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Sample records for building requirement california

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  2. California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy" Collectively, energy use, as well as the sustainable operation, retrofitting and renovation of existing buildings. Since 1978, when building energy efficiency standards (Title 24, Part 6) were adopted, Californian's have saved more than

  3. 33-EDUCATION BUILDING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    33-EDUCATION BUILDING FIRE AND EVACUATION PLAN UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DAVIS EDUCATION BUILDING 4610 X STREET #12;BUILDING NAME: 33-EDUCATION BUILDING Page 2 of 11 This Fire Plan is to be used the building. In conjunction with the fire evacuation signs posted throughout the building, this plan satisfies

  4. Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Part 11 of the California Building Code (also known as CalGreen) Patrick Saxton, P.E. patrick.saxton@energy.ca.gov 916-651-0489 High Performance Buildings and Standards Development Office California Energy Commission September 20

  5. University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building (VLSB) Building Emergency Plan Date Revised: January 2014 Prepared By: Derek Apodaca #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS I. BUILDING INFORMATION 1. Building Name 2. Building Coordinator Name 3. Alternate BC Name 4. Emergency Assembly Area Location 5

  6. University of California, Santa Barbara University of California Insurance Requirements Ground Transportation Charter Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of California, Santa Barbara University of California Insurance Requirements Ground Transportation Charter Services Prior to working with the University, vendors providing Ground Transportation. Workers' Compensation: as required under California State Law. D. Additional Insured Endorsement

  7. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    of fresh in California for power could plant require coolingCapacity in California for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricityfor the mix of power plants the California pro;ected by the

  8. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing:...

  9. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Ritschard, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    NEVADA: REQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'SWATERREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTIONIN ENERGYREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  10. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    NEVADA: REQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION STATE'SWATERREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTIONIN ENERGYREQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE ENERGY PRODUCTION IN CALIFORNIA

  11. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    2010, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings,” IEEEIravani, and C. Marnay, “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoing

  12. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    CALIFORNIA WATER RESOURCES. Water Demand Energy Suppon future forecasts of of Water energy predicted energy aunder these PHASE II: WATER ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR FUTURE

  13. San Bernardino County- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was...

  14. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    OIRA Comparison Document Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Document...

  15. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-05-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new load-shedding programs have been implemented or are under consideration. Historically, the target customers have been large industrial users who can reduce the equivalent load of several large office buildings. While the individual load reduction from an individual office building may be less significant, there is ample opportunity for load reduction in this area. The load reduction programs and incentives for industrial customers may not be suitable for commercial building owners. In particular, industrial customers are likely to have little variation in load from day to day. Thus a robust baseline accounting for weather variability is required to provide building owners with realistic targets that will encourage them to participate in load shedding programs.

  16. LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings Wm National Laboratory Berkeley, California Synopsis This paper discusses field measurements of duct system

  17. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

  18. Impacts of lateral code changes associated with the 2006 International Building Code and the 2008 California Building Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratley, Desirée Page

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 California Building Code (CBC) will adopt the structural section of the 2006 International Building Code (IBC), which includes alterations to the procedure to determine earthquake design loading, and a drastic ...

  19. California Energy Commission CONSULTANT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roofs and the energy requirement for renovated lighting systems to meet the new 2013 energyCalifornia Energy Commission CONSULTANT REPORT IMPACT ANALYSIS California's 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards JULY 2013 CEC4002013008 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr

  20. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  1. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    greenblgcert.docx More Documents & Publications EA-1991: Final Environmental Assessment Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major...

  2. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    to southern to transport California from the Sacramento-Sansouthern to transport from northern California California.California, include federally-owned to south. transport from

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Zero Net-Energy Homes Production Builder Business Case: California/Florida Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Grupe Homes of Sacramento’s work with Building America to design California’s first production-scale community of solar homes. The homes outsold neighboring developments two to one.

  4. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  5. Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL Building (Energy Budget) and the annual TDV energy consumption for lighting and components not regulated for energy use components included in the performance compliance approach for the Standard Design Building

  6. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, S.; Piette, M. A.; Gu, L.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new loadshedding programs have been...

  7. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2010-04-08

    In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested changes in specifications were developed in consultation with staff from the Iowa Energy Center who evaluated the accuracy of new CO{sub 2} sensors in laboratory-based research. In addition, staff of the California Energy Commission, and their consultants in the area of DCV, provided input for the suggested changes in specifications.

  8. Office Buildings: Developer's Requirements- Consultant's Solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, P.; Arndt, J.

    2008-01-01

    between active and passive means; for example the reduction of energy usage by using good building design concepts, or using natural resources and highly efficient building technologies to save fossil fuels. New technologies will also be highlighted... Conference for Enhanced Building Operations - ICEBO?08 Conference Center of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology Berlin, October 20 - 22, 2008 Dipl.-Ing. (TU) Peter Forster Dipl.-Ing (TU)Jens Arndt Ringstrasse 44 Hedderichstr. 55...

  9. Benefits of Radial Build Minimization and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    build means smaller R and lower Bmax fi smaller machine and lower cost. · All components provide concepts. · Propose innovative shielding approach that minimizes radial standoff. · Assess implications

  10. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California2012 ICF, 2012, “Combined Heat and Power: Policy AnalysisA New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning

  11. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

  12. A New Campus Building on Efficiency: University of California (UC) Merced Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  13. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings (3): 305-316.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, (4): 205-210.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, (4): 177-185.

  14. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and does consider CHP in commercial buildings as an option.for CHP installations are office buildings, hospitals,building sector can install 1.4 GW of economic CHP capacity

  15. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    PHASE I: SURVEY OF WATER IN CALIFORNIA AND NEVADA:PRODUCTION STATE'S PERSPECTIVE. CALIFORNIA WATER RESOURCES.Water Demand Energy Supp

  16. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    include: EnergyPlus, Modelica, Building Controls Virtualfaçade constructions. Modelica is a, “ non-proprietary,and control systems”. The Modelica Buildings Library, is

  17. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

  18. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  19. New York City- Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Council Bill No. 564-A (Local Law 85 of 2009): Requires that renovations of existing buildings meet minimum energy conservation standards. The result of this law is essentially a city energy code ...

  20. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingof Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

  1. 222 Mesa Arts Building Irvine, California 92697-2775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Influence William Chapman Nyaho, with Louise Toppin in concert Friday, February 10 Flowers 9:00 AM Welcome:30 AM "The African American Concert Singer: San Francisco 1925-65, In Paradisium" Lecture Bill Doggett 10:00 AM The Black Composer in Opera Lecture Anthony Davis, University of California, San Diego 11

  2. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  3. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lai (2009b), “Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal2008), “Developing a Greenhouse Gas Tool for Buildings inERKELEY N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Greenhouse Gas Abatement with

  4. 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 1722, 2008 Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 17­22, 2008 · Asilomar Conference Center · Pacific Grove, California 1 Targeting Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings Using Advanced energy use, prioritizes buildings for specific energy-efficiency retrofits, and tracks weather

  5. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-02-01

    Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each specific outcome threshold are estimated; and the highest of these MVRs, which would then meet all outcome thresholds, is selected as the target MVR. In a second step, implemented only if the target MVR from step 1 is judged impractically high, costs and benefits are estimated and this information is used in a risk management process. Four human outcomes with substantial quantitative evidence of relationships to VRs are identified for initial consideration in setting MVR standards. These are: building-related symptoms (sometimes called sick building syndrome symptoms), poor perceived indoor air quality, and diminished work performance, all with data relating them directly to VRs; and cancer and non-cancer chronic outcomes, related indirectly to VRs through specific VR-influenced indoor contaminants. In an application of step 1 for offices using a set of example outcome thresholds, a target MVR of 9 L/s (19 cfm) per person was needed. Because this target MVR was close to MVRs in current standards, use of a cost/benefit process seemed unnecessary. Selection of more stringent thresholds for one or more human outcomes, however, could raise the target MVR to 14 L/s (30 cfm) per person or higher, triggering the step 2 risk management process. Consideration of outdoor air pollutant effects would add further complexity to the framework. For balancing the objective and subjective factors involved in setting MVRs in a cost-benefit process, it is suggested that a diverse group of stakeholders make the determination after assembling as much quantitative data as possible.

  6. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

  7. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transcript of Building America webinar, "Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements," held on Sept. 24, 2014.

  8. Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where we’re going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

  9. Building HVAC Requirements Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heating, radiant floor systems, evaporative cooling, gas cooling, ground-source heat pumps, and wood space.1.1 Introduction and Organization This chapter addresses the requirements for heating, ventilating, and air the following topics: 1. Heating Equipment. The first section addresses the requirements for heating equipment

  10. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-06-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial-sector distributed energy resources (DER) with combined heat and power (CHP) in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. Historically, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. In our research, we examine how these medium-sized commercial buildings might implement DER and CHP. The buildings are able to adopt and operate various technologies, e.g., photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, batteries and thermal storage systems. We apply the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs and/or CO2 emissions. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California, existing tariffs of major utilities, and expected performance data of available technologies in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for these buildings. We compare different policy instruments, e.g., a CO2 pricing scheme or a feed-in tariff (FiT), and show their contributions to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goals of additional 4 GW CHP capacities and 6.7 Mt/a GHG reduction in California by 2020. By applying different price levels for CO2, we find that there is competition between fuel cells and PV/solar thermal. It is found that the PV/solar thermal adoption increases rapidly, but shows a saturation at high CO2 prices, partly due to limited space for PV and solar thermal. Additionally, we find that large office buildings are good hosts for CHP in general. However, most interesting is the fact that fossil-based CHP adoption also increases with increasing CO2 prices. We will show service territory specific results since the attractiveness of DER varies widely by climate zone and service territory.

  11. Better Building Alliance, Plug and Process Loads in Commercial Buildings: Capacity and Power Requirement Analysis (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This brochure addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that can help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. This brochure should be used to make these decisions so systems can operate more energy efficiently; upfront capital costs will also decrease. This information can also be used to drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands. It should enable brokers and tenants to agree about lower PPL capacities. Owner-occupied buildings will also benefit. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems.

  12. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Using the CEUS Database to Benchmark Commercial Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-01

    The 2006 Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS) database developed by the California Energy Commission is a far richer source of energy end-use data for non-residential buildings than has previously been available and opens the possibility of creating new and more powerful energy benchmarking processes and tools. In this article--Part 2 of a two-part series--we describe the methodology and selected results from an action-oriented benchmarking approach using the new CEUS database. This approach goes beyond whole-building energy benchmarking to more advanced end-use and component-level benchmarking that enables users to identify and prioritize specific energy efficiency opportunities - an improvement on benchmarking tools typically in use today.

  13. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-12-31

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  14. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-11-16

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  15. CALIFORNIA LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS CLTC.UCDAVIS.EDU New requirements for lighting controls constitute one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -construction standards for both lighting power density (LPD) and controls. The only exceptions are buildings with fewer% of full-rated power. WHAT'S NEW IN THE 2013 CODE?Changes to mandatory Title 24 lighting requirements automatically reduce lighting power by 50% in these areas when they are unoccupied: · Corridors and stairwells

  16. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    obtained from the New and Alamo waste water. minimal rivers,400,000 acre-ft/yr The New and Alamo rivers Sea. These carrythe requirements. the New and Alamo, the "Mono Lake area

  17. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

  18. Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California-Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California quality. We have made progress towards achieving deep demand response of 30% reduction of peak loads modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless

  19. Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    to compare a given building’s energy performance to that ofof a given building’s energy performance based on thetheir building’s energy use intensities and performance to

  20. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-01-01

    the energy cost and value of California’s electricity in twocosts using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California:California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in HVAC system annual operating cost

  1. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements- Joe Lstiburek

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation will be delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar, Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements, on September 24, 2014. Joe...

  2. Building America Webinar: Multifamily Ventilation Strategies and Compartmentalization Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America webinar, held on Sept. 24, 2014, focused on key challenges in multifamily ventilation and strategies to address these challenges.

  3. Demo Abstract: A Cooja-based Tool for Maintaining Sensor Network Coverage Requirements in a Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) simulator, but it lacks support for modelling sens- ing coverage. We introduce WSN-Maintain, a Cooja-based tool for maintaining coverage requirements in an in-building WSN. To analyse the coverage of a building, WSN-Maintain takes as input the floorplan of the building

  4. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2009. U. S. Buildings Energy Data Book. prepared by D&R2010d. 2008 State Energy Data System. Washington, DC: EIA. ,several sources of energy data and developed the California

  5. Occupant comfort, control, and satisfaction in three California mixed-mode office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ring, Erik W; Brager, Gail S

    2000-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Consumer BehaviorSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

  6. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Referenceimpact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Reference

  7. Building geothermal research and development partnerships: The California Energy Commission`s geothermal program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hare, R.; Tiangco, V.; Birkinshaw, K.; Johannis, M.

    1995-12-31

    The California Energy Commission`s Geothermal Program (Assembly Bill 1905, Bosco) has built cost-shared Research, Development and Demonstration (RD&D) partnerships with over 150 public and private entities. The Geothermal Program promotes the development of new geothermal resources and technologies for both direct-use and electricity generation while protecting the environment and promoting energy independence. This is accomplished by providing financial and technical assistance in the form of contingent awards which, depending on project success, can become either a loan or a grant. Some of the cost-shared RD&D accomplishments are presented. The process and requirements to obtain financial assistance through the Geothermal Program are summarized.

  8. City of Houston- Residential and Commercial Green Building Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, the City Council of Houston passed Ordinance No. 2014-5, requiring new residential construction to exceed the energy efficiency requirements under the 2009 International Energy Conservat...

  9. Lighting/HVAC interactions and their effects on annual and peak HVAC requirements in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, A.O.; Huang, Y.J.

    1994-08-01

    Lighting measures is one effective strategy for reducing energy use in commercial buildings. Reductions in lighting energy have secondary effects on cooling/heating energy consumption and peak HVAC requirements; in general, they increase the heating and decrease cooling requirements of a building. Net change in a building`s annual and peak energy requirements, however, is difficult to quantify and depends on building characteristics, operating conditions, climate. This paper characterizes impacts of lighting/HVAC interactions on annual and peak heating/cooling requirements of prototypical US commercial buildings through computer simulations using DOE-2.1E building energy analysis program. Ten building types of two vintages and nine climates are chosen to represent the US commercial building stock. For each combination, a prototypical building is simulated with two lighting power densities, and resultant changes in heating and cooling loads are recorded. Simple concepts of Lighting Coincidence Factors are used to describe the observed interactions between lighting and HVAC requirements. (Coincidence Factor (CF) is ratio of changes in HVAC loads to those in lighting loads, where load is either annual or peak load). The paper presents tables of lighting CF for major building types and climates. These parameters can be used for regional or national cost/benefit analyses of lighting- related policies and utility DSM programs. Using Annual CFs and typical efficiencies for heating and cooling systems, net changes in space conditioning energy use from a lighting measure can be calculated. Similarly, Demand CFs can be used to estimate the changes in HVAC sizing, which can then be converted to changes in capital outlay using standard-design curves; or they can be used to estimate coincident peak reductions for the analysis of the utility`s avoided costs. Results from use of these tables are meaningful only when they involve a significantly large number of buildings.

  10. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaCommission, July 23, Combined Heat and Power Installation

  11. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaAnalysis Inc. (2009), “Combined Heat and Power Installation

  12. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

  13. How to Build a Small Wind Energy Business: Lessons from California; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2007-07-01

    This paper highlights the experience of one small wind turbine installer in California that installed more than 1 MW of small wind capacity in 6 years.

  14. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-01-01

    TX Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California76SF00098. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Largeof research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy

  15. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in reducingFigure 13. Adopted CHP Capacities by Building Types for the

  16. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.of medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in GHGbased CHP systems is wrong and large office buildings,

  17. Identification of Market Requirements of Smart Buildings Technologies for High Rise Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reffat, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    , office automation and energy efficiency. In essence, the components of a smart building must include building management system for real time control, utility functions, energy efficiency/energy management, security and life safety systems... in respective order as shown in Figure 8. Other additional features involve interoperable systems that can help in easily integrating current smart technology without substantial modification. ESL-IC-10-10-23 Proceedings of the Tenth...

  18. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Control of Building Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE TransactionsControl of Building Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE Transactionsshifting technology. Thermal storage can be achieved with

  19. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    for Energy-Efficiency in Building (BuildSys 2010). Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all

  20. Analysis of Plug Load Capacities and Power Requirements in Commercial Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-08-01

    Plug and process load power requirements are frequently overestimated because designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' data, or design assumptions are high because information is not available. This generally results in oversized heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; increased initial construction costs; and increased energy use caused by inefficiencies at low, part-load operation. Rightsizing of chillers in two buildings reduced whole-building energy use by 3%-4%. If an integrated design approach could enable 3% whole-building energy savings in all U.S. office buildings stock, it could save 34 TBtu of site energy per year.

  1. Installation Practices of California HVAC Contractors: Implications for Residential Building Codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, S. S.; Koved, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    This report documents a study that was conducted by XENERGY. Inc. for the CEC and a consortium of California utilities. The utilities primarily involved in the study were Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E), Sacramento Municipal Utility...

  2. Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    EUIs (less energy consumption per square foot per year),Building energy usage is normalized per square foot perBuilding energy usage is normalized per square foot per

  3. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management VARICK L. ERICKSON, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    control strategy," in Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing Systems for Energy-Efficiency in Building (BuildSys 2010). This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science

  4. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01

    In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

  5. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    PV and solar thermal in commercial buildings 14 . However, most interesting is the fact that CHP adoption

  6. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  7. UC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    efficiency of residential buildings by 25 percent and boosting energy savings in non-residential buildingsUC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes July 5, 2012 The California Energy Commission recently adopted more stringent energy efficiency requirements

  8. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Xu, Peng; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-09

    This paper discusses how to optimize pre-cooling strategies for buildings in a hot California climate zone with the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), a building energy simulation tool. This paper outlines the procedure used to develop and calibrate DRQAT simulation models, and applies this procedure to eleven field test buildings. The results of a comparison between the measured demand savings during the peak period and the savings predicted by the simulation model indicate that the predicted demand shed match well with measured data for the corresponding auto-demand response (Auto-DR) days. The study shows that the accuracy of the simulation models is greatly improved after calibrating the initial models with measured data. These improved models can be used to predict load reductions for automated demand response events. The simulation results were compared with field test data to confirm the actual effect of demand response strategies. Results indicate that the optimal demand response strategies worked well for most of the buildings tested in this hot climate zone.

  9. Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of supply and demand alternatives is conducted to assess requirements for future California energy systems demand from transportation and heating, but the optimal levels of wind and solar deployment dependDeep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic

  10. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

  11. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingof Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onenergy resources, GHG control, microgrids, policies The work

  12. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    and Passive Building Thermal Storage Utilization. ” JournalControl of Passive Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE Transactions,due to the high thermal storage during the pre-cooling

  13. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-10-01

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

  14. Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Facilities

    2013-11-12

    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES BUILDING. BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN. Date Adopted: Sept 20, 2013. Date Revised: Sep 20. 2013. Prepared By: Kelly ...

  15. EA-1991: 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435: Green Building Certification Program Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA originally addressed the sustainable design requirements contained in the Federal building rule. Since the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR), however, the DOE has modified and downscaled this rule to a procedural rule that only addresses only the green building certification requirements. While the final rule is significantly downscaled from the proposed rule, due to the fact that the previous EA was put out for public review, is tied to this rulemaking, and in order to maintain the integrity of the NEPA process, we continue to use the EA process for this rulemaking.

  16. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    of HVAC Simulations Between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for DataTool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypesprototypical building using an EnergyPlus simulation model (

  17. Pore pressure within formations determines the mud weight required to build a balancing fluid pressure down-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pore pressure within formations determines the mud weight required to build a balancing fluid, then formation fluids can flow into the well, potentially leading to well blowouts if not con- trolled. Complex but not for shale. Overpressure is one of the primary concernsofexplorationists,and drilling through overpressured

  18. Economic Analysis and Optimization of Exterior Insulation Requirements for Ventilated Buildings at Power Generation Facilities with High Internal Heat Gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Douglas E.

    2010-12-17

    Industrial buildings require a large amount of heating and ventilation equipment to maintain the indoor environment within acceptable levels for personnel protection and equipment protection. The required heating and ventilation equipment...

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  1. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat: Airtightness3. EffectiveBUILDING AMERICA

  2. Added Value of Reliability to a Microgrid: Simulations of Three California Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-05-07

    The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model is used to estimate the value an Oakland nursing home, a Riverside high school, and a Sunnyvale data center would need to put on higher electricity service reliability for them to adopt a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Microgrid (CM) based on economics alone. A fraction of each building's load is deemed critical based on its mission, and the added cost of CM capability to meet it added to on-site generation options. The three sites are analyzed with various resources available as microgrid components. Results show that the value placed on higher reliability often does not have to be significant for CM to appear attractive, about 25 $/kWcdota and up, but the carbon footprint consequences are mixed because storage is often used to shift cheaper off-peak electricity to use during afternoon hours in competition with the solar sources.

  3. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code is Part 11 of twelve parts Chapter 13C of the official1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code (Omitting amendments to 2010 California Building Code and 2010 California Residential Code which do

  4. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  5. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  6. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  7. Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-01-01

    California Energy Commission Debt Service Coverage Ratio Internal Rate of Return on Equity Investment Tax Credit Joint Powers Authority Levelized Cost

  8. Presented at the U.S. Green Buildings Council Third Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, November 17-19, 1996. The research reported here was funded, in part, by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), a research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexityLBNL-40833 LC-365 Presented at the U.S. Green Buildings Council Third Annual Conference, San Diego for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), a research unit of the University of California. Publication of research

  9. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    control of building thermal storage, ASHARE Transactionscan be achieved by utilizing thermal energy storage suchas ice storage or building thermal mass. Demand shedding is

  10. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    REPORT California Energy Balance Update and DecompositionCalifornia Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis2011. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition

  11. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure progress over time in the State of California.

  12. Building America Case Study: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    While previous versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) have included provisions to improve the air tightness of dwellings, for the first time, the 2012 IECC mandates compliance verification through blower door testing. Simply completing the Air Barrier and Insulation Installation checklist through visual inspection is no longer sufficient by itself. In addition, the 2012 IECC mandates a significantly stricter air sealing requirement. In Climate Zones 3 through 8, air leakage may not exceed 3 ACH50, which is a significant reduction from the 2009 IECC requirement of 7 ACH50. This requirement is for all residential buildings, which includes low-rise multifamily dwellings. While this air leakage rate requirement is an important component to achieving an efficient building thermal envelope, currently, the code language doesn't explicitly address differences between single family and multifamily applications. In addition, the 2012 IECC does not provide an option to sample dwellings for larger multifamily buildings, so compliance would have to be verified on every unit. With compliance with the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements on the horizon, several of CARB's multifamily builder partners are evaluating how best to comply with this requirement. Builders are not sure whether it is more practical or beneficial to simply pay for guarded testing or to revise their air sealing strategies to improve compartmentalization to comply with code requirements based on unguarded blower door testing. This report summarizes CARB's research that was conducted to assess the feasibility of meeting the 2012 IECC air leakage requirements in 3 multifamily buildings.

  13. Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

    2005-09-15

    The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

  14. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    develop new modules for EnergyPlus. Also, Fortran 90 allowscapability. California. EnergyPlus can calculate water usageCHP, and fuel cells. EnergyPlus has detailed daylighting

  15. EA-1065: Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to...

  16. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 FLU CONSENT - INACTIVATED

  17. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 Influenza Vaccine Declination

  18. A system design for a courthouse building in Boston : implementing user needs and requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiroz, Edgar Alexander

    1992-01-01

    In this thesis, will design a courthouse building located in the Government Center, Boston. This investigation will eventually lead to the development of a preliminary building system. In order to arrive at this level of ...

  19. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT 2008 Building Energy the evaporator coil by drilling of Temperature Measurement Access Holes for the placement of temperature sensors

  20. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These strategies, however, would make it more complex and more prescriptive, and would require substantial research. One practical intermediate strategy to save energy would be an alternate VRP, allowing VRs lower than currently prescribed, as long as indoor VOC concentrations were no higher than with VRs prescribed under the current VRP. This kind of hybrid, with source reduction and use of air cleaning optional but permitted, could eventually evolve, as data, materials, and air-cleaning technology allowed gradual lowering of allowable concentrations, into a fully developed IAQP. Ultimately, it seems that VR standards must evolve to resemble the IAQP, especially in California, where buildings must achieve zero net energy use within 20 years.

  1. Transamerica Pyramid Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 1 MW CCHP system at the Transamerica Pyramid Building in San Francisco, California.

  2. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Santa Barbara County, California. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data More Documents &...

  3. How To Build Enterprise Data Models To Achieve Compliance To Standards Or Regulatory Requirements (and share data).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Mark S.

    How To Build Enterprise Data Models To Achieve Compliance To Standards Or Regulatory Requirements models at their core. In an ontology-based enterprise model, business rules and definitions-Oxley, inference constitutes a model-based proof of compliance. In this paper, we detail the development

  4. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2005. Development of Energy Balances for the State ofIEA). 2010. World Energy Balance, 1971 to 2008. Paris: IEA.thermal unit California Energy Balance California Energy

  5. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily Dwellings, Upstate New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team sought to create a well-documented design and implementation strategy for air sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings that would assist in compliance with new building infiltration requirements of the 2012 IECC.

  6. Water Heating Requirements Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Heating Requirements ­ Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements 5.1 Overview 5.1.1 Water Heating Energy Water heating energy use is an important end use in low-rise residential buildings. Roughly 90 percent of California households use natural gas fueled water heaters, typically storage gas

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: WWN.energy.ca.gov STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES Energy Policy Report Update (20121EPR Update), Background Public Resources Code Section 25302 requires

  8. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 151 6 NINTH STREET SACRAMENTO, CA 95814-551 2 www.energy.ca.gov Buildings Technologies Program Building Energy Codes Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy August 7, 2013 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  9. EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct...

  10. EA-1087: Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments...

  11. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Evidence California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energymarine. California’s Energy Future - Transportation EnergyCCST 2011a. California’s Energy Future - The View to 2050,

  12. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    of meeting California’s transportation energy needs andEvidence California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energymarine. California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energy

  13. BENEFITS OF RADIAL BUILD MINIMIZATION AND REQUIREMENTS IMPOSED ON ARIES COMPACT STELLARATOR DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    savings in the radial build has been achieved, reducing the major radius by more than 20%, which. The primary goal of the study is to develop a more compact machine that retains the cost savings associated

  14. Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · ·/ Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program California Code of Regulations Title Commission Chapter 4. Energy Conservation Article 9. Nonresidential Building Benchmarking and Disclosure Manager that summarizes the space and energy usage of a building and compares a building's energy use

  15. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program that helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and GHG emissions.

  16. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    Research Institute. Building CHP While this paper hashence analysis of CHP applications in buildings is a centraland power (CHP) technology, especially for building heating

  18. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Stadler

    2011-01-01

    UCD USDOE WAPA WECC Building Automation System CaliforniaSiemens’ Apogee Building Automation System (BAS). Figure 6.

  19. California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building America Top Innovation California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building...

  20. Zero Net Energy Homes Production Builder Business Case: California...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CaliforniaFlorida Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation Photo of a solar home. Building America's production builder partners have found that energy efficiency...

  1. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    Title 24 requires air side economizer for most systems withAir Economizers ACM has an optional capability to Control model differential enthalpy. Strategies Water Side Economizers

  2. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-03-10

    Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

  3. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARBI

    2014-09-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  4. Santa Barbara County, California Data Dashboard | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Santa Barbara County, California, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Santa Barbara County Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications...

  5. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  6. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  7. California department of education HQ block 225: California's valedictorian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Dickerhoff, Darryl J; Fentress, Curtis; Popowski, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Greg Gidez, AIA, DBIA, LEED AP is the corporate manager ofteam set a goal of achieving LEED Gold certifica- tion — abecame only the second LEED Gold build- ing in California as

  8. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2010. Fuel and Electricity Consumption by California CementCEC. 2010d. Electricity Consumption by Standard Industrialnatural gas and electricity consumption used in CALEB come

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonderegger, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Quality Measurements in Energy- Efficient Buildings; April,9576 EEB 79-5 NIA ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM ChapterCalifornia 94720 ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM Annual

  10. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Life cycle cost methodology: 2005 California building energyCalifornia Energy Commission. This document details the calculation of the life cycle cost

  11. Residential California adobe : mud form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daymond, Diana Leigh

    1985-01-01

    Northern California has a rich tradition of adobe architecture . Formed with earth, defined by site, climate and use, the adobe structures exemplify a building methodology in harmony with nature and the lifestyle of it's ...

  12. SCE- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Edison offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006 Iowa enacted H.F. 2361, requiring the State Building Commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized building energy code. The State Building Code...

  14. The origin of California’s zero emission vehicle mandate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Collantes, Gustavo O

    2008-01-01

    Regulations for Low-Emission Vehicles and Clean Fuels: FinalAmendments to the Zero-Emissions Vehicle Requirements, Marchauthority to regulate vehicle emissions. California is not

  15. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing...

  16. California's Housing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Cynthia; Singa, Krute

    2008-01-01

    only improve California’s housing opportunities but produce2004: California’s Affordable Housing Crisis. 2004. http://Raising the Roof: California Housing Development Projections

  17. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability Developing Renewable Generation on State Property Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings

  18. Model Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Building Performance Standards (EEBPS) are statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (ECCCNYS) requires that all government, commercial and residential buildings, including renovations involving building system replaceme...

  20. Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

  1. Achieving Energy Savings in Municipal Construction in Long Beach California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    Long Beach Gas and Oil (LBGO), the public gas utility in Long Beach, California, partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to build a new, low-energy modular office building that is at least 50% below requirements set by Energy Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program. The LBGO building, which demonstrates that modular construction can be very energy efficient, is expected to exceed the ASHRAE baseline by about 45%.

  2. Building Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport development will require new strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building Airport Systems for the Next Generation Dealing with the uncertainties of airport and passenger buildings, and most travelers know from experience the frequency of aircraft delays, missed skilled and smart people doing their best to make things better, why aren't we getting reasonable results

  3. California Member Connects Solar Adoption With Upgrades | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    adoption and energy upgrades by Better Buildings Residential Network member Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) in California are helping solar companies realize that partnering...

  4. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

  5. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    topped crude, cracking stocks, and slop oil (US EIA-810,plus net stock withdrawals. In California, crude oil andCrude Oil Net Imports Primary Supply TBtu Growth Rate Annual Average Growth Rate Share of total Energy Supply Includes Net Stock

  6. Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

    2011-03-01

    The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

  7. Modeling to predict positive pressurization required to control mold growth from infiltration in a building in College Station, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge,D.; Chen,W.J

    2014-01-01

    -IC-14-09-27a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 Outline • Prevention of Mold growth • Modeling Building Infiltration • Results, Discussion and Conclusions ESL-IC-14...-09-27a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 Prevention of Mold Growth • Battle of dry time and wet time 0 24 Bathroom Door Closed Bathroom Door Open Exhaust Fan On Daily...

  8. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    truck activity in California. Transport Policy. Volume 16,in California Travel Demand Reductions Decreasing transportCalifornia, USA. Transportation Research, Part D: Transport

  9. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  11. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

  12. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Energy Use in California PEV Technology and Costs The mainEnergy Use in California Component HEV Battery Cost, $/kWhaccount the cost of delivery. California’s Energy Future -

  13. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  14. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Deputy Project Director, Energy and Environmental Security,Security Principal Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Lab California’s Energy

  15. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    air conditioning requirements in 2025, we use appliance efficiency standards mandated by the California Energy

  16. Electric Vehicle Manufacturing in Southern California: Current Developments, Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Allen J.

    1993-01-01

    power plants) that produce the electricity required to recharge EVs, given the fuel generat~tng mix of Southern California,

  17. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  18. Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future: A Preliminary Report Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderston, F.

    2010-01-01

    in the thermal mass of a passive building. for degree dayEnergy Systems Passive solar design of buildings Solar waterPassive Solar Architecture and the California Building Code,

  19. Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul

    2009-01-01

    smart building layers that build upon it, and requires the greatest investment. Systems integration provides the bridge

  20. Costs of 2001 methyl bromide rules estimated for California strawberry industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Chalfant, James A.; Goodhue, Rachael E.; McKee, Gregory J.

    2005-01-01

    requirements. California strawberry industry California’sfresh and processed strawberry sales were $805.8 millionCalif. strawberry acreage using MBr MBr applied per acre to

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSIONGUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these facilities may become selfsustaining without further public funding by 2011, and to secure for California. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirements, details how funding awards will be made, describes renewable energy, production incentives, renewables portfolio standard, biomass, solar thermal electric

  2. -California -Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Hawaii-based U.S. fisheries, as well as the fleets of other Pacific Rim nations. As such, the managementPacific - California - Oregon - Washington #12;Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed

  3. California's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SB 375 and California's Environmental Goals Louise Bedsworth Deputy Director Governor's Office of Planning and Research January 22, 2014 UC Davis Policy Forum Series #12;A vision for California's future Strong economy Thriving urban areas Prosperous rural regions Clean Environment Clean and efficient energy

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manager California Energy Commission 1516 9th Street, MS 2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Comments may are routinely monitored with a continuous emission monitoring system. An averaging time requirement is standardSTATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY

  5. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foresight Renewable Solutions Integrated Solar PV, Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage, and Microgrid Power and Smart Building Management for California Communities $1,726,438 $1,726,438 $1,025,822 77

  6. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides /sup 60/Co and /sup 152/Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. /sup 60/Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  7. Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    Building Cavities Used As Ducts: Air Leakage Characteristicspan” technique to prioritize duct sealing efforts: a studyField investigation of duct system performance in California

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California Basement Insulation Systems -...

  9. Why Do Building Owners Invest in Bicycle-Oriented Design?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrick, Phyllis; Trapenberg Frick, Karen; Ragland, David R

    2011-01-01

    Building Owners Invest in Bicycle-Oriented Design? Phyllisof California, Berkeley ISSUE Bicycle infrastructure designhas largely emphasized bicycle lanes and paths, with little

  10. Incentive Pass-through for Residential Solar Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The deployment of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems has grown rapidly over the last decade, partly because of various government incentives. In the United States, those established in California are among the largest and longest-running incentives. Building on past research, this report addresses the still-unanswered question: to what degree have the direct PV incentives in California been passed along from installers to consumers? This report addresses this question by carefully examining the residential PV market in California and applying both a structural-modeling approach and a reduced-form regression analysis to estimate the incentive pass-through rate. The results suggest an average pass-through rate of direct incentives of nearly 100%, but with regional differences among California counties. While these results could have multiple explanations, they suggest a relatively competitive market and well-functioning subsidy program. Further analysis is required to determine whether similar results broadly apply to other states, to other customer segments, to all third-party-owned PV systems, or to all forms of financial incentives for solar.

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) is a statewide minimum requirement that local jurisdictions cannot amend. The code is applicable to all new buildings in the commonwealth. The...

  12. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    economy from today’s levels, cutting energy consumption pertoday, though they will likely continue to improve and be refined over time. California’s Energy

  13. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    aviation, marine and rail sectors. Energy use, broken out bysuch as aviation and marine. California’s Energy Future -and marine. We believe that the CEF transportation energy

  14. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy Residential Building Envelopes Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchOzone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff

  15. BUILDING PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING DURING CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toole, T. Michael

    1 BUILDING PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING DURING CONSTRUCTION T. Michael Toole1 and Matthew Hallowell2 of building performance engineering tasks on design-bid-build projects are typically provided by entities building construction projects. Twenty four building performance engineering tasks were required

  16. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    2000. California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington Vogel, Nancy (23 2001. California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington Girion,of” California’s Energy Crisis Jan Whittington Abstract This

  17. CaliforniaFIRST (California) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Photovoltaics Solar Water Heat Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing The CaliforniaFIRST Program is a Property Assessed Clean...

  18. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Building Performance Standards (MBPS) are adopted by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Codes Administration. As required by legislation passed in...

  19. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Policy, University of California, Berkeley (on leave) and Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy

  20. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Outside Air Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    venThis Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how automated night ventilation can reduce cooling energy costs up to 40% and peak demand up to 50% in California’s hot-dry central valley climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning altogether in the coastal marine climate.

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ALLIANCE, CALIFORNIA SOLAR ENERGY., LOCAL ENERGY AGGREGATION NETWORK, DR. LUIS PACHECO, PRESENTE.ORG, SIERRA CLUB, SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION, AND THE VOTE SOLAR INITIATIVE FOR SOCIETAL COST-BENEFIT EVALUATION OF CALIFORNIA'S NET ENERGY

  2. Implementation of Title V in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, B.; Cook, B.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides information on California`s Title V operating permit programs for stationary sources mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. It covers background, applicability, regulatory history, requirements, and issues. In addition, specific information is provided on the progress of Title V implementation in California, including: the roles of implementing agencies, the status of district Title V programs, number and distribution of Title V sources, cost of Title V implementation, and highlights of Title V implementation in the State. The question and answer format is intended to facilitate easy access to specific information related to the Title V operating permit programs in California.

  3. Summary Report: Control Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam; Lee, Yoonsu

    2007-01-01

    efficiency. The adage “passive buildings require activesuch that the building is primarily in passive mode most of

  4. Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-53605 Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large Commercial Buildings and for implementing the duct models in a form that could readily be used in this project; and Brian Smith (LBNL

  5. University of California Shared Image Collections: Convergence and Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zentall, Lena; Burns, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Marmor, “ArtSTOR: A Digital Library for the History of Art,”Lena Zentall, California Digital Library, and Maureen Burns,to painstakingly build a digital library of over 120,000

  6. California: California’s Clean Energy Resources and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-15

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of California.

  7. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

  8. A Report on the Economics of California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard & Cost Containment Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    D Candidate, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis. Associate and Policy, University of California, Davis. Acknowledgments: We thank Sonia Yeh and the California Air statewide reductions in greenhouse gas emissions required by California's Assembly Bill 32, the Global

  9. Building Commissioning in the USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, N.; Friedman, H.

    2006-01-01

    $50 billion/yr for energy? Cx energy savings range: 6% - 9% ? California Market Characterization Study (2000) ? RCx energy savings range: 7% - 30 % ? LBNL study: The Cost-Effectiveness of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial Buildings: Lessons... Commissioning in the USA Natascha Castro, Annex 47- US Team Leader National Institute of Standards and Technology Hannah Friedman, Cost-Benefit Subtask Leader Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Asian Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning November 7, 2006...

  10. Five-Year NRHP Re-Evaluation of Historic Buildings Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R A; Heidecker, K R

    2011-09-12

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) 'Draft Programmatic Agreement among the Department of Energy and the California State Historic Preservation Officer Regarding Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory' requires a review and re-evaluation of the eligibility of laboratory properties for the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) every five years. The original evaluation was published in 2005; this report serves as the first five-year re-evaluation. This re-evaluation includes consideration of changes within LLNL to management, to mission, and to the built environment. it also determines the status of those buildings, objects, and districts that were recommended as NRHP-eligible in the 2005 report. Buildings that were omitted from the earlier building list, those that have reached 50 years of age since the original assessment, and new buildings are also addressed in the re-evaluation.

  11. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . California Air Resources Board California Energy Commission Gerhard Achtelik Mike Smith Independent Oil Marketers Association Gerald Secundy, California Council for Environmental and Economic and Anthony Brunello, California Resources Agency Rick Shedd, California Department of General Services John

  12. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    since offshore oil production is expected to peak by 1990,a peak in production within California of both crude oil andis expected to peak in 1990. Additional oil requirements

  13. California's electricity crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  14. Promoting emerging energy-efficiency technologies and practices by utilities in a restructured energy industry: A report from California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward L.

    2000-01-01

    cost-effectiveness of building control systems sensing and data collection Food service technology center PIER2 Contracts Energy efficient downlights for California

  15. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Statutes of 1997) requires retail electricity providers to disclose quarterly and annual fuel mix the mix of electricity fuel and technology types of the retail suppliers' sources of power and includes to disclose total California system electricity, which is the sum of all in-state generation and net

  16. Effects of Diffuser Airflow Minima on Occupant Comfort, Air Mixing, and Building Energy Use (RP-1515)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in buildings that reduce energy by reducing minimum airflowAdvanced variable air volume (VAV) systems. Energy DesignResources, California Energy Commission. Taylor S, Stein T,

  17. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium &progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage foronsite energy production (e.g. fuel cells, PV) at different

  18. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  19. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    be used to offset EV charging at home at the residentialthe different EV and home charging constraints. Decisiondimensionless EV battery charging efficiency, dimensionless

  20. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onNM, USA. [37] Electricity Storage Association, Morgan Hill,dimensionless d. electricity storage loss factor for the EV

  1. University of California, Berkeley Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Procedures 8. Hazardous Materials Release Procedures 9. Utility Failure 10. Elevator Failure 11. Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure 12. Natural Gas Release or Leak 13. Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY

  2. University of California, Berkeley Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keaveny, Tony

    #12;11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A. B. C. D. E. Utility Failure Elevator Failure Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure Natural Gas Release or Leak Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

  3. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    system (EMS) to enable demand response or any other buildingfor tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected tobased technologies, $ demand response costs for other non-

  4. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION In the matter of: Preparation of the 2013 of the 2013 IEPR Scoping Order follows. Background Public Resources Code Section 25302 requires the Energy

  5. Campus Parking Map University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Campus Parking Map University of California BERKELEY #12;Campus Building Locations Parking Lots Campus parking lots are located around and near campus and in the hill areas east of campus. Parking lot/Weekend parking permits are valid weekdays after 5pm and on weekends in , , and designated lots. Parking on campus

  6. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, OfficeLBNL-48258 Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Nance Matson, Craig Wray, Iain Walker, Max Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Performance of Buildings Group

  7. UCDavis University of California A California Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Francisco 20% have a garage · About 50% of USA, California new car buyers have a stable parking spot 25 feetUCDavis University of California A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research · Fleet Operation · Energy Savings Battery studies · Benchmark Testing · 2nd use · End of life Spatial

  8. Riverside County- Sustainable Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects...

  9. Energy Standards for State Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The State is still required by statute to adopt planning and construction standards for state buildings that conserve energy and optimize the energy performance of new buildings. The standards mu...

  10. Required Safety and Compliance Training for Researchers http://rac.berkeley.edu/training.html RESEARCH ADMINISTRATION AND COMPLIANCE OFFICE 1 of 11 pages UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    injury risk factors Safer work practices Workstation evaluation Initial training only Classroom lecture and their subjects, and compliance risks for both the investigators and the University. For these reasons and others their work. In each case where training is required, there are potentially significant consequences for non

  11. Building and Buildings, Scotland: The Building Standards Advisory Committee (Scotland) Regulations, 1959 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maclay, John.S.

    1959-01-01

    These regulations make provision for the constitution and procedure of the Building Standards Advisory Committee which the Secretary of State is required to appoint under section 12 of the Building (Scotland) Act, 1959

  12. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  13. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100 public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear

  14. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    much individual California power plants increased earningspower plants were popular developments in California, butno new power plants had been constructed in California over

  15. Ancillary services market in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Tomas; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Liew, Lucy; Khavkin, Mark

    1999-01-01

    www.caiso.com). California Power Exchange. 1998. PX Primer:Source: California Power Exchange) . 2 CaliforniaControl Automated Power Exchange Ancillary Service Balancing

  16. Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE,...

  17. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    policy implications.   Energy Policy.   2009. 37 (12). ppin Southern California”, Energy Policy, 39 (2011) 1923–1938.and Policy and Director, Sustainable Transportation Energy

  18. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    in California PEV Technology and Costs The main challengesthis analysis. FCV Technology and Costs A hydrogen fuel cell6. Hydrogen storage technology and cost status compared to

  19. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Dan Rutherford Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Dan Rutherford Building King's Buildings A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES Dan Rutherford Building King's Buildings Edinburgh EH9 3JF United Kingdom http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/buildi ngs/daniel-rutherford-building #12;If you require this document in an alternative format (e.g. large

  20. Curriculum for Commissioning Energy Efficient Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, Lia

    2012-09-30

    In July 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded funding to PECI to develop training curriculum in commercial energy auditing and building commissioning. This program was created in response to the high demand for auditing and commissioning services in the U.S. commercial buildings market and to bridge gaps and barriers in existing training programs. Obstacles addressed included: lack of focus on entry level candidates; prohibitive cost and time required for training; lack of hands-on training; trainings that focus on certifications & process overviews; and lack of comprehensive training. PECI organized several other industry players to create a co-funded project sponsored by DOE, PECI, New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), California Energy Commission (CEC), Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and California Commissioning Collaborative (CCC). After awarded, PECI teamed with another DOE awardee, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), to work collaboratively to create one comprehensive program featuring two training tracks. NJIT’s Center for Building Knowledge is a research and training institute affiliated with the College of Architecture and Design, and provided e-learning and video enhancements. This project designed and developed two training programs with a comprehensive, energy-focused curriculum to prepare new entrants to become energy auditors or commissioning authorities (CxAs). The following are the key elements of the developed trainings, which is depicted graphically in Figure 1: • Online classes are self-paced, and can be completed anywhere, any time • Commissioning Authority track includes 3 online modules made up of 24 courses delivered in 104 individual lessons, followed by a 40 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 75 and 100 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Energy Auditor track includes 3 online modules made up of 18 courses delivered in 72 individual lessons, followed by a 24 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 50 and 70 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Individual courses can be taken for continuing education credits. • Assessments are included for each course, and a score of at least 80% is required for completion. • Completion of Modules 1 through 3 is prerequisite for participating in the laboratory. More experienced participants have the option to test out of Modules 1 and 2 and complete Module 3 to progress to the laboratory.

  1. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    and/or require energy efficiency in buildings during the 11to strengthen energy efficiency in buildings. This BuildingHao Bin. 2009. “Building Energy Efficiency Evaluation and

  2. Building Energy Efficient Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Many new school buildings consume only half the energy required by similar efficient structures designed without energy performance as a design criterion. These are comfortable and efficient while construction costs remain about the same as those...

  3. High Performance Sustainable Building

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-11-09

    This Guide provides approaches for implementing the High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB) requirements of DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-6.

  4. SOME ANALYTIC MODELS OF PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDING PERFORMANCE: A THEORETICAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF ENERGY-CONSERVING BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, David Baird

    2011-01-01

    performance of 5 passive buildings. 3a. See Ref. 3a and thewell-performing passive building requires the use of anwork for unmanaged passive buildings; that is, buildings

  5. BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    P18$ P16 BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building AC Recreation and Athletics Centre AH Alumni Hall AP Azrieli Pavillion AT Azrieli Theatre CB Canal Building CO Residence Commons DT Dunton Tower FH Interaction Building (HCI) HP Herzberg Laboratories IH Ice House LA Loeb Building LE Leeds House LH Lanark

  6. Residential Solar Permit Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington's State Building Code sets requirements for the installation, inspection, maintenance and repair of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems. Local jurisdictions have the authority to is...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements Rev04.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev. 05) California...

  8. Effects of California's Climate Policy in Facilitating CCUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Elizabeth

    2014-12-31

    California is at the forefront of addressing the challenges involved in redesigning its energy infrastructure to meet 2050 GHG reduction goals, but CCUS commercialization lags in California as it does elsewhere. It is unclear why this is the case given the state’s forefront position in aggressive climate change policy. The intent of this paper is to examine the factors that may explain why CCUS has not advanced as rapidly as other GHG emissions mitigation technologies in California and identify ways by which CCUS commercialization may be advanced in the context of California’s future energy infrastructure. CCUS has application to reduce GHG emissions from the power, industrial and transportation sectors in the state. Efficiency, use of renewable energy or nuclear generation to replace fossil fuels, use of lower or no-net-carbon feedstocks (such as biomass), and use of CCUS on fossil fuel generation are the main options, but California has fewer options for making the deep cuts in CO2 emissions within the electricity sector to meet 2050 goals. California is already the most efficient of all 50 states as measured by electricity use per capita, and, while further efficiency measures can reduce per capita consumption, increasing population is still driving electricity demand upwards. A 1976 law prevents building any new nuclear plants until a federal high-level nuclear waste repository is approved. Most all in-state electricity generation already comes from natural gas; although California does plan to eliminate electricity imports from out-of-state coal-fired generation. Thus, the two options with greatest potential to reduce in-state power sector CO2 emissions are replacing fossil with renewable generation or employing CCUS on natural gas power plants. Although some scenarios call on California to transition its electricity sector to 100 percent renewables, it is unclear how practical this approach is given the intermittency of renewable generation, mismatches between peak generation times and demand times, and the rate of progress in developing technologies for large-scale power storage. Vehicles must be electrified or move to biofuels or zero-carbon fuels in order to decarbonize the transportation sector. These options transfer the carbon footprint of transportation to other sectors: the power sector in the case of electric vehicles and the industrial and agricultural sectors in the case of biofuels or zero-carbon fuels. Thus, the underlying presumption to achieve overall carbon reductions is that the electricity used by vehicles does not raise the carbon emissions of the power sector: biofuel feedstock growth, harvest, and processing uses low carbon energy or production of fuels from fossil feedstocks employs CCUS. This results in future transportation sector energy derived solely from renewables, biomass, or fossil fuel point sources utilizing CCUS. In the industrial sector, the largest contributors to GHG emissions are transportation fuel refineries and cement plants. Emissions from refineries come from on-site power generation and hydrogen plants; while fuel mixes can be changed to reduce the GHG emissions from processing and renewable sources can be used to generate power, total decarbonization requires use of CCUS. Similarly, for cement plants, power generation may use carbon-free feedstocks instead of fossil fuels, but CO2 emissions associated with the manufacture of cement products must be dealt with through CCUS. Of course, another option for these facilities is the purchase of offsets to create a zero-emissions plant.

  9. Effects of California's Climate Policy in Facilitating CCUS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burton, Elizabeth

    2014-12-31

    California is at the forefront of addressing the challenges involved in redesigning its energy infrastructure to meet 2050 GHG reduction goals, but CCUS commercialization lags in California as it does elsewhere. It is unclear why this is the case given the state’s forefront position in aggressive climate change policy. The intent of this paper is to examine the factors that may explain why CCUS has not advanced as rapidly as other GHG emissions mitigation technologies in California and identify ways by which CCUS commercialization may be advanced in the context of California’s future energy infrastructure. CCUS has application to reducemore »GHG emissions from the power, industrial and transportation sectors in the state. Efficiency, use of renewable energy or nuclear generation to replace fossil fuels, use of lower or no-net-carbon feedstocks (such as biomass), and use of CCUS on fossil fuel generation are the main options, but California has fewer options for making the deep cuts in CO2 emissions within the electricity sector to meet 2050 goals. California is already the most efficient of all 50 states as measured by electricity use per capita, and, while further efficiency measures can reduce per capita consumption, increasing population is still driving electricity demand upwards. A 1976 law prevents building any new nuclear plants until a federal high-level nuclear waste repository is approved. Most all in-state electricity generation already comes from natural gas; although California does plan to eliminate electricity imports from out-of-state coal-fired generation. Thus, the two options with greatest potential to reduce in-state power sector CO2 emissions are replacing fossil with renewable generation or employing CCUS on natural gas power plants. Although some scenarios call on California to transition its electricity sector to 100 percent renewables, it is unclear how practical this approach is given the intermittency of renewable generation, mismatches between peak generation times and demand times, and the rate of progress in developing technologies for large-scale power storage. Vehicles must be electrified or move to biofuels or zero-carbon fuels in order to decarbonize the transportation sector. These options transfer the carbon footprint of transportation to other sectors: the power sector in the case of electric vehicles and the industrial and agricultural sectors in the case of biofuels or zero-carbon fuels. Thus, the underlying presumption to achieve overall carbon reductions is that the electricity used by vehicles does not raise the carbon emissions of the power sector: biofuel feedstock growth, harvest, and processing uses low carbon energy or production of fuels from fossil feedstocks employs CCUS. This results in future transportation sector energy derived solely from renewables, biomass, or fossil fuel point sources utilizing CCUS. In the industrial sector, the largest contributors to GHG emissions are transportation fuel refineries and cement plants. Emissions from refineries come from on-site power generation and hydrogen plants; while fuel mixes can be changed to reduce the GHG emissions from processing and renewable sources can be used to generate power, total decarbonization requires use of CCUS. Similarly, for cement plants, power generation may use carbon-free feedstocks instead of fossil fuels, but CO2 emissions associated with the manufacture of cement products must be dealt with through CCUS. Of course, another option for these facilities is the purchase of offsets to create a zero-emissions plant.« less

  10. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    energy demand along with the potential for technologies in different transportation sectors to reduce fuelpotential for reductions in energy demand, rather than the supply of low-carbon transportation fuel.potential for reductions in fuel use is provided. California’s Energy

  11. Dismantling College Opportunity in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Civil Rights Project/ Proyecto Derechos Civiles

    2011-01-01

    DISMANTLING   COLLEGE     OPPORTUNITY   IN   CALIFORNIACrisis   and   California’s   Future   Dismantling   CollegePART   4: DISMANTLING   COLLEGE     OPPORTUNITY   IN  

  12. Conversion of three-dimensional graphic building models into input data for building energy calculation program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayek, Raja Fares

    1994-01-01

    Building energy use calculation programs require descriptions of the building geometry as well as data relating to climate, materials, occupancy, among other aspects. Powerful micro-computers and sophisticated building ...

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Treasure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes, Sacramento, California Case study of Treasure Homes, who worked with SMUD, DOE, NREL, and ConSol to build HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC, ducts buried in attic...

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance of a Hot-Dry...

  15. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01

    the integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringthe integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringArchitecture University of California, Berkeley Professor Charles C. Benton, Chair Commercial office buildings promoted as “sustainable,” “

  16. Institutional Causes of California's Budget Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, Bruce E.; Noll, Roger

    2010-01-01

    2, Issue 3 Institutional Causes of California’s BudgetCain and Noll: Institutional Causes of California’s BudgetPolicy Institutional Causes of California’s Budget Problem

  17. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA METALLURGICAL SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    . Chin, Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 12:30 "UFO Professor Robert Creegan as our luncheon speaker. His topic will be "UFO's -- Borders of Science." 5

  18. Energy Upgrade California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Upgrade California program serves as a one-stop shop for California homeowners who want to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. The program connects homeowners with qualified...

  19. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SKYLIGHT AREA SUPPORT WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as shown on page _______ of building plans has general lighting power density of ______ W/ft2 , which is indicated on page _________ of the building plans. Skylights not required as fully designed lighting system is less than 0.5 W/ft2 . Note: this exemption applies only to buildings with a fully designed lighting

  20. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa...

  1. Sustainability in Existing Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For meeting federal sustainability requirements, agencies can use evaluation methods, such as benchmarking and energy audits, and planning to make existing buildings energy efficient. Agencies can follow these steps to comply with energy reduction requirements.

  2. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    renewable case) alone almost exceed the target emissions. California’s Energy Future -renewable energy, i.e. the “median case. ” California’s Energy Future -

  3. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasts of California transportation energy demand, 2005-alternative transportation energy pathways on California’salternative transportation energy pathways on California’s

  4. Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    California Current System. California Cooperative OceanicCalifornia Current system. California Cooperative OceanicCalifornia Current region. California Cooperative Oceanic

  5. Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    such as the energy efficiency of building engineeringIEA, 2008, Energy efficiency requirements in building codes,motivating energy-efficiency in these buildings. 2 Direct

  6. Technical Management for Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of an 'instrument' for the optimization of the functionality and conservation of tertiary buildings. This technique has several different names: Building Automation Systems (BAS), Central Control and Monitoring System (CCMS) in English, and Gestion Technique du Bâtiment' (GTB) or Gestion Technique Centralisée (GTC) in French. With this technique it is possible to manage all the functions of a building, it is a modern instrument that introduces the concept of 'automation' in the operation of buildings using computerized procedures, earlier reserved for industrial processes. The system is structured with different automation levels with a distributed intelligence, each level characterized by a communication system (Fieldbus for the lowest and Ethernet for the highest level). In order to apply the BAS to CERN buildings it is necessary to evaluate the advantages, the CERN requirements and the integration with the several existing control and automation systems.

  7. Institute for Software Research University of California, Irvine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demsky, Brian

    in Usable Requirements Specification Formats Thomas A. Alspaugh Susan Elliott Sim Kristina Winbladh Mamadou Specification Formats Thomas A. Alspaugh Susan Elliott Sim Kristina Winbladh Mamadou H. Diallo Leila Naslavsky.isr.uci.edu/tech-reports.html Thomas A. Alspaugh Kristina Winbladh University of California, Irvine University of California, Irvine

  8. 11 California Petroleum Supply, Transportation, Refining and Marketing Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regions require time. ONSHORE OIL PRODUCTION Onshore California oil is currently recovered by both to as Thermally Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR), is important to California's total production since it represents about 63 percent of onshore production and is responsive to prevailing oil prices and technology

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS Lecturer Pool: Economics Disciplinary Communication The Department of Economics within the Social Sciences Division at the University of California satisfying the disciplinary communication (DC) requirement for the Economics Department. The ability to teach

  10. University of California Policy CANRA Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    "), codified at California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, requires that employers of Mandated Reporters (as by University personnel to promptly report the concern to appropriate external and University officials (the "Act" or "CANRA"): California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, as currently in effect or subsequently

  11. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy Technical Position NSEP-TP-2007- 1, Technical Position on the Requirement in DOE 0 420.1B to Use National Consensus Industry Standards and the Model Building CodesTechnical Position NS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All new construction required to follow the provisions of Department of Energy(DOE) Order 420. lB, Facility Safety, must comply with national consensus industrystandards and the model building...

  12. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  13. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  14. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  15. Irving Gill and rediscovery of concrete in California the Marie and Chauncey Clark, 1919-22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scensor, Sean

    1995-01-01

    The thesis focuses on a large residence by architect Irving Gill: the house for Marie and Chauncey Dwight Clarke in Santa Fe Springs, California (1919-22). The Clarke House was only discovered as a Gill building in 1981; ...

  16. Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House...

  17. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  18. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings that would assist in compliance with new building infiltration requirements of the 2012 IECC. Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air...

  19. ENERGY STAR Webinar: ENERGY STAR and Green Building Rating Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    resources to help meet requirements for green building rating systems, such as the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the Green...

  20. California’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGhee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Quinn, Tony. 2013. The “Top Two” System: Working Like ItAssessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingCalifornia’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda Eric

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and utilities. Ted Dang, Steven Mac, and Libbie Bessman prepared the historical energy consumption data. Miguel CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020 ADOPTED FORECAST Schwarzenegger, Governor #12; #12; CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Chris Kavalec Tom Gorin

  2. Capitol Area East End, Block 225: California Department of Education Headquarters

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Sacramento, CA The California Department of Education Headquarters, Block 225 was the first of the five buildings to make up the Capitol Area East End Complex. The entire project is being developed by the California Department of General Services Real Estate Division. At 336,000 square feet and six stories high, Block 225 was the most ambitious green-building initiative to have been undertaken by the State at that time and the largest office building project ever undertaken by the State. The project was delivered through a bridged design-build process.

  3. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    CDC 2005). Heavy oil resources require additional energyin California Low-quality oil resources produce fuels withthan high-quality oil resources. The differences between

  4. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    CDC 2005). Heavy oil resources require additional energyin California Low-quality oil resources produce fuels withthan high-quality oil resources. The differences between

  5. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    the California Power Exchange, and the CaliforniaOperator (Cal ISO). The Power Exchange would be a wholesaleauspices of the Western Power Exchange Steering Committee.

  6. Exploring California PV Home Premiums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices.Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California,”

  7. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01

    Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communitiesusing the 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communitiessurveyed in 2011 (Energy Sustainable California Communities

  8. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 2 Acknowledgements Our largest debt of gratitude is to our Energy Becker, Southern California Gas Company; Karl Brown, California Institute for Energy Efficiency; Grant

  9. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  10. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  11. California Energy Incentive Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) discusses annual update on key energy issues and financial opportunities for federal sites in California.

  12. Understanding the response of commercial and institutional organizations to the California energy crisis. A report to the California Energy Commission - Sylvia Bender, Project Manager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutzenhiser, Loren; Janda, Kathryn; Kunkle, Rick; Payne, Christopher

    2002-07-24

    Beginning in the summer of 2000, California experienced serious energy supply problems, sharp increases in wholesale (and retail) electricity and natural gas prices, and isolated blackouts. In response to the rapidly worsening electricity situation in California in late 2000, the state set, as an initial goal, the reduction of the state's peak demand for the summer of 2001 by 5,000 megawatts. To meet this goal, the governor and legislature took a variety of steps to enhance supply, encourage rapid voluntary reductions in demand, and provide incentives for actions that would result in load reductions. Three bills-Assembly Bill 970, Senate Bill X1 5 and Assembly Bill X1 29-allocated roughly $950 million for consumption and demand reduction programs. The governor also enacted a variety of additional measures, including the ''Flex Your Power'' (media awareness and direct business involvement) campaign, requirements for retail sector outdoor lighting reductions, and toughening of energy efficiency building codes. There were, in fact, significant reductions in electricity demand in California during the summer of 2001 and the large number of expected supply disruptions was avoided. To understand the nature of these demand reductions and the motivations for consumer response, Washington State University (WSU) undertook a study for the California Energy Commission (CEC) focusing on conservation behavior in the residential, commercial, and agricultural sectors. The research presented in this report represents an exploration of the response of commercial and institutional organizations to the California energy situation and the unique set of influences that existed during this time. These influences included informational messages and media attention, program interventions, price changes, and external triggering events (e.g., blackouts). To better understand the effects of these influences on organizational response to the energy situation, we conducted 84 semi-structured inter views with members of commercial and institutional organizations (many of which participated in three different California Energy Commission Programs) and with 21 key informants representing program managers, administrators, and aggregators as well as a small number of energy service providers and utilities. Separate reports examine the consumer response in the residential and agricultural sectors.

  13. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    renewable case) alone almost exceed the target emissions. California’s Energy Future -renewable energy, i.e. the “median case. ” California’s Energy Future -

  14. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  15. University of California, Berkeley Department of Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    1 University of California, Berkeley Department of Psychology Psychology W1 General Psychology to most upper-division courses in the Department of Psychology. Psychology 1 (or its online equivalent, Psychology W1) is required for prospective majors in Psychology, and is intended for lower-division students

  16. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  17. Applications of Optimal Building Energy System Selection and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; Lai, Judy

    2011-04-01

    Berkeley Lab has been developing the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) for several years. Given load curves for energy services requirements in a building microgrid (u grid), fuel costs and other economic inputs, and a menu of available technologies, DER-CAM finds the optimum equipment fleet and its optimum operating schedule using a mixed integer linear programming approach. This capability is being applied using a software as a service (SaaS) model. Optimisation problems are set up on a Berkeley Lab server and clients can execute their jobs as needed, typically daily. The evolution of this approach is demonstrated by description of three ongoing projects. The first is a public access web site focused on solar photovoltaic generation and battery viability at large commercial and industrial customer sites. The second is a building CO2 emissions reduction operations problem for a University of California, Davis student dining hall for which potential investments are also considered. And the third, is both a battery selection problem and a rolling operating schedule problem for a large County Jail. Together these examples show that optimization of building u grid design and operation can be effectively achieved using SaaS.

  18. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  19. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    installed at California power plants. Furthermore, recentlyinformation for California’s power plants. Personalinformation for California’s power plants. Personal

  20. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U was also supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy underLBNL 61282 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California Max H. Sherman and Iain

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    into 18 categories: 1. Research: Centers and Academic Programs 2. Green Buildings 3. Renewable Energy 4UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED "I recognize the right #12;July 2011 UC IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED JULY 2011 This outline summarizes UC

  2. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whether you are building a new facility, renovating an existing one, or want to reduce your energy billsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES F O 2004 www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/partnership Call (916) 654-4147 #12;The Energy Partnership Program

  3. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington cogeneration facilities, were advocating deregulation as a solution to high costs.cost overseas producers. Their primary representation was the California Large Energycosts - were equally dramatic. In August of 2000, “Energy Insight Today” compared how much individual California

  4. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network RequirementsCalifornia. High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Networkof High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements (Rev...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5), May, 11, 2015. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements Rev05 - Final.pdf More Documents & Publications California DOE ZERH Program Requiremets DOE Zero Energy...

  6. A Prototype Data Archive for the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings California Energy Data Archive (CalEDA) that provides public web access to data from PIER and related projects. Characteristics of a Building Energy Data Archive Several groups have developed data archives

  7. Harris County- Green Building Policy for County Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Harris County Facilities and Property Management (FPM) Division also requires all county buildings to meet minimum energy efficiency and sustainability measures, as described in the Best Gree...

  8. Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2011-01-01

    OF ENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES B. COST CALCULATIONScost calculations carries weight in California because the state EnergyCOST CALCULATIONS AS A BASIS FOR CODES Even small improvements in conservation design save energy, and

  9. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  10. Building Safety Coordinator Program UC Merced Office of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Building Safety Coordinator Program UC Merced Office of Emergency Services #12;Building Safety Coordinator Program Objectives · To empower employee volunteers with the knowledge required to assist building leaving a building. #12;Training Session Outline · Defining the purpose of a Building Safety Coordinator

  11. Energy Efficient State Building Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The order also requires that renovations or repairs of existing buildings achieve the maximum efficiency level that is cost-effective based on an analysis of construction and operating costs over...

  12. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving...

  13. Development of guidelines for Modeling Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Systems in EnergyPlus, eQUEST, and EnergyPro for use in California non-residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    out of the analysis. ? EnergyPlus UFAD refinements: Therereport. Development work for EnergyPlus would be required asrefine inputs to both EnergyPlus and eQuest to better align

  14. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

  15. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary report and...

  16. Retrofit California Overview and Final Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choy, Howard; Rosales, Ana

    2014-03-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (also called upgrades) are widely recognized as a critical component to achieving energy savings in the building sector to help lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, however, upgrades have accounted for only a small percentage of aggregate energy savings in building stock, both in California and nationally. Although the measures and technologies to retrofit a building to become energy efficient are readily deployed, establishing this model as a standard practice remains elusive. Retrofit California sought to develop and test new program models to increase participation in the energy upgrade market in California. The Program encompassed 24 pilot projects, conducted between 2010 and mid-2013 and funded through a $30 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The broad scope of the Program can be seen in the involvement of the following regionally based Grant Partners: Los Angeles County (as prime grantee); Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), consisting of: o StopWaste.org for Alameda County o Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA) for Sonoma County o SF Environment for the City and County of San Francisco o City of San Jose; California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) for the San Diego region; Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD). Within these jurisdictions, nine different types of pilots were tested with the common goal of identifying, informing, and educating the people most likely to undertake energy upgrades (both homeowners and contractors), and to provide them with incentives and resources to facilitate the process. Despite its limited duration, Retrofit California undoubtedly succeeded in increasing awareness and education among home and property owners, as well as contractors, realtors, and community leaders. However, program results indicate that a longer timeframe will be needed to transform the market and establish energy retrofits as the new paradigm. Innovations such as Flex Path, which came about because of barriers encountered during the Program, have already shown promise and are enabling increased participation. Together, the pilots represent an unprecedented effort to identify and address market barriers to energy efficiency upgrades and to provide lessons learned to shape future program planning and implementation. The statistics reflects the scope of the marketing and outreach campaigns, which tested a variety of approaches to increase understanding of the benefits of energy upgrades to drive participation in the Program. More traditional methods such as TV and radio advertisements were complimented by innovative community based social marketing campaigns that sought to leverage the trusted status of neighborhood organizations and leaders in order to motivate their constituents to undertake retrofits. The remainder of this report provides an overview of Retrofit California including brief summaries of the pilots’ main components and highlights, followed by the major findings or takeaway lessons from the approaches that were tested. Eleven of the pilots will be continued, with modifications, under the ratepayer-funded Regional Energy Networks. Involvement in the RENS by many of the Retrofit California partners will ensure that early lessons learned are carried forward to guide future programs for energy upgrades in California.

  17. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy...

  18. Diesel Use in California | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use in California Diesel Use in California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: California Energy Commission 2002deerboyd.pdf More Documents & Publications Reducing Petroleum...

  19. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01

    Southern California Bight/San Onofre/Power Plant/Southern California Bight/San Onofre Power Plant/Power Plant (DCPP), San Luis Obispo County, California.

  20. The Aftermath of Redistricting Reform in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchler, Justin

    2011-01-01

    2009. “Redistricting Reform Will Not Solve California’sMatthew. 2009. “Redistricting Reform Could Save California2. ———. 2011. “Redistricting Reform Revisited. ” California

  1. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  2. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software ? Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  3. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  4. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  5. National Green Building Standard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-07-01

    DOE's Building America Program is a research and development program to improve the energy performance of new and existing homes. The ultimate goal of the Building America Program is to achieve examples of cost-effective, energy efficient solutions for all U.S. climate zones. Periodic maintenance of an ANSI standard by review of the entire document and action to revise or reaffirm it on a schedule not to exceed five years is required by ANSI. In compliance, a consensus group has once again been formed and the National Green Building Standard is currently being reviewed to comply with the periodic maintenance requirement of an ANSI standard.

  6. Building debris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

  7. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  8. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  9. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01

    Users in a zone with one solar measurement location shouldin California where solar data of one kind or another havelifetime of the solar heating system: one can expect to pay

  10. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) .................................................................... 25 Natural Gas TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE James D. Boyd Presiding Member Karen Douglas Associate Member Primary Author was prepared by the California Energy Commission's Transportation Committee as part of the Alternative

  11. University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    , SANCTIONS, & LAWS 11 University Policy and Sanctions 11 Loss of Financial Aid for Conviction Involving Possession/Sale of Illegal Drugs 11 Federal Laws and Sanctions 12 California Laws and Sanctions 12 Sacramento

  12. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  13. New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew Jersey is homeAdvancedIncreasesFoundedDepartment of

  14. Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17andPurchased energyEnergyFactA

  15. Building Requirements for State-Funded Buildings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at the Edge of aCamberlyEnergy AmirISTN< Back

  16. City of Bloomington - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying2-2002Joshua< Back

  17. City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying2-2002Joshua<Department of

  18. City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy < Back EligibilityEnergy2011|

  19. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current:5LoggingGraphene,DraftOand Major

  20. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive CompensationEnergyGet Current:5LoggingGraphene,DraftOand

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER, Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Kern County, California and uses cogeneration steam to aid in the enhanced oil recovery process Commission approved a petition to add SCR systems to each of their three turbine units. The addition of SCR was required to meet the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District's (District) revised Rule 4703 NOx

  2. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    California, the area of solar collector required would beserves as the solar collector and storage (Anderson, 1977).for the area of Of the solar collectors required to meet the

  3. Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholomy, Obadiah

    2005-01-01

    lowest cost renewable energy source in California [2], windCost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies” August 2003, California Energycosts are consistent with values developed by the California Energy

  4. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  5. Building America System Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  6. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    from imports. Onshore crude oil production in California isa peak in production within California of both crude oil and

  8. Office Buildings - Full Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17...

  9. California: California's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of California.

  10. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  11. Topic Brief 4: Above-Code Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Linda M.

    2009-10-07

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) requires a plan for achieving compliance with building energy codes in at least 90% of the new and renovated residential and commercial building space. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is developing procedures and tools for measuring compliance as required in this legislation. This is the fourth topic brief, to be posted on the BECP website, responding to feedback received on these procedures.

  12. Building America Retrofit Participation Requirements and Release |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivativeColdSealedOverview - 2015August 2011 |Department

  13. Green Building Requirement | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping STD-1128-2013 April 2013Department of Energy<<

  14. AB 2188: Implementation of the California Solar Rights Act at the Local Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is intended to provide guidance for implementing the Solar Permitting Efficiency Act (AB 2188), which was enacted in California in 2015, in substantial conformance with the California Solar Permitting Guidebook. This document also includes a stand-alone model ordinance that complies with the requirements of the Solar Rights Act, as amended. The sections of this document are organized to first provide the reader with the statutory requirements of AB 2188 and the existing requirements of the Solar Rights Act, followed by the recommendations from the California Solar Permitting Guidebook for substantial conformance with regard to the permitting requirements for local permitting processes.

  15. Energy efficiency in California laboratory-type facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, E.; Bell, G.; Sartor, D.

    1996-07-31

    The central aim of this project is to provide knowledge and tools for increasing the energy efficiency and performance of new and existing laboratory-type facilities in California. We approach the task along three avenues: (1) identification of current energy use and savings potential, (2) development of a {ital Design guide for energy- Efficient Research Laboratories}, and (3) development of a research agenda for focused technology development and improving out understanding of the market. Laboratory-type facilities use a considerable amount of energy resources. They are also important to the local and state economy, and energy costs are a factor in the overall competitiveness of industries utilizing laboratory-type facilities. Although the potential for energy savings is considerable, improving energy efficiency in laboratory-type facilities is no easy task, and there are many formidable barriers to improving energy efficiency in these specialized facilities. Insufficient motivation for individual stake holders to invest in improving energy efficiency using existing technologies as well as conducting related R&D is indicative of the ``public goods`` nature of the opportunity to achieve energy savings in this sector. Due to demanding environmental control requirements and specialized processes, laboratory-type facilities epitomize the important intersection between energy demands in the buildings sector and the industrial sector. Moreover, given the high importance and value of the activities conducted in laboratory-type facilities, they represent one of the most powerful contexts in which energy efficiency improvements stand to yield abundant non-energy benefits if properly applied.

  16. Pricing and Firm Conduct in California's Deregulated Electricity Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    and fall 2000. The incumbent utilities were required to purchase power at high wholesale prices and to sell, the organized market broke down, and the state government was required to step in to purchase power. Market of the Program on Workable Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER is a program of the University of California Energy

  17. One: The California Economic Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    THE CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC OUTLOOK Christopher Thornberg,signs of having peaked. The outlook for 2006 is dominated by

  18. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palermo, Sam

    of California, Los Angeles 2003 #12;iii Dedication To my parents #12;iv Table of Contents Dedication

  19. Energy Implications of Economizer Use in California Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Traber, Kim; Price, Hillary; Horvath, Arpad; Nazaroff, William W.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-08-01

    In the US, data center operations currently account for about 61 billion kWh/y of electricity consumption, which is more than 1.5percent of total demand. Data center energy consumption is rising rapidly, having doubled in the last five years. A substantial portion of data-center energy use is dedicated to removing the heat generated by the computer equipment. Data-center cooling load might be met with substantially reduced energy consumption with the use of air-side economizers. This energy saving measure, however, has been shown to expose servers to an order-of-magnitude increase in indoor particle concentrations with an unquantified increase in the risk of equipment failure. An alternative energy saving option is the use of water-side economizers, which do not affect the indoor particle concentration but require additional mechanical equipment and tend to be less beneficial in high humidity areas. Published research has only presented qualitative benefits of economizer use, providing industry with inadequate information on which to base their design decisions. Energy savings depend on local climate and the specific building-design characteristics. In this paper, based on building energy models, we report energy savings for air-side and water-side economizer use in data centers in several climate zones in California. Results show that in terms of energy savings, air-side economizers consistently outperform water-side economizers, though the performance difference varies by location. Model results also show that conventional humidity restrictions must by relaxed or removed to gain the energy benefits of air-side economizers.

  20. Buildings & Connective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Signage Program Complete New Signage, Wayfinding, Campus Identity Program 2 4 4 0 2 2 0 4 2 4 2 5 16 47 Sciences Greenway Interim Landscape New Green Pathway Connecting Parking, Building Entrances Courtyard 2 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 4 2 2 0 16 34 Ashland/Taylor Lot G/K Interim Green Gate Provide New Green

  1. Better Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neukomm, M.

    2012-01-01

    replicable programs/solutions. Emphasis on home energy improvement Federal Performance-based Contracting Challenge ?Leverage ARRA ?Overcome Barriers ?Drive Action/Change ?Grow Partnerships Better Buildings promotes energy efficiency as top... Senior Executive --Announce innovations/market solutions Take Action -Showcase project within 9 months -Organization wide plan, schedule and milestones within 9 months Report Results -Share information and implementation models -Share...

  2. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Project Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    California’s North Coast Fishing Communities HistoricalCalifornia’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historicalprovided by North Coast fishing community members, including

  3. The State of Health Insurance in California: Findings from the 2005 California Health Interview Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, E. Richard; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Ponce, Ninez; Yoon, Jean; al., et

    2007-01-01

    THE STATE OF HEALTH INSURANCE IN CALIFORNIA FINDINGSFROM THE 2005 CALIFORNIA HEALTH INTERVIEW SURVEY JULY 2007Foundation THE STATE OF HEALTH INSURANCE IN CALIFORNIA

  4. Inefficiencies and Market Power in Financial Arbitrage: A Study of California’s Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Severin; Bushnell, James; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2006-01-01

    California electricity market, too few participants learnedof California’s Electricity Markets,” Center for the Studyof the New York Electricity Market,” mimeo, UC Berkeley. [

  5. Preliminary evaluation of the performance, water use, and current application trends of evaporative coolers in California climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Hanford, J.W.; Wu, H.F.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the latest results of an ongoing analysis investigating the potential for evaporative cooling as an energy-efficient alternative to standard air-conditioning in California residences. In particular, the study uses detailed numerical models of evaporative coolers linked with the DOE-2 building energy simulation program to study the issues of indoor comfort, energy and peak demand savings with and without supplemental air-conditioning and consumptive water use. In addition, limited surveys are used to assess the current market availability of evaporative cooling in California, typical contractor practices and costs, and general acceptance of the technology among engineers, contractors, and manufacturers. The results show that evaporative coolers can provide significant energy and peak demand savings in California residences, but the impact of the increased indoor humidity on human comfort remains an unanswered question that requires further research and clarification. Evaluated against ASHRAE comfort standards developed primarily for air-conditioning both direct and two-stage evaporative coolers would not maintain comfort at peak cooling conditions due to excessive humidity. However, using bioclimatic charts that place human comfort at the 80% relative humidity line, the study suggests that direct evaporative coolers will work in mild coastal climates, while two-stage models should provide adequate comfort in Title 24 houses throughout California, except in the Imperial Valley. The study also shows that evaporative coolers will increase household water consumption by less than 6% on an annual basis, and as much as 23% during peak cooling months, and that the increases in water cost are minimal compared to the electricity savings. Lastly, a survey of engineers and contractors revealed generally positive experiences with evaporative coolers, with operational cost savings, improved comfort, unproved air quality as the primary benefits in their use.

  6. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. BuildingB7. Building6.

  7. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. BuildingB7. Building6.8.

  8. Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal DER Technology Investment and Energy Management in Zero-Net-Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Aki, Hirohisa; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy has launched the commercial building initiative (CBI) in pursuit of its research goal of achieving zero-net-energy commercial buildings (ZNEB), i.e. ones that produce as much energy as they use. Its objective is to make these buildings marketable by 2025 such that they minimize their energy use through cutting-edge, energy-efficiency technologies and meet their remaining energy needs through on-site renewable energy generation. This paper examines how such buildings may be implemented within the context of a cost- or CO2-minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various technologies: photovoltaic modules (PV) and other on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and passive/demand-response technologies. A mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has a multi-criteria objective function is used. The objective is minimization of a weighted average of the building's annual energy costs and CO2 emissions. The MILP's constraints ensure energy balance and capacity limits. In addition, constraining the building's energy consumed to equal its energy exports enables us to explore how energy sales and demand-response measures may enable compliance with the ZNEB objective. Using a commercial test site in northernCalifornia with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find that a ZNEB requires ample PV capacity installed to ensure electricity sales during the day. This is complemented by investment in energy-efficient combined heat and power (CHP) equipment, while occasional demand response shaves energy consumption. A large amount of storage is also adopted, which may be impractical. Nevertheless, it shows the nature of the solutions and costs necessary to achieve a ZNEB. Additionally, the ZNEB approach does not necessary lead to zero-carbon (ZC) buildings as is frequently argued. We also show a multi-objective frontier for the CA example, whichallows us to estimate the needed technologies and costs for achieving a ZC building or microgrid.

  9. Achieving Sustainability inCalifornia’s CentralValley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubell, Mark; Beheim, Bret; Hillis, Vicken; Handy, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    of agricultural sustainability. ” Agriculture, Ecosystems &19, 2009. Achieving Sustainability in California’s Centralvariables. Achieving Sustainability in California’s Central

  10. California/Transmission/Agency Links | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Agency Links California Department of Fish and Wildlife California Office of Historic Preservation California Department of Transportation California Department of...

  11. The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

    2005-01-01

    California Energy Commission, Staff Report: Supply and CostCalifornia Energy Commission. Staff Report: Supply and Costthe total cost of gasoline in California. California Energy

  12. State of California Website Trends 2008-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneca, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    of Transportation (Caltrans) California Energy Commissionof Transportation (Caltrans)  California Energy Commission Transportation ( Caltrans)  11388  California Courts  California Energy 

  13. California Lithium Battery, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    California Lithium Battery (CaLBattery), based in Los Angeles, California, is developing a low-cost, advanced lithium-ion battery that employs a novel silicon graphene composite material that will substantially improve battery cycle life. When combined with other advanced battery materials, it could effectively lower battery life cycle cost by up to 70 percent. Over the next year, CALBattery will be working with Argonne National Laboratory to combine their patented silicon-graphene anode material process together with other advanced ANL cathode and electrolyte battery materials.

  14. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  15. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  16. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  17. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use...

  18. Building Performance Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Y (2008). DeST—An integrated building simulation toolkit,Part ? : Fundamentals. Building Simulation, 1: 95 ? 110.Y (2008). DeST—An integrated building simulation toolkit,

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee adopts, promulgates and administers the state building code. Compliance is determined through the building permit and inspection process by local...

  20. Accessible buildings Moderately accessible buildings*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Campus neighborhood map Moderately accessible paths** Accessible building entrance via parking lot to the University Park campus. This map, provided by UAC, is designed to assist persons with disabilities in finding accessibility. Your observations and suggestions regarding architectural For more information on UAC, you can

  1. Handbook of energy use for building construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, R.G.; Stein, C.; Buckley, M.; Green, M.

    1980-03-01

    The construction industry accounts for over 11.14% of the total energy consumed in the US annually. This represents the equivalent energy value of 1 1/4 billion barrels of oil. Within the construction industry, new building construction accounts for 5.19% of national annual energy consumption. The remaining 5.95% is distributed among new nonbuilding construction (highways, ralroads, dams, bridges, etc.), building maintenance construction, and nonbuilding maintenance construction. The handbook focuses on new building construction; however, some information for the other parts of the construction industry is also included. The handbook provides building designers with information to determine the energy required for buildings construction and evaluates the energy required for alternative materials, assemblies, and methods. The handbook is also applicable to large-scale planning and policy determination in that it provides the means to estimate the energy required to carry out major building programs.

  2. Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notice of Decision by the California Energy Commission To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Sacramento, CA 95814 Subject: Filing of Notice of Decision in compliance with Public Resources Code Section

  3. NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency From: California Energy Commission 1416 9th Street, Room 1311 1516 9th Street, MS-2000 Sacramento, CA 95814 Sacramento, CA 95814 Subject: Filing of Notice of Decision in compliance with Public Resources Code Section

  4. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Building Activity Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building Activity Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity,...

  5. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

  6. University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korpela, Eric J.

    to allocate the following F&A costs to Organized Research, Instruction, and other functions: ­ Operations and Maintenance (utilities, maintenance, etc.) ­ Building Depreciation ­ Interest ­ Equipment Depreciation F

  7. Buildings Interoperability Planning: Connected Buildings Interoperabil...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vision Context Steve Widergren PNNL 11 March 2015 Topics Purpose of meeting Buildings automation in the transformative time of connectivity Interoperability - a connected buildings...

  8. California Geothermal Energy Collaborative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CEC5002013105 Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT #12; PRIMARY AUTHOR, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Office Manager Energy Generation Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director ENERGY RESEARCH

  9. CALIFORNIA ENERGY FOURTH EDITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    further public funding, and to secure for California the environmental, economic, and reliability benefits, details how funding awards will be made, describes invoicing procedures, and includes necessary forms standard, biomass, solar thermal electric, wind, existing renewable #12;Table of Contents I - Introduction

  10. 167 Prospectus California Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system and associated changes in coastal upwelling. These data will be used to reconstruct north Pacific Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) where the digital data have been archived. #12;INTRODUCTION The California upwelling systems to climate change is poorly documented. Climate models and available paleoceanographic

  11. The Economics of Green Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Rental Sample Control Buildings PSM Controls Rated BuildingsSample Control Buildings PSM Controls Appendix Table A2 (Sample Control Buildings PSM Controls Rated Buildings Sales

  12. Googling the Top Two: Information Search in California’s Top Two Primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Betsy; Wray, Michael

    2015-01-01

    more as a consequence of the top two primary. ReferencesAssessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingGoogling the Top Two: Information Search in California’s Top

  13. The Los Angeles Aqueduct: A Reexamination of California’s First Critical Water Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robie, Charles

    2015-01-01

    California’s First Critical Water Transfer By Charles Robieof California’s first great water transfer, between InyoLos Angeles’s Department of Water and Power. As I reexamine

  14. Estimated impacts of climate warming on California’s high-elevation hydropower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madani, Kaveh; Lund, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    on high elevation hydropower generation in California’sCalifornia’s high-elevation hydropower Kaveh Madani · Jay R.Abstract California’s hydropower system is composed of high

  15. EMERGENCY ACTION University of California Riverside Main Campus Emergency Action Plan (EAP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    If possible to do so without endangering yourself, shut down all operations that could produce hazards if leftEMERGENCY ACTION PLAN (EAP) University of California Riverside Main Campus Emergency Action Plan emergencies that arise within the workplace as required by the California Code of Regulations (CCR) Title 8

  16. California's The state tries afirst-in-the-nationapproach to attackin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    . A Ijevy of bikes at the busy Southern l'.icific Depot in Davis, California--a city that's ahead In downtown Davis. he lirst time L^vry Mintier, FAICP, heard the term "sustainahility" in a discussion." California Assembly Bill 32 is the landmark state law approved in 2006 that requires Califomians to reduce

  17. Building Envelope Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is hosting a building envelope stakeholder workshop on behalf of the DOE Building Technologies Office.

  18. Modeling and Optimization of Commercial Buildings and Stationary Fuel Cell Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ainscough, C.; McLarty, D.; Sullivan, R.; Brouwer, J.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation describes the Distributed Generation Building Energy Assessment Tool (DG-BEAT) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of California Irvine. DG-BEAT is designed to allow stakeholders to assess the economics of installing stationary fuel cell systems in a variety of building types in the United States.

  19. A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6184E A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE DATA of California. #12;A SOFTWARE TOOL TO COMPARE MEASURED AND SIMULATED BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE DATA Tobias goals. To link design goals to actual operation one can compare measured with simulated energy

  20. CALIFORNIA PATH PROGRAM INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    CALIFORNIA PATH PROGRAM INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERFITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY,in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation, and Housing Agency, Department Agogino, Kai Goebel SatnamAlag University of California,Berkeley CaliforniaPATH Research Report UCB

  1. European Union Energy Performance of Building Directive and the Impact of Building Automation on Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, U.

    2008-01-01

    ) of consumers in the room and the integration in a superposed building automation and control system to meet efficiency class A. A high level of control accuracy (CA) for individual room controllers is necessary so that the room user adjusts the system... for the concrete implementation of required measures. Siemens Building Technologies has taken a leading role in these activities and with its products and systems that meet the requirements at a high level of quality. Properly designed building automation...

  2. California energy flow in 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.; Mui, N.

    1996-09-01

    California energy consumption increased in 1994 in keeping with a recovery from the previous mild recession years. Although unemployment remained above the national average, other indicators pointed to improved economic health. Increased energy use was registered principally in the residential/commercial and transportation end-use sectors. A cooler-than-usual winter and spring was reflected in increased consumption of natural gas, the principal space-heating fuel in the state. Because of low water levels behind state dams, utilities turned to natural gas for electrical generation and to increased imports from out-of- state sources to meet demand. Other factors, such as smaller output from geothermal, biomass, and cogenerators, contributed to the need for the large increase in electrical supply from these two sources. Nonetheless, petroleum dominated the supply side of the energy equation of the state in which transportation requirements comprise more than one-third of total energy demand. About half of the oil consumed derived from California production. Onshore production has been in slow decline; however, in 1994 the decrease was compensated for by increases from federal offshore fields. Until 1994 production had been limited by regulatory restrictions relating to the movement of the crude oil to onshore refineries. State natural gas production remained at 1993 levels. The increased demand was met by larger imports from Canada through the recent expansion of Pacific Transmission Company`s 804 mile pipeline. Deregulation of the state`s utilities moved ahead in 1994 when the California Public Utilities Commission issued its proposal on how to restructure the industry. Public hearings were conducted in which the chief issues were recovery of the utilities` capital investments, conflicts with the Public Utilities Policies Act, management of power transactions between new suppliers and former utility customers, and preservation of energy conservation programs currently sponsored by the utilities. The issues were not resolved at year-end, but the state`s public utilities began to take steps to improve their positions in a future competitive market by cutting costs, improving efficiencies operating plants, and enlarging their nonutility interests.

  3. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Department of Transportation, California Energy Commission,California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Department of Transportation (Caltrans), California Energy

  4. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Unvented, Conditioned Crawlspaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research which influenced code requirements by demonstrating that unvented, conditioned crawlspaces use 15% to 18% less energy for heating and cooling while reducing humidity over 20% in humid climates.

  5. City of Phoenix- Design Standards for City Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Phoenix has had energy standards for public buildings in place since 2005. In June 2005, the Phoenix City Council adopted a policy requiring all new city buildings built with 2006 bond...

  6. Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosar, D.

    1998-01-01

    for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality", that has cascaded into building codes over the early to mid 1990's. There has been a twofold to fourfold increase in outside air requirements for many commercial building applications, compared to the 1981 version...

  7. Improved Building Energy Consumption with the Help of Modern ICT 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietilainen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Kyoto process and the global combat against climate change will require more intensive energy saving efforts especially in all developed countries. Key for the success in building sector is the energy efficiency of the existing building stock...

  8. 1 Zoology Building 2 Cruickshank Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    1 Zoology Building 2 Cruickshank Building 3 23 St Machar Drive 4 King's Museum (Old Town House) 5 The Hub 6 St Mary's 7 Fraser Noble Building 8 Elphinstone Road Halls 9 The Sir Duncan Rice Library 10 Meston Building 11 Chaplaincy Centre 12 Confucius Institute 13 Security Office/Mailroom 14 Counselling

  9. The origin of California’s zero emission vehicle mandate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Collantes, Gustavo O

    2008-01-01

    Sperling, D. , 1989. Electric vehicles: performance, life-in California: The Role of Electric Vehicles. The ClaremontGM’s Revolutionary Electric Vehicle. Random House, New York.

  10. The Role of Linked Data and Semantic Web in Building Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corry, E. J.; Coakley, D.; O'Donnell, J.; Pauwels, P.; Keane, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Effective Decision Support Systems (DSS) for building service managers require adequate performance data from many building data silos in order to deliver a more complete view of building performance. Current performance analysis techniques tend...

  11. Residential building energy analysis : development and uncertainty assessment of a simplified model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

    1998-01-01

    Effective design of energy-efficient buildings requires attention to energy issues during the preliminary stages of design. To aid in the early consideration of a building's future energy usage, a simplified building energy ...

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software-EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated January 31, 2007, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Controlled Ventilation in General Office Spaces in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Fisk, William

    2010-01-01

    A prototypical office building meeting the prescriptive requirements of the 2008 California building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) was used in EnergyPlus simulations to calculate the energy savings potential of demand controlled ventilation (DCV) in five typical California climates per three design occupancy densities and two minimum ventilation rates. The assumed minimum ventilation rates in offices without DCV, based on two different measurement methods employed in a large survey, were 38 and 13 L/s per occupant. The results of the life cycle cost analysis show DCV is cost effective for office spaces if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 38 L/s per person, except at the low design occupancy of 10.8 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 3 (north coast) and 6 (south Coast). DCV was not found to be cost effective if the typical minimum ventilation rate without DCV is 13 L/s per occupant, except at high design occupancy of 21.5 people per 100 m2 in climate zones 14 (desert) and 16 (mountains). Until the large uncertainties about the base case ventilation rates in offices without DCV are reduced, the case for requiring DCV in general office spaces will be a weak case. Under the Title 24 Standards office occupant density of 10.8 people per 100 m2, DCV becomes cost effective when the base case minimum ventilation rate is greater than 42.5, 43.0, 24.0, 19.0, and 18.0 L/s per person for climate zone 3, 6, 12, 14, and 16 respectively.

  14. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7 Relative Standard ErrorsYear Jan Feb MarA6. BuildingB7.

  15. Building America Building Science Translator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergy IndustrialofofBuilding Science Translator February

  16. California Energy Incentive Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department ofBusinessCEA90:2:09California Energy Incentive

  17. Lessons from the California Electricity Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolak, Frank

    2003-01-01

    from the California Power Exchange (PX) day-ahead market andin the California Power Exchange day-ahead energy market andto cause the California Power Exchange to declare bankruptcy

  18. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Summit on America’s Energy Future (2008), http://www.natural gas. California’s Energy Future - The View to 2050supply California’ s Energy Future - The View to 2050 and

  19. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2002-01-01

    California houses are improved energy utilization and reduced operating costs.Costs = Increased Funds for Other Purposes Improving the energy efficiency of California’costs, and environmental impacts. Energy Consumption Our evaluation of the benefits from commissioning California

  20. COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATIONCann Please use the following citation for this report: Klein, Joel. 2009. Comparative Costs of California............................................................................................................................1 Changes in the Cost of Generation Model

  1. COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY GENERATION and Anitha Rednam, Comparative Costs of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies................................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 1: Summary of Technology Costs

  2. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01

    BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Greenhouse Gas Abatement withan equal opportunity employer. Greenhouse Gas Abatement withgeneration (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by * a p p l y

  3. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    combustion engine - CHP micro turbine - CHP gas turbine -power gas turbines, micro-turbines, and internal combustion

  4. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2010-01-01

    2020 S00 S/t of carbon mpared to CHP, PV a n d solar t h e rm a l as options in DE R-CAM only CHP as optioninDER-CAM CHP Capacity: 2.25 GW CHP Electricity: 10.05 TWh

  5. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and may also be charged by CHP systems during off-peak andDarrow, K et al. (2009), “CHP Market Assessment”, Integratedwith combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within

  6. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Field Evaluation of Cold Air Distribution Systems. EPRIand J.S. Elleson. 1988. Cold Air Distribution Design Guide.Field Evaluation of a Cold Air Distribution System. EPRI

  7. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Department of Energy research project. To show the impact ofResearch, Development, and Demonstration Projects”, IEEE power & energy

  8. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    energy commission representatives, and other users of cold air distribution technology. The contact list

  9. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    hybrid natural ventilation system was unable to provide ample cooling during the winter months, which caused a heat pump

  10. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Off-peak cooling with thermal storage." ASHRAE Journal, Vol.1. Brady, T.W. 1986. "Thermal storage for the merchandiseof Wisconsin, Madison Thermal Storage Research Institute 150

  11. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    adoption and reduced PV adoption, but ICEs are still veryindicate that PV and electric storage adoption can competeindicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete

  12. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and not only by PV / solar thermal systems. To satisfy theheat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptionphotovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electrical

  13. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onsand_doc/2001/012022p.pdf). Electricity Storage Association,Symons and Butler 2001, Electricity Storage Association, own

  14. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    in a 8.7% electricity cost decrease, full storage a 13.5%Electricity Cost: San Bernardino Installed Chiller and Storageon Total Fan Electricity Use: San Jose, Full Storage, 42°F

  15. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    fuel cell adoption compared to run 4e from the Basic Results of DER-CAM Optimizationoptimization approach for this analysis was chosen that allows optimizing the adoption of the following technologies in the commercial sector: fuel cells,

  16. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    ofCommercial Cool Storage Systems. EPRI Report CU-6561, Vol.sizing concepts for ice storage systems." Proceedings:produced by the ice storage system. The colder temperature

  17. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Proceedings: International Load Management Conference. EPRIto have significant load management benefits for utilitycan further promote load management technology by supporting

  18. University of California, Berkeley Hearst Memorial Mining Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    . Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure 15 12. Natural Gas Release or Leak 15 13. Ventilation Problem 15

  19. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electricalexchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers,

  20. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    that the use of air-side economizers may be omitted in neweconomic benefit of an air-side economizer is expected to beinclusion of an air-side economizer can create big headaches

  1. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PV capacities (GW) installed Solar Thermal capacities (MW) installed Solar Thermal capacities (GW) electricityGW) installed Solar Thermal capacities (MW) installed Solar

  2. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    air on demand with direct injection diffusers. Case 4 - 42°Fair is provided through direct injection diffusers. Variousis provided through direct injection diffusers. Case 6 - 42°

  3. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers,photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electrical

  4. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    lead acid absorption solar photo- storage batteries chillersolar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageand solar thermal collectors; • electrical storage, flow

  5. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    cooling plant consists of two Carrier 300-ton (for water chilling) centrifugal chillers combined with a PAPCO icecooling plant consists of two 587-ton (for water chilling) Trane centrifugal chillers with a storage system of Cryogel Ice

  6. Cold Air Distribution in Office Buildings: Technology Assessment for California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    for summer air conditioning with ice storage." ASHRAEIce storage is one form of thennal energy storage (TES), or off-peak air-conditioning,

  7. Post Office Building, Rancho Mirage, California | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLEDEnergy Political Activity at DOERemovalHarmless7951Post

  8. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water Resources

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhoun County,EnergyInformation

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01Technical Information-- Energy, science,

  10. Sandia California breaks ground on new building | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal of HonorPosterNationalProgramsSSGF Magazine

  11. The California Energy Crisis: A Little Too Much Help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Kenneth T.; Howard, Amanda L.

    2001-01-01

    55 percent of California’s power plants use natural gas (100supply of new power plants in California and a coincidentof California’s power supply is generated by plants that

  12. Transnational Social Networks and Globalization: The Geography of California's Exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deo Bardhan, Ashok; Howe, David K.

    1998-01-01

    THE GEOGRAPHY OF CALIFORNIA’S EXPORTS B These papers areGeography of California’s Exports Ashok Deo Bardhan & Davidof California's Exports, Working Paper 98-262. Fisher

  13. High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2009-12-31

    Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and the US.A collaborative test, monitoring, and reporting protocol was also formulated via the Windows Testbed Facility in collaboration with industry partners, transitioning industry to focus on the importance of expecting measured performance to consistently achieve design performance expectations. The facility enables accurate quantification of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts of synergistic facade-lighting-HVAC systems on an apples-to-apples comparative basis and its data can be used to verify results from simulations. Emerging interior and exterior shading technologies were investigated as potential near-term, low-cost solutions with potential broad applicability in both new and retrofit construction. Commercially-available and prototype technologies were developed, tested, and evaluated. Full-scale, monitored field tests were conducted over solstice-to-solstice periods to thoroughly evaluate the technologies, uncover potential risks associated with an unknown, and quantify performance benefits. Exterior shading systems were found to yield net zero energy levels of performance in a sunny climate and significant reductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shading systems were found to yield significant daylighting and comfort-related benefits.In support of an integrated design process, a PC-based commercial fenestration (COMFEN) software package, based on EnergyPlus, was developed that enables architects and engineers to quickly assess and compare the performance of innovative facade technologies in the early sketch or schematic design phase. This tool is publicly available for free and will continue to improve in terms of features and accuracy. Other work was conducted to develop simulation tools to model the performance of any arbitrary complex fenestration system such as common Venetian blinds, fabric roller shades as well as more exotic innovative facade systems such as optical louver systems.

  14. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  15. CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

  16. California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

  17. Steven Greenhut California's Secret Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    Steven Greenhut California's Secret Government Redevelopment agencies blight the Golden State as a national travesty, a failed experiment in top-heavy government and liberal social engineering

  18. Early Ceramics from Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drover, Christopher E.

    1975-01-01

    REPORTS Early Ceramics from Southern California CHRISTOPHERThis paper describes the ceramics and their chronologicalfor dating. To date, 10 ceramic specimens have been

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottie, Gregory J.

    , Committee Chair University of California, Los Angeles 2002 #12;iii DEDICATION To my family, near and far... With Love... #12;iv Contents Dedication

  20. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottie, Gregory J.

    of California, Los Angeles 1999 ii #12;DEDICATION This dissertation is dedicated to my parents. iii #12;Contents Dedication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii List of Figures

  1. Determinants of Acorn Productivity Among Five Species of Oaks in Central Coastal California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geographic and climatic range inhabited by oaks in California. Finally, the logistic problems associated animals, require considerable maintenance, and are difficult to put out in suffi cient numbers to yield

  2. High-performance commercial building facades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen; Bazjanac, Vladimir; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Kohler, Christian

    2002-06-01

    This study focuses on advanced building facades that use daylighting, sun control, ventilation systems, and dynamic systems. A quick perusal of the leading architectural magazines, or a discussion in most architectural firms today will eventually lead to mention of some of the innovative new buildings that are being constructed with all-glass facades. Most of these buildings are appearing in Europe, although interestingly U.S. A/E firms often have a leading role in their design. This ''emerging technology'' of heavily glazed fagades is often associated with buildings whose design goals include energy efficiency, sustainability, and a ''green'' image. While there are a number of new books on the subject with impressive photos and drawings, there is little critical examination of the actual performance of such buildings, and a generally poor understanding as to whether they achieve their performance goals, or even what those goals might be. Even if the building ''works'' it is often dangerous to take a design solution from one climate and location and transport it to a new one without a good causal understanding of how the systems work. In addition, there is a wide range of existing and emerging glazing and fenestration technologies in use in these buildings, many of which break new ground with respect to innovative structural use of glass. It is unclear as to how well many of these designs would work as currently formulated in California locations dominated by intense sunlight and seismic events. Finally, the costs of these systems are higher than normal facades, but claims of energy and productivity savings are used to justify some of them. Once again these claims, while plausible, are largely unsupported. There have been major advances in glazing and facade technology over the past 30 years and we expect to see continued innovation and product development. It is critical in this process to be able to understand which performance goals are being met by current technology and design solutions, and which ones need further development and refinement. The primary goal of this study is to clarify the state-of-the-art of the performance of advanced building facades so that California building owners and designers can make informed decisions as to the value of these building concepts in meeting design goals for energy efficiency, ventilation, productivity and sustainability.

  3. Mountain View, California: Fiat Res Publica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    Mountain View, California: Fiat Res Publica Gregory Tungundifferen­ tiated. In Mountain View, California (populationtoward San Francisco. Mountain View is avoiding a "just say

  4. California Nonpoint Source Program Strategy and Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Nonpoint Source Program Strategy and Implementation Plan, 1998-2013Legal Abstract California Nonpoint Source Program...

  5. Edmund G. Brown Jr. LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmund G. Brown Jr. Governor LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: SMART LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE LIGHTING's Future: Smart LightEmitting Diode Lighting in Residential Fans. California Energy Commission, PIER

  6. GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

  7. California Streamlines Approvals for Renewable Energy Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Department of Fish and Game to create a "one-stop" permitting process. The collaboration, called the...

  8. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California at at Davis Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: University of California...

  9. Competitive ancillary service procurement in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Khavkin, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Model (Source: California Power Exchange) In late 1996, theestablishment of the Power Exchange (PX) and the IndependentSource: California Power Exchange) Imbalance Energy Price $/

  10. California's Electricity Crisis: A Market Apart?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James

    2003-01-01

    rule in the California Power exchange as the source of theThe California Power Exchange (PX) was to oversee mostaverage unconstrained Power Exchange price through the 32

  11. California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...

  12. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    2006-2016: Staff energy demand forecast (Revised SeptemberCEC (2005b) Energy demand forecast methods report.California energy demand 2003-2013 forecast. California

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    Rand Corporation, "Energy Alternatives for California: PathsDoctor et aI. , "Energy Alternatives for California: PathsPrograms Energy Facility Alternatives Discussion . ,

  14. Modelica Buildings Library

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performers:-- Lawrence Berkeley National Lab – Berkeley, CA-- Oak Ridge National Lab – Oak Ridge, TN-- University of California-Berkeley – Berkeley, CA

  15. California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards for Light-Duty Vehicles (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    In July 2002, California Assembly Bill 1493 (A.B. 1493) was signed into law. The law requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) develop and adopt, by January 1, 2005, greenhouse gas emission standards for light-duty vehicles that provide the maximum feasible reduction in emissions. In estimating the feasibility of the standard, CARB is required to consider cost-effectiveness, technological capability, economic impacts, and flexibility for manufacturers in meeting the standard.

  16. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance Building America Top...

  17. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on...

  18. Better Buildings Neighborhood Initiative Upgrades 100,000 Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Neighborhood Initiative Upgrades 100,000 Buildings, Saves 730 Million on Energy Bills Better Buildings Neighborhood Initiative Upgrades 100,000 Buildings, Saves...

  19. Microsoft Word - Green Building Certification EA

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As required by Section 436(h) of EISA 2007, in 2008 GSA identified the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) 5 Silver as...

  20. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, L.W.

    2009-01-01

    indoor air quality, buildings energy performance, computervoluntary building-energy-performance guidelines. Recentlyrelated to building-energy-performance standards, guidelines

  1. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  2. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program Under Solicitation PON-09-604 #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION impacts report assesses and reports on the potential localized health impacts of this additional fuelCalifornia Energy Commission STAFF REPORT MAY 2011 CEC-600-2010-009-AD2 LOCALIZED HEALTH IMPACTS

  3. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenstrom, Michael K.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Application of Knowledge-Based Classification Techniques of California, Los Angeles 2005 #12;iii Table of Contents Signature Page ii Table of Contents iii List.5 Image Data 20 2.6 References 25 3 Digital Image Processing 28 3.1 Image Rectification and Restoration 28

  4. LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN CALIFORNIA: HISTORY, RISKS, AND SITING Tyler Contributors Dave Maul Manager NATURAL GAS & SPECIAL PROJECTS OFFICE Terrence O'Brien, Deputy Commissioner and Leader of the Governor's Natural Gas Working Group #12;This paper was prepared as the result

  5. University of California Los Angeles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    University of California Los Angeles Understanding the BGP Transport Delay A dissertation submitted. Federic Paik Schoenberg Mario Gerla Songwu Lu Lixia Zhang, Committee Chair University of California, Los . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 BGP Transport Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.3 BGP Monitoring

  6. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  7. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    (page 18). In another story on transformations, Energy and Resources Ph.D. candidate and California Public Utilities Commissioner Carla Peterman is focusing on developing the energy storage market, a project that could push California's alternative energy to the next level of efficiency and make

  8. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  9. Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef, J. An, R. Hunt, P. Rainsberry, M. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef, J. An, R. Hunt, P. Rainsberry, M. Abdou Fusion Engineering Science, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, California, USA ying

  10. Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

    2001-09-17

    Dimming controls for electric lighting have been one of the mainstays of the effort to use daylighting to reduce annual lighting energy consumption. The coincidence of daylighting with electric utility peak demand makes daylighting controls an effective strategy for reducing commercial building peak electric loads. During times of energy shortage, there is a greatly increased need to reduce electricity use during peak periods, both to ease the burden on electricity providers and to control the operating costs of buildings. The paper presents a typical commercial building electric demand profile during summer, and shows how daylighting-linked lighting controls and load shedding techniques can reduce lighting at precisely those times when electricity is most expensive. We look at the importance of dimming for increasing the reliability of the electricity grid in California and other states, as well as examine the potential cost-effectiveness of widespread use of daylighting to save energy and reduce monthly electricity bills.

  11. Office Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Type of Office Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per Million Btu All Office Buildings 1,089 1,475 90.5 16.32...

  12. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    platforms and  building automation systems (BAS), a including  basic  building  automation  control,  fault Smart building power management automation. Building

  13. Building Energy Monitoring and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    United States and China, Energy and Buildings, 2013. Underin Singapore. Energy and Buildings, 37, 167-174. Eom, J. ,building operations. Energy and Buildings, 33, 783–791.

  14. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  15. Maximizing the Value of Photovoltaic Installations on Schools in California: Choosing the Best Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.

    2011-07-01

    Schools in California often have a choice between multiple electricity rate options. For schools with photovoltaic (PV) installations, choosing the right rate is essential to maximize the value of PV generation. The rate option that minimizes a school?s electricity expenses often does not remain the most economical choice after the school installs a PV system. The complex interaction between PV generation, building load, and rate structure makes determining the best rate a challenging task. This report evaluates 22 rate structures across three of California?s largest electric utilities--Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E)--in order to identify common rate structure attributes that are favorable to PV installations.

  16. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    multifamily buildings, including how to successfully implement those strategies through smart design, specification, and construction techniques. webinarventilationmultifamily...

  17. California Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948California (Million Cubic Feet)per272 522 542

  18. Portsmouth Proposed Plan for the Process Buildings and Complex...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the process buildings and complex facilities at the Portsmouth Site. Two remedial alternatives were developed for consideration. This Proposed Plan describes the required...

  19. Qualified Software for Calculating Commercial Building Tax Deductions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On this page you'll find a list of qualified computer software for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings that meet federal tax incentive requirements.

  20. Building Energy Asset Score: Building Owners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Asset Score is a national standardized tool for evaluating the physical and structural energy efficiency of commercial and multifamily residential buildings. The Asset Score generates a simple energy efficiency rating that enables comparison among buildings, and identifies opportunities for users to invest in energy efficiency upgrades. It is web-based and free to use.