Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY

  19. California's electricity crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  20. Demand Response In California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the demand response in California and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Fall meeting, held on November 1-2, 2006 in San Francisco, California.

  1. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Statutes of 1997) requires retail electricity providers to disclose quarterly and annual fuel mix the mix of electricity fuel and technology types of the retail suppliers' sources of power and includes to disclose total California system electricity, which is the sum of all in-state generation and net

  2. California Energy Commission BLOCK GRANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    requires the Energy Commission to prioritize grants based on cost-effective energy efficiencyCalifornia Energy Commission REVISED BLOCK GRANT GUIDELINES (FORMULA-BASED GRANTS) ENERGY EFFICIENCY CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM FOR CONSIDERATION FOR ADOPTION BY THE CALIF. ENERGY COMMISSION

  3. California Energy Commission BLOCK GRANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Assembly Bill X4 114 . This state law requires the Energy Commission to prioritize grants based on costCalifornia Energy Commission Committee Draft BLOCK GRANT GUIDELINES (FORMULA-BASED GRANTS) ENERGY GLOSSARY #12;Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Guidelines 1. Background

  4. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EUI) predicted with building energy models created using theusing EPA model ? Health benefits of reduced energy usage (

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION In the matter of: Preparation of the 2013 of the 2013 IEPR Scoping Order follows. Background Public Resources Code Section 25302 requires the Energy

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY that must be replaced to satisfy local capacity area requirements. · A status report on the several studies, protect the environment, ensure energy reliability, enhance the state's economy, and protect public health

  7. SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 CALIFORNIA ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ). #12;SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 COMMON QUESTION Question: How many buildings can be coveredSMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Bright Schools Program Karen Perrin, Energy Specialist, Bright Schools Program #12;SMART SCHOOLS SYMPOSIUM 2013 OVERVIEW · What is the Bright

  8. AN ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED CALIFORNIA CLIMATE USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , respectively, with funding provided by the Energy Commission. Model simulations performed by Masao Kanamitsu Analogues statistical model (CANA). #12;ii #12;iii Preface The California Energy Commission's Public institutions. PIER funding efforts focus on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy

  9. Building Energy Efficient Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many new school buildings consume only half the energy required by similar efficient structures designed without energy performance as a design criterion. These are comfortable and efficient while construction costs remain about the same as those...

  10. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) requirements of DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Cancels DOE G 413.3-6.

  11. Online.Academy.edu/BuildingInfo Ads by Google August 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Online.Academy.edu/BuildingInfo Ads by Google August 1, 2010 The best in green design By Relaxnews California Academy of Sciences (San Francisco USA) Renzo Piano Building workshop 2008 9 Votes Genzyme Center

  12. Curriculum for Commissioning Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, Lia

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded funding to PECI to develop training curriculum in commercial energy auditing and building commissioning. This program was created in response to the high demand for auditing and commissioning services in the U.S. commercial buildings market and to bridge gaps and barriers in existing training programs. Obstacles addressed included: lack of focus on entry level candidates; prohibitive cost and time required for training; lack of hands-on training; trainings that focus on certifications & process overviews; and lack of comprehensive training. PECI organized several other industry players to create a co-funded project sponsored by DOE, PECI, New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), California Energy Commission (CEC), Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and California Commissioning Collaborative (CCC). After awarded, PECI teamed with another DOE awardee, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), to work collaboratively to create one comprehensive program featuring two training tracks. NJIT’s Center for Building Knowledge is a research and training institute affiliated with the College of Architecture and Design, and provided e-learning and video enhancements. This project designed and developed two training programs with a comprehensive, energy-focused curriculum to prepare new entrants to become energy auditors or commissioning authorities (CxAs). The following are the key elements of the developed trainings, which is depicted graphically in Figure 1: • Online classes are self-paced, and can be completed anywhere, any time • Commissioning Authority track includes 3 online modules made up of 24 courses delivered in 104 individual lessons, followed by a 40 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 75 and 100 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Energy Auditor track includes 3 online modules made up of 18 courses delivered in 72 individual lessons, followed by a 24 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 50 and 70 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Individual courses can be taken for continuing education credits. • Assessments are included for each course, and a score of at least 80% is required for completion. • Completion of Modules 1 through 3 is prerequisite for participating in the laboratory. More experienced participants have the option to test out of Modules 1 and 2 and complete Module 3 to progress to the laboratory.

  13. Around Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treib, Marc

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

  14. BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

  15. City of Chicago- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chicago Energy Conservation Code (CECC) requires residential buildings applying for building permits to comply with energy efficient measures which go beyond those required by the [http://www...

  16. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much individual California power plants increased earningspower plants were popular developments in California, butno new power plants had been constructed in California over

  17. The Least-cost Hydrogen for Southern California Zhenhong Lin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Yueyue

    of hydrogen infrastructure build-up in Southern California during 2010-2060. Given an exogenous demand, the model generates temporal and spatial decisions for building a hydrogen infrastructure, in terms of when emissions, and oil dependence [1]-[3]. Although a hydrogen refueling infrastructure does not currently exist

  18. DRAFT October 4, 2007 Residential Thermostats: Comfort Controls in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    review forsakes depth for focus. It also has a bias towards California issues including Demand response (DR), and applicability and relation to Title 24 (Building Efficiency Standards) and Title 20 around a couple of companies who are still in the business of building thermal controls today: Johnson

  19. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners

  20. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  1. Immigration reform and California agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reform and California agriculture Philip Martin Professor,proposals for California agriculture. Immigration reformCenter. 196 CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE • VOLUME 67 , NUMBER 4

  2. Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei: Energy3BuildingOS byprovide

  3. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All new construction required to follow the provisions of Department of Energy(DOE) Order 420. lB, Facility Safety, must comply with national consensus industrystandards and the model building...

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge...

  5. Wireless Electricity Metering of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culler, David E.

    Wireless Electricity Metering of Miscellaneous and Electronic Devices in Buildings, University of California, Berkeley, USA Abstract- Miscellaneous and electronic devices hundreds of miscellaneous and electronic devices where metered for several months

  6. 4 Questions for a Better Buildings Case Competition Student Participan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from right) helped the Xenergy team from the University of California at Santa Barbara win two Better Buildings Case Competition awards. Harry is now working as a project manager...

  7. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in California PEV Technology and Costs The main challengesthis analysis. FCV Technology and Costs A hydrogen fuel cell6. Hydrogen storage technology and cost status compared to

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020 ADOPTED FORECAST for this report: Kavalec, Chris and Tom Gorin, 2009. California Energy Demand 20102020, Adopted Forecast. California Energy Commission. CEC2002009012CMF #12; i Acknowledgments The demand forecast

  9. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringthe integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringArchitecture University of California, Berkeley Professor Charles C. Benton, Chair Commercial office buildings promoted as “sustainable,” “

  10. Presented at the U.S. Green Buildings Council Third Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, November 17-19, 1996. The research reported here was funded, in part, by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), a research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution Prevention Division. Interoperable, Life-cycle Tools for Assuring Building Performance to the structure of the building industry, the numerous people and companies involved in the process, the current design and construction are completed. We suggest that new interoperable software tools could greatly

  11. CALIFORNIA REPORTING, LLC 52 Longwood Drive, San Rafael, California 94901 (415) 457-4417

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington David Ware Nelson R. Peña George Nesbitt, Environmental Design Build, CALHERS, Passive House Group Kurt Hurley, Passive House California Pat Eilert, PG&E Dan Varvais, SPFA Bruce D. Roy Roger Le Wilcox, Berkeley Solar Group* Rob Falke, National Comfort Institute Jamy Bacchus, Natural Resources

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SKYLIGHT AREA SUPPORT WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as shown on page _______ of building plans has general lighting power density of ______ W/ft2 , which is indicated on page _________ of the building plans. Skylights not required as fully designed lighting system is less than 0.5 W/ft2 . Note: this exemption applies only to buildings with a fully designed lighting

  13. California Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saving Energy in Existing Buildings and Achieving a ZeroNetEnergy Future JULY 2011 CEC4002011007SD Commission staff's draft recommendations for achieving zero-net-energy residential buildings by 2020, and zero-net-energy commercial buildings by 2030. Doing so will require enormous efficiency improvements

  14. Expanding Buildings-to-Grid (B2G) Objectives in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Demand Response Building-to-Grid RequirementsPolicy Demand Response Market Design Building IntegrationDemand Response Potential Market in Commercial Buildings ..

  15. CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

  16. California Energy Commission REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission REGULATIONS FINAL STATEMENT OF REASONS ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES by Government Code section 11346.9(a) for the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission) regulations 399.30 (l) directs the Energy Commission to adopt regulations specifying procedures

  17. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA METALLURGICAL SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    . Chin, Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 12:30 "UFO Professor Robert Creegan as our luncheon speaker. His topic will be "UFO's -- Borders of Science." 5

  18. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  19. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  20. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  1. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  2. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link...

  3. California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presents its audit report concerning our review of the California Energy Commission's (energy commission Recommendation 40 Response to the Audit California Energy Commission 41 #12;1 SUMMARY RESULTS IN BRIEF C oncernsCalifornia Energy Commission: Although External Factors Have Caused Delays in Its Approval of Sites

  4. Energy-Efficient Building Standards for State Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Via Executive Order 27, Maine requires that construction or renovation of state buildings must incorporate "green building" standards that would achieve "significant" energy efficiency and...

  5. UCDavis University of California A California Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    PEV drivers charge at home #12;Charging behavior ­ self reportedLarger sample ­About 50% sayUCDavis University of California A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research · Fleet Operation · Energy Savings Battery studies · Benchmark Testing · 2nd use · End of life Spatial

  6. Mandating Solar Hot Water by California Local Governments: Legal Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman,, Peter C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the county building code to require solar energy to be thebuilding code, in accord with the energy element of its general plan, to require solar

  7. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  8. INL Green Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer Dalton

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green buildings, also known as sustainable buildings, resource efficient buildings, and high performance buildings, are structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reducing solid waste and pollutants, and limiting the depletion of natural resources. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish the mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate green design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. With this in mind, the recommendations described in this strategy are intended to form the INL foundation for green building standards. The recommendations in this strategy are broken down into three levels: Baseline Minimum, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Certification, and Innovative. Baseline Minimum features should be included in all new occupied buildings no matter what the purpose or size. These features do not require significant research, design, or capital costs and yet they can reduce Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs and produce more environmentally friendly buildings. LEED Certification features are more aggressive than the Baseline Minimums in that they require documentation, studies, and/or additional funding. Combined with the Baseline Minimums, many of the features in this level will need to be implemented to achieve the goal of LEED certification. LEED Silver certification should be the minimum goal for all new buildings (including office buildings, laboratories, cafeterias, and visitor centers) greater than 25,000 square feet or a total cost of $10 million. Innovative features can also contribute to LEED certification, but are less mainstream than those listed in the previous two levels. These features are identified as areas where INL can demonstrate leadership but they could require significant upfront cost, additional studies, and/or development. Appendix A includes a checklist summary of the INL Green Building Strategy that can be used as a tool during the design process when considering which green building features to include. It provides a quick reference for determining which strategies have lower or no increased capital cost, yield lower O&M costs, increase employee productivity, and contribute to LEED certification.

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Wendell

    for the protection of personnel. #12;RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION DESCRIPTION PAGE` #12;#12;UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL SEPTEMBER, 1996 This information is being provided in accordance with the following State requirements: CALIFORNIA RADIATION

  10. University of California Policy CANRA Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    "), codified at California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, requires that employers of Mandated Reporters (as by University personnel to promptly report the concern to appropriate external and University officials (the "Act" or "CANRA"): California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, as currently in effect or subsequently

  11. Irving Gill and rediscovery of concrete in California the Marie and Chauncey Clark, 1919-22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scensor, Sean

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis focuses on a large residence by architect Irving Gill: the house for Marie and Chauncey Dwight Clarke in Santa Fe Springs, California (1919-22). The Clarke House was only discovered as a Gill building in 1981; ...

  12. Los Angeles County- LEED for County Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2007, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors adopted rules to require that all new county buildings greater than 10,000 square feet be LEED Silver certified. All buildings...

  13. King County- Green Building Initiative (Washington)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The King County Green Building Initiative started in 2001, and was included in the King Code Code with the Green Building and Sustainable Development Ordinance in 2008. The ordinance requires that...

  14. Capitol Area East End, Block 225: California Department of Education Headquarters

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Sacramento, CA The California Department of Education Headquarters, Block 225 was the first of the five buildings to make up the Capitol Area East End Complex. The entire project is being developed by the California Department of General Services Real Estate Division. At 336,000 square feet and six stories high, Block 225 was the most ambitious green-building initiative to have been undertaken by the State at that time and the largest office building project ever undertaken by the State. The project was delivered through a bridged design-build process.

  15. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was no good source of local building stone, rock was usuallyrock-cut shrines and especially tombs, and these are the sources

  16. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CDC 2005). Heavy oil resources require additional energyin California Low-quality oil resources produce fuels withthan high-quality oil resources. The differences between

  17. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CDC 2005). Heavy oil resources require additional energyin California Low-quality oil resources produce fuels withthan high-quality oil resources. The differences between

  18. City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification program, and to strive for higher...

  19. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of aLogging SystemsResidential SavingsOand Major

  20. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of aLogging SystemsResidential SavingsOand

  1. California’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGhee, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quinn, Tony. 2013. The “Top Two” System: Working Like ItAssessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingCalifornia’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda Eric

  2. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  3. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  4. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  5. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; Lai, Judy

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab has been developing the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) for several years. Given load curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (u grid), fuel costs and other economic inputs, and a menu of available technologies, DER-CAM finds the optimum equipment fleet and its optimum operating schedule using a mixed integer linear programming approach. This capability is being applied using a software as a service (SaaS) model. Optimisation problems are set up on a Berkeley Lab server and clients can execute their jobs as needed, typically daily. The evolution of this approach is demonstrated by description of three ongoing projects. The first is a public access web site focused on solar photovoltaic generation and battery viability at large commercial and industrial customer sites. The second is a building CO2 emissions reduction operations problem for a University of California, Davis student dining hall for which potential investments are also considered. And the third, is both a battery selection problem and a rolling operating schedule problem for a large County Jail. Together these examples show that optimization of building u grid design and operation can be effectively achieved using SaaS.

  6. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for many commuters’ electric cars. California requires that,well suited to charging electric cars. If the solar energydrivers who don’t own electric cars can feel green when they

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

  8. Better Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neukomm, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency as top priority energy resource Revolutionary change in market Robust energy efficiency industry Prime the market for new technology Better Buildings Challenge Goals Make commercial & industrial buildings 20% more efficient by 2020... opportunities for energy efficiency 2 Great opportunities in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors 20% + savings is average Other benefits: Jobs, Environment, Competitiveness But persistent barriers exist?? ?Energy efficiency...

  9. Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demand-side management framework from building operationsdemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 2 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:buildings in California. This paper summarizes the integration of DR in demand-side management

  10. Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a building operations perspective, a demand-side managementdemand-side management (DSM) framework presented in Table 2 provides three major areas for changing electric loads in buildings:buildings in California. This report summarizes the integration of DR in demand-side management

  11. Proceedings of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 3, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Proceedings of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 ­ 3, 2003 of the Sixth California Islands Symposium, Ventura, California, December 1 ­ 3, 2003. National Park Service

  12. Office Buildings: Developer's Requirements- Consultant's Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, P.; Arndt, J.

    sound knowledge with technical solution such as geothermal energy systems or developments following comprehensive sustainability criteria from the scheme design through to fit-out. Vivico was also involved in pilot certifications for the German En...

  13. City of San Antonio- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009 San Antonio announced [http://www.sanantonio.gov/oep/SustainabilityPlan.asp Mission Verde], which outlines eleven initiatives for a sustainable economy. As part of this plan, the City...

  14. Building America Retrofit Participation Requirements and Release |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future ofHydronic Heating inOctober 2011 | Department

  15. California Energy Commission

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    California Energy Commission Quadrennial Water Review Comments - June 19, 2014 Water-Energy Nexus Water and energy systems are inextricably linked -- producing energy uses large...

  16. CaliforniaFIRST

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligibility is generally determined by the property records and value, and the property must meet general underwriting criteria established by the California Statewide Communities Development Aut...

  17. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  18. Energy Reduction in California Pipeline Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies that can help California's industrial sectors reduce their energy consumption, their water use. In addition to significant baseline energy consumption, more energy is often required by pipelines Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Industrial/Agriculture/Water EndUse Phone

  19. California Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . While the Energy Commission cannot require independent transmission developers to respond to these dataCalifornia Energy Commission DRAFT STAFF REPORT FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR ELECTRIC TRANSMISSIONRELATED DATA Prepared in Support of the 2011 Integrated Energy Policy Report NOVEMBER 2010 CEC

  20. California Institute of Technology Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    California Institute of Technology Mechanical Engineering PhD Coursework Planning Matrix and Record) Math/Advanced Math Advanced Math (27) Engineering Seminar (3) Research summer summer (54) Total Units course requirements for the Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, provided that the student takes and passes

  1. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings This webinar was presented by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential...

  2. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

  3. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy...

  4. Building Efficiency and Indoor Air Quality - You Can Have Both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettler, G. J.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing ventilation for acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 does not require large increases in utility costs. Building efficiency does not have to be sacrificed for a healthy building. The ASHRAE 62- 1989 requirement...

  5. Hybrid Model for Building Performance Diagnosis and Optimal Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, S.; Xu, X.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern buildings require continuous performance monitoring, automatic diagnostics and optimal supervisory control. For these applications, simplified dynamic building models are needed to predict the cooling and heating requirement viewing...

  6. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    installed at California power plants. Furthermore, recentlyinformation for California’s power plants. Personalinformation for California’s power plants. Personal

  7. ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    in advance if the renovation and demolition project with friable asbestos-containing materials is over 1601 ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego UC San Diego project managers to maintenance, repair, and construction of UC-owned and leased buildings where asbestos-containing materials

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whether you are building a new facility, renovating an existing one, or want to reduce your energy billsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES F O 2004 www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/partnership Call (916) 654-4147 #12;The Energy Partnership Program

  9. Overcoming Barriers to Ground Source Heat Pumps in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by consumers, industry and, government and high first costs. Compared to other states, California also has heat pump's constant lowlevel usage of electricity. · Integrate ground source heat pumps formally. It would increase energy efficiency of buildings, dramatically reduce fossil fuel consumption, reduce

  10. USING ENERGYPLUS FOR CALIFORNIA TITLE-24 COMPLIANCE CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -residential portion of California's Title-24 building energy standard has relied on DOE-2.1E as the reference computer standards, the Commission has been evaluating the possible future replacement of DOE-2.1E by Energy) certification test suite of 150 DOE-2 files to EnergyPlus, and made parallel DOE-2 and EnergyPlus runs

  11. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    into 18 categories: 1. Research: Centers and Academic Programs 2. Green Buildings 3. Renewable Energy 4UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED "I recognize the right #12;July 2011 UC IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED JULY 2011 This outline summarizes UC

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software ? Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants to produce hydrogen and infrastructure to deliver it2009. “Building a hydrogen infrastructure in the US” in TheH 2 pump prices. Hydrogen infrastructure generally falls

  16. Filter Press Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, W. M.

    " exemplifies the ultimate all-electric application. INTRODUCTION The City of Avon Lake launched a program in 1983 to eKpand and modernize its water pollution control facilities. A part of this expansion was construction of a separate building to house a...? was established as a year-round requirement for both management 585 ESL-IE-86-06-94 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 17-19, 1986 ~>-:? ~ Filter Press Building Avon Lake Water Pollution Control...

  17. Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei: Energy3 WindBuildingEnergy

  18. National Green Building Standard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAHB Research Center, Upper Marlboro, Maryland

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

  19. Homelessness in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Homelessness in California · · · John M. Quigley Steven Raphael Eugene Smolensky with Erin Mansur-in-Publication Data Quigley, John M. Homelessness in California / John M. Quigley, Steven Raphael, Eugene Smolensky. p. The authors of the present volume--John Quigley, Stephen Raphael, and Eugene Smolensky, all from the Goldman

  20. Building Science

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question ŤHow do we first do no harm with high-r enclosures??

  1. Building debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

  2. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992 Are the pyramids of Egypt built of poured concreteel-Anba’ut, Red Sea coast, Egypt. Marmora 6, pp. 45 - 56.building stones of ancient Egypt are those relatively soft,

  3. Healthy buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is covered under the following headings: Healthy building strategies/productivity, Energy and design issues, Ventilation, Contaminants, Thermal, airflow, and humidity issues, School-related issues, Sources and sinks, Filtering, Operation and maintenance.

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan Governor Brown's Clean Energy Jobs Plan directed the Energy Commission to prepare a planSTATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: WWN.energy.ca.gov STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES

  5. Healthy buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geshwiler, M.; Montgomery, L.; Moran, M. (eds.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proceedings is of the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Conference held September 4--8, 1991 in Washington, D.C. Entitled the IAQ 91, Healthy Buildings,'' the major topics of discussion included: healthy building strategies/productivity; energy and design issues; ventilation; contaminants; thermal, airflow, and humidity issues; school-related issues; sources and sinks; filtering; and operation and maintenance. For these conference proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for input into the Energy Data Base. (BN)

  6. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  7. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  8. City of San Carlos Building Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Green Building Ordinance: Updated Ordinance Submittal Dear Commissioners, Attached, please find the amended San Carlos Green Building Ordinance recently adopted by City Council. Similar to the prior version of the Ordinance, it is our full intention that the City of San Carlos Green Building Ordinance requires Energy

  9. Buildings | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei: Energy3BuildingOS

  10. Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: EnergyHoloceneHonest Buildings Jump to:

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEETING STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION In the Matter of ) ) California Clean Energy Jobs by the voters in November of last year, and it's known as the clean energy -- or California Clean Energy Jobs in the areas of energy efficiency and clean energy jobs in California. We want to see schools leveraging

  12. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  13. Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1. Building Picture / Satellite Photo Demand ResponseDemand Response Research Center, July 2007 https://escholarship.org/uc/item/19p737k1 The buildingbuilding in Palm Desert, California. The precooling Demand Response

  14. Retrofit California Overview and Final Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choy, Howard; Rosales, Ana

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy efficiency retrofits (also called upgrades) are widely recognized as a critical component to achieving energy savings in the building sector to help lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, however, upgrades have accounted for only a small percentage of aggregate energy savings in building stock, both in California and nationally. Although the measures and technologies to retrofit a building to become energy efficient are readily deployed, establishing this model as a standard practice remains elusive. Retrofit California sought to develop and test new program models to increase participation in the energy upgrade market in California. The Program encompassed 24 pilot projects, conducted between 2010 and mid-2013 and funded through a $30 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The broad scope of the Program can be seen in the involvement of the following regionally based Grant Partners: Los Angeles County (as prime grantee); Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), consisting of: o StopWaste.org for Alameda County o Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA) for Sonoma County o SF Environment for the City and County of San Francisco o City of San Jose; California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) for the San Diego region; Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD). Within these jurisdictions, nine different types of pilots were tested with the common goal of identifying, informing, and educating the people most likely to undertake energy upgrades (both homeowners and contractors), and to provide them with incentives and resources to facilitate the process. Despite its limited duration, Retrofit California undoubtedly succeeded in increasing awareness and education among home and property owners, as well as contractors, realtors, and community leaders. However, program results indicate that a longer timeframe will be needed to transform the market and establish energy retrofits as the new paradigm. Innovations such as Flex Path, which came about because of barriers encountered during the Program, have already shown promise and are enabling increased participation. Together, the pilots represent an unprecedented effort to identify and address market barriers to energy efficiency upgrades and to provide lessons learned to shape future program planning and implementation. The statistics reflects the scope of the marketing and outreach campaigns, which tested a variety of approaches to increase understanding of the benefits of energy upgrades to drive participation in the Program. More traditional methods such as TV and radio advertisements were complimented by innovative community based social marketing campaigns that sought to leverage the trusted status of neighborhood organizations and leaders in order to motivate their constituents to undertake retrofits. The remainder of this report provides an overview of Retrofit California including brief summaries of the pilots’ main components and highlights, followed by the major findings or takeaway lessons from the approaches that were tested. Eleven of the pilots will be continued, with modifications, under the ratepayer-funded Regional Energy Networks. Involvement in the RENS by many of the Retrofit California partners will ensure that early lessons learned are carried forward to guide future programs for energy upgrades in California.

  15. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern California Bight/San Onofre/Power Plant/Southern California Bight/San Onofre Power Plant/Power Plant (DCPP), San Luis Obispo County, California.

  16. CaliforniaFIRST (California) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    program for non-residential properties. PACE programs allow property owners to finance the installation of energy and water improvements on their buildings and to pay the...

  17. Environmental Review and the Design Build Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Environmental Review and the Design Build Process MnDOT Stewardship Conference to have an environmental team as part of the project · Required to develop an environmental management plan and provide training to workers · Required to host open

  18. UCDavis University of California A California Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    % of USA, California new car buyers have a stable parking spot 25 feet from electricity each night 0% 10 Agency, Clean Energy Ministerial Electric Vehicle Initiative,(16 Energy Ministries), Clinton 40, Rocky-in Prius Battery kWh: Charge Time: Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 All Electric Range: Price: 3hrs/110v (15A) 1

  19. Geothermal resources of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezore, S.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal resources may be classified into two types: high temperature, >150 C, suitable for electrical generation and low- to moderate-temperature, 20-150 C, suitable for direct use. To further the development of geothermal resources in California, a concentrated study of low-temperature and moderate-temperature geothermal resources has been conducted by the California Department of Conservation. As part of that study a map containing technical data on the geothermal resources of California is now available to help planners, local governments, etc. develop their local resources.

  20. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  1. Building Interoperability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartment of Energy Building Energy-EfficientBuilding

  2. Building Interoperability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy FutureDepartment of Energy Building Energy-EfficientBuilding

  3. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  4. Goals and Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sustainable procurement requirements Ensure 15% of building stock meet sustainability principles by 2015 Design new facilities to reach net-zero energy use by 2030 Back to Top...

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --THE NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission is charged with certifying eligible renewable energy resources that may be used by retail sellers requirements and process for certifying renewable resources as eligible for California's RPS and describes how to the state's RPS under statute. Many of the RPS-eligible renewable energy resources may qualify for funding

  6. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identity Theft Prevention, Computer Security, Information Assurance, Social Engineering, CyberNAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution COVERED Master's Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Title (Mix case letters) Identity Theft Prevention in Cyber

  7. CALIFORNIA ENERGY FOURTH EDITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    standard, biomass, solar thermal electric, wind, existing renewable #12;Table of Contents I - IntroductionCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION EXISTING RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM FOURTH EDITION GUIDEBOOK MARCH RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE Valerie Hall Deputy Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION #12

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONGUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    renewable energy, production incentives, renewables portfolio standard, biomass, solar thermal electricCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMMISSIONGUIDEBOOK EXISTING RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM FIFTH Office Manager RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE Valerie Hall Deputy Director ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLES

  9. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) .................................................................... 25 Natural Gas TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Presiding Member Karen Douglas Associate Member Primary Author was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Transportation Committee as part of the Alternative

  10. CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal Ongoing atGreenhouse GasesRespond1CALIFORNIA VALLEY

  11. Mechanical properties and fabric of the Punchbowl fault zone, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Frederick Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MECHANICAL PROPERIIES AND FABRIC OF THE PUiVCHBOlv'L FAULT ZONE, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by FREDERICK MICHAEL CHESTER Subm-', tted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND FABRIC OF THE PUNCHBOWL FAULT ZONE, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by FREDERICK MICHAEL CHESTER Approved as to sty1e and content by: on . . an airman o ommittee) Me1vin edman...

  12. Feldspar diagenesis in the Yowlumne sandstone, Kern County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, John David

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FELDSPAR DIAGENESIS IN THE YOWLUMNE SANDSTONE& KERN COUNTY& CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JOHN DAVID PIKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1981 Major Subject: Geology FELDSPAR DIAGENESIS IN THE YOWLUMNE SANDSTONE, KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JOHN DAVID PIKE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ( mber) (Me er) (He'a' of Dep rtment) December...

  13. An Energy and Peak Loads Analysis of the Texas Department of Health Building, Final Report, Prepared for the Energy Efficiency Division, Texas Public Utility Commission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design temperatures, lighting levels, and requires a heat pump for heating, the total energy con- sumption has dropped by 44%. The major reduction in cooling energy use 18 Table 4.5-Comparison of Peak Loads of the Base Case for the Health Building... because of an increase in the design cooling temperature. The reduction of the total heating energy is basically from the use of a heat pump and also due to the decrease in design heating temperature. Although implementing the California standards shows a...

  14. Additions to a Design Tool for Visualizing the Energy Implications of California’s Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milne, Murray; Liggett, Robin rliggett@ucla.edu; Benson, Andrew; Bhattacharya, Yasmin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Labs, Climatic Building Design, Energy Efficient BuildingLabs, Climatic Building Design, Energy Efficient Building

  15. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  16. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from imports. Onshore crude oil production in California isa peak in production within California of both crude oil and

  17. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  18. DRAFT for discussion only --Do not cite EMERGING REQUIREMENTS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of reasons. Firstly, energy conservation and Demand Response programs are requiring thermostats to have more Recent changes in building codes and elsewhere will require thermostats with more capabilities

  19. Home | Better Buildings Workforce

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Connect with Us LinkedIn Twitter Better Buildings...

  20. Handbook of energy use for building construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, R.G.; Stein, C.; Buckley, M.; Green, M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction industry accounts for over 11.14% of the total energy consumed in the US annually. This represents the equivalent energy value of 1 1/4 billion barrels of oil. Within the construction industry, new building construction accounts for 5.19% of national annual energy consumption. The remaining 5.95% is distributed among new nonbuilding construction (highways, ralroads, dams, bridges, etc.), building maintenance construction, and nonbuilding maintenance construction. The handbook focuses on new building construction; however, some information for the other parts of the construction industry is also included. The handbook provides building designers with information to determine the energy required for buildings construction and evaluates the energy required for alternative materials, assemblies, and methods. The handbook is also applicable to large-scale planning and policy determination in that it provides the means to estimate the energy required to carry out major building programs.

  1. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  2. AB 2188: Implementation of the California Solar Rights Act at the Local Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is intended to provide guidance for implementing the Solar Permitting Efficiency Act (AB 2188), which was enacted in California in 2015, in substantial conformance with the California Solar Permitting Guidebook. This document also includes a stand-alone model ordinance that complies with the requirements of the Solar Rights Act, as amended. The sections of this document are organized to first provide the reader with the statutory requirements of AB 2188 and the existing requirements of the Solar Rights Act, followed by the recommendations from the California Solar Permitting Guidebook for substantial conformance with regard to the permitting requirements for local permitting processes.

  3. Energy efficiency in California laboratory-type facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, E.; Bell, G.; Sartor, D. [and others

    1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The central aim of this project is to provide knowledge and tools for increasing the energy efficiency and performance of new and existing laboratory-type facilities in California. We approach the task along three avenues: (1) identification of current energy use and savings potential, (2) development of a {ital Design guide for energy- Efficient Research Laboratories}, and (3) development of a research agenda for focused technology development and improving out understanding of the market. Laboratory-type facilities use a considerable amount of energy resources. They are also important to the local and state economy, and energy costs are a factor in the overall competitiveness of industries utilizing laboratory-type facilities. Although the potential for energy savings is considerable, improving energy efficiency in laboratory-type facilities is no easy task, and there are many formidable barriers to improving energy efficiency in these specialized facilities. Insufficient motivation for individual stake holders to invest in improving energy efficiency using existing technologies as well as conducting related R&D is indicative of the ``public goods`` nature of the opportunity to achieve energy savings in this sector. Due to demanding environmental control requirements and specialized processes, laboratory-type facilities epitomize the important intersection between energy demands in the buildings sector and the industrial sector. Moreover, given the high importance and value of the activities conducted in laboratory-type facilities, they represent one of the most powerful contexts in which energy efficiency improvements stand to yield abundant non-energy benefits if properly applied.

  4. California: California's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of California.

  5. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

  6. Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    about BEopt. See an example of a Building America project that used BEopt. Find more case studies of Building America projects across the country that incorporate BEopt when...

  7. Preliminary evaluation of the performance, water use, and current application trends of evaporative coolers in California climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Hanford, J.W.; Wu, H.F.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing analysis investigating the potential for evaporative cooling as an energy-efficient alternative to standard air-conditioning in California residences. In particular, the study uses detailed numerical models of evaporative coolers linked with the DOE-2 building energy simulation program to study the issues of indoor comfort, energy and peak demand savings with and without supplemental air-conditioning and consumptive water use. In addition, limited surveys are used to assess the current market availability of evaporative cooling in California, typical contractor practices and costs, and general acceptance of the technology among engineers, contractors, and manufacturers. The results show that evaporative coolers can provide significant energy and peak demand savings in California residences, but the impact of the increased indoor humidity on human comfort remains an unanswered question that requires further research and clarification. Evaluated against ASHRAE comfort standards developed primarily for air-conditioning both direct and two-stage evaporative coolers would not maintain comfort at peak cooling conditions due to excessive humidity. However, using bioclimatic charts that place human comfort at the 80% relative humidity line, the study suggests that direct evaporative coolers will work in mild coastal climates, while two-stage models should provide adequate comfort in Title 24 houses throughout California, except in the Imperial Valley. The study also shows that evaporative coolers will increase household water consumption by less than 6% on an annual basis, and as much as 23% during peak cooling months, and that the increases in water cost are minimal compared to the electricity savings. Lastly, a survey of engineers and contractors revealed generally positive experiences with evaporative coolers, with operational cost savings, improved comfort, unproved air quality as the primary benefits in their use.

  8. California Energy Commission PROPOSED REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission PROPOSED REGULATIONS INITIAL STATEMENT OF REASONS FOR ENFORCEMENT CEC3002013004 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor #12;#12;1 INITIAL STATEMENT OF REASONS PROPOSED REGULATIONS ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES FOR THE RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD

  9. The Resources Agency of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission's certified program for siting powerplants. I am happy to inform you that, having reviewed://ceres.ca.gov/cra/ California Coastal Commission · California Tahoe Conservancy · Coachella Valley Mountains Conservancy · San

  10. Community-dependent Positive Interactions in Southern California Coastal Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryson, Sarah

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-Estuarine Wetland At Carpinteria, California - Plant-

  11. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning California's houses can result in better performing systems and houses. In turn, this will result in more efficient use of energy, carbon emission reductions, and improved occupant comfort. In particular, commissioning houses can save a significant amount of HVAC-related energy (15 to 30% in existing houses, 10 to 20% in new conventional houses, and up to 8% in advanced energy efficiency houses). The process that we considered includes corrective measures that could be implemented together during construction or during a single site visit (e.g., air tightening, duct sealing, and refrigerant and air handler airflow corrections in a new or existing house). Taking advantage of additional, more complex opportunities (e.g., installing new windows in an existing house, replacing the heating and air conditioning system in a new or existing house) can result in additional HVAC-related energy savings (60 to 75% in existing houses, and 50 to 60% in new conventional houses). The commissioning-related system and house performance improvements and energy savings translate to additional benefits throughout California and beyond. By applying commissioning principles to their work, the building community (builders and contractors) benefit from reduced callbacks and lower warranty costs. HERS raters and inspectors will have access to an expanded market sector. As the commissioning process rectifies construction defects and code problems, building code officials benefit from better compliance with codes. The utilities benefit from reduced peak demand, which can translate into lower energy acquisition costs. As houses perform closer to expectations, governmental bodies (e.g., the California Energy Commission and the Air Resources Board) benefit from greater assurance that actual energy consumption and carbon emissions are closer to the levels mandated in codes and standards, resulting in better achievement of state energy conservation and environmental goals. California residents' quality of life is improved through better indoor environmental comfort and lower energy bills. Lower energy bills free up money for residents to spend on other needs or goals, such as additional education and health and welfare. With an expansion of existing industries and the development of new commissioning-related industries, related jobs and tax revenues will increase, further increasing the quality of life for California.

  12. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Service (NMFS), and Debbie Marshall, California Sea GrantService (NMFS), and Debbie Marshall, California Sea GrantService (NMFS), and Debbie Marshall, California Sea Grant

  13. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reach Coast of California, Carpinteria to Point Mugu, BeachCell Coast of California, Carpinteria to Point Mugu, Beach1, Coast of California, Carpinteria to Point Mugu, Beach

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA WPRS INSTRUCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA WPRS INSTRUCTIONS ued 12/13) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION(Iss Wind Performance performance information and wind power purchasing information provided to the Energy Commission has been analyses including the commission's biennial Integrated Energy Policy Report. Authority: California Code

  15. NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) Location: San...

  16. Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing...

  17. AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings (AB 549 Report), the Energy Commission made a series in California homes and small commercial buildings (estimated at close to 420,000 units in 2010) is 30 to 50 the resources necessary to enforce health and safety codes and energy efficiency standards because the revenue

  18. Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5932E Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Authors and Technologies Division September 2012 Presented at the 9th International Modelica Conference 2012 #12;DISCLAIMER of California. #12;Validation and Application of the Room Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Thierry

  19. A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6184E A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE DATA of California. #12;A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE DATA Tobias and simulated performance data. In context of this method, we developed a software tool that provides graphing

  20. ThreadedComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ThreadedComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models Edward A. Lee Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at Berkeley Technical Report No. UCBComposite: A Mechanism for Building Concurrent and Parallel Ptolemy II Models Edward A. Lee UC Berkeley eal

  1. Modeling and Optimization of Commercial Buildings and Stationary Fuel Cell Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainscough, C.; McLarty, D.; Sullivan, R.; Brouwer, J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the Distributed Generation Building Energy Assessment Tool (DG-BEAT) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of California Irvine. DG-BEAT is designed to allow stakeholders to assess the economics of installing stationary fuel cell systems in a variety of building types in the United States.

  2. Industrial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0 0.0Decade4Year114,937

  3. High Performance Building Standards in New State Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2008, New Jersey enacted legislation mandating the use of high performance green building standards in new state construction. The standard requires that new buildings larger than 15...

  4. Improved Building Energy Consumption with the Help of Modern ICT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietilainen, J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kyoto process and the global combat against climate change will require more intensive energy saving efforts especially in all developed countries. Key for the success in building sector is the energy efficiency of the existing building stock...

  5. 3Building a Business Building a Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    15 3Building a Business Building a Business This section provides direction on the kinds. If you contemplate building a "garage- based" company to sell a product into a niche market, you should-ups conjure up images of future wealth, of building the next Amgen or Microsoft, of launching what will become

  6. California Lithium Battery, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California Lithium Battery (CaLBattery), based in Los Angeles, California, is developing a low-cost, advanced lithium-ion battery that employs a novel silicon graphene composite material that will substantially improve battery cycle life. When combined with other advanced battery materials, it could effectively lower battery life cycle cost by up to 70 percent. Over the next year, CALBattery will be working with Argonne National Laboratory to combine their patented silicon-graphene anode material process together with other advanced ANL cathode and electrolyte battery materials.

  7. Southern California Smart Grid Symposium California Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California Smart Grid Symposium California Institute of TechnologyCalifornia Institute Service in a Smart Grid World Hung po ChaoHung-po Chao Director, Market Strategy and Analysis October 13 of Technology Competitive Electricity Markets with Consumer Subscription Service in a SmartConsumer Subscription

  8. Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Sacramento, CA 95814 Subject: Filing of Notice of Decision in compliance with Public Resources Code Section

  9. NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street, MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Sacramento, CA 95814 Subject: Filing of Notice of Decision in compliance with Public Resources Code Section

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software-EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated January 31, 2007, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. Residential building energy analysis : development and uncertainty assessment of a simplified model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective design of energy-efficient buildings requires attention to energy issues during the preliminary stages of design. To aid in the early consideration of a building's future energy usage, a simplified building energy ...

  12. Comfort standards and variation in exceedance for mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of designing low-energy buildings. In spite of traditionalis sized in a low-energy building. Thus, the geometry,operation of every low-energy building requires striking a

  13. educating, engaging and empowering californians to improve our state's future California Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    and Resources (BeaR) model, we find that if California improves energy efficiency by just 1 percent per year order #s­3­05 (schwarzenegger 2005) which calls for a 30 percent reduction below business- as on emissions that cause global warming, requires that the California air Resources Board (CaRB) put

  14. Building technolgies program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. We have focused our past efforts on two major building systems, windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed by researchers and designers to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. In addition, we are now taking more of an integrated systems and life cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity-factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout every space in a building, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Window and lighting systems are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program.

  15. Requirement Enforcement by Transformation Automata Douglas R. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavens, Gary T.

    Requirement Enforcement by Transformation Automata Douglas R. Smith Kestrel Institute 3260 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, California 94304 USA smith@kestrel.edu ABSTRACT The goal of this work is to treat

  16. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Laboratory 1303 Engineering Research Building UniversitySolar Energy Laboratory 1303 Engineering Research laboratory UniversitySolar Energy Group, Energy and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University

  17. Googling the Top Two: Information Search in California’s Top Two Primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Betsy; Wray, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more as a consequence of the top two primary. ReferencesAssessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingGoogling the Top Two: Information Search in California’s Top

  18. Estimated impacts of climate warming on California’s high-elevation hydropower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madani, Kaveh; Lund, Jay R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on high elevation hydropower generation in California’sCalifornia’s high-elevation hydropower Kaveh Madani · Jay R.Abstract California’s hydropower system is composed of high

  19. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on cyber-attackers to design fake honeypot, we exposed a tightly secured, self-contained virtual honeypotNAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited ASSESSING THE EFFECT OF HONEYPOTS ON CYBER-ATTACKERS by Sze Li Harry Lim December 2006 Thesis

  20. POSTGRADUATE MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of locating kelp in the California coastal waters. The task is currently done using multi-spectral imagery to eliminate all of it in the classification of kelp. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves proved they are a very good detector and discriminator of kelp and water. Using panchromatic and variance

  1. Albany, California Mailing address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    to management. Guidelines are given to managers for sustaining soil health and productive forests. Retrieval. Proceedings of the California Forest Soils Council conference on forest soils biology and forest management Terms: soil biota, mycorrhizae, nitrogen fixation, soil fauna, truffles, forest management Technical

  2. of California, General Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064-1077, (831) 459-4544. Web site: slugstore of Classes, which is on the World Wide Web at reg.ucsc.edu/soc/. (Additional web sites are referenced through

  3. High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and the US.A collaborative test, monitoring, and reporting protocol was also formulated via the Windows Testbed Facility in collaboration with industry partners, transitioning industry to focus on the importance of expecting measured performance to consistently achieve design performance expectations. The facility enables accurate quantification of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts of synergistic facade-lighting-HVAC systems on an apples-to-apples comparative basis and its data can be used to verify results from simulations. Emerging interior and exterior shading technologies were investigated as potential near-term, low-cost solutions with potential broad applicability in both new and retrofit construction. Commercially-available and prototype technologies were developed, tested, and evaluated. Full-scale, monitored field tests were conducted over solstice-to-solstice periods to thoroughly evaluate the technologies, uncover potential risks associated with an unknown, and quantify performance benefits. Exterior shading systems were found to yield net zero energy levels of performance in a sunny climate and significant reductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shading systems were found to yield significant daylighting and comfort-related benefits.In support of an integrated design process, a PC-based commercial fenestration (COMFEN) software package, based on EnergyPlus, was developed that enables architects and engineers to quickly assess and compare the performance of innovative facade technologies in the early sketch or schematic design phase. This tool is publicly available for free and will continue to improve in terms of features and accuracy. Other work was conducted to develop simulation tools to model the performance of any arbitrary complex fenestration system such as common Venetian blinds, fabric roller shades as well as more exotic innovative facade systems such as optical louver systems.

  4. High-performance commercial building facades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen; Bazjanac, Vladimir; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Kohler, Christian

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on advanced building facades that use daylighting, sun control, ventilation systems, and dynamic systems. A quick perusal of the leading architectural magazines, or a discussion in most architectural firms today will eventually lead to mention of some of the innovative new buildings that are being constructed with all-glass facades. Most of these buildings are appearing in Europe, although interestingly U.S. A/E firms often have a leading role in their design. This ''emerging technology'' of heavily glazed fagades is often associated with buildings whose design goals include energy efficiency, sustainability, and a ''green'' image. While there are a number of new books on the subject with impressive photos and drawings, there is little critical examination of the actual performance of such buildings, and a generally poor understanding as to whether they achieve their performance goals, or even what those goals might be. Even if the building ''works'' it is often dangerous to take a design solution from one climate and location and transport it to a new one without a good causal understanding of how the systems work. In addition, there is a wide range of existing and emerging glazing and fenestration technologies in use in these buildings, many of which break new ground with respect to innovative structural use of glass. It is unclear as to how well many of these designs would work as currently formulated in California locations dominated by intense sunlight and seismic events. Finally, the costs of these systems are higher than normal facades, but claims of energy and productivity savings are used to justify some of them. Once again these claims, while plausible, are largely unsupported. There have been major advances in glazing and facade technology over the past 30 years and we expect to see continued innovation and product development. It is critical in this process to be able to understand which performance goals are being met by current technology and design solutions, and which ones need further development and refinement. The primary goal of this study is to clarify the state-of-the-art of the performance of advanced building facades so that California building owners and designers can make informed decisions as to the value of these building concepts in meeting design goals for energy efficiency, ventilation, productivity and sustainability.

  5. Building America Webinar: Saving Energy in Multifamily Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar Energy Saver Guide Building America...

  6. and Pollutant Safeguarding Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commercial buildings, these flows are driven primarily by the building's ventilation system, but natural2004 Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group Safeguarding Buildings Against Chemical and Biological research since 1998 to protect buildings and building occupants from threats posed by airborne chemical

  7. The Building Design Advisor K. Papamichael, J. LaPorta, H. Chauvet, D. Collins, T. Trzcinski, J. Thorpe, and S. Selkowitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - The Building Design Advisor K. Papamichael, J. LaPorta, H. Chauvet, D. Collins, T. Trzcinski, J. Thorpe, and S. Selkowitz Building Technologies Program Energy and Environment Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 Abstract The Building Design

  8. Building Envelope Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Envelope ­ Overview Page 3-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009 3 Building Envelope This chapter describes the requirements for the design of the building envelope for nonresidential buildings. Loads from the building envelope, especially windows, skylights, and roofs are among the most

  9. SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Green Building Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION ­ NOT CURRENTLY OPEN ­ FOR INFORMATION ONLY Green Building Internship City of Portland Background: The City of Portland's green building policy requires all existing buildings to pursue silver certification under the US Green Building Council's LEED for Existing Buildings

  10. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs currently sponsored by the utilities. The issues were not resolved at year-end, but the state`s public utilities began to take steps to improve their positions in a future competitive market by cutting costs, improving efficiencies operating plants, and enlarging their nonutility interests.

  11. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototypical office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) was used in EnergyPlus simulations to calculate the energy savings potential of demand controlled ventilation (DCV) in five typical California climates per three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates. The assumed minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods employed in a large survey, were 38 and 13 L/s per occupant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 38 L/s per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10.8 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 3 (north coast) and 6 (south Coast). DCV was not found to be cost effective if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 13 L/s per occupant, except at high design occupancy of 21.5 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 14 (desert) and 16 (mountains). Until the large uncertainties about the base case ventilation rates in offices without DCV are reduced, the case for requiring DCV in general office spaces will be a weak case. Under the Title 24 Standards office occupant density of 10.8 people per 100 m2, DCV becomes cost effective when the base case minimum ventilation rate is greater than 42.5, 43.0, 24.0, 19.0, and 18.0 L/s per person for climate zone 3, 6, 12, 14, and 16 respectively.

  12. Building America Webinar: Building America Research Tools | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Research Tools Building America Webinar: Building America Research Tools This webinar was held on March 18, 2015, and reviewed Building America research tools,...

  13. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy...

  14. Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building permits are required for new construction and development in the Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). All development projects in SFHA must comply with Title 12 DCMR and Title 20 DCMR...

  15. Microsoft Word - Green Building Certification EA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As required by Section 436(h) of EISA 2007, in 2008 GSA identified the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) 5 Silver as...

  16. Automatic CX Tool for Electrical Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couillaud, N.; Jandon, M.; Viaud, B.; Clemoncon, B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning (Cx) consists in specifying building system performance requirements set by the owner, auditing different judgments and actions performed by the Cx related parties in order to achieve the performance, writing necessary and sufficient...

  17. Priority Permit Processing for Green Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hawaii Revised Statutes (HRS) §46-19.6 requires each county agency that issues building, construction, or development-related permits to establish a procedure for priority processing of permit...

  18. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and may also be charged by CHP systems during off-peak andDarrow, K et al. (2009), “CHP Market Assessment”, Integratedwith combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within

  19. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2020 S00 S/t of carbon mpared to CHP, PV a n d solar t h e rm a l as options in DE R-CAM only CHP as optioninDER-CAM CHP Capacity: 2.25 GW CHP Electricity: 10.05 TWh

  20. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizations,” National Renewable Energy ResourceCharacterizations,” National Renewable Energy ResourceCharacterizations,” National Renewable Energy Resource

  1. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold Air Distribution Systems. EPRI Report EM-5447, ElectricAir Distribution Design Guide. EPRI Report EM-5730, ElectricAir Distribution System. EPRI Report CU-6690, Vol. 1 and 2,

  2. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate zones, the representative city’s mean daytimelives in/near the representative city. Similarly, non-and asthma) for each representative city. The scope of this

  3. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009. Report #:DOE/Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010. Report #:DOE/2011, Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. U.S.

  4. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application of thermal energy storage for off-peak coolingair distribution without thermal energy storage; and (3) TESsystem, however, thermal energy storage was not utilized.

  5. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and not only by PV / solar thermal systems. To satisfy theheat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptionphotovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electrical

  6. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating, ventilating and air conditioning survey of small2004) Workplace air-conditioning and health servicesventilating, and air-conditioning applications. Bauman, F. ,

  7. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

  8. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    holidays ICE: Internal combustion engine, GT: Gas turbine,indicate that internal combustion engines (ICE) with heatdominance of internal combustion engines with heat exchanger

  9. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's research priorities include an additional 6.5 GW of combined heat and power (CHP) by 2030. As of 2009, roughly 0.25 GW of small natural gas and biogas fired CHP is documented by the Self-Generation Incentive on the development of 20 GW of renewable energy will influence the CHP adoption. Thus, an integrated optimization

  10. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    subsidy 14 for lead acid batteries is given and this bringsMWh) adopoted lead acid batteries (MWh) adopted PV (MW)thermal lead acid absorption solar photo- storage batteries

  11. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Evaluation of Cold Air Distribution Systems. EPRIand J.S. Elleson. 1988. Cold Air Distribution Design Guide.Field Evaluation of a Cold Air Distribution System. EPRI

  12. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electricalexchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers,

  13. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    warmer room air with the cold supply air whenever the supplyroom air diffusion with cold supply air temperatures under

  14. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHP enabled fuel cell adoption, demonstrating how sensitive the results are to investment costs,costs, and payback periods for investments have been performed. The most optimistic CHP

  15. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that represented an energy-efficient design in the currentnew products and energy-efficient designs for systems usingenergy use. However, with the fairly efficient cold air system designs

  16. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fired natural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; • hot-with HX can utilize waste heat for heating or coolingto utilize all the waste heat just reduces overall energy

  17. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity supply and heat supply for a January and Julyelectricity supply and heat supply for a January and July

  18. University of California, Berkeley Hearst Memorial Mining Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    . Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure 15 12. Natural Gas Release or Leak 15 13. Ventilation Problem 15

  19. University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 1. Evacuation 2. Supplies 3. Training and Documentation 4

  20. 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the product in Btu/h. If the unit's capacity is less than 7000 Btu/h, use 7000 Btu/h in the calculation. If the unit's capacity is greater than 15,000 Btu/h, use 15,000 Btu/h in the calculation. b Replacement units and with mechanical cooling capacity at AHRI conditions of greater than or equal to 54,000 Btu/hr, shall include