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Sample records for building policy california

  1. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Building Survey Information Database of Buildings over 100 Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program. This program was funded by the California of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Project Management: Cathy Higgins, Program Director for New Buildings

  2. Riverside County- Sustainable Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2009, the County of Riverside Board of Supervisors adopted Policy Number H-29, creating the Sustainable Building Policy. The Policy requires that all new county building projects...

  3. California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Air Resources Board's "California Green Building Strategy" Collectively, energy use, as well as the sustainable operation, retrofitting and renovation of existing buildings. Since 1978, when building energy efficiency standards (Title 24, Part 6) were adopted, Californian's have saved more than

  4. 33-EDUCATION BUILDING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    33-EDUCATION BUILDING FIRE AND EVACUATION PLAN UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DAVIS EDUCATION BUILDING 4610 X STREET #12;BUILDING NAME: 33-EDUCATION BUILDING Page 2 of 11 This Fire Plan is to be used the building. In conjunction with the fire evacuation signs posted throughout the building, this plan satisfies

  5. Broward County- Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, Board of County Commissioners of Broward County passed a resolution creating the County Green Building Policy. All new County-owned and operated buildings must achieve a minimum...

  6. Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Memorandum Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California2012 ICF, 2012, “Combined Heat and Power: Policy AnalysisA New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning

  7. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

    2009-09-01

    The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

  8. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    of Buildings: Energy Policies in Europe – Examples of BestCEC. (2005). Integrated Energy Policy Report. CEC-100-2005-Heating  Region.  Energy Policy , 37 (6), 2113-2118. Li,

  9. Sustainable Building Policy 1 3/17/2005 Sustainable Building Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Sustainable Building Policy 1 3/17/2005 Sustainable Building Policy University Facilities POLICY 9 University. This policy makes a clear statement that the University embraces these priorities and will invest in them through every major building project. Contained in the policy are procedures, responsibilities

  10. Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Part 11 of the California Building Code (also known as CalGreen) Patrick Saxton, P.E. patrick.saxton@energy.ca.gov 916-651-0489 High Performance Buildings and Standards Development Office California Energy Commission September 20

  11. 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Page 1 of 1 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Page 1 of 1 100.2 Building Evacuation Policy Policy Name: Building leadership to students and others by directing all persons to promptly vacate a building upon the activation safety of members of the University community, adherence to building evacuation procedures protects

  12. California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks California Policy Stimulates Carbon Negative CNG for Heavy Duty Trucks Describes system for fueling truck fleet with...

  13. California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects by Richard J: _______________________________________ Date #12;California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming Effects Richard J, 2006 #12;#12;ABSTRACT California Policy Should Distinguish Biofuels by Differential Global Warming

  14. Inconsistent Application of Environmental Laws and Policies to California's Oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inconsistent Application of Environmental Laws and Policies to California's Oak Woodlands1 Gregory of environmental laws and policies to California's oak woodlands and associated resources. Specifically, large of Environmental Laws and Policies to California's Oak Woodlands-- Giusti and Merenlender Oaks continue

  15. CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING (CCPM) DIALOG Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    H2 CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING (CCPM) DIALOG Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling ­ California goals of criteria pollutant and GHG emission reduction. · Modelers need to work with policy makers more to policy-makers and stakeholders. 5 #12;Greenhouse Gas Emissions Modeling ­ California 2030 #12;

  16. CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION POLICY 12/3/03 Page 1 of 5 SUMMARY guidelines related to the funding and the estimating of costs. It also formalizes the review and approval construction project or major renovation with a project cost estimated to be $3 million or greater should

  17. SUMMARY OF CALIFORNIA CLIMATE POLICY MODELING FORUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Corey (CARB), Joshua Cunningham (CARB), Nicole Dolney (CARB), Guido Franco (California Energy Commission of the UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy and the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways program of the Institute of Transportation Studies. While the content was significantly

  18. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    of Buildings: Energy Policies in Europe – Examples of BestEnergy Buildings in Europe: Current State of Play, Definitions and Bestto finance energy-efficiency projects in Europe. The best

  19. University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University Of California, Berkeley Valley Life Sciences Building (VLSB) Building Emergency Plan Date Revised: January 2014 Prepared By: Derek Apodaca #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS I. BUILDING INFORMATION 1. Building Name 2. Building Coordinator Name 3. Alternate BC Name 4. Emergency Assembly Area Location 5

  20. Dalhousie Sustainable Building Policy March 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    .2 LEED Rating System "The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating of Principles, and Plan. This policy formalizes Dalhousie's existing practice and commitment to green building as demonstrated by the design and construction of a number of energy efficient buildings from the 90s to the LEED

  1. Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies Information about appliance...

  2. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01

    2004) “What Makes a Good Sustainable Development Plan? AnPrinciples of Sustainable Development,” Environment and1396. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California

  3. Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy 1 Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy (December, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy 1 Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy (December, 2011....................................................................................................... 2 3.1 Alignment of Art for New Buildings and Spaces Scheme with State Government Public Art Scheme................................................................................................................. 3 Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy #12;Art for New Buildings and Spaces Policy 2 Art for New

  4. City of San Jose- Private Sector Green Building Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2008, the City of San Jose enacted the Private Sector Green Building Policy (Policy No. 6-32). The policy was adopted in Ordinance No. 28622 in June, 2009. All new buildings must meet...

  5. + University of California Riverside + Executive Management Policy Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to this guide The Executive Management Policy Group (EMPG) is the executive level oversight and strategic involved in the day-to-day management of the crisis. The EMPG makes proactive policy and strategicCrisis & Emergency + University of California Riverside + Executive Management Policy Group Crisis

  6. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing:...

  7. Policy Forum Series "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Policy Forum Series "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy Future, From Near as it transitions to a renewable energy future. Featuring panelists from government, industry and academia the renewables portfolio standard (RPS) beyond 33 percent. "Beyond 33 Percent: California's Renewable Energy

  8. Effects of California's Climate Policy in Facilitating CCUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Elizabeth

    2014-12-31

    California is at the forefront of addressing the challenges involved in redesigning its energy infrastructure to meet 2050 GHG reduction goals, but CCUS commercialization lags in California as it does elsewhere. It is unclear why this is the case given the state’s forefront position in aggressive climate change policy. The intent of this paper is to examine the factors that may explain why CCUS has not advanced as rapidly as other GHG emissions mitigation technologies in California and identify ways by which CCUS commercialization may be advanced in the context of California’s future energy infrastructure. CCUS has application to reduce GHG emissions from the power, industrial and transportation sectors in the state. Efficiency, use of renewable energy or nuclear generation to replace fossil fuels, use of lower or no-net-carbon feedstocks (such as biomass), and use of CCUS on fossil fuel generation are the main options, but California has fewer options for making the deep cuts in CO2 emissions within the electricity sector to meet 2050 goals. California is already the most efficient of all 50 states as measured by electricity use per capita, and, while further efficiency measures can reduce per capita consumption, increasing population is still driving electricity demand upwards. A 1976 law prevents building any new nuclear plants until a federal high-level nuclear waste repository is approved. Most all in-state electricity generation already comes from natural gas; although California does plan to eliminate electricity imports from out-of-state coal-fired generation. Thus, the two options with greatest potential to reduce in-state power sector CO2 emissions are replacing fossil with renewable generation or employing CCUS on natural gas power plants. Although some scenarios call on California to transition its electricity sector to 100 percent renewables, it is unclear how practical this approach is given the intermittency of renewable generation, mismatches between peak generation times and demand times, and the rate of progress in developing technologies for large-scale power storage. Vehicles must be electrified or move to biofuels or zero-carbon fuels in order to decarbonize the transportation sector. These options transfer the carbon footprint of transportation to other sectors: the power sector in the case of electric vehicles and the industrial and agricultural sectors in the case of biofuels or zero-carbon fuels. Thus, the underlying presumption to achieve overall carbon reductions is that the electricity used by vehicles does not raise the carbon emissions of the power sector: biofuel feedstock growth, harvest, and processing uses low carbon energy or production of fuels from fossil feedstocks employs CCUS. This results in future transportation sector energy derived solely from renewables, biomass, or fossil fuel point sources utilizing CCUS. In the industrial sector, the largest contributors to GHG emissions are transportation fuel refineries and cement plants. Emissions from refineries come from on-site power generation and hydrogen plants; while fuel mixes can be changed to reduce the GHG emissions from processing and renewable sources can be used to generate power, total decarbonization requires use of CCUS. Similarly, for cement plants, power generation may use carbon-free feedstocks instead of fossil fuels, but CO2 emissions associated with the manufacture of cement products must be dealt with through CCUS. Of course, another option for these facilities is the purchase of offsets to create a zero-emissions plant.

  9. Effects of California's Climate Policy in Facilitating CCUS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burton, Elizabeth

    2014-12-31

    California is at the forefront of addressing the challenges involved in redesigning its energy infrastructure to meet 2050 GHG reduction goals, but CCUS commercialization lags in California as it does elsewhere. It is unclear why this is the case given the state’s forefront position in aggressive climate change policy. The intent of this paper is to examine the factors that may explain why CCUS has not advanced as rapidly as other GHG emissions mitigation technologies in California and identify ways by which CCUS commercialization may be advanced in the context of California’s future energy infrastructure. CCUS has application to reducemore »GHG emissions from the power, industrial and transportation sectors in the state. Efficiency, use of renewable energy or nuclear generation to replace fossil fuels, use of lower or no-net-carbon feedstocks (such as biomass), and use of CCUS on fossil fuel generation are the main options, but California has fewer options for making the deep cuts in CO2 emissions within the electricity sector to meet 2050 goals. California is already the most efficient of all 50 states as measured by electricity use per capita, and, while further efficiency measures can reduce per capita consumption, increasing population is still driving electricity demand upwards. A 1976 law prevents building any new nuclear plants until a federal high-level nuclear waste repository is approved. Most all in-state electricity generation already comes from natural gas; although California does plan to eliminate electricity imports from out-of-state coal-fired generation. Thus, the two options with greatest potential to reduce in-state power sector CO2 emissions are replacing fossil with renewable generation or employing CCUS on natural gas power plants. Although some scenarios call on California to transition its electricity sector to 100 percent renewables, it is unclear how practical this approach is given the intermittency of renewable generation, mismatches between peak generation times and demand times, and the rate of progress in developing technologies for large-scale power storage. Vehicles must be electrified or move to biofuels or zero-carbon fuels in order to decarbonize the transportation sector. These options transfer the carbon footprint of transportation to other sectors: the power sector in the case of electric vehicles and the industrial and agricultural sectors in the case of biofuels or zero-carbon fuels. Thus, the underlying presumption to achieve overall carbon reductions is that the electricity used by vehicles does not raise the carbon emissions of the power sector: biofuel feedstock growth, harvest, and processing uses low carbon energy or production of fuels from fossil feedstocks employs CCUS. This results in future transportation sector energy derived solely from renewables, biomass, or fossil fuel point sources utilizing CCUS. In the industrial sector, the largest contributors to GHG emissions are transportation fuel refineries and cement plants. Emissions from refineries come from on-site power generation and hydrogen plants; while fuel mixes can be changed to reduce the GHG emissions from processing and renewable sources can be used to generate power, total decarbonization requires use of CCUS. Similarly, for cement plants, power generation may use carbon-free feedstocks instead of fossil fuels, but CO2 emissions associated with the manufacture of cement products must be dealt with through CCUS. Of course, another option for these facilities is the purchase of offsets to create a zero-emissions plant.« less

  10. State Policies to Encourage Green Building Principles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation, presented Dec. 17, 2008, covered state policies for green building principles. Presenters included Brian Lips of North Carolina State University, Chuck Sathrum of the North Carolina Department of Administration's State Energy Office, and Angie Fyfe of the Colorado Governor's Energy Office.

  11. Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

  12. Green Building Policy Options for New Orleans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted from a memo and report delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in 2008. The report outlines ideas for and potential impacts of various green building policies in New Orleans in the years following Hurricane Katrina.

  13. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    2010, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,and Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings,” IEEEIravani, and C. Marnay, “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoing

  14. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, Mark; Can, Stephane de la Rue de; Zheng, Nina; Williams, Christopher; Amman, Jennifer; Staniaszek, Dan

    2012-10-26

    This report addresses the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions and the greatest opportunity to reduce these emissions. The IPCC 4th Assessment Report estimates that globally 35% to 40% of all energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions (relative to a growing baseline) result from energy use in buildings. Emissions reductions from a combination of energy efficiency and conservation (using less energy) in buildings have the potential to cut emissions as much as all other energy-using sectors combined. This is especially the case for China, India and other developing countries that are expected to account for 80% or more of growth in building energy use worldwide over the coming decades. In short, buildings constitute the largest opportunity to mitigate climate change and special attention needs to be devoted to developing countries. At the same time, the buildings sector has been particularly resistant to achieving this potential. Technology in other sectors has advanced more rapidly than in buildings. In the recent past, automobile companies have made large investments in designing, engineering, and marketing energy efficient and alternative fuel vehicles that reduce greenhouse gas emissions. At the same time, the buildings sector – dependent on millions and millions of decisions by consumers and homeowners – face a large variety of market barriers that cause very substantial underinvestment in energy efficiency. How can the trajectory of energy use in buildings be changed to reduce the associated CO{sub 2} emissions? Is it possible to greatly accelerate this change? The answer to these questions depends on policy, technology, and behavior. Can policies be crafted and implemented to drive the trajectory down? Can the use of existing energy efficiency technologies be increased greatly and new technologies developed and brought to market? And what is the role of behavior in reducing or increasing energy use in buildings? These are the three overarching issues. The information assembled in this study and the knowledge derived from it needs to be brought to bear on these three questions. And thus we turn to some of the insights from the study, presented in the form of findings and recommendation.

  15. Greater Energy Savings through Building Energy Performance Policy: Four Leading Policy and Program Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action Existing Commercial Buildings Working Group

    2014-05-30

    This paper lays out recommendations for linking existing policies and developing new policies, such that their success is based on the real energy savings achieved in buildings. This approach has the potential to affect the entire building lifecycle.

  16. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Low Energy Buildings .6.2.2.7. International Comparisons of Low Energy Building218 China Low Energy Building Case

  17. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A. B. (1992). Energy-Efficiency Buildings: Institutionalec.europa.eu/energy/efficiency/buildings/buildings_en.htm20). Plan on energy efficiency building to be announced,

  18. Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance...

  19. Indonesia-ECN Capacity building for energy policy formulation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia-ECN Capacity building for energy policy formulation and implementation of sustainable energy projects Jump to: navigation, search Name CASINDO: Capacity development and...

  20. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    study of Ningbo. Energy and Buildings(43), 2197-2202. Yin,buildings in China. Energy and Buildings, 36, 1191-1196.Public Buildings. Energy and Buildings, 41, 426:435. Hong,

  1. LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings Wm National Laboratory Berkeley, California Synopsis This paper discusses field measurements of duct system

  2. Impacts of lateral code changes associated with the 2006 International Building Code and the 2008 California Building Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratley, Desirée Page

    2007-01-01

    The 2008 California Building Code (CBC) will adopt the structural section of the 2006 International Building Code (IBC), which includes alterations to the procedure to determine earthquake design loading, and a drastic ...

  3. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    construction, and eventually the operation of the building.2008. Richland, Washington: Building Energy Codes Program,L. , & Hogan, J. (2003). Building Energy Code Enforcement: A

  4. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manley, Steven L.

    in the analysis and design of power generating systems, such as direct conversion, coal burning, hydraulic, nuclear, solar wind, and various other types of power plants. Requirement for the Certificate Program: Certificate Program In Energy Conversion And Power Systems Engineering The following policy statement

  5. University of California Policy Personal Protective Equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    and regulatory standards require the supervisor to select Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for workers under is included in Appendix A. Laboratory/Technical Areas: For the purposes of this policy, a laboratory/technical, the default "supervisor" in laboratory/technical areas is the Principal Investigator. Use or Storage

  6. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    advanced commercial lighting products and less successful at increasing the number of whole-building, HVAC, and building envelope

  7. "Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Figure: 2050 Scenario from California Air Resources Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , and diversify our transportation energy supply. This policy forum draws from the latest research to explore some"Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Figure: 2050 Scenario from California Air dependency, California has adopted numerous vehicle and fuel policies that accelerate the introduction

  8. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01

    Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communitiesusing the 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communitiessurveyed in 2011 (Energy Sustainable California Communities

  9. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. ACEEE. EarthStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 10-196. Martinez,Rubild, J. (2008). Energy Efficiency in Buildings in China.

  10. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Richland, Washington: Building Energy Codes Program, PacificHogan, J. (2003). Building Energy Code Enforcement: A LookM. (2010, April). Options for Energy Efficiency in India and

  11. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    India, as both the LEED and GRIHA building labeling schemesgreen building labeling programs such as LEED, which haverelevant labeling systems:  India’s GRIHA and the LEED green

  12. CONSTRUCTION SAFETY POLICY JANUARY 2014 Page 1 of 9 California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    CONSTRUCTION SAFETY POLICY ­ JANUARY 2014 Page 1 of 9 California Institute of Technology GUIDELINES..................................................4 HOW TO DISPOSE OF CYTOTOXIC WASTE.................................................................................................4 WASTE CYTOTOXIC DRUGS

  13. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    83 3.6. Best Energy Policy Practices in the EuropeanEuropean Union) 3.6. Best Energy Policy Practices in thethat are among the best low energy commercial (public)

  14. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2010-06-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial-sector distributed energy resources (DER) with combined heat and power (CHP) in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. Historically, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. In our research, we examine how these medium-sized commercial buildings might implement DER and CHP. The buildings are able to adopt and operate various technologies, e.g., photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, batteries and thermal storage systems. We apply the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM), which is a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs and/or CO2 emissions. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California, existing tariffs of major utilities, and expected performance data of available technologies in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for these buildings. We compare different policy instruments, e.g., a CO2 pricing scheme or a feed-in tariff (FiT), and show their contributions to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goals of additional 4 GW CHP capacities and 6.7 Mt/a GHG reduction in California by 2020. By applying different price levels for CO2, we find that there is competition between fuel cells and PV/solar thermal. It is found that the PV/solar thermal adoption increases rapidly, but shows a saturation at high CO2 prices, partly due to limited space for PV and solar thermal. Additionally, we find that large office buildings are good hosts for CHP in general. However, most interesting is the fact that fossil-based CHP adoption also increases with increasing CO2 prices. We will show service territory specific results since the attractiveness of DER varies widely by climate zone and service territory.

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Zero Net-Energy Homes Production Builder Business Case: California/Florida Production Builders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Grupe Homes of Sacramento’s work with Building America to design California’s first production-scale community of solar homes. The homes outsold neighboring developments two to one.

  16. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Passive House Passive House (Passivhaus in German) is the oldest voluntary standard for super-efficient buildings

  17. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    April). Options for Energy Efficiency in India and Barriersmain.htm Bureau of Energy Efficiency, Government of India. (of Building Energy Efficiency Labeling. Presentation.

  18. Harris County- Green Building Policy for County Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Harris County Facilities and Property Management (FPM) Division also requires all county buildings to meet minimum energy efficiency and sustainability measures, as described in the Best Gree...

  19. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  20. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    renewables- integrated green building floor space growing towhich renewable energy resources are used to provide spacerenewable energy (especially rooftop solar), and energy-efficient light bulbs, rather than for energy-efficient space-

  1. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    end-users in California. All power plants from whom theseCalifornia could cover its baseload power needs from clean plantsCalifornia that takes delivery of power generated by a plant

  2. Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL Building (Energy Budget) and the annual TDV energy consumption for lighting and components not regulated for energy use components included in the performance compliance approach for the Standard Design Building

  3. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    4 - BEE Policies Review (China) LEED is one of the mostReview (India) Gaining a foothold in these high-visibility  projects  will  undoubtedly  work  to  expand  LEED’Review (U.S.A. ) Table 2-4. Points Available under the LEED

  4. High-Performance Buildings – Value, Messaging, Financial and Policy Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Molly

    2011-02-22

    At the request of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, an in-depth analysis of the rapidly evolving state of real estate investments, high-performance building technology, and interest in efficiency was conducted by HaydenTanner, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program. The analysis objectives were • to evaluate the link between high-performance buildings and their market value • to identify core messaging to motivate owners, investors, financiers, and others in the real estate sector to appropriately value and deploy high-performance strategies and technologies across new and existing buildings • to summarize financial mechanisms that facilitate increased investment in these buildings. To meet these objectives, work consisted of a literature review of relevant writings, examination of existing and emergent financial and policy mechanisms, interviews with industry stakeholders, and an evaluation of the value implications through financial modeling. This report documents the analysis methodology and findings, conclusion and recommendations. Its intent is to support and inform the DOE Building Technologies Program on policy and program planning for the financing of high-performance new buildings and building retrofit projects.

  5. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California Commercial Office Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, S.; Piette, M. A.; Gu, L.; Haves, P.

    2001-01-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new loadshedding programs have been...

  6. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingof Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onenergy resources, GHG control, microgrids, policies The work

  7. Managing California’s Water: Insights from Interviews with Water Policy Experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Null, Sarah E.; Bartolomeo, Eleanor; Lund, Jay R.; Hanak, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    2009. Bulletin 160–09: California water plan update.California Department of Water Resources. Available from:should be allowed to sell water in California? Third-party

  8. Zero Energy Building Policies and Definitions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobsMotion to Withdraw | Department of EnergyAdvisorZero Energy Building

  9. University of California, Davis China-U.S. ZEV Policy Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    University of California, Davis China-U.S. ZEV Policy Lab China Center For Energy and Transportation Yunshi Wang Director #12;Chinese New Energy Vehicle Development Status Data Source: 1 2 3IEA-Tianjin-Hebei work together, following California Experience · Beijing led New Energy Vehicle Development Supply

  10. Environmental Assessment for the proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-1087) evaluating the proposed action to modify existing Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. LBNL is located in Berkeley, California and operated by the University of California (UC). The project consists of placing a pre-fabricated building inside Building 51B to house a new 10 MeV heavy ion linear accelerator. A control room and other support areas would be provided within and directly adjacent to Building 51B. The accelerator system would be used to conduct tests, at reduced scale and cost, many features of a heavy-ion accelerator driver for the Department of Energy`s inertial fusion energy program. Based upon information and analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01

    Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey, Interna- tional County/City Management Association (ICMA), and US

  12. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    in carbon-intensive generating plants before the overallCalifornia, Mexico. Mohave generating plant is included in

  13. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications”,Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

  14. A New Campus Building on Efficiency: University of California (UC) Merced Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit two existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  15. Asilomar Declaration on Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Board, California Department of Transportation, Energyon Transportation and Energy Policy at California’s Asilomar

  16. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    of Architectural Energy-Saving in China. ” http://Assessment of Building Energy- Saving Policies and Programsi Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs

  17. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings (3): 305-316.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, (4): 205-210.Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, (4): 177-185.

  18. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    and does consider CHP in commercial buildings as an option.for CHP installations are office buildings, hospitals,building sector can install 1.4 GW of economic CHP capacity

  19. Natural Ventilation for Energy Savings in California Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    include: EnergyPlus, Modelica, Building Controls Virtualfaçade constructions. Modelica is a, “ non-proprietary,and control systems”. The Modelica Buildings Library, is

  20. Building 13 Conference Room Policy Building 13 conference rooms are available for use by the members of the MIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kastner, Marc A.

    Building 13 Conference Room Policy Building 13 conference rooms are available for Materials Science and Engineering. Reservations for building 13 conference rooms and keys, if needed, are made through the following building 13 offices: 1. von Hippel Room (13-2137) ­ CMSE headquarters staff

  1. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    States Agree to Cut Greenhouse Gases. ” Washington Post,H. Ling. 2006. “Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies.In Managing Greenhouse Gas Emissions in California. Hanemann

  2. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01

    1368 by shifting their power purchases to low- carbon powerCalifornia firms could purchase power under SB 1368. Carbonterm purchases, such as the daily wholesale power market,

  3. University of California Policy CANRA Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    "), codified at California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, requires that employers of Mandated Reporters (as by University personnel to promptly report the concern to appropriate external and University officials (the "Act" or "CANRA"): California Penal Code §§ 11164-11174.3, as currently in effect or subsequently

  4. P\\procedure\\FP#36 TITLE: GREEN BUILDING POLICY PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    P\\procedure\\FP#36 TITLE: GREEN BUILDING POLICY PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RESOURCE the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Silver standard or equivalent. This policy will be limited% of building replacement value". RESPONSIBILITY: ACTION FACILITIES PLANNING DIRECTOR Ensure that the green

  5. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingof Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

  6. 222 Mesa Arts Building Irvine, California 92697-2775

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Influence William Chapman Nyaho, with Louise Toppin in concert Friday, February 10 Flowers 9:00 AM Welcome:30 AM "The African American Concert Singer: San Francisco 1925-65, In Paradisium" Lecture Bill Doggett 10:00 AM The Black Composer in Opera Lecture Anthony Davis, University of California, San Diego 11

  7. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  8. Reusing and Building a Policy Library Fernando Fernandez and Manuela Veloso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veloso, Manuela M.

    Reusing and Building a Policy Library Fernando Fern´andez and Manuela Veloso Computer Science Library. Given a new task, a Policy Reuse learner uses the past policies in the library as a probabilistic of the novelty of the new task with respect to the previously solved ones in the policy library. In the paper we

  9. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    truck activity in California. Transport Policy. Volume 16,in California Travel Demand Reductions Decreasing transportCalifornia, USA. Transportation Research, Part D: Transport

  10. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lai (2009b), “Control of Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Optimal2008), “Developing a Greenhouse Gas Tool for Buildings inERKELEY N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Greenhouse Gas Abatement with

  11. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    policy implications.   Energy Policy.   2009. 37 (12). ppin Southern California”, Energy Policy, 39 (2011) 1923–1938.and Policy and Director, Sustainable Transportation Energy

  12. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    clean energy future." Energy policy 29(14): 1179- CBI (2008) US Department of Energy, Commercial Building Initiative

  13. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-05-01

    A great deal of research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy consumption in commercial buildings; however, the recent power crisis in California has given greater importance to peak demand. Several new load-shedding programs have been implemented or are under consideration. Historically, the target customers have been large industrial users who can reduce the equivalent load of several large office buildings. While the individual load reduction from an individual office building may be less significant, there is ample opportunity for load reduction in this area. The load reduction programs and incentives for industrial customers may not be suitable for commercial building owners. In particular, industrial customers are likely to have little variation in load from day to day. Thus a robust baseline accounting for weather variability is required to provide building owners with realistic targets that will encourage them to participate in load shedding programs.

  14. 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 1722, 2008 Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 17­22, 2008 · Asilomar Conference Center · Pacific Grove, California 1 Targeting Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings Using Advanced energy use, prioritizes buildings for specific energy-efficiency retrofits, and tracks weather

  15. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  16. Does Partisan Polarization Lead to Policy Gridlock in California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kousser, Thad B

    2010-01-01

    10.2202/1944-4370.1071 Kousser: Does Partisan Polarization10.2202/1944-4370.1071 Kousser: Does Partisan PolarizationPolicy Volume 2, Issue 2 Does Partisan Polarization Lead to

  17. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    develop a web-based building energy performance benchmarkingtraining, building energy performance studies, and thermaland Energy Performance Benchmarking for Commercial Buildings

  18. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    constructing a net zero-energy building to house the REECCountry Report on Building Energy Codes in India. Richland,2010. Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in

  19. Examining Sustainable Development Policy in California Cities: 2011 Energy Sustainable California Communities Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Myungjung

    2013-01-01

    The Adoption of Energy Sustainability and Climate Protectionclimate protection and energy sustainability policy actions;climate protection and energy sustainability programs, such

  20. Building Access Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Access Manager: Web-based software that Building Proctors will use to grant or deny electronic building

  1. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  2. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH Campus Usage Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    is prohibited on roadways and in parking lots and parking structures. Use of the devices for acrobatics, racing or other stunts is strictly prohibited. Riding on any architectural or landscape features other than of coasting devices is prohibited within any building, any covered area and in the designated pedestrian

  3. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Forecasts of California Transportation Energy Demand 2005-70 percent of California’s transportation energy, diesel 17of the transportation energy market in California. However,

  4. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Forecasts of California Transportation Energy Demand 2005-70 percent of California’s transportation energy, diesel 17of the transportation energy market in California. However,

  5. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Policy, University of California, Berkeley (on leave) and Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy

  6. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 4:351–366.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 8:209–224.Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, 10-196– 212.

  7. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    India’s local LEED-based building labeling program and otherLEED and the Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment (a domestically-developed building labeling

  8. Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin California's Renewable Energy Policies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's Renewable Energy Policies and Their Impact on the Northwest (Continued on page 2) Northwest Power. California's renewable energy policies are some of the most aggressive in the nation, and the state has utilities have to look outside the state to satisfy their renewable portfolio goals. Renewable energy

  9. Cultivating a Green Political Landscape: Lessons for Climate Change Policy from the Defeat of California’s Proposition 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biber, Eric

    2013-01-01

    92. California’s total renewable energy production (definedthe creation of a renewable energy industry as well asdevelopment of renewable energy in Oregon and Washington for

  10. Cultivating a Green Political Landscape: Lessons for Climate Change Policy from the Defeat of California’s Proposition 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biber, Eric

    2013-01-01

    92. California’s total renewable energy production (definedsupported the creation of a renewable energy industry asthe rapid development of renewable energy in Oregon and

  11. Recommended Changes to Specifications for Demand Controlled Ventilation in California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2010-04-08

    In demand-controlled ventilation (DCV), rates of outdoor air ventilation are automatically modulated as occupant density varies. The objective is to keep ventilation rates at or above design specifications and code requirements and also to save energy by avoiding excessive ventilation rates. DCV is most often used in spaces with highly variable and sometime dense occupancy. In almost all cases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sensors installed in buildings provide the signal to the ventilation rate control system. People produce and exhale CO{sub 2} as a consequence of their normal metabolic processes; thus, the concentrations of CO{sub 2} inside occupied buildings are higher than the concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the outdoor air. The magnitude of the indoor-outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration difference decreases as the building's ventilation rate per person increases. The difference between the indoor and outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration is also a proxy for the indoor concentrations of other occupant-generated bioeffluents, such as body odors. Reviews of the research literature on DCV indicate a significant potential for energy savings, particularly in buildings or spaces with a high and variable occupancy. Based on modeling, cooling energy savings from applications of DCV are as high as 20%. With support from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has performed research on the performance of CO{sub 2} sensing technologies and optical people counters for DCV. In addition, modeling was performed to evaluate the potential energy savings and cost effectiveness of using DCV in general office spaces within the range of California climates. The above-described research has implications for the specifications pertaining to DCV in section 121 of the California Title 24 Standard. Consequently, this document suggests possible changes in these specifications based on the research findings. The suggested changes in specifications were developed in consultation with staff from the Iowa Energy Center who evaluated the accuracy of new CO{sub 2} sensors in laboratory-based research. In addition, staff of the California Energy Commission, and their consultants in the area of DCV, provided input for the suggested changes in specifications.

  12. Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2011-01-01

    OF ENERGY CONSERVATION BUILDING CODES B. COST CALCULATIONScost calculations carries weight in California because the state EnergyCOST CALCULATIONS AS A BASIS FOR CODES Even small improvements in conservation design save energy, and

  13. Proceedings of the 26th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (1997): 1301-1304. COMMERCIAL BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAICS: MARKET AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    1997-01-01

    BUILDING INTEGRATED PHOTOVOLTAICS: MARKET AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS John Byrne, Steven Letendre, Lawrence

  14. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Using the CEUS Database to Benchmark Commercial Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-01

    The 2006 Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS) database developed by the California Energy Commission is a far richer source of energy end-use data for non-residential buildings than has previously been available and opens the possibility of creating new and more powerful energy benchmarking processes and tools. In this article--Part 2 of a two-part series--we describe the methodology and selected results from an action-oriented benchmarking approach using the new CEUS database. This approach goes beyond whole-building energy benchmarking to more advanced end-use and component-level benchmarking that enables users to identify and prioritize specific energy efficiency opportunities - an improvement on benchmarking tools typically in use today.

  15. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Department of Transportation, California Energy Commission,California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Department of Transportation (Caltrans), California Energy

  16. DOE Resources Help Measure Building Energy Benchmarking Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    assess benchmarking polices in a consistent manner. DOE also sponsored the New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report, which uses the...

  17. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-12-31

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) todetermine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e. ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site?s annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB?s assumed utilization is far higher than is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inlandareas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27 percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  18. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-11-16

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

  19. Why Hydrogen and Fuel Cells are Needed to Support California Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Joshua M; Gronich, Sig

    2008-01-01

    of all transportation energy in California by 2020. EnactedEnergy Hydrogen Program Institute of Transportation Studies ? University of California,

  20. Comparative Policy Study for Green Buildings in U.S. and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Nina; Romankiewicz, John; Feng, Wei; Zhou, Nan; Ye, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Prominent barriers facing the U.S. green building industry include the fact that government bodies that supervise health, fire safety, land, and other public operations are slow to revise codes to accommodate green building (regulatory barrier). In China, the lack of a green building professional accreditation process similar to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP process limits the green building workforce capacity development (informational barrier). The main policies highlighted in this report to tackle these barriers are 1) comprehensive codes and labeling plan (informational, institutional), 2) government-led targets and demonstrations (risk), 3) education and awareness programs (informational), 4) fiscal policy that supports green building investment (financial), and 5) integrated design promotion (institutional, financial).

  1. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

  2. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    of Architectural Energy-Saving in China. ” http://Assessment of Building Energy- Saving Policies and Programssector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during

  3. Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.

    2012-04-01

    There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

  4. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    2009. Doing Business in India 2009: Comparing Regulations inon Building Energy Codes in India. Richland, Wash. : PacificM. McNeil, & J. Sathaye. 2009. India Energy Outlook: End Use

  5. Gauging Improvements in Urban Building Energy Policy in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    J. Sathaye. 2009. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand ineetools.in/. New Delhi, India: Bureau of Energy Efficiency.Report on Building Energy Codes in India. Richland, Wash. :

  6. Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California-Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Deep Demand Response: The Case Study of the CITRIS Building at the University of California quality. We have made progress towards achieving deep demand response of 30% reduction of peak loads modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless

  7. Institutional Causes of California's Budget Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, Bruce E.; Noll, Roger

    2010-01-01

    2, Issue 3 Institutional Causes of California’s BudgetCain and Noll: Institutional Causes of California’s BudgetPolicy Institutional Causes of California’s Budget Problem

  8. Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    to compare a given building’s energy performance to that ofof a given building’s energy performance based on thetheir building’s energy use intensities and performance to

  9. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    To foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end, we present anmore »integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.« less

  10. Improving energy efficiency via smart building energy management systems. A comparison with policy measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Paula; Siddiqui, Afzal; Stadler, Michael

    2014-12-09

    To foster the transition to more sustainable energy systems, policymakers have been approving measures to improve energy efficiency as well as promoting smart grids. In this setting, building managers are encouraged to adapt their energy operations to real-time market and weather conditions. Yet, most fail to do so as they rely on conventional building energy management systems (BEMS) that have static temperature set points for heating and cooling equipment. In this paper, we investigate how effective policy measures are at improving building-level energy efficiency compared to a smart BEMS with dynamic temperature set points. To this end, we present an integrated optimisation model mimicking the smart BEMS that combines decisions on heating and cooling systems operations with decisions on energy sourcing. Using data from an Austrian and a Spanish building, we find that the smart BEMS results in greater reduction in energy consumption than a conventional BEMS with policy measures.

  11. Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-01-01

    the energy cost and value of California’s electricity in twocosts using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California:California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in HVAC system annual operating cost

  12. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    California Crude Oil Production and Imports. Sacramento:2. Production Active oil production occurs from 209 oilfields (CDC-DOGGR 2006). Oil production in California occurs

  13. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    California Crude Oil Production and Imports. Sacramento:2. Production Active oil production occurs from 209 oilfields (CDC-DOGGR 2006). Oil production in California occurs

  14. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    California Crude Oil Production and Imports. Sacramento:Profit structure Crude oil production is the most profitableand much of California oil production is heavy oil that is

  15. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    from California’s heavy oil and importing fuel refined frommanufactured from heavy oil, and fuel b might representresources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale and

  16. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    from California’s heavy oil and importing fuel refined frommanufactured from heavy oil, and fuel b might representresources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale and

  17. building science into EU policy The current status of biofuels in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    easac building science into EU policy The current status of biofuels in the European Union the EASAC Secretariat at secretariat@easac.eu #12;The current status of biofuels in the European Union, their environmental impacts and future prospects easac #12;ii | December 2012 | Sustainable Biofuels EASAC ISBN 978

  18. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-02-01

    Background - The goal of this project, with a focus on commercial buildings in California, was to develop a new framework for evidence-based minimum ventilation rate (MVR) standards that protect occupants in buildings while also considering energy use and cost. This was motivated by research findings suggesting that current prescriptive MVRs in commercial buildings do not provide occupants with fully safe and satisfactory indoor environments. Methods - The project began with a broad review in several areas ? the diverse strategies now used for standards or guidelines for MVRs or for environmental contaminant exposures, current knowledge about adverse human effects associated with VRs, and current knowledge about contaminants in commercial buildings, including their their presence, their adverse human effects, and their relationships with VRs. Based on a synthesis of the reviewed information, new principles and approaches are proposed for setting evidence-based VRs standards for commercial buildings, considering a range of human effects including health, performance, and acceptability of air. Results ? A review and evaluation is first presented of current approaches to setting prescriptive building ventilation standards and setting acceptable limits for human contaminant exposures in outdoor air and occupational settings. Recent research on approaches to setting acceptable levels of environmental exposures in evidence-based MVR standards is also described. From a synthesis and critique of these materials, a set of principles for setting MVRs is presented, along with an example approach based on these principles. The approach combines two sequential strategies. In a first step, an acceptable threshold is set for each adverse outcome that has a demonstrated relationship to VRs, as an increase from a (low) outcome level at a high reference ventilation rate (RVR, the VR needed to attain the best achievable levels of the adverse outcome); MVRs required to meet each specific outcome threshold are estimated; and the highest of these MVRs, which would then meet all outcome thresholds, is selected as the target MVR. In a second step, implemented only if the target MVR from step 1 is judged impractically high, costs and benefits are estimated and this information is used in a risk management process. Four human outcomes with substantial quantitative evidence of relationships to VRs are identified for initial consideration in setting MVR standards. These are: building-related symptoms (sometimes called sick building syndrome symptoms), poor perceived indoor air quality, and diminished work performance, all with data relating them directly to VRs; and cancer and non-cancer chronic outcomes, related indirectly to VRs through specific VR-influenced indoor contaminants. In an application of step 1 for offices using a set of example outcome thresholds, a target MVR of 9 L/s (19 cfm) per person was needed. Because this target MVR was close to MVRs in current standards, use of a cost/benefit process seemed unnecessary. Selection of more stringent thresholds for one or more human outcomes, however, could raise the target MVR to 14 L/s (30 cfm) per person or higher, triggering the step 2 risk management process. Consideration of outdoor air pollutant effects would add further complexity to the framework. For balancing the objective and subjective factors involved in setting MVRs in a cost-benefit process, it is suggested that a diverse group of stakeholders make the determination after assembling as much quantitative data as possible.

  19. Durham County - High-Performance Building Policy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i Framing DocumentUnits atis from a BuildingSelf-SchedulersDepartmentLocal

  20. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2009. U. S. Buildings Energy Data Book. prepared by D&R2010d. 2008 State Energy Data System. Washington, DC: EIA. ,several sources of energy data and developed the California

  1. Cultivating a Green Political Landscape: Lessons for Climate Change Policy from the Defeat of California’s Proposition 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biber, Eric

    2013-01-01

    23: renewable energy companies that would benefit fromas to the job benefits of renewable energy in California,benefits. 175 They argued that the climate bill would produce “green jobs” in the renewable energy

  2. Occupant comfort, control, and satisfaction in three California mixed-mode office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ring, Erik W; Brager, Gail S

    2000-01-01

    Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Consumer BehaviorSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings https://

  3. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Referenceimpact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.Electricity Generation from CHP by Building Types, Reference

  4. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Buhl, Fred; Haves, Philip

    2008-03-28

    California has been using DOE-2 as the main building energy analysis tool in the development of building energy efficiency standards (Title 24) and the code compliance calculations. However, DOE-2.1E is a mature program that is no longer supported by LBNL on contract to the USDOE, or by any other public or private entity. With no more significant updates in the modeling capabilities of DOE-2.1E during recent years, DOE-2.1E lacks the ability to model, with the necessary accuracy, a number of building technologies that have the potential to reduce significantly the energy consumption of buildings in California. DOE-2's legacy software code makes it difficult and time consuming to add new or enhance existing modeling features in DOE-2. Therefore the USDOE proposed to develop a new tool, EnergyPlus, which is intended to replace DOE-2 as the next generation building simulation tool. EnergyPlus inherited most of the useful features from DOE-2 and BLAST, and more significantly added new modeling capabilities far beyond DOE-2, BLAST, and other simulations tools currently available. With California's net zero energy goals for new residential buildings in 2020 and for new commercial buildings in 2030, California needs to evaluate and promote currently available best practice and emerging technologies to significantly reduce energy use of buildings for space cooling and heating, ventilating, refrigerating, lighting, and water heating. The California Energy Commission (CEC) needs to adopt a new building energy simulation program for developing and maintaining future versions of Title 24. Therefore, EnergyPlus became a good candidate to CEC for its use in developing and complying with future Title 24 upgrades. In 2004, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company contracted with ArchitecturalEnergy Corporation (AEC), Taylor Engineering, and GARD Analytics to evaluate EnergyPlus in its ability to model those energy efficiency measures specified in both the residential and nonresidential Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) of the Title-24 Standards. The AEC team identified gaps between EnergyPlus modeling capabilities and the requirements of Title 24 and ACMs. AEC's evaluation was based on the 2005 version of Title 24 and ACMs and the version 1.2.1 of EnergyPlus released on October 1, 2004. AEC's evaluation is useful for understanding the functionality and technical merits of EnergyPlus for implementing the performance-based compliance methods described in the ACMs. However, it did not study the performance of EnergyPlus in actually making building energy simulations for both the standard and proposed building designs, as is required for any software program to be certified by the CEC for use in doing Title-24 compliance calculations. In 2005, CEC funded LBNL to evaluate the use of EnergyPlus for compliance calculations by comparing the ACM accuracy test runs between DOE-2.1E and EnergyPlus. LBNL team identified key technical issues that must be addressed before EnergyPlus can be considered by the CEC for use in developing future Nonresidential Title-24 Standards or as an ACM tool. With Title 24 being updated to the 2008 version (which adds new requirements to the standards and ACMs), and EnergyPlus having been through several update cycles from version 1.2.1 to 2.1, it becomes crucial to review and update the previously identified gaps of EnergyPlus for use in Title 24, and more importantly to close the gaps which would help pave the way for EnergyPlus to be adopted as a Title 24 compliance ACM. With this as the key driving force, CEC funded LBNL in 2008 through this PIER (Public Interest Energy Research) project with the overall technical goal to expand development of EnergyPlus to provide for its use in Title-24 standard compliance and by CEC staff.

  5. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaCommission, July 23, Combined Heat and Power Installation

  6. THE CO2 ABATEMENT POTENTIAL OF CALIFORNIA'S MID-SIZED COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaAnalysis Inc. (2009), “Combined Heat and Power Installation

  7. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Modeling with Combined Heat and Power Applications,”Committee, Combined Heat and Power Workshop, CaliforniaJuly 23, 2009 Combined Heat and Power Installation

  8. How to Build a Small Wind Energy Business: Lessons from California; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2007-07-01

    This paper highlights the experience of one small wind turbine installer in California that installed more than 1 MW of small wind capacity in 6 years.

  9. Demand relief and weather sensitivity in large California commercial office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann; Gu, Lixing; Haves, Philip

    2001-01-01

    TX Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Large California76SF00098. Demand Relief and Weather Sensitivity in Largeof research has examined the weather sensitivity of energy

  10. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Fiscal Policy Urban heating system reform Energy efficiencyRate of Energy Efficiency Standards in Urban Areas Rate ofurban development. Figure 1. Government Organization Chart in Building Energy Efficiency

  11. Cluster building by policy design: a sociotechnical constituency study of information communication technology (ICT) industries in Scotland and Hong Kong 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Alexandra Wai Wah

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates whether and how public policies can help build industrial clusters. The research applies a case study method based on 60 interviews to the emerging information communication technology (ICT) ...

  12. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  13. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  14. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in reducingFigure 13. Adopted CHP Capacities by Building Types for the

  15. The Influence of a CO2 Pricing Scheme on Distributed Energy Resources in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    impact of mid-sized building CHP systems on CO 2 emissions.of medium-sized commercial building CHP-enabled DG in GHGbased CHP systems is wrong and large office buildings,

  16. Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Control of Building Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE TransactionsControl of Building Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE Transactionsshifting technology. Thermal storage can be achieved with

  17. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    for Energy-Efficiency in Building (BuildSys 2010). Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all

  18. Evaluation of the Implementation of the University of California Tobacco-free Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fallin, Amanda PhD, RN; Roditis, Maria PhD, MPH; Glantz, Stanton PhD

    2015-01-01

    Report. 1997. Smoke-free Policy Proposal Page 22 Green, M. ,effectiveness of smoke-free policies. Tobacco Control. 2009;smokefree and tobacco-free policies. 2013; http://www.no-

  19. Policy on Building use during Ventilation Outage: School of Science Roger Bacon Hall and Morrell Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy on Building use during Ventilation Outage: School of Science Roger Bacon Hall and Morrell not only laboratories, but also the entire building, including non-laboratory space. When Roger Bacon Hall environment. When a laboratory in Roger Bacon Hall or Morrell Science Center has no ventilation or reduced

  20. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Magaret. 2006. California Crude Oil Production and Imports.revenue and profits from crude oil production and less fromand regional firms. Crude oil is a fairly competitive global

  1. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Magaret. 2006. California Crude Oil Production and Imports.revenue and profits from crude oil production and less fromand regional firms. Crude oil is a fairly competitive global

  2. The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collantes, Gustavo

    2006-01-01

    California. ‘ The Role of Electric Vehicles. The Claremontof GM ’s Revolutionary Electric Vehicle. New York: Random1995). Future Drive: Electric Vehicles and Sustainable

  3. The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collantes, Gustavo O

    2006-01-01

    in California: The Role of Electric Vehicles. The ClaremontGM’s Revolutionary Electric Vehicle. New York: Random House.1995). Future Drive: Electric Vehicles and Sustainable

  4. California film subsidies and on-screen smoking: Resolving the policy conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polansky, Jonathan R.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01

    Taxpayer subsidies for US films with tobacco imagery. UCSFpdf. 21 Leah Medrano, Film & TV Tax Credit Programand Housing Agency, California Film Commission: CFC approved

  5. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    California Crude Oil Production and Imports. Sacramento:and profits from crude oil production and less from refiningProfit structure Crude oil production is the most profitable

  6. The California Zero-Emission Vehicle Mandate: A Study of the Policy Process, 1990-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collantes, Gustavo O

    2006-01-01

    in the history of vehicle emissions regulation: the Zero-adopt and implement motor vehicle emission standards, in-useCalifornia and Federal vehicle emission standards to that

  7. Installation Practices of California HVAC Contractors: Implications for Residential Building Codes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, S. S.; Koved, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    This report documents a study that was conducted by XENERGY. Inc. for the CEC and a consortium of California utilities. The utilities primarily involved in the study were Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E), Sacramento Municipal Utility...

  8. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  9. Review of California and National Methods for Energy Performance Benchmarking of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, Nance E.; Piette, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    EUIs (less energy consumption per square foot per year),Building energy usage is normalized per square foot perBuilding energy usage is normalized per square foot per

  10. Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management VARICK L. ERICKSON, University of California, Merced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

    control strategy," in Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing Systems for Energy-Efficiency in Building (BuildSys 2010). This material is based upon work partially supported by the National Science

  11. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    PV and solar thermal in commercial buildings 14 . However, most interesting is the fact that CHP adoption

  12. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Xu, Peng; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-01-09

    This paper discusses how to optimize pre-cooling strategies for buildings in a hot California climate zone with the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), a building energy simulation tool. This paper outlines the procedure used to develop and calibrate DRQAT simulation models, and applies this procedure to eleven field test buildings. The results of a comparison between the measured demand savings during the peak period and the savings predicted by the simulation model indicate that the predicted demand shed match well with measured data for the corresponding auto-demand response (Auto-DR) days. The study shows that the accuracy of the simulation models is greatly improved after calibrating the initial models with measured data. These improved models can be used to predict load reductions for automated demand response events. The simulation results were compared with field test data to confirm the actual effect of demand response strategies. Results indicate that the optimal demand response strategies worked well for most of the buildings tested in this hot climate zone.

  13. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Pala, California, Roundtable Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-03-23

    PALA EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Pala, California, DOE Tribal Roundtable convened at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, March 23, at the Pala Resort. The meeting was hosted by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (DOE Office of Indian Energy). Tracey LeBeau, Director of the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Pilar Thomas, Deputy Director?Policy of the DOE Office of Indian Energy, attended. Tribal leaders and representatives from five tribal communities also attended. There were thirteen participants. The meeting was facilitated by Debra Drecksel, Senior Program Manager, Senior Facilitator, Udall Foundation’s U.S. Institute for Environmental Conflict Resolution (U.S. Institute). She was assisted by Lindsey Sexton, Program Associate, U.S. Institute.   

  14. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

  15. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Policy, University of California, Berkeley (on leave) and Chief Technical Specialist for Renewable Energy

  16. California's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SB 375 and California's Environmental Goals Louise Bedsworth Deputy Director Governor's Office of Planning and Research January 22, 2014 UC Davis Policy Forum Series #12;A vision for California's future Strong economy Thriving urban areas Prosperous rural regions Clean Environment Clean and efficient energy

  17. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Magaret. 2006. California Crude Oil Production and Imports.and profits from crude oil production and less from refiningProfit structure Crude oil production is the most profitable

  18. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Magaret. 2006. California Crude Oil Production and Imports.and profits from crude oil production and less from refiningProfit structure Crude oil production is the most profitable

  19. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    resources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale andCalifornia oil production is heavy oil that is more viscousfrom gasoline made from heavy oil are upstream, due to

  20. A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    resources, including heavy oil, tar sands, oil shale andCalifornia oil production is heavy oil that is more viscousfrom gasoline made from heavy oil are upstream, due to

  1. The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

  2. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    and Passive Building Thermal Storage Utilization. ” JournalControl of Passive Thermal Storage. ” ASHRAE Transactions,due to the high thermal storage during the pre-cooling

  3. Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-10-01

    The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

  4. Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical Facilities

    2013-11-12

    MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES BUILDING. BUILDING EMERGENCY PLAN. Date Adopted: Sept 20, 2013. Date Revised: Sep 20. 2013. Prepared By: Kelly ...

  5. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Mcneil, Michael; Levine, Mark

    2011-03-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target to reduce the energy intensity per unit of gross domestic product (GDP) by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). In the building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocated during the 11 FYP period is 100 Mtce. Savings are expected to be achieved through the strengthening of enforcement of building energy efficiency codes, existing building retrofits and heat supply system reform, followed by energy management of government office buildings and large scale public buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date, China has reported that it achieved the half of the 20% intensity reduction target by the end of 2008, however, little has been made clear on the status and the impact of the building programs. There has also been lack of description on methodology for calculating the savings and baseline definition, and no total savings that have been officially reported to date. This paper intends to provide both quantitative and qualitative assessment of the key policies and programs in building sector that China has instituted in its quest to fulfill the national goal. Overall, this paper concludes that the largest improvement for building energy efficiency were achieved in new buildings; the program to improve the energy management in government and large scale public buildings are in line with the target; however the progress in the area of existing building retrofits, particularly heating supply system reform lags behind the stated goal by a large amount.

  6. NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUCLEAR POWER in CALIFORNIA: 2007 STATUS REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION October 2007 CEC-100 public workshops on nuclear power. The Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee, led by Commissioners, California Contract No. 700-05-002 Prepared For: California Energy Commission Barbara Byron, Senior Nuclear

  7. California Energy Commission CONSULTANT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roofs and the energy requirement for renovated lighting systems to meet the new 2013 energyCalifornia Energy Commission CONSULTANT REPORT IMPACT ANALYSIS California's 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards JULY 2013 CEC4002013008 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown Jr

  8. Four: Evaluating Reforms in the Implementation of Hazardous Waste Policies in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cutter, W. Bowman; DeShazo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    THE IMPLEMENTATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE POLICIES IN CALIFORNIAfrom the release of hazardous waste and toxic substances.The mishandling of hazardous waste by industry has created

  9. Water Quality Improvement Policies: Lessons Learned from the Implementation of Proposition O in Los Angeles, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mi-Hyun; Stenstrom, Michael; Pincetl, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Stenstrom MK (1999) Storm-water impact. Available at http://ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Water Quality Improvement Policies:under the federal Clean Water Act. Funding water quality

  10. Plenary Session, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, January 29-30, 1998, San Diego, California THE ELECTRIC MARKET RESTRUCTURING IN SOUTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    1 Plenary Session, Harvard Electricity Policy Group, January 29-30, 1998, San Diego, California THE ELECTRIC MARKET RESTRUCTURING IN SOUTH AMERICA: SUCCESSES AND FAILURES ON MARKET DESIGN Hugh Rudnick on the restructured electric markets in Latin America, which have pioneered changes worldwide. The changes started

  11. VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers. For FEL visitors, this generally means covering the basic guidelines/tasks below. The FEL management loosely defines a "visitor

  12. Comparative Policy Study for Green Buildings in U.S. and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01

    WBCSD. (2009). Energy Efficiency in Buildings: TransformingA Review of Building Energy Efficiency in China During theStaniaszek. (2012). Building Energy Efficiency Best Practice

  13. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    of HVAC Simulations Between EnergyPlus and DOE-2.2 for DataTool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypesprototypical building using an EnergyPlus simulation model (

  14. CAMPUS RECHARGE DEFINITIONS, BACKGROUND, & University of California, Berkeley, Recharge Centers Policy and Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operations R) Recharge forms S) Records retention A. References Business & Finance Bulletin A-47 http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/a47.html Business & Finance Bulletin A-56 http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/a56.html OMB

  15. CONTROLLING ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY FACILITIES 1. It is the Policy of Syracuse University that all electronically secured University buildings will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    that all electronically secured University buildings will have a single access control system for managing) and the Department of Energy and Computing Management (ECM). B. INFORMATION 1.The policy establishes responsibility of electronic security systems and provides for the monitoring of external access to University facilities

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  18. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Climate and TransportationTransportation and Energy Policy, at Paci?c Grove, California.

  19. Building geothermal research and development partnerships: The California Energy Commission`s geothermal program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hare, R.; Tiangco, V.; Birkinshaw, K.; Johannis, M.

    1995-12-31

    The California Energy Commission`s Geothermal Program (Assembly Bill 1905, Bosco) has built cost-shared Research, Development and Demonstration (RD&D) partnerships with over 150 public and private entities. The Geothermal Program promotes the development of new geothermal resources and technologies for both direct-use and electricity generation while protecting the environment and promoting energy independence. This is accomplished by providing financial and technical assistance in the form of contingent awards which, depending on project success, can become either a loan or a grant. Some of the cost-shared RD&D accomplishments are presented. The process and requirements to obtain financial assistance through the Geothermal Program are summarized.

  20. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat: Airtightness3. EffectiveBUILDING AMERICA

  1. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    energy assessment." Energy and Buildings 41: 1263-1268.Canada, and USA,” Energy and Buildings 36, no. 12 (Decemberbuildings (LC-ZEB),” Energy and Buildings 42, no. 6 (June

  2. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    IZ, et al. 2009. “Life cycle assessment in buildings: State-S, et al. 2006. "Life-cycle Assessment of Office BuildingsA. (2006) "Life-cycle Assessment of Office Buildings in

  3. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    P. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: DefiningP. 2010. “From net energy to zero energy buildings: Defining

  4. University of California, Berkeley Fall 2014 Energy and Resources Group (ERG) & Goldman School of Public Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    is the role of nuclear power in our present and future energy mix? · Could fuel cells or the hydrogen economy--and a technically and socially deep working knowledge--of our energy technologies, policies, and options, tools and perspectives to understand, critique, and ultimately influence the management of technical

  5. Breaking new ground in building green : the role of city policy and regulation in a building industry market transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Shiva R

    2010-01-01

    With a growing awareness of the need for a widespread reduction in the use of natural resources, including energy and water, buildings have been identified as a key component of America's, and the world's, drain on these ...

  6. DOE TAP Webcast 17: State Policies to Encourage Green Building Principles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Colorado Green Government Program, recent Colorado legislation supporting renewable energy and energy efficiency, state buildings

  7. Added Value of Reliability to a Microgrid: Simulations of Three California Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-05-07

    The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model is used to estimate the value an Oakland nursing home, a Riverside high school, and a Sunnyvale data center would need to put on higher electricity service reliability for them to adopt a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions Microgrid (CM) based on economics alone. A fraction of each building's load is deemed critical based on its mission, and the added cost of CM capability to meet it added to on-site generation options. The three sites are analyzed with various resources available as microgrid components. Results show that the value placed on higher reliability often does not have to be significant for CM to appear attractive, about 25 $/kWcdota and up, but the carbon footprint consequences are mixed because storage is often used to shift cheaper off-peak electricity to use during afternoon hours in competition with the solar sources.

  8. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  9. San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The California San Francisco Green Building Standards Code is Part 11 of twelve parts Chapter 13C of the official1 2010 San Francisco Building Code Amendments to the 2010 California Green Building Standards Code (Omitting amendments to 2010 California Building Code and 2010 California Residential Code which do

  10. Transcript of See Action and Technical Assistance Program Webcast: Energy Audit and Retro-Commissioning Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Office (DOE) of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) transcript of See Action and Technical Assistance Program Webcast: Energy Audit and Retro-Commissioning Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings.

  11. Energy Demand and Emissions in Building in China: Scenarios and Policy Options 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejun, J.; Xiulian, H.

    2006-01-01

    including transport), taking into account the most up-to-date data and recent policy discussions that will affect future economic, population, and energy supply trends. To understand the role of policy options including technology options and countermeasures...

  12. Overestimation Reduction in Forecasting Telecommuting as a TDM Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tal, Gil

    2008-01-01

    California Transportation Implications of Telecommuting Energy,California Energy Commission Department of Transportation Department of EnergyTransportation Policy Study Commission California Energy

  13. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: WWN.energy.ca.gov STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES Energy Policy Report Update (20121EPR Update), Background Public Resources Code Section 25302 requires

  15. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  16. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  17. Revisiting the "Buy versus Build" decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2001-01-01

    California Energy Commission Debt Service Coverage Ratio Internal Rate of Return on Equity Investment Tax Credit Joint Powers Authority Levelized Cost

  18. Presented at the U.S. Green Buildings Council Third Annual Conference, San Diego, CA, November 17-19, 1996. The research reported here was funded, in part, by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), a research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexityLBNL-40833 LC-365 Presented at the U.S. Green Buildings Council Third Annual Conference, San Diego for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), a research unit of the University of California. Publication of research

  19. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  20. The Heroic Framing of US Foreign Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Emily D.

    2010-01-01

    leaders affirm foreign policy as a moral issue,” Unitedemphasis of foreign policy. ” POLITICAL RESEARCH QUARTERLYThe Press and Foreign Policy. Univ of California. Cohen,

  1. Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01

    control of building thermal storage, ASHARE Transactionscan be achieved by utilizing thermal energy storage suchas ice storage or building thermal mass. Demand shedding is

  2. Energy efficiency, innovation, and job creation in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roland-Holst, David

    2008-01-01

    Renewable Energy. Renewable Energy Policy Project, with BBCenergy. The Renewable Energy Policy Project. Small, K.Renewable energy and jobs: Employment impacts of developing markets for renewables in California. Environment California Research and Policy

  3. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    REPORT California Energy Balance Update and DecompositionCalifornia Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis2011. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition

  4. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure progress over time in the State of California.

  5. Comparative Policy Study for Green Buildings in U.S. and China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Nina

    2014-01-01

    maintenance programs, water and energy use, environmentallythe greenest buildings (water and energy self-sufficient) indifferent process water and energy consumption. Two options

  6. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    al. 2006. “Research and development of Chinese LCA databaseand LCA software,” Rare Metals 25, no. 6 (December 2006):recent developments based on LCA,” Construction and Building

  7. Achieving California’s Land Use and Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emission Targets Under AB 32: An Exploration of Potential Policy Processes and Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Bejamin-Chung, Jade; Allen, Denise; Howe-Steiger, Linda

    2009-01-01

    1999?for fuel economy, CO2 emissions, car dealerships Tax onfor passenger cars and induce GHG emission reductions. Taxesregulates CO2 emissions from passenger cars; the policy

  8. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the USconditioning. Very low energy buildings in particular tendand customization in most low energy buildings, the best

  9. EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2009-01-01

    develop new modules for EnergyPlus. Also, Fortran 90 allowscapability. California. EnergyPlus can calculate water usageCHP, and fuel cells. EnergyPlus has detailed daylighting

  10. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    and/or require energy efficiency in buildings during the 11to strengthen energy efficiency in buildings. This BuildingHao Bin. 2009. “Building Energy Efficiency Evaluation and

  11. EA-1065: Proposed Construction and Operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to...

  12. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 FLU CONSENT - INACTIVATED

  13. University of California Davis Medical Center, Employee Health Services 2221 Stockton Boulevard, Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , Cypress Building Suite A, Sacramento, CA 95817 916-734-3572 Fax 916-734-7510 Influenza Vaccine Declination

  14. Decarbonising the English residential sector: modelling policies, technologies and behaviour within a heterogeneous building stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Scott

    2013-04-16

    propensity to consume more energy are also more likely to have higher energy efficiency. Internal dwelling temperature is one of the most important parameters for explaining residential energy demand over a heterogeneous building stock. Yet bottom up...

  15. Energy Audit and Retro-Commissioning Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program and SEE Action hosted this webinar on August 30, 2012, on retro-commissioning for energy efficiency in commercial buildings.

  16. Lifecycle Assessment of Beijing-Area Building Energy Use and Emissions: Summary Findings and Policy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aden, Nathaniel

    2010-01-01

    component selection. 13 EnergyPlus is a building envelope,program. 14 The roots of EnergyPlus are in the BLAST (weather patterns) and interfaces. EnergyPlus version 5.0 was

  17. Energy Audit and Retro-Commissioning Policies for Public and Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Assistance Program and SEE Action hosted this webinar on August 30, 2012, on retro-commissioning for energy efficiency in commercial buildings.

  18. California’s K-12 Educational Infrastructure Investments: Leveraging the State’s Role for Quality School Facilities in Sustainable Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    California  is  establishing   new  policies  to  ensure  land  use,   transportation,  and  infrastructure  investments  promote  energy,  

  19. California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Energy Commission STAFF REPORT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT 2008 Building Energy the evaporator coil by drilling of Temperature Measurement Access Holes for the placement of temperature sensors

  20. Transamerica Pyramid Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on a 1 MW CCHP system at the Transamerica Pyramid Building in San Francisco, California.

  1. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Santa Barbara County, California. Santa Barbara County, California Summary of Reported Data More Documents &...

  2. P:\\POLICIES&PROCEDURES\\BG#13 Page 1 of 3 Buildings and Grounds Boca Raton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    AND GROUNDS ­ BOCA RATON USER DEPARTMENTS AUTOMATION OF THE FUEL DISPENSING SYSTEM This policy details the processes for establishing and operating an automated fuel dispensing system; outlines the user training process for utilizing the automated fuel dispensing system (hereafter referenced as "fuel"); and describes

  3. University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullrich, Paul

    , SANCTIONS, & LAWS 11 University Policy and Sanctions 11 Loss of Financial Aid for Conviction Involving Possession/Sale of Illegal Drugs 11 Federal Laws and Sanctions 12 California Laws and Sanctions 12 Sacramento

  4. P:\\Policy & Procedures\\PP\\PP#9-Building Tours.doc Physical Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    conditions encountered as they relate to maintenance and custodial operations and as they relate: BUILDING TOURS OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: To establish a level of quality in the maintenance and custodial care of University Facilities and to foster communication between the maintenance and custodial functions

  5. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    University Building Energy Efficiency Research Centre (Report on China Building Energy Efficiency. Beijing: Chinaand Practice on Building Energy Efficiency in China. ”

  6. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    China. ” Energy& Buildings 40 (12): 2121-2127. Zhou N. ,Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption inbuilding energy retrofits, and building energy control

  7. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    China. ” Energy& Buildings 40 (12): 2121-2127. Zhou N. ,Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption inbuilding energy retrofits, and building energy control

  8. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    photovoltaic PURPA Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act QFs qualifying facilities SBC system benefits charge SC Shading

  9. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2005. Development of Energy Balances for the State ofIEA). 2010. World Energy Balance, 1971 to 2008. Paris: IEA.thermal unit California Energy Balance California Energy

  10. The wood in the forest: Why California needs to reexamine the role of biomass in climate policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sonora Soledad Stockton Biomass power plants Stockton Weedto reexamine the role of biomass in climate policy PeterAcademic Coordinator, Woody Biomass Utilization Group,

  11. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2008-12-01

    In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA -NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA - NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 151 6 NINTH STREET SACRAMENTO, CA 95814-551 2 www.energy.ca.gov Buildings Technologies Program Building Energy Codes Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy August 7, 2013 Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  13. EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct...

  14. EA-1087: Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments...

  15. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Evidence California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energymarine. California’s Energy Future - Transportation EnergyCCST 2011a. California’s Energy Future - The View to 2050,

  16. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    of meeting California’s transportation energy needs andEvidence California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energymarine. California’s Energy Future - Transportation Energy

  17. Confined Space Program It is the policy of California State University, Fullerton, to maintain, insofar as can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    working environments can be made completely safe from potentially hazardous substances and atmospheres these locations. II. Authority Code of Federal Regulations, 29CFR 1910.146; California Code of Regulation, Article and injuries occur because employees are unaware of the hazards in confined spaces and are not properly

  18. Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · ·/ Nonresidential Building Energy Use Disclosure Program California Code of Regulations Title Commission Chapter 4. Energy Conservation Article 9. Nonresidential Building Benchmarking and Disclosure Manager that summarizes the space and energy usage of a building and compares a building's energy use

  19. POLICY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more thanPNM ResourcesCERTIFIED

  20. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in thea commitment to delivering net-zero energy new (and in someplan calls for net-zero energy commercial buildings by

  1. Assessment of Distributed Energy Adoption in Commercial Buildings: Part 1: An Analysis of Policy, Building Loads, Tariff Design, and Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01

    systems, estimates of energy consumption intensities of various building types are typically obtained from the Natural Gas Cogeneration

  2. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01

    systems, estimates of energy consumption intensities of various building types are typically obtained from the Natural Gas Cogeneration

  3. policy

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp8/%2A4/%2A en NNSA Policy

  4. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    buildings, adoption of renewable energy sources. To date,buildings, as well as renewable energy application, whereaspromotes the use of renewable energy by encouraging local

  5. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Code The building energy consumption data has been adjustedand analyzing energy consumption data; to establish threeand monitoring. Building energy consumption data and data

  6. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    2 of The building energy consumption data has been adjustedand analyzing energy consumption data; to establish threeand monitoring. Building energy consumption data and data

  7. Distributed Energy Resource Optimization Using a Software as Service (SaaS) Approach at the University of California, Davis Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Stadler

    2011-01-01

    UCD USDOE WAPA WECC Building Automation System CaliforniaSiemens’ Apogee Building Automation System (BAS). Figure 6.

  8. California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building America Top Innovation California Energy Standards Recognize the Importance of Filter Selection - Building...

  9. Zero Net Energy Homes Production Builder Business Case: California...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CaliforniaFlorida Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation Photo of a solar home. Building America's production builder partners have found that energy efficiency...

  10. POLICY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more thanPNM ResourcesCERTIFIED MAILPOCs3,

  11. California Water and the Rhetoric of Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollak, Josh

    2010-01-01

    planner specializing in water managment, and isinterested in California water policy and groundwaterBerkeley on conjunctive water management in the San Joaquin

  12. A Taxpayers' Perspective: Re-engineering California's State Budget for Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casazza, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Policy Commentary A Taxpayers’ Perspective: Re-EngineeringTeresa Casazza* California Taxpayers’ Association Public ?consumes. The California Taxpayers’ Association urges state

  13. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-03-10

    Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

  14. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARBI

    2014-09-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  15. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Fiscal Policy Urban heating system reform Energy efficiencyRate of Energy Efficiency Standards in Urban Areas Rate of

  16. Santa Barbara County, California Data Dashboard | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The data dashboard for Santa Barbara County, California, a partner in the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. Santa Barbara County Data Dashboard More Documents & Publications...

  17. Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management College of Natural Resources University of California, Berkeley 260 Mulford Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-3100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management College of Natural Resources University Studies Major Snapshot Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management The Conservation policy; conservation and culture; global environmental politics; and ecological restoration and policy

  18. Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2011-01-01

    Impact Evaluation of New York State Energy Code (ASHRAE 90-N.Y. , N.Y. : New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentJ. "New York Puts Together Its Own State Energy Policy and

  19. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  20. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  1. Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    APRIL 2013 Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California: A WAsteWAteR And WAteR QuAlity Pe | Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California Wheeler Institute for Water Law & Policy Center for Law #12;Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California | 3Berkeley law | wheeler InstItute for water law

  2. ANTHONY EGGERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POLICY INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND THE ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ANTHONY EGGERT, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POLICY INSTITUTE FOR ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT AND THE ECONOMY Energy Carbon Intensity Efficiency Total Demand California GHG Regulatory Policies Widgets year #12 LEVERAGING UNIVERSITY EXPERTISE TO INFORM BETTER POLICY California Linking Through 2020: The Golden State

  3. California department of education HQ block 225: California's valedictorian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom; Dickerhoff, Darryl J; Fentress, Curtis; Popowski, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Greg Gidez, AIA, DBIA, LEED AP is the corporate manager ofteam set a goal of achieving LEED Gold certifica- tion — abecame only the second LEED Gold build- ing in California as

  4. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    2010. Fuel and Electricity Consumption by California CementCEC. 2010d. Electricity Consumption by Standard Industrialnatural gas and electricity consumption used in CALEB come

  5. Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior Research Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior Research Brief Center for Environmental Policy Haden* , Louise Jackson* Department of Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis * Department of Land like methane digesters or increased organic acreage. Policy & Management Implications California

  6. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonderegger, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Quality Measurements in Energy- Efficient Buildings; April,9576 EEB 79-5 NIA ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM ChapterCalifornia 94720 ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM Annual

  7. Residential California adobe : mud form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daymond, Diana Leigh

    1985-01-01

    Northern California has a rich tradition of adobe architecture . Formed with earth, defined by site, climate and use, the adobe structures exemplify a building methodology in harmony with nature and the lifestyle of it's ...

  8. SCE- California Advanced Homes Incentives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern California Edison offers an incentive for home builders to build homes which exceed 2008 Title 24 standards by 15%. The program is open to all single-family and multi-family new...

  9. Policy on Student Grievance Procedures February 15, 2013 110.00 POLICY ON STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Policy on Student Grievance Procedures ­ February 15, 2013 110.00 POLICY ON STUDENT GRIEVANCE, portions of the state of California Education Code, and the University of California Policies Applying, or under the Student-Related Policy Applying to Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Sex (see Section 150

  10. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    retrofit in northern area district heating Special fund forbuildings that have district heating system (Wu, 2009). Thein heating load is assumed for buildings using district

  11. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    retrofit in northern area district heating Special fund forbuildings that have district heating system (Wu, 2009). Thein heating load is assumed for buildings using district

  12. 3-100.1 Building Evacuation 1 Building Evacuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Kien A.

    3-100.1 Building Evacuation 1 SUBJECT: Building Evacuation Effective Date: 10-20-10 Policy Number and Safety APPLICABILITY/ACCOUNTABILITY: This policy applies to all individuals in all buildings on all University of Central Florida campuses. BACKGROUND INFORMATION: University buildings occasionally need

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Passive Room-to-Room Air Transfer, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing...

  14. Policy Brief For more policy briefs, click here.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Policy Brief March 2014 For more policy briefs, click here. Sustainable Communities: Implementation@ucdavis.edu Gian-Claudia Sciara, sciara@ucdavis.edu Policy Forum Series: January to March 2014 Issue California, the UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy and the National Center

  15. DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration and cogeneration. Additionally, this report describes long-term strategies, pathways, and milestones to take

  16. Leackage from Sub-national Climate Initiatives: The Case of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caron, Justin

    2012-05-29

    With federal policies to curb greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. stagnating, California has taken action

  17. Policy Brief October 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Kleeman Contact: Mike Kleeman UC Davis Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering mjkleeman@ucdavis.edu Issue California became a leader in climate change policy when it enacted Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32

  18. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability 2011 Integrated Energy Policy Report [CEC-100-2011-001-CMF / Docket # 11-IEP-1] The 2011

  19. California's Housing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Cynthia; Singa, Krute

    2008-01-01

    only improve California’s housing opportunities but produce2004: California’s Affordable Housing Crisis. 2004. http://Raising the Roof: California Housing Development Projections

  20. For more policy briefs, click here. Policy Brief 2014-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    For more policy briefs, click here. Policy Brief 2014-03 Energy and Climate Experts Find Wide Range is a leader in developing and implementing policies that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, improve air or proposed policy targets and policy instruments. The California Climate Policy Modeling (CCPM) is an ongoing

  1. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2011-01-01

    building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocatedfor 25% of the total primary energy use in China (Zhou etsector is 100 Mtce in primary energy units (Wu Y. , 2009). A

  2. Assessment of Building Energy-Saving Policies and Programs in China During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    building sector, the primary energy-saving target allocatedfor 25% of the total primary energy use in China (Zhou etsector is 100 Mtce in primary energy units (Wu Y. , 2009). A

  3. STATE OF CALIFORNIA --NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA -- NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION 1516 Ninth Street Sacramento, California 95814 Main website: www.energy.ca.gov Notice of Availability Developing Renewable Generation on State Property Installing Renewable Energy on State Buildings

  4. Sustainable Building in China - A Green Leap Forward?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    energy use; energy efficiency; commercial buildings; green2. Shui, B. ; Li, J. Building Energy Efficiency Policies inUSA, 2010. 7. Building Energy Efficiency Research Center (

  5. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy...

  6. Clean Energy Program Policy Brief. The Value of Energy Performance and Green Attributes in Buildings: Review of Existing Literature and Recommendations for Future Research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Union (EU) Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD).with EU Energy  Performance of Buildings  Directive)  in Buildings Study Label European Energy  Performance 

  7. California's Energy Policy: Conservation Works 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, D.

    1982-01-01

    dependence on oil. In making our investments, we have given energy efficiency the highest preference, followed by cogeneration and renewable energy supplies. Conventional power supplies come last, and only when absolutely necessary because they are costly...

  8. California Member Connects Solar Adoption With Upgrades | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    adoption and energy upgrades by Better Buildings Residential Network member Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) in California are helping solar companies realize that partnering...

  9. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

  10. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    topped crude, cracking stocks, and slop oil (US EIA-810,plus net stock withdrawals. In California, crude oil andCrude Oil Net Imports Primary Supply TBtu Growth Rate Annual Average Growth Rate Share of total Energy Supply Includes Net Stock

  11. Complementary State Policies for Energy Efficiency Programs ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State Policies for Energy Efficiency Programs Complementary State Policies for Energy Efficiency Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange...

  12. Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-05-01

    Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

  13. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA'S STATE ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCE REBATE PROGRAM INITIAL November 2009 CEC-400-2009-026-CMD Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor #12;#12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Program Manager Paula David Supervisor Appliance and Process Energy Office Valerie T. Hall Deputy Director

  14. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Energy Use in California PEV Technology and Costs The mainEnergy Use in California Component HEV Battery Cost, $/kWhaccount the cost of delivery. California’s Energy Future -

  15. Environmental assessment for the proposed construction and operation of a Genome Sequencing Facility in Building 64 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document is an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a proposed project to modify 14,900 square feet of an existing building (Building 64) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to operate as a Genome Sequencing Facility. This EA addresses the potential environmental impacts from the proposed modifications to Building 64 and operation of the Genome Sequencing Facility. The proposed action is to modify Building 64 to provide space and equipment allowing LBL to demonstrate that the Directed DNA Sequencing Strategy can be scaled up from the current level of 750,000 base pairs per year to a facility that produces over 6,000,000 base pairs per year, while still retaining its efficiency.

  16. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Deputy Project Director, Energy and Environmental Security,Security Principal Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Lab California’s Energy

  17. Women's Health in California: Health Status, Health Behaviors. Health Insurance Coverage and Use of Services Among California Women Ages 18-64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyn, Roberta; Hastert, Theresa A.; Peckham, Erin

    2008-01-01

    www.chis.ucla.edu. UCLA CENTER FOR HEALTH POLICY RESEARCHWOMEN’S HEALTH IN CALIFORNIA 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, SuiteWomen’s Health in California: Health Status, Health

  18. Energy Audits and Retro-Commissioning: State and Local Policy Design Guide and Sample Policy Language

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-29

    Provides guidance and sample policy language to help state and local governments enact and implement policies addressing energy assessments of or improvements to existing commercial buildings

  19. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  20. The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area comprising northern California. southwestern Oregon. and the east slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. The policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area. The policy scenarios. all subject to a stand-scale fire-hazard-reduction effectiveness constraint. included merchantable timber removal (Min Merch). Differences in the area treated under each scenario were considerable

  1. A Report on the Economics of California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard & Cost Containment Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    D Candidate, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis. Associate and Policy, University of California, Davis. Acknowledgments: We thank Sonia Yeh and the California Air statewide reductions in greenhouse gas emissions required by California's Assembly Bill 32, the Global

  2. Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future: A Preliminary Report Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderston, F.

    2010-01-01

    in the thermal mass of a passive building. for degree dayEnergy Systems Passive solar design of buildings Solar waterPassive Solar Architecture and the California Building Code,

  3. Policy on Pets on Campus Policy on Pets on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Pets on Campus 10/30/2014 Policy on Pets on Campus I. Purpose and Scope The presence. This policy addresses pets on all property owned and controlled by the university and applies to all students. Policy The University prohibits pets in university-owned or leased buildings, except as provided below

  4. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These strategies, however, would make it more complex and more prescriptive, and would require substantial research. One practical intermediate strategy to save energy would be an alternate VRP, allowing VRs lower than currently prescribed, as long as indoor VOC concentrations were no higher than with VRs prescribed under the current VRP. This kind of hybrid, with source reduction and use of air cleaning optional but permitted, could eventually evolve, as data, materials, and air-cleaning technology allowed gradual lowering of allowable concentrations, into a fully developed IAQP. Ultimately, it seems that VR standards must evolve to resemble the IAQP, especially in California, where buildings must achieve zero net energy use within 20 years.

  5. NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    switchgrass and Miscanthus (left) to develop sustainably produced biofuels at the Energy Biosciences Institute. Story on page 16. The NeW gridPlugging Into California's Clean- Energy Future #12;ONLINE 4 LETTER FROM of renewable energy are widely accepted, but policy implemen- tation -- hooking it all up to a grid designed

  6. -California -Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with Hawaii-based U.S. fisheries, as well as the fleets of other Pacific Rim nations. As such, the managementPacific - California - Oregon - Washington #12;Regional Summary Pacific Region Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foresight Renewable Solutions Integrated Solar PV, Advanced Compressed Air Energy Storage, and Microgrid Power and Smart Building Management for California Communities $1,726,438 $1,726,438 $1,025,822 77

  8. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides /sup 60/Co and /sup 152/Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. /sup 60/Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  9. Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    Building Cavities Used As Ducts: Air Leakage Characteristicspan” technique to prioritize duct sealing efforts: a studyField investigation of duct system performance in California

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California Basement Insulation Systems -...

  11. Why Do Building Owners Invest in Bicycle-Oriented Design?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrick, Phyllis; Trapenberg Frick, Karen; Ragland, David R

    2011-01-01

    Building Owners Invest in Bicycle-Oriented Design? Phyllisof California, Berkeley ISSUE Bicycle infrastructure designhas largely emphasized bicycle lanes and paths, with little

  12. Assess Policy Retire Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Assess Policy Need Retire Policy Revise Policy Evaluate Effectiveness Enforce Compliance Educate Employees Evaluate Risks to VCU Decide Course of Action Draft Policy Acquire Approval Communicate Policy Solicit Feedback Policy Lifecycle Page 1 of 3 #12;1. Assess need 2. Analyze impact on University

  13. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    economy from today’s levels, cutting energy consumption pertoday, though they will likely continue to improve and be refined over time. California’s Energy

  14. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    aviation, marine and rail sectors. Energy use, broken out bysuch as aviation and marine. California’s Energy Future -and marine. We believe that the CEF transportation energy

  15. Policy Implications of Permanently Flooded Islands in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suddeth, Robyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Science and Policy 12:631–643. Kimmerer W,discussions with attorneys and policy-makers familiar withSan Francisco (CA): Public Policy Institute of California.

  16. Energy Efficient Community Development in California: Chula Vista Research Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Technology Institute

    2009-03-31

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy joined the California Energy Commission in funding a project to begin to examine the technical, economic and institutional (policy and regulatory) aspects of energy-efficient community development. That research project was known as the Chula Vista Research Project for the host California community that co-sponsored the initiative. The researches proved that the strategic integration of the selected and economically viable buildings energy efficiency (EE) measures, photovoltaics (PV), distributed generation (DG), and district cooling can produce significant reductions in aggregate energy consumption, peak demand and emissions, compared to the developer/builder's proposed baseline approach. However, the central power plant emission reductions achieved through use of the EE-DG option would increase local air emissions. The electric and natural gas utility infrastructure impacts associated with the use of the EE and EE-PV options were deemed relatively insignificant while use of the EE-DG option would result in a significant reduction of necessary electric distribution facilities to serve a large-scale development project. The results of the Chula Vista project are detailed in three separate documents: (1) Energy-Efficient Community Development in California; Chula Vista Research Project report contains a detailed description of the research effort and findings. This includes the methodologies, and tools used and the analysis of the efficiency, economic and emissions impacts of alternative energy technology and community design options for two development sites. Research topics covered included: (a) Energy supply, demand, and control technologies and related strategies for structures; (b) Application of locally available renewable energy resources including solar thermal and PV technology and on-site power generation with heat recovery; (c) Integration of local energy resources into district energy systems and existing energy utility networks; (d) Alternative land-use design and development options and their impact on energy efficiency and urban runoff, emissions and the heat island effect; and (e) Alternative transportation and mobility options and their impact on local emissions. (2) Creating Energy-Efficient Communities in California: A Reference Guide to Barriers, Solutions and Resources report provides the results of an effort to identify the most innovative existing and emerging public policy, incentive and market mechanisms that encourage investment in advanced energy technologies and enabling community design options in the State of California and the nation. The report evaluates each of these mechanisms in light of the preceding research and concludes with a set of recommended mechanisms designed for consideration by relevant California State agencies, development and finance industry associations, and municipal governments. (3) Creating Energy-Efficient Communities in California: A Technical Reference Guide to Building and Site Design report contains a set of selected commercially viable energy technology and community design options for high-efficiency, low-impact community development in California. It includes a summary of the research findings referenced above and recommendations for energy technology applications and energy-efficient development strategies for residential, commercial and institutional structures and supporting municipal infrastructure for planned communities. The document also identifies design options, technology applications and development strategies that are applicable to urban infill projects.

  17. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy Residential Building Envelopes Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchOzone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff

  18. POLICIES & PROCEDURES Legal Disclaimers for CSUN Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Randy W.

    POLICIES & PROCEDURES Legal Disclaimers for CSUN Internet Sites/Terms and Conditions of Use Policy on California State University, Northridge Internet sites. POLICY/PROCEDURES: The following legal disclaimers and Conditions of Use CSUN Internet Sites Endorsements General Liability Limitation of Liability Disclaimer

  19. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    2000. California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington Vogel, Nancy (23 2001. California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington Girion,of” California’s Energy Crisis Jan Whittington Abstract This

  20. CaliforniaFIRST (California) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Photovoltaics Solar Water Heat Program Info State California Program Type PACE Financing The CaliforniaFIRST Program is a Property Assessed Clean...

  1. Clean Energy Program Policy Brief. The Value of Energy Performance and Green Attributes in Buildings: Review of Existing Literature and Recommendations for Future Research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    quantify the value of “green” and energy efficiency upgradesof homes with Build Green, ENERGY STAR or LEED for Homes major renovations, and energy or “green” upgrade projects.

  2. OFFICIAL POLICY 6.1.3 Policy on Pets on Campus 4/22/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    OFFICIAL POLICY 6.1.3 Policy on Pets on Campus 4/22/2014 Policy Statement 1.0 BUILDINGS AND OFFICES, "College"), unless allowed under the terms of Section 4.0 of this Policy. 2.0 COLLEGE GROUNDS Pets are permitted on campus grounds, subject to the terms of this Policy. Pets brought on campus grounds

  3. Data and Analytics to Inform Energy Retrofit of High Performance Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong , Tianzhen; Yang, Le; Hill, David; Feng , Wei

    2014-01-25

    Buildings consume more than one-third of the world?s primary energy. Reducing energy use in buildings with energy efficient technologies is feasible and also driven by energy policies such as energy benchmarking, disclosure, rating, and labeling in both the developed and developing countries. Current energy retrofits focus on the existing building stocks, especially older buildings, but the growing number of new high performance buildings built around the world raises a question that how these buildings perform and whether there are retrofit opportunities to further reduce their energy use. This is a new and unique problem for the building industry. Traditional energy audit or analysis methods are inadequate to look deep into the energy use of the high performance buildings. This study aims to tackle this problem with a new holistic approach powered by building performance data and analytics. First, three types of measured data are introduced, including the time series energy use, building systems operating conditions, and indoor and outdoor environmental parameters. An energy data model based on the ISO Standard 12655 is used to represent the energy use in buildings in a three-level hierarchy. Secondly, a suite of analytics were proposed to analyze energy use and to identify retrofit measures for high performance buildings. The data-driven analytics are based on monitored data at short time intervals, and cover three levels of analysis ? energy profiling, benchmarking and diagnostics. Thirdly, the analytics were applied to a high performance building in California to analyze its energy use and identify retrofit opportunities, including: (1) analyzing patterns of major energy end-use categories at various time scales, (2) benchmarking the whole building total energy use as well as major end-uses against its peers, (3) benchmarking the power usage effectiveness for the data center, which is the largest electricity consumer in this building, and (4) diagnosing HVAC equipment using detailed time-series operating data. Finally, a few energy efficiency measures were identified for retrofit, and their energy savings were estimated to be 20percent of the whole-building electricity consumption. Based on the analyses, the building manager took a few steps to improve the operation of fans, chillers, and data centers, which will lead to actual energy savings. This study demonstrated that there are energy retrofit opportunities for high performance buildings and detailed measured building performance data and analytics can help identify and estimate energy savings and to inform the decision making during the retrofit process. Challenges of data collection and analytics were also discussed to shape best practice of retrofitting high performance buildings.

  4. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Outside Air Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    venThis Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how automated night ventilation can reduce cooling energy costs up to 40% and peak demand up to 50% in California’s hot-dry central valley climates and can eliminate the need for air conditioning altogether in the coastal marine climate.

  5. Swimming Upstream: The Hard Politics of Health Reform in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelman, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The Hard Politics of Health Reform in California June 2009Report on State Health Access Reform,” Health Affairs, WebPolicy in State Health Reform,” Zelman, W. A. , and Melamed,

  6. Cost and benefit of energy efficient buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wenying, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A common misconception among developers and policy-makers is that "sustainable buildings" may not be financially justified. However, this report strives to show that building green is cost-effective and does make financial ...

  7. CHANCELLOR'S SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE GREEN BUILDING SUBCOMMITTEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    CHANCELLOR'S SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE GREEN BUILDING SUBCOMMITTEE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST FALL 2013 GBGBGUIDELINES 2013 UPDATE #12;#12;Theseguidelineshavebeen prepared by the Green, policies and practices as they pertain to green building and LEED certification. It is our hope

  8. Better Buildings Network View, July 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a set of policies and programs through energy benchmarking that improve energy efficiency in buildings. CEP is supported in part by fellow Residential Network member the Institute...

  9. Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Minneapolis, Minnesota Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 About this site Web Policies...

  10. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California Energy Commission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY, CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE ALLIANCE, CALIFORNIA SOLAR ENERGY., LOCAL ENERGY AGGREGATION NETWORK, DR. LUIS PACHECO, PRESENTE.ORG, SIERRA CLUB, SOLAR ENERGY INDUSTRIES ASSOCIATION, AND THE VOTE SOLAR INITIATIVE FOR SOCIETAL COST-BENEFIT EVALUATION OF CALIFORNIA'S NET ENERGY

  11. CSEM WP 110R Lessons from the California Electricity Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PUCs should revise their retail market policies to prevent a future California crisis that these standard market rules, combined with the retail market rules implemented by state PUCs will increaseCSEM WP 110R Lessons from the California Electricity Crisis Frank A. Wolak Revised May 2003

  12. I. BACKGROUND The devastating consequences of the California energy crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    fundamental flaws in the California electricity market design and some of the policies adopted by the CPUC in deregulating the California electricity market. Many commentators have identified the lack of long term whether there is a need for a centralized capacity market that will supplement or replace the current c

  13. City of San Diego- Sustainable Building Expedited Permit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2002, the City of San Diego passed a Resolution R-298001, which amended the Sustainable Building Policy to allow for expedited permitting for sustainable buildings. Sustainable buildings are...

  14. Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management College of Natural Resources University of California, Berkeley 260 Mulford Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-3100 Tel: (510) 643-9479 Fax: (510) 643-3132 envsci@berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management College of Natural Resources University/3/2013 Environmental Sciences Major Snapshot Department of Environmental Science, Policy & Management The Environmental, engineering, or a social science field such as planning, policy analysis, economics, environmental justice

  15. Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-53605 Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in California Large Commercial Buildings and for implementing the duct models in a form that could readily be used in this project; and Brian Smith (LBNL

  16. University of California Shared Image Collections: Convergence and Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zentall, Lena; Burns, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Marmor, “ArtSTOR: A Digital Library for the History of Art,”Lena Zentall, California Digital Library, and Maureen Burns,to painstakingly build a digital library of over 120,000

  17. California: California’s Clean Energy Resources and Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-15

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of California.

  18. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

  19. Building Commissioning in the USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castro, N.; Friedman, H.

    2006-01-01

    $50 billion/yr for energy? Cx energy savings range: 6% - 9% ? California Market Characterization Study (2000) ? RCx energy savings range: 7% - 30 % ? LBNL study: The Cost-Effectiveness of Commissioning New and Existing Commercial Buildings: Lessons... Commissioning in the USA Natascha Castro, Annex 47- US Team Leader National Institute of Standards and Technology Hannah Friedman, Cost-Benefit Subtask Leader Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Asian Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning November 7, 2006...

  20. CALIFORNIA INVESTMENT PLAN FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . California Air Resources Board California Energy Commission Gerhard Achtelik Mike Smith Independent Oil Marketers Association Gerald Secundy, California Council for Environmental and Economic and Anthony Brunello, California Resources Agency Rick Shedd, California Department of General Services John

  1. UC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    efficiency of residential buildings by 25 percent and boosting energy savings in non-residential buildingsUC Davis Research Supports Energy-Efficiency Improvements to California's Title 24 Codes July 5, 2012 The California Energy Commission recently adopted more stringent energy efficiency requirements

  2. Policy Coversheet Policy Title: Green IT Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucy, David

    Policy Coversheet Policy Title: Green IT Policy Policy reference number: SEC/2011/2/0316 Committee/ Office- assigned reference number: (if applicable) Name of Committee/ Office which approved the policy: Information Technology Policy Committee (ITPC) Date of committee/ office approval: 27 January 2010 Expiry date

  3. "Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" Session Three: Planning for Change: How Regions are Planning to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    , Commissioner for the California Energy Commission, and Deputy Secretary for Energy Policy of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Prior positions include advising the University of California on federal energyD, is the Associate Director of the Urban Land Use and Transportation Center at the University of California, Davis

  4. California's electricity crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    The collapse of California's electricity restructuring and competition program has attracted attention around the world. Prices in California's competitive wholesale electricity market increased by 500% between the second ...

  5. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Financial Accountability Policy for Student Organizations that receive Fee Remittances from the University Policy Number: Approved by: Associate Vice Recent Approval: November 2013 Date of Original Approval: Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: Guidelines

  6. Communiquer dans un monde de normes l 92 Within the Norwegian resource management system, many different organizations function to build and enact policies. This is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for understanding the complex decision making environments faced by a global community. "Windmills or Deepwater Drills? : Normative Roles of Technology in Norwegian Resource Extraction Policy After discovering oil and drilling efforts in the High North region, a geopolitical term used to describe Northern coastlines above

  7. Promoting emerging energy-efficiency technologies and practices by utilities in a restructured energy industry: A report from California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward L.

    2000-01-01

    cost-effectiveness of building control systems sensing and data collection Food service technology center PIER2 Contracts Energy efficient downlights for California

  8. Effects of Diffuser Airflow Minima on Occupant Comfort, Air Mixing, and Building Energy Use (RP-1515)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    in buildings that reduce energy by reducing minimum airflowAdvanced variable air volume (VAV) systems. Energy DesignResources, California Energy Commission. Taylor S, Stein T,

  9. University of California, Berkeley Fall 2003 Energy and Resources Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    University of California, Berkeley Fall 2003 Energy and Resources Group Advanced Graduate Seminar Public Policy 290 - Energy and Development Professor Daniel M. Kammen Energy and Resources Group as either: Public Policy 290 P019 (CC# 77265), or Energy and Resources 290 P 004 (CC# 27765) Course WWW page

  10. California wins by collaborating with China on electric vehicle market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and strengthened policies. The motivation is clean air, as well as energy security and enhancing the domestic auto, renewable electricity and nuclear energy. #12;California can also benefit by learning from China's electric for climate policy. It is very likely the success of PEVs, along with renewable energy, played a role in China

  11. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium &progress in batteries, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage foronsite energy production (e.g. fuel cells, PV) at different

  12. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  13. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    be used to offset EV charging at home at the residentialthe different EV and home charging constraints. Decisiondimensionless EV battery charging efficiency, dimensionless

  14. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability onNM, USA. [37] Electricity Storage Association, Morgan Hill,dimensionless d. electricity storage loss factor for the EV

  15. University of California, Berkeley Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Procedures 8. Hazardous Materials Release Procedures 9. Utility Failure 10. Elevator Failure 11. Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure 12. Natural Gas Release or Leak 13. Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY

  16. University of California, Berkeley Building Emergency Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keaveny, Tony

    #12;11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A. B. C. D. E. Utility Failure Elevator Failure Flooding, Plumbing or Steam Line Failure Natural Gas Release or Leak Ventilation Problem IV. EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

  17. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    system (EMS) to enable demand response or any other buildingfor tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected tobased technologies, $ demand response costs for other non-

  18. Policy on University Policies Policy on University Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on University Policies 10/16/2013 Policy on University Policies I. Purpose and Scope University policies promote the University's mission, enhance operational efficiency and University University policies. In order to promote accessibility to current policies, as well as consistency

  19. Campus Parking Map University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    Campus Parking Map University of California BERKELEY #12;Campus Building Locations Parking Lots Campus parking lots are located around and near campus and in the hill areas east of campus. Parking lot/Weekend parking permits are valid weekdays after 5pm and on weekends in , , and designated lots. Parking on campus

  20. Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, OfficeLBNL-48258 Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes Nance Matson, Craig Wray, Iain Walker, Max Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy Performance of Buildings Group

  1. UCDavis University of California A California Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Francisco 20% have a garage · About 50% of USA, California new car buyers have a stable parking spot 25 feetUCDavis University of California A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research · Fleet Operation · Energy Savings Battery studies · Benchmark Testing · 2nd use · End of life Spatial

  2. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: McMaster University Alcohol Policy Policy Number, 1998 Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: May 11, 1998 Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. INTRODUCTION Mc

  3. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Gifts and Awards Policy Policy Number: Approved by: President Date of Most Recent Approval: November 1, 2013 Date of Original Approval: Supersedes/Amends Policy DISCLAIMER: If there is a discrepancy between this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy

  4. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  5. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    much individual California power plants increased earningspower plants were popular developments in California, butno new power plants had been constructed in California over

  6. UC Santa Barbara Policy 4105 Issuing Unit: Student Affairs Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Santa Barbara Policy 4105 Policies Issuing Unit: Student Affairs Date: University of California. The University is committed to a policy against discriminatory practices based upon race, color, religion by a designated entity; (b) review by an impartial hearing entity; (c) an opportunity to present evidence both

  7. Ancillary services market in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Tomas; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Liew, Lucy; Khavkin, Mark

    1999-01-01

    www.caiso.com). California Power Exchange. 1998. PX Primer:Source: California Power Exchange) . 2 CaliforniaControl Automated Power Exchange Ancillary Service Balancing

  8. Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes Building America BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE,...

  9. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    in California PEV Technology and Costs The main challengesthis analysis. FCV Technology and Costs A hydrogen fuel cell6. Hydrogen storage technology and cost status compared to

  10. Physics of Sustainable Energy --California State Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Self-Generation Incentive Program (wind, fuel cells, storage systems New Solar Homes Programs Emerging Renewables Program (fuel cells) #12; Solar Roofs 1% Renewables 13% Cap and Trade 20% Energy 29% Transportation 33% Energy Efficiency 15

  11. Northern California Nanotechnology Center Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    our vacuum systems clean, only put in clean dry samples that don't give off any odor. Odiferous samples can typically be made clean by baking them, or drying them overnight with a fan. Label chemicals chemicals, label all chemicals with your name and the date in which they were brought into the lab

  12. Macroeconomic Impacts of Climate Policies in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ") pollutants ­ decrease in energy use & hence improved energy security ­ "double in its forecasAng ability ­ Generates forecast on an annual basis ­ Has finely-grained sectoring details (169-sectoral scheme) ­ Five major blocks: · Output and Demand

  13. Financial Policy Manual ACCOUNTING POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 ACCOUNTING POLICIES 1101 General Accounting Policy ­ University Financial Activity 1102 General Accounting Policy ­ Financial Resources 1103 Accounting System Maintenance ACCOUNTING - UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL ACTIVITY Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2006 Last Reviewed: March

  14. POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: Approved: April 1, 2013 Revised: Cross References: Purchasing Policy Capital Projects and Renovations Policy Conflict of Interest Policy Sustainability Policy Green Procurement Policy 1 of 9 PROCEDURES: Purchasing Policy AUTHORITY: University

  15. International Policy International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Research Strategy 2006-2009 International Policy Energy Adaptation International Development Coasts Change Research. Our strategy builds upon our previous work on integrated assessment, energy, adaptation of time. In this spirit, the Centre reconfirms its vision statement: "The Tyndall Centre is the UK network

  16. BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    P18$ P16 BUILDING NAMES AA Architecture Building AC Recreation and Athletics Centre AH Alumni Hall AP Azrieli Pavillion AT Azrieli Theatre CB Canal Building CO Residence Commons DT Dunton Tower FH Interaction Building (HCI) HP Herzberg Laboratories IH Ice House LA Loeb Building LE Leeds House LH Lanark

  17. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    energy demand along with the potential for technologies in different transportation sectors to reduce fuelpotential for reductions in energy demand, rather than the supply of low-carbon transportation fuel.potential for reductions in fuel use is provided. California’s Energy

  18. Dismantling College Opportunity in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Civil Rights Project/ Proyecto Derechos Civiles

    2011-01-01

    DISMANTLING   COLLEGE     OPPORTUNITY   IN   CALIFORNIACrisis   and   California’s   Future   Dismantling   CollegePART   4: DISMANTLING   COLLEGE     OPPORTUNITY   IN  

  19. UC Santa Barbara Policy 6015 Issuing Unit: Housing & Auxiliary Services Date: February 1, 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will be paid to the University Center. B. Electrical Requirements All vending machines utilizing electrical, 1985 VENDING MACHINES I. REFERENCES: A. UCSB Policies Manual, Policy 6010, Sale or Distribution of Food. B. UCSB Policies Manual, Policy 5518, Smoking in University Facilities. C. California Uniform Retail

  20. Planning for sustainable communities: Regional incentives and local policy under SB375

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -Claudia Sciara, Ph.D., AICP Urban Land Use and Transportation Center University of California, Davis Policy Institute Policy for Energy, Environment and the Economy University of California, Davis March 19, 2014Sacramento Los Angeles S.F. Bay Area Land use component of regional transportation plans #12;2013 SB375

  1. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Treasure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homes, Sacramento, California Case study of Treasure Homes, who worked with SMUD, DOE, NREL, and ConSol to build HERS-54 homes with high-efficiency HVAC, ducts buried in attic...

  2. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole-House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance of a Hot-Dry...

  3. Energy Efficiency, Building Productivity and the Commercial Buildings Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.W.

    2002-05-16

    The energy-efficiency gap literature suggests that building buyers are often short-sighted in their failure to apply life-cycle costing principles to energy efficient building technologies, with the result that under investment in these advanced technology occurs. This study examines the reasons this behavior may occur, by analyzing the pressures that market forces place on purchasers of buildings. Our basic conclusion is that the fundamental manner in which the buildings sector does business creates pressures to reduce initial capital outlays and to hedge against a variety of risks, including the ability of building owners to capture benefits from energy efficiency. Starting from the position that building buyers' willingness to pay drives choices over building attributes, we examine basic market principles, the structure of the buildings market, including the role of lenders, and policies that promote penetration of energy efficient technologies. We conclude that greater attention to buyers, and to the incentives and constraints they face, would promote a better understanding of building investment choices and contribute to better policies to promote the penetration of these technologies into markets.

  4. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01

    the integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringthe integration of architecture and sustainable engineeringArchitecture University of California, Berkeley Professor Charles C. Benton, Chair Commercial office buildings promoted as “sustainable,” “

  5. City of Phoenix- Design Standards for City Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Phoenix has had energy standards for public buildings in place since 2005. In June 2005, the Phoenix City Council adopted a policy requiring all new city buildings built with 2006 bond...

  6. NORTHERN CALIFORNIA METALLURGICAL SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    . Chin, Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, California 12:30 "UFO Professor Robert Creegan as our luncheon speaker. His topic will be "UFO's -- Borders of Science." 5

  7. Energy Upgrade California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Upgrade California program serves as a one-stop shop for California homeowners who want to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. The program connects homeowners with qualified...

  8. CESC-Webinar: Building an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Driven...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Driven Economy: How Policies Can Foster Risk Capital Investment in Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building an Innovation and...

  9. Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CODES AND INCENTIVES 31 Chapter Six VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS AND LOCAL AND STATE POLICIES FOR GREEN AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 38 Chapter Seven RESOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION 50...

  10. Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Mapping of the Renewable Energy, Buildings and Transport Sectors: Policy Drivers and International Trade Aspects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

  11. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa...

  12. Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector BUILDING FOR ECOLOGICALLY RESPONSIVE of effective green building policy for legislators; · skills upgrade for construction workers; · green building to 40% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, 30 to 40% of solid waste generation, 25 to 40% of total energy

  13. Trade Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    In an otherwise insightful and thoughtful article, Sebastian Pfotenhauer (Trade Policy Is Science Policy,” Issues, Fall 2013) might better have entitled his contribution “Trade Policy Needs to Be Reconciled with Science ...

  14. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    renewable case) alone almost exceed the target emissions. California’s Energy Future -renewable energy, i.e. the “median case. ” California’s Energy Future -

  15. California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasts of California transportation energy demand, 2005-alternative transportation energy pathways on California’salternative transportation energy pathways on California’s

  16. Foraging ecology of North Pacific albacore in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    California Current System. California Cooperative OceanicCalifornia Current system. California Cooperative OceanicCalifornia Current region. California Cooperative Oceanic

  17. ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION Administrative & Business Services UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE July 1, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Chart V ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION Administrative & Business Services UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Policies & Procedures Manager Rachel Gamby Facilities Management and Environmental Health & Safety Environmental Planning & Sustainability Director Richard G. Demerjian Interim Associate Vice Chancellor Richard

  18. A Quantitative Analysis of Pricing Behavior In California's Wholesale Electricity Market During Summer 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul; Kahn, Edward

    2004-06-16

    in Northern California, gas-fired steam and peaking turbines, and cogenerators and other generation sources that are ?Qualifying Facilities? (QFs) under the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act of 1978 (PURPA). About half of in-state generating capacity... and Lynch (2000), California Independent System Operator Department of Market Analysis (2000), California Power Exchange Corporation Compliance Unit (2000) among others. 3 FERC (1998) gives a detailed account of price spikes in Midwestern markets...

  19. 2015 Women's Policy STEM Fair | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 Women's Policy STEM Fair 2015 Women's Policy STEM Fair July 22, 2015 5:00PM to 7:00PM EDT Location: 345 Cannon House Office Building POC: Recruitment@doe.gov Website: Women's...

  20. Benchmarking and Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report Building Energy...

  1. Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Investment...

  2. San Bernardino County- Green Building Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was...

  3. Sustainable Energy Future in China's Building Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates the potentials of energy-saving and mitigation of green-house gas (GHG) emission offered by implementation of building energy efficiency policies in China. An overview of existing literature regarding long-term energy...

  4. Drivers of Commercial Building Operator Skills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, J.

    2011-01-01

    ? Managerial skills ? Market knowledge ? Building certifications ? Energy Star, LEED ? Industry resources 9 C&W TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES ? C&W Training and Support programs ? C&W Green Practice Policies ? LEED Green Associate and AP...

  5. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  6. "Leveraging University Expertise to Inform Better Policy" The UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy is part of a bold new campus-wide initiative to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and Clean Energy in California Thank you for attending the Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Clean Energy in California forum and reception. The UC Davis Policy Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy, the UC the opportunities for linking Plug-in Electric Vehicles and Clean Energy in California. Driving a plug-in electric

  7. Transformation of California's Residential Photovoltaics Market Through Third-Party Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Miller, M.; Macal, C. M.; Graziano, D. J.; Heimiller, D.; Ozik, J.; Perry, T. D.

    2012-03-01

    Third-party photovoltaics (PV) ownership is a rapidly growing market trend, where commercial companies own and operate customer-sited PV systems and lease PV equipment or sell PV electricity to the building occupant. Third-party PV companies can reduce or eliminate up-front adoption costs, reduce technology risk and complexity by monitoring system performance, and can repackage the PV value proposition by showing cost savings in the first month of ownership rather than payback times on the order of a decade. We find that the entrance of third-party business models in southern California residential PV markets has enticed a new demographic to adopt PV systems that is more highly correlated to younger, less affluent, and less educated populations than the demographics correlated to purchasing PV systems. By enticing new demographics to adopt PV, we find that third-party PV products are likely increasing total PV demand rather than gaining market share entirely at the expense of existing customer owned PV demand. We also find that mean population demographics are good predictors of third-party and customer owned PV adoption, and mean voting trends on California carbon policy (Proposition 23) are poor predictors of PV adoption.

  8. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  9. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  10. 4 Int. J. Public Policy, Vol. 4, Nos. 1/2, 2009 Copyright 2009 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    . The long and the short of it: California's electricity crisis Lee S. Friedman Goldman School of Public Policy University of California at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720­7320, USA E-mail: lfried. The problem considered herein is market power and its exercise during the California electricity crisis

  11. Irving Gill and rediscovery of concrete in California the Marie and Chauncey Clark, 1919-22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scensor, Sean

    1995-01-01

    The thesis focuses on a large residence by architect Irving Gill: the house for Marie and Chauncey Dwight Clarke in Santa Fe Springs, California (1919-22). The Clarke House was only discovered as a Gill building in 1981; ...

  12. Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House...

  13. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  14. Essays in monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakdawala, Aeimit Kirti

    2012-01-01

    Monetary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11.2.3 Optimal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monetary policy shocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. California’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGhee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Quinn, Tony. 2013. The “Top Two” System: Working Like ItAssessing California’s Top-Two Primary and RedistrictingCalifornia’s Top Two Primary and the Business Agenda Eric

  16. CALIFORNIA ENERGY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and utilities. Ted Dang, Steven Mac, and Libbie Bessman prepared the historical energy consumption data. Miguel CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2010-2020 ADOPTED FORECAST Schwarzenegger, Governor #12; #12; CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Chris Kavalec Tom Gorin

  17. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01

    and evaluation of renewable energy policies; is an advisorevaluation of renewable energy policies, and on the costs,renewable energy in integrated resource planning; the cost of state-level renewables portfolio standards; trends in solar costs in California; state policy

  18. Capitol Area East End, Block 225: California Department of Education Headquarters

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Sacramento, CA The California Department of Education Headquarters, Block 225 was the first of the five buildings to make up the Capitol Area East End Complex. The entire project is being developed by the California Department of General Services Real Estate Division. At 336,000 square feet and six stories high, Block 225 was the most ambitious green-building initiative to have been undertaken by the State at that time and the largest office building project ever undertaken by the State. The project was delivered through a bridged design-build process.

  19. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  20. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-02

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Australia, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Australia.

  1. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-07

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America. This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in India, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes in India, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial buildings in India.

  2. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

  3. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    the California Power Exchange, and the CaliforniaOperator (Cal ISO). The Power Exchange would be a wholesaleauspices of the Western Power Exchange Steering Committee.

  4. Exploring California PV Home Premiums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices.Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California,”

  5. Towards a Policy of Renewable and Distributed Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desbrun, Mathieu

    Grid 2020 Towards a Policy of Renewable and Distributed Energy Resources September 2012 Resnick W. California Blvd. MC 132-80 Pasadena, CA. 91125 USA + #12;GRID 2020: Towards a Policy of Renewable in the Resnick Insti- tute's Managing Uncertainty: Incorporating Intermittent Renewable Energy Into the Power

  6. Department.: Department of public policy Course number: PP 223W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Policy Credits: 3 Contact Person: Mark Robbins Content Area: CA 2 Social Sciences Catalog Copy: PP 223W Wars 3 Citizen Participation in Monroe 4 New York City 's Policies for the Homeless 5 California Water and be about 4 pages in length. The memoranda must be between 750 1,000 words.Style and format requirements

  7. THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Rick Diamond, Craig Wray, Darryl Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies SYSTEMS IN COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS 2 Acknowledgements Our largest debt of gratitude is to our Energy Becker, Southern California Gas Company; Karl Brown, California Institute for Energy Efficiency; Grant

  8. California Energy Incentive Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) discusses annual update on key energy issues and financial opportunities for federal sites in California.

  9. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    vehicle is that it depends upon the uncertain status of a number of different policies, external commodity and energy prices, and alternative

  10. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    renewable case) alone almost exceed the target emissions. California’s Energy Future -renewable energy, i.e. the “median case. ” California’s Energy Future -

  11. California Public Utilities Commission 505 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISCUSSION ON UTILIZING ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA TO IMPROVE EFFECTIVENESS OF POLICIES AND PROGRAMS SAN Thought Leaders Speaker Series will address the issue of utilizing energy consumption data to evaluate, California Energy Commission WHY: Currently, access to energy consumption data is difficult and sometimes

  12. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA ACCOUNTING SERVICES & CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA ACCOUNTING SERVICES & CONTROLS Petty Cash Reimbursement Accounting Manual, Cash: Petty Cash Disbursements C- 173- 61 · UCSB Policy 5255, Operation of Petty Cash. · Complete bottom part of form providing FULL ACCOUNTING UNIT data and the four letter OWNER CODE for your

  13. City of Houston- Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As of April 2015, a total of 23 city projects were LEED certified, seven were pursing LEED certification, and 6 were designed to LEED standards but not pursing certification.

  14. City of Forth Worth- Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Fort Worth adopted a goal to reduce its electricity consumption by 5% each fiscal year for 10 years beginning in 2011 in reaction to Texas S.B. 898, which required political subdivisi...

  15. Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummaryDIST OFMEAG, Dalton2Program San JoseTurbine-RadarEnergy Santa|

  16. City of Plano - Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy <of Energy Local Government Savings

  17. City of Scottsdale - Green Building Policy for Public Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy <of EnergyResidential

  18. City of Austin - Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying2-2002Joshua DeLungCommercialof

  19. City of Dallas - Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCaribElectricSouthApplying2-2002Joshua<Department<<of

  20. City of El Paso - Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy < Back EligibilityEnergy <

  1. City of Kansas City - Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energy < BackDepartment of Energy < Back

  2. Chemical Hygiene Plan UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    .1 Strategy for Implementation 6.2 Self Assessment for Compliance with CHP 7.0 Training 7.1 Implementation 7 (hereinafter referred to as the INRF lab) occupies the southwest section of the campus second floor of Building. To this end, this Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) establishes policy, responsibilities, and procedures to ensure

  3. UC Santa Barbara Endowed Chairs, Policy #1105

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UC Santa Barbara Endowed Chairs, Policy #1105 Issuing Unit: Academic Affairs Revised June 16, 1998 of the University of California retains authority for establishing and naming endowed chairs. No final commitment shall be in such form as to constitute a legally binding commitment by the donor. Pledges to The UCSB

  4. Application and Mode Establishment of Asset-backed Securitization in Existing Large-scale Public Building Retrofit Financing in China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, J.; Wu, Y.; Dai, Z.; Hao, Y.

    2006-01-01

    to reconstruct existing large-scale public buildings for large-scale public buildings having the characteristics of high-energy consumption and low-energy efficiency. Existing building retrofit is a system engineering involving technology, policy and management...

  5. CALIFORNIA-MEXICO HEALTH INITIATIVE | CALIFORNIA POLICY RESEARCH CENTER UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA | OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , 20045 Prevalence of Diabetes United States w As of 2002, 2 million Latinos over age 20 in the United States had been diagnosed with diabetes. Approximately 24% of the Mexican-origin community in the United States ages 45-74 have diabetes.1 w In the United States, Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to have

  6. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  7. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01

    installed at California power plants. Furthermore, recentlyinformation for California’s power plants. Personalinformation for California’s power plants. Personal

  8. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    to consumers, energy suppliers, builders, the environment,property owners and four energy suppliers. This group’s  CERT, requires domestic energy suppliers to save 293 Mt CO 2

  9. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    photovoltaics (PV), and ground-source heat pump systems.as solar PV and water heaters, ground-source heat pumps, andas geothermal heat pumps, solar water heaters, and solar PV

  10. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    from http://www.iea.org/weo/ IEA. (2011a, November).from http://www.iea.org/weo/ IEA. (2011b). Energy Statistics

  11. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    as photovoltaics (PV) and solar water heaters, and directheat pumps, solar water heaters, and solar PV systems. Theshading measures, solar water heaters, and high efficiency

  12. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    integrates renewable and energy service companies (ESCOs),in China. Vienna: Renewable Energy & Energy EfficiencyD. (2011). China Renewable Energy Architecture Development

  13. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    energy-efficiency measure installed by households under this program, followed by heating system replacements and solar

  14. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Passive House Passive House (Passivhaus in German) is theis the German Passivhaus, 72 or Passive House, standard.Passive House Trend in the 10 PASS-NET Countries The Passivhaus

  15. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    investments: Energy-efficiency resource standards, energyon land, energy, water, resource/material efficiency, andWeighting Energy Efficiency Resource/ Material Efficiency

  16. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    and marketing energy efficient and alternative fuel vehiclesand marketing energy efficient and alternative fuel vehiclesalternative financing vehicles that are often used, to make repayable energy-

  17. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    property management plans for water, energy, and materialheating, cooling and water heating energy use based on theSites Possible Points Water Efficiency Energy and Atmosphere

  18. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Sathaye, J. (2009). India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand inies.lbl.gov/iespubs/india_energy_outlook.pdf de la Rue duRetrieved from USAID India - Energy Conservation and

  19. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Renewable Energy Incentives The  subsections  below  describe  India’India. The majority of such measures are for appliances, renewable energy (

  20. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Passive House .191 6.2.2. From Passive Houses to Nearly Zero Energyincremental-cost-analysis Passive House Institute. (2011,

  1. Building Energy-Efficiency Best Practice Policies and Policy Packages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark

    2014-01-01

    and water heating demand as well as use of natural ventilation and lighting, energy recovery systems, waste heat,

  2. Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and called on it to return to the city council with a proposal for mandatory energy efficien- cy upgrades ordinance by August 2008. The 27 member taskforce brought to- gether a...

  3. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U was also supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy underLBNL 61282 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Standards in California Max H. Sherman and Iain

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    into 18 categories: 1. Research: Centers and Academic Programs 2. Green Buildings 3. Renewable Energy 4UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED "I recognize the right #12;July 2011 UC IRVINE "GREEN" ACTIONS UNDERWAY OR COMPLETED JULY 2011 This outline summarizes UC

  5. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whether you are building a new facility, renovating an existing one, or want to reduce your energy billsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SPECIAL DISTRICTS HOSPITALS & PUBLIC CARE COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES F O 2004 www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/partnership Call (916) 654-4147 #12;The Energy Partnership Program

  6. “The Making of” California’s Energy Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittington, Jan

    2002-01-01

    California’s Energy Crisis, Whittington cogeneration facilities, were advocating deregulation as a solution to high costs.cost overseas producers. Their primary representation was the California Large Energycosts - were equally dramatic. In August of 2000, “Energy Insight Today” compared how much individual California

  7. A Prototype Data Archive for the PIER "Thermal Distribution Systems in Commercial Buildings" Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    archive for a selection of building energy data on thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings California Energy Data Archive (CalEDA) that provides public web access to data from PIER and related projects. Characteristics of a Building Energy Data Archive Several groups have developed data archives

  8. Sustainable Energy Policy University Facilities (UF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    . Conservation Goals It is the goal of Clemson University to reduce energy consumption per gross square foot of building space on average by 1% per year beginning July 1, 2008, with an ultimate goal of reducing energySustainable Energy Policy University Facilities (UF) POLICY 10 Effective Date: August 11, 2008 Last

  9. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Office of Legal Services & Access to External Legal Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration) Enquiries: University Secretariat DISCLAIMER for retention of external counsel for University legal matters; and · the administrative and financial oversight

  10. English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy Abstract This Policy sets out the University their courses of study. Dates Policy approved Policy takes effect Policy is due for review (up to five years) 03/11/2010 22/11/2010 11/2015 Policy amendment approved Policy amendment takes effect 11/12/2014 19

  11. Georgia Tech Department of Housing Bicycle Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Georgia Tech Department of Housing Bicycle Policies Bicycle Storage There are several options for storage of bicycles in and around Housing buildings: Bicycle storage lockers are available, in limited. Some residence halls have bicycle storage rooms within the building. Ask your staff member if your

  12. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving...

  13. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings through New Media--An Idea Exchange This report...

  14. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary report and...

  15. Retrofit California Overview and Final Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choy, Howard; Rosales, Ana

    2014-03-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (also called upgrades) are widely recognized as a critical component to achieving energy savings in the building sector to help lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To date, however, upgrades have accounted for only a small percentage of aggregate energy savings in building stock, both in California and nationally. Although the measures and technologies to retrofit a building to become energy efficient are readily deployed, establishing this model as a standard practice remains elusive. Retrofit California sought to develop and test new program models to increase participation in the energy upgrade market in California. The Program encompassed 24 pilot projects, conducted between 2010 and mid-2013 and funded through a $30 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The broad scope of the Program can be seen in the involvement of the following regionally based Grant Partners: Los Angeles County (as prime grantee); Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG), consisting of: o StopWaste.org for Alameda County o Regional Climate Protection Authority (RCPA) for Sonoma County o SF Environment for the City and County of San Francisco o City of San Jose; California Center for Sustainable Energy (CCSE) for the San Diego region; Sacramento Municipal Utilities District (SMUD). Within these jurisdictions, nine different types of pilots were tested with the common goal of identifying, informing, and educating the people most likely to undertake energy upgrades (both homeowners and contractors), and to provide them with incentives and resources to facilitate the process. Despite its limited duration, Retrofit California undoubtedly succeeded in increasing awareness and education among home and property owners, as well as contractors, realtors, and community leaders. However, program results indicate that a longer timeframe will be needed to transform the market and establish energy retrofits as the new paradigm. Innovations such as Flex Path, which came about because of barriers encountered during the Program, have already shown promise and are enabling increased participation. Together, the pilots represent an unprecedented effort to identify and address market barriers to energy efficiency upgrades and to provide lessons learned to shape future program planning and implementation. The statistics reflects the scope of the marketing and outreach campaigns, which tested a variety of approaches to increase understanding of the benefits of energy upgrades to drive participation in the Program. More traditional methods such as TV and radio advertisements were complimented by innovative community based social marketing campaigns that sought to leverage the trusted status of neighborhood organizations and leaders in order to motivate their constituents to undertake retrofits. The remainder of this report provides an overview of Retrofit California including brief summaries of the pilots’ main components and highlights, followed by the major findings or takeaway lessons from the approaches that were tested. Eleven of the pilots will be continued, with modifications, under the ratepayer-funded Regional Energy Networks. Involvement in the RENS by many of the Retrofit California partners will ensure that early lessons learned are carried forward to guide future programs for energy upgrades in California.

  16. Diesel Use in California | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use in California Diesel Use in California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: California Energy Commission 2002deerboyd.pdf More Documents & Publications Reducing Petroleum...

  17. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01

    Southern California Bight/San Onofre/Power Plant/Southern California Bight/San Onofre Power Plant/Power Plant (DCPP), San Luis Obispo County, California.

  18. The Aftermath of Redistricting Reform in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchler, Justin

    2011-01-01

    2009. “Redistricting Reform Will Not Solve California’sMatthew. 2009. “Redistricting Reform Could Save California2. ———. 2011. “Redistricting Reform Revisited. ” California

  19. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  20. Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Dispatch Strategies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Dispatch Strategies for Distributed Photovoltaic;Center for Energy and Environmental Policy BUILDING PEAK-SHAVING (BPS) DISPATCH STRATEGY · Economic charging mode #12;Center for Energy and Environmental Policy BPS DISPATCH STRATEGY Mode "PV System Charging