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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaMiscellaneous FloorAreaMiscellaneous Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 445 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 250 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 254 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,629 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 175 + Sweden Building 05K0040 + 869 + Sweden Building 05K0044 + 1,234 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,039 + Sweden Building 05K0051 + 1,489.92 + Sweden Building 05K0052 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 140 + Sweden Building 05K0063 + 654 + Sweden Building 05K0068 + 746 + Sweden Building 05K0071 + 293 +

2

Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaRestaurants" Showing 13 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1,990 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 215 + Sweden Building 05K0038 + 345 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 330 + Sweden Building 05K0060 + 256 + Sweden Building 05K0065 + 520 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 98 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 155 + Sweden Building 05K0098 + 170 + Sweden Building 05K0105 + 2,450 + Sweden Building 05K0114 + 400 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants&oldid=285973#SMWResults"

3

Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaShops" Showing 19 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 800 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1,587 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 154 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3,150 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 245 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 5,600 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 292 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 940 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0086 + 920 + Sweden Building 05K0088 + 1,170 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 976 + Sweden Building 05K0092 + 360 +

4

Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 °C) Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages" Showing 15 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 400 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 3,300 + Sweden Building 05K0031 + 2,331 + Sweden Building 05K0033 + 465 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,276 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 130 + Sweden Building 05K0039 + 580 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,076 + Sweden Building 05K0048 + 340 + Sweden Building 05K0061 + 90 + Sweden Building 05K0067 + 856 + Sweden Building 05K0093 + 2,880 +

5

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

6

Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaOffices FloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaOffices" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 5,000 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,360 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,150 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 21,765 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,500 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 33,955 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 14,080 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 20,978 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 15,632 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,101 +

7

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

8

Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Schools, including child day-care centres Pages using the property "Building...

9

Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises" Showing 6 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0021 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0050 + 760 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 1,200 + Sweden Building 05K0080 + 2,000 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0102 + 234 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises&oldid=285964#SMWResults" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

10

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 -...

11

Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Churches and chapels Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:BuildingFloorAreaChurchesChapels&oldid285978" What links here Related changes Special pages...

12

Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Grocery shops Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:BuildingFloorAreaGroceryShops&oldid286018" What links here Related changes Special pages...

13

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Floors | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floors Floors The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_floors.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

14

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

15

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

16

Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999" B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings ","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",4657,2348,1110,708,257,145,59,23,7 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",327,119,61,52,49,30,10,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",174,138,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

17

Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" 4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1897,272,"Q","Q","Q",164 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,802,222,17,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,506,121,51,12,"Q",17 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,184,33,15,15,"Q","Q"

18

Number of U.S. Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2

19

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

20

Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Used to determine the climate zone. Floor Area. This is usedBuilding Activity, Climate Zone, and Floor Area. A number ofbuildings with. Climate Zone. The California Energy

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",67338,43343,10582,3574,3260,4811,1769 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5358,857,"Q","Q","Q",512 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5952,1630,137,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,7812,1982,784,"Q","Q",296

22

Table B27. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Cooking Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

23

Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings...

24

Table B10. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" 0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings ................",4657,2376,807,683,487,174,90,39 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1567,482,226,66,"Q","Q","N" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,511,180,249,144,"Q","Q","N" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,250,105,146,157,46,"Q","Q"

25

Table B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999" B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999" "All Buildings ................",4657,419,499,763,665,774,846,690 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,227,270,359,321,367,413,390 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,107,102,240,166,193,156,145 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,63,90,97,84,130,179,65 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,13,20,39,53,44,43,44 "50,001 to 100,000 ............",145,7,9,19,24,26,33,27

26

Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1 Outpatient .................................................. 116 64 Q Q 7 Q Q Q Q Lodging ........................................................ 153 Q 38 27 32 11 4 3 Q Mercantile .................................................... 667 316 146 141 28 20 13 2 1 Retail (Other Than Mall) ............................ 534 308 103 100 11 6 5 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ...........................

27

Efficient 3D building model generation from 2D floor plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D building models are beneficial to architects, interior designers, and ordinary people in visualizing indoor space in three dimensions. 3D building models appear to be more aesthetic to ordinary people than architectural ...

Kashlev, Dmitry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Vertical displacement of the storage ring floor due to building distortion in the Photon Factory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Light Source Building of the Photon Factory was found to distort so much as to induce the displacement of magnets in the storage ring. This resulted in drifting of the beam orbit. It was considered that the building was distorted by the variations of thermal stress

Tomotaro Katsura; Yutaka Fujita

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Innovative accessible sunken floor systems for multi-story steel buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the demands of telecommunications and computer equipment, building owners and designers are facing an increasingly difficult problem for wire management in today's electronic workplace. This thesis is to investigate ...

Kwan, Henry K

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Table B16. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings ................",4657,1362,142,67338,26049,7101 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,604,"Q",6774,1706,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,297,"Q",8238,2211,"Q"

31

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelors thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets",,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets" "All Buildings ................",4657,950,658,255,719,67338,25652,19713,8808,19938 "Building Floorspace"

33

Building America Developments, September 2000, Information Bulletin Number 1 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect

Building America Developments on-line newsletter highlights the Erie-Ellington Homes publicly-funded housing project in Boston, Massachusetts. A Building America and industry partnership that produced energy-efficient manufactured homes built with foam core panels is featured. Also, Habitat for Humanity dedicates two energy-efficient test houses in East Tennessee, and affordable, healthy homes are offered in metro Atlanta. Upcoming events in the Building America Program are also listed.

Hendron, R.; Anderson, J.; Epstein, K.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NBTC Safety Orientation Second Floor Duffield Hall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ EVACUATE THE BUILDING. IF THERE IS A GAS ALARM ­ EVACUATE THE FLOOR. IF THE GAS ALARM IS ON ALL FLOORS&S) - Laser Safety - Centrifuge Rotor Safety - Fire Extinguisher Education · ENTER THE LABS BY SWIPING YOUR ID

Wu, Mingming

35

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

36

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

37

Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" . Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","North- east","Midwest ","South","West","All Buildings","North- east","Midwest","South","West" "All Buildings ................",4657,686,1188,1762,1021,67338,12360,16761,23485,14731 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,305,620,916,506,6774,901,1835,2536,1503 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,169,273,413,255,8238,1302,2045,3058,1834 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,130,188,260,130,11153,1954,2881,4194,2124

38

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

39

Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presently in Kuwait the code of practice for energy conservation in the air conditioned buildings implemented by the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) which has been in effect since 1983 has no consideration taken for thermally insulating the floors of residential and commercial buildings with unconditioned basements. As a part of a comprehensive research program conducted by the Building and Energy Technologies Department of Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research for revision of the code this paper analyzes the effect of using un-insulated floors on the peak cooling demand and energy consumption of a middle income residential private villa and a onebedroom multi-story apartment building in Kuwait. These floors typically separate air-conditioned spaces with ambient environment or un-conditioned spaces. This was done using the ESP-r, a building's energy simulation program, in conjunction with typical meteorological year for Kuwait. The study compared such typical floors with three types of insulated floors. It was found that using an R- 10 floors in multi-story apartment buildings greatly reduce both the peak cooling demand as well as the energy consumption by about 15%, whereas only minimal savings (about 4%) were detected in the case of the residential villas.

Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Property:Number of Build Out Units Deployed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Build Out Units Deployed Build Out Units Deployed Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Build Out Units Deployed Property Type String Pages using the property "Number of Build Out Units Deployed" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 50 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 20 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 3700 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 450 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 2350 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 2851 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 1260 + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 1 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 3802 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 4942 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 1400 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

querying (building type, climate zone, etc) sufficient forBuilding Type Floor Area Climate Zone Building Age Heatingtype, and zip code/climate zone. A memo describing the

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

News from the Expo floor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainability, the recession, and challenges to the biodiesel industry were three major topics raised by a number of exhibitors at the 101st AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, May 1619, 2010. News from the Expo floor Inform Magazine I

43

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manufact-uring",,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water...

45

Table B24. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water",,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water" "All Buildings...

46

User ESH Support (UES)/Floor Coordinators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators Bruce Glagola, Group Leader Building 431, Room Z005 Phone: 630-252-9797 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: glagola@aps.anl.gov Nena Moonier Building 431, Room Z008 Phone: 630-252-8504 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: nmoonier@aps.anl.gov Karen Kucer Building 401, Room C3257C Phone: 630-252-9091 Fax: 630-252-5948 E-mail: kucer@aps.anl.gov Floor Coordinators Bruno Fieramosca Building 432, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0201 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site page: 4-0201 E-mail: bgf@aps.anl.gov Shane Flood Building 436, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0600 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0600 E-mail: saf@aps.anl.gov Patti Pedergnana Building 434, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0401 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0401 E-mail: neitzke@aps.anl.gov Wendy VanWingeren Building 435, Room C001

47

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF BUILDINGS AND BUILDING ENVELOPE SYSTEMS: AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters for typ- ical building envelope constructions,Energy Conservation: Buildings," u. s. Dept. of Commerce,Heated Floor Structures and Buildings Foundation Soils with

Carroll, William L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

50

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Features | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Score Score Features Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Features The Asset Scoring Tool evaluates buildings by use type. The initial version of the Asset Scoring Tool included: office, school, retail, and unrefrigerated warehouse buildings. Phase II currently under development, which will be used for the 2013 Pilot, includes library, lodging, multi-family housing, and courthouse buildings, as well as mixed-use types of buildings that incorporate Phase I and II. You can enter small and large commercial buildings, and an Asset Score will be equally applicable to new and existing buildings. Inputs You can enter these building characteristics: General information-number of floors, footprint dimension, orientation, and use type Envelope components-roof, exterior wall, and floor types and

51

NIST WTC 7 Investigation Finds Building Fires Caused ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the building superstructure to the columns of the electric substation (over which ... floor framing and/or composite floor systems." Engineers, the team ...

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

APS Floor Coordinators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to: cee@aps.anl.gov SecurityPrivacy Notice APS Floor Coordinators LOM COORDINATORS CAT INFORMATION 431 A,B,D Vacant SRI-CAT, Sectors 1-3 C FC Office E SRI-CAT, Sector 4 432 A...

53

Economic analysis of the daylight-linked lighting control system in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to perform an economic analysis of the daylight-linked automatic on/off lighting control system installed for the purpose of energy savings in office buildings. For this, a building was chosen as a typical example, and the energy cost was calculated by using the daylight and building energy analysis simulation. When the lighting control was utilized, an economic analysis was performed using a payback period that was calculated by comparing the initial cost of installing the lighting control system with the annual energy cost which was reduced thanks to the application of the lighting control. The results showed that the lighting energy consumption, when the lighting control was applied, was reduced by an average of 30.5% compared with the case that there was not lighting control applied. Also, the result for total energy consumption showed that, when lighting control was applied, this was reduced by 8.5% when the glazing ratio was 100%, 8.2% for 80%, and 7.6% for 60% when compared to non-application. The payback period was analyzed in terms of the number of floors in a building; 10 floors, 20 floors, 30 floors, and 40 floors. Hence, the building with 40 floors and glazing ratio 100% resulted in the shortest payback period of 8.8 years, the building with 10 floors and glazing ratio 60% resulted in the longest period of 12.7 years. In other words, the larger the glazing ratio and the number of building floors are, the shorter the payback period is. (author)

Yang, In-Ho; Nam, Eun-Ji [Department of Architectural Engineering, College of Engineering, Dongguk University, 26-3, Pil-dong, Chung-gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

55

Sheraton Seattle Hotel Floor Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Sheraton Seattle Hotel Floor Plans. MEETING ROOMS. RESTROOMS. LEVEL 1. LEVEL. MEETING INFORMATION.

56

WOOD FLOORING 1. INTRODUCTION TO WARM AND WOOD FLOORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for wood flooring beginning at the waste generation reference point. 1 The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with wood flooring in the following three waste management alternatives: source reduction, combustion, and landfilling.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective Action Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP.

NONE

1997-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switch Floor1 GSA Smart Buildings Report April 8, 2009 PageDE-AC02-05CH11231. GSA Smart Buildings Report April 8, 2009National Laboratory, Building Intelligence Group and Noblis.

Ehrlich, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Control of human induced floor vibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the growing demand for open, column-free floor spaces and the advances in material strength, floor vibration serviceability criterion has been of growing importance within the past 20-30 years. All floor systems are ...

Homen, Sean Manuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Walking on daylight : the application of translucent floor systems as a means of achieving natural daylighting in mid and low rise architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the introduction of quality daylight to buildings by means of translucency in the horizontal planes or floors within the building. Since people began to build, the concept of translucency in ...

Widder, James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Mobile Building Energy Audit and Modeling Tools: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-00441  

SciTech Connect

Broadly accessible, low cost, accurate, and easy-to-use energy auditing tools remain out of reach for managers of the aging U.S. building population (over 80% of U.S. commercial buildings are more than 10 years old*). concept3D and NREL's commercial buildings group will work to translate and extend NREL's existing spreadsheet-based energy auditing tool for a browser-friendly and mobile-computing platform. NREL will also work with concept3D to further develop a prototype geometry capture and materials inference tool operable on a smart phone/pad platform. These tools will be developed to interoperate with NREL's Building Component Library and OpenStudio energy modeling platforms, and will be marketed by concept3D to commercial developers, academic institutions and governmental agencies. concept3D is NREL's lead developer and subcontractor of the Building Component Library.

Brackney, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mobile Building Energy Audit and Modeling Tools: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-00441  

SciTech Connect

Broadly accessible, low cost, accurate, and easy-to-use energy auditing tools remain out of reach for managers of the aging U.S. building population (over 80% of U.S. commercial buildings are more than 10 years old*). concept3D and NREL's commercial buildings group will work to translate and extend NREL's existing spreadsheet-based energy auditing tool for a browser-friendly and mobile-computing platform. NREL will also work with concept3D to further develop a prototype geometry capture and materials inference tool operable on a smart phone/pad platform. These tools will be developed to interoperate with NREL's Building Component Library and OpenStudio energy modeling platforms, and will be marketed by concept3D to commercial developers, academic institutions and governmental agencies. concept3D is NREL's lead developer and subcontractor of the Building Component Library.

Brackney, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Title Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

64

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

65

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 400A EXPANSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY LEMONT, IL BUILDING 400A EXPANSION 3 WEEK LOOK AHEAD SCHEDULE PROJECT Touch Up Paint X X X X X B&A Install Insulation At North Parapet Walls X X Scrub / Clean Floors X X Seal OPEN Final Clean Building X TRIUMPH Caulk Interior Floors / Concrete / Frames X X G&L Water Test

Kemner, Ken

66

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingSim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a one-room apartment up to a 100+ floor skyscraper--and account for everything from window coverings to shade trees. BuildingSim uses actual hourly weather data from over 90...

67

Sheraton Seattle Hotel Floor Plans - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LEARN NETWORK ADVANCE. Sheraton Seattle Hotel Floor Plans. MEETING ROOMS. RESTROOMS. LEVEL. PIKE ST. TOWER. UNION ST. TOWER.

68

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

69

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

70

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

71

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/PEW_EnergyEfficiency_FullReport.pdf References: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency[1] FROM SHOP FLOOR TO TOP FLOOR: BEST BUSINESS PRACTICES IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Pew Center on Global Climate Change. William R. Prindle. April 2010. In the last decade, rising and volatile energy prices coupled with

72

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

73

PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

Douglas C. Hittle

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection Form Version: 6/14/2013 Building Name: Data collected by: Email, phone: Date of Data Collection: HOW TO USE THIS DATA COLLECTION FORM This form is intended to facilitate your data collection. The Energy Asset Scoring Tool uses the "block" concept to simplify your building geometry. Most buildings can be scored as one block un- less at least one of the follow situations applies: a. The building has sections with different numbers of floors Example: A portion of the building is 3 story and the other portion is 10 story. b. Different parts of the building are served by different HVAC systems Example: A portion of the building uses a local chiller, the other portion uses packaged DX

75

Development of Energy Trading Floors - Implications for Company Operations and Regional Energy Markets: Report Series on Fuel and Po wer Market Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of different firms have established energy trading floors over the past several years, to such an extent that trading floors are increasingly being viewed as a mandatory part of the generation business. Increasing in number and scope, trading floors are undergoing rapid evolution, with inevitable -- but as yet uncertain -- impacts on alignment of fuel and power prices. This report provides a snapshot of the development and implications of energy trading floors, drawing on leading examples from ...

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Case Study, The Philip Merrill Environmental Center, Annapolis, Maryland (Office) Building Design Floor Area: 31,000 SF Floors: 2 Footprint: 220 ft. x (1) 2 Floors of open office space Attached pavilion containing: Meeting space Kitchen Staff dining Conference room Shell Windows U-Factor SHGC (2) Type: Double Pane, Low-e, Argon Filled Insulating Glass 0.244 0.41 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value Interior Wall plywood, gypsum, SIP foam, and sheathing 28.0 Exterior Wall gypsum and insulated metal framing 9.3 Roof plywood, gypsum, SIP foam, and sheathing 38.0 HVAC 18 ground source heat pumps fin and tube radiators connected to a propane boiler 1 air condtioning unit Lighting Power Densities (W/SF) First Floor: 1.2 Second Floor: 1.6 Conference Room: 1.4 Energy/Power PV System: 4.2 kW thin-film system

77

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

78

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

79

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 3.25. Water-Heating Equipment in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and...

80

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Record of Technical Change {number_sign}1 for ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada'' Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Record of Technical Change provides updates to the technical information included in ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Underground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada'' Revision 0

US DOE Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy consumption characterization as an input to building management and performance benchmarking - a case study PPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper aims at describing the methodology and presents some final results of a work developed in the field of building energy benchmarking applied to the buildings of the Polytechnic Institute of Leiria, based on a thorough energy performance characterization of each of its buildings, looking specifically at the typology of canteen. Developing building energy performance benchmarking systems enables the comparison of actual consumption of individual buildings against others of the same typology and against targets previously defined. The energy performance indicator was computed based on two different relevant elements, the net floor area and number of served meals. Then, the results were ranked according to the percentile rules previously established, and compared. An environmental analysis based on equivalent CO2 emissions was also performed for each building.

Bernardo, H.; Neves, L.; Oliveira, F.; Quintal, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

REFERENCE APPENDICES For the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ADDITION is any change to a building that increases conditioned floor area and conditioned volume. Addition is also any change that increases the floor area or volume of an unconditioned building of an occupancy group or type regulated by Part 6. Addition is also any change that increases the illuminated area

84

Crack Width Analysis of Floor Slabs from Hyster 550 FS Lift Truck with 55 Kip Pay Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This calculation determines the probable crack width experienced by the slab on grade floor at Building 2404WA from a Hyster 550 FS lift truck having tire pressures of 124 psi while moving and placing Standard Waste Disposal Boxes within the building.

BLACK, D.G.

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CELLAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from a rectangular building with a foundation of the cellar type with constant insulation thickness at the floor and the wall. Both the heat loss variation during the year,...

86

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 37. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 38. Water-Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 39. Lighting...

88

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 25. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 27. Water-Heating Energy...

89

Dynamic characteristics and wind-induced responses of a super tall building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a combined experimental and numerical investigation of wind effects on a super tall building, Di Wang Tower (325m high with 79 floors) (more)

Liu, Pengfei (???)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Building Technologies Office: Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Photo of the Denver skyline with Wells Fargo Center building in the center of the image and the Rocky Mountains in the background. A local law firm upgraded one floor of their offices in the Wells Fargo Center (center) in Denver as part of Commercial Building Partnerships. Renovation, retrofit and refurbishment of existing buildings represent an opportunity to upgrade the energy performance of commercial building assets for their ongoing life. Often retrofit involves modifications to existing commercial buildings that may improve energy efficiency or decrease energy demand. In addition, retrofits are often used as opportune time to install distributed generation to a building. Energy efficiency retrofits can reduce the operational costs, particularly in older buildings, as well as help to attract tenants and gain a market edge.

91

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

92

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

93

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

94

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Use Tables Buildings Use Tables (24 pages, 129 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 12. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 13. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1995 Table 14. Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 15. Weekly Operating Hours, Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 17. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the

96

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingSim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BuildingSim BuildingSim BuildingSim logo BuildingSim allows users to model a building and analyze the heating and cooling energy costs in any climate. Users can create any building—from a one-room apartment up to a 100+ floor skyscraper--and account for everything from window coverings to shade trees. BuildingSim uses actual hourly weather data from over 90 climates around the world to numerically solve the full thermodynamic differential equations every minute of the year, giving the user the actual energy use down to the cent. The simulation algorithm fully accounts for thermostat and HVAC controls, allowing the user to analyze the effects of different thermostat algorithms (programmable thermostats, setback, split-zone, etc.) on the energy costs for a specific building and climate. Screen Shots

97

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

98

Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example  

SciTech Connect

This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Kalman-type positioning filters with floor plan information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of Kalman-type filters that estimate the user's position indoors, using range measurements and floor plan data, is presented. The floor plan information is formulated as a set of linear constraints and is used to truncate the Gaussian posterior ... Keywords: Kalman filter, floor plan, inequality constraints, nonlinear filtering, positioning

Tommi Perl; Simo Ali-Lytty

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4011,1841,2029,141,635,46,164,425 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2272,980,1205,87,280,"Q",77,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,783,384,375,"Q",106,"Q","Q",87

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

102

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

103

Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Achieving effective floor control with a low-bandwidth gesture-sensitive videoconferencing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiparty videoconferencing with even a small number of people is often infeasible due to the high network bandwidth required. Bandwidth can be significantly reduced if most of the advantages of using full-motion video can be achieved with low-frame-rate ... Keywords: floor control, frame rate, multiparty videoconferencing

Milton Chen

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

106

Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,1477,116,64783,24735,6604 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,771,"Q",6789,2009,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,259,"Q",6585,1912,"Q"

107

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

108

Religious Worship Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Religious Worship Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Religious Worship Buildings... 93 percent of religious worship buildings were less than 25,000 square feet. The oldest religious worship buildings were found in the Northeast, where the median age was over two and half times older than those in South, where religious worship buildings were the newest. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Top Number of Religious Worship Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of worship buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

109

Engineering Evaluation Report on K-311-1 Floor Subsidence (2008 Annual Report) at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this task is to evaluate the effect of floor settlement on building structure, piping, and equipment foundations between column lines 1 and 2 and B and K of Bldg. K-311-1 (see Fig. A-1 in Appendix A) at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 0 of this document covers the 2005 annual inspection. Revision 1 addresses the 2006 annual inspection, Revision 2 addresses the 2007 annual inspection, and Revision 3 covers the 2008 annual inspection, as indicated by the changed report title. A civil survey and visual inspection were performed. Only a representative number of points were measured during the 2008 survey. The exact location of a number of survey points in Table A-1 could not be accurately determined in the 2008 survey since these points had not been spray painted since 2003. The points measured are deemed adequate to support the conclusions of this report. Based on the survey and observations, there has been no appreciable change in the condition of the unit since the 2007 inspection. The subsidence of the floor presents concerns to the building structure due to the possible indeterminate load on the pipe gallery framing. Prior to demolition activities that involve the piping or removal of the equipment, such as vent, purge and drain and foaming, engineering involvement in the planning is necessary. The piping connected to the equipment is under stress, and actions should be implemented to relieve this stress prior to disturbing any of the equipment or associated piping. In addition, the load on the pipe gallery framing needs to be relieved prior to any activities taking place in the pipe gallery. Access to this area and the pipe gallery is not allowed until the stress is released.

Knott R.B.

2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating andcooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

SciTech Connect

A recently completed project for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building Equipment combined DOE-2 results for a large set of prototypical commercial and residential buildings with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) residential and commercial energy consumption surveys (RECS, CBECS) to estimate the total heating and cooling loads in U.S. buildings attributable to different shell components such as windows, roofs, walls, etc., internal processes, and space-conditioning systems. This information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy efficiency. The prototypical building descriptions and DOE-2 input files were developed from 1986 to 1992 to provide benchmark hourly building loads for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and include 112 single-family, 66 multi-family, and 481 commercial building prototypes. The DOE study consisted of two distinct tasks : (1) perform DOE-2 simulations for the prototypical buildings and develop methods to extract the heating and cooling loads attributable to the different building components; and (2) estimate the number of buildings or floor area represented by each prototypical building based on EIA survey information. These building stock data were then multiplied by the simulated component loads to derive aggregated totals by region, vintage, and building type. The heating and cooling energy consumption of the national building stock estimated by this bottom-up engineering approach was found to agree reasonably well with estimates from other sources, although significant differences were found for certain end-uses. The main added value from this study, however, is the insight it provides about the contributing factors behind this energy consumption, and what energy savings can be expected from efficiency improvements for different building components by region, vintage, and building type.

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ubiquitous Indoor Localization and Worldwide Automatic Construction of Floor Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although GPS has been considered a ubiquitous outdoor localization technology, we are still far from a similar technology for indoor environments. While a number of technologies have been proposed for indoor localization, they are isolated efforts that are way from a true ubiquitous localization system. A ubiquitous indoor positioning system is envisioned to be deployed on a large scale worldwide, with minimum overhead, to work with heterogeneous devices, and to allow users to roam seamlessly from indoor to outdoor environments. Such a system will enable a wide set of applications including worldwide seamless direction finding between indoor locations, enhancing first responders' safety by providing anywhere localization and floor plans, and providing a richer environment for location-aware social networking applications. We describe an architecture for the ubiquitous indoor positioning system (IPS) and the challenges that have to be addressed to materialize it. We then focus on the feasibility of automating ...

Youssef, Moustafa; Elkhouly, Reem; Lotfy, Amal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Natural Gas Price Uncertainty: Establishing Price Floors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of comprehensive calculations of ceiling and floor prices for natural gas. Ceiling prices are set by the price levels at which it is more economic to switch from natural gas to residual fuel oil in steam units and to distillate in combined cycle units. Switching to distillate is very rare, whereas switching to fuel oil is quite common, varying between winter and summer and increasing when natural gas prices are high or oil prices low. Monthly fuel use was examined for 89 ...

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fire Resistance Testing of WTC Floor System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NYC Building Code Provisions (Fire Resistance in hours) ... [1] Letter dated October 30, 1969 from Robert J. Linn (Manager, Project Planning, The ...

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale DC Microgrids Title Building Scale DC Microgrids Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5729E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Marnay, Chris, Steven...

115

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

116

Buildings*","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,2552,889,738,241,129,65,25,7 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",386,162,56,60,48,39,16,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",226,164,44,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

117

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",4859,2586,948,810,261,147,74,26,8 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",386,162,56,60,48,39,16,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",226,164,44,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

118

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Education","Food Sales","Food Service","Health Care",,"Lodging","Retail (Other Than Mall)" ,,,,,"Inpatient","Outpatient" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,386,226,297,8,121,142,443 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,162,164,202,"N",56,38,241 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,56,44,65,"N",38,21,97 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,60,"Q",23,"Q",19,38,83

119

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL BUILDING ENERGY ASSET SCORE 1 SUMMARY BUILDING INFORMATION Example Building 2000 A St., Chicago, IL 60601 Building Type: Mixed-Use Gross Floor Area: 140,000 ft 2 Year Built: 2005 Office: 100,000 ft 2 Retail: 40,000 ft 2 Report #: IL-1234567 Score Date: 02/2013 Building ID #: XXXXX ASSET SCORE DATA LEVEL: ¨ Simple Score ¨ Advanced Score ¨ Verified Advanced Score Current Score Potential Score BUILDING USE TYPES: This report includes a Score for the entire building as well as individual Scores for each of the separate use types. CONTENTS BUILDING ASSET SCORE: * Summary.......................................................... Page 1 * Score................................................................ Pages 2-4 * Upgrade Opportunities

120

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Case Study, The Cambria Department of Environmental Protection Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania (Office) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Open office space (1) File storage area Two small labratories Conference rooms Break room Storage areas Two mechanical rooms Telecom room Shell Windows Material: Triple Pane, low-e with Aluminum Frames and Wood Frames Triple Pane Triple Pane Aluminum Frames Wood Frames U-Factor 0.24 U-Factor 0.26 Wall/Roof Primary Material R-Value Wall : Insulating Concrete Forms 27.0 Roof: Decking and Insulation 33.0 HVAC Total Capacities(thousand Btu/hr) 12 Ground Source Heat Pumps 644 (2) 12 Auxiliary Electric Resistance Heaters 382 (3) Lighting Power Densities(W/SF) Open Office Area: 0.75 Office Area Task Lighting(4): 0.5 Energy/Power PV System: 18.2 kW grid-tie system (5)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stress Analysis of Floor Slab from Hyster 550 FS Lift Truck with 55 Kip Pay Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this calculation is to determine the probable moments and stresses that will be induced into the slab on grade floor at building 2404WA from operation of a Hyster 550 FS lift truck having tire pressures of 124 psi while moving and placing SWDB boxes within building 2404WA. It was found that the probable reinforcing steel stress induced in the grade 60 reinforcing steel for the 124 psi tire pressure is about 35.55 ksi and the factor of safety against yield is about 1.7:l. The probable maximum concrete compression stress is expected to be about 2.21 ksi resulting in a factor of safety of about 2.04:1 against concrete compression failure. Slab on grade design is not subject to building code factors of safety requirements.

BLACK, D.G.

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ventilation measurements in large office buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation rates were measured in nine office buildings using an automated tracer gas measuring system. The buildings range in size from a two-story federal building with a floor area of about 20,000 ft/sup 2/ (1900 m/sup 2/) to a 26-story office building with a floor area of 700,000 ft/sup 2/ (65,000 m/sup 2/). The ventilation rates were measured for about 100 hours in each building over a range of weather conditions. The results are presented and examined for variation with time and weather. In most cases, the ventilation rate of a building is similar for hot and cold weather. In mild weather, outdoor air is used to cool the building and the ventilation rate increases. In the buildings where infiltration is a significant portion of the total ventilation rate, this total rate exhibits a dependence on weather conditions. The measured ventilation rates are discussed in relation to the outdoor air intake strategy in each building. The ventilation rates are also compared to the design rates in the buildings and ventilation rates based on the ASHRAE Standard 62-81. Some of the buildings are at times operated at lower ventilation rates than recommended in Standard 62-81.

Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Office Buildings: Market Analysis for Electricity Service Providers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office buildings nationwide account for the greatest floor space and energy use of all commercial building types. To best serve and retain the loyalty of this important market, electric utilities need to understand the energy uses, priorities, and decision-making approaches of commercial building managers. This report assesses the office building energy market to provide a basic reference for utility program planners, marketing managers, and field representatives.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

125

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

126

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

127

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Tables Conservation Tables (16 pages, 86 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 41. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 42. Building Shell Conservation Features, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 43. Building Shell Conservation Features, Floorspace, 1995 Table 44. Reduction in Equipment Use During Off Hours, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

129

STATE OF CALIFORNIA BUILDING ENVELOPE SEALING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per minute (cfm) at 50 pascals for the dwelling with air distribution registers unsealed. SLA = 3.819 x (CFM50H / Conditioned Floor Area in ft2 ) per Residential ACM Manual Equation R3-16 Building and ventilation air and vented in accordance with manufacturers' installation instructions and all applicable

130

Solar heated building structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar heated building structure comprises an exterior shell including side walls and a roof section with the major portion of the roof section comprised of light transmitting panels or panes of material to permit passage of sunlight into the attic section of the building structure. The structure is provided with a central vertical hollow support column containing liquid storage tanks for the circulation and collection of heated water from a flexible conduit system located on the floor of the attic compartment. The central column serves as a heating core for the structure and communicates by way of air conduits or ducts with the living areas of the structure. Fan means are provided for continuously or intermittently circulating air over the hot water storage tanks in the core to transfer heat therefrom and distribute the heated air into the living areas.

Rugenstein, R.W.

1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Geographic Location Tables Geographic Location Tables (24 pages, 136kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1995 Table 6. Climate Zone, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 7. Metropolitan Status, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

132

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develops Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analyti- cal and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results.

133

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

134

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Title Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, William W. Delp, Elisabeth A. Derby, Sheng-Chieh Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Abstract Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to provide all or part of a building with collective- protection against harmful chemical or biological (CB) agents. Collective-protection, as opposed to individual protection, uses the building -- its architecture, ventilation system, and control components -- to safeguard the health of the building occupants in the event of an indoor or outdoor release of toxic agents. In this study, we investigate the movement of tracer gases within a six-story building. The building was retrofitted to provide collective-protection on the upper two floors. To achieve this protection, the upper floors were over-pressurized using outside air that had passed through military specification carbon canisters and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The four lower floors were outside the collective-protection area and had a ventilation system that was retrofitted to provide response modes in the event of a CB release. These response modes (e.g. building flush and shelter in place) were designed to reduce the exposure of occupants on the lower floors without compromising the collective-protection zones. Over the course of four weeks, 16 tracer gas experiments were conducted to evaluate the collective- protection system (CPS) of the building's upper two floors and the ventilation response modes of the lower floors. Tracer gas concentrations were measured at a rate of 50 Hz in up to 30 locations in each experiment, which provided data with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Differential pressure and temperature measurements were also made throughout the building. Experiments showed that the CPS maintained a positive pressure differential between the upper two floors and the lower floors with various meteorological conditions and within specified settings of the HVAC fans serving the lower floors. However, the tracer experiments did show that a CB agent could enter the first zone of the decontamination areas on each CPS floor. Tracer gas analysis also showed that the shelter in place HVAC mode provided protection of lower floor occupants from an outdoor release by significantly lowering the air exchange rates on those floors. It was also determined that the efficacy of a flush mode triggered by an agent sensor depends greatly on the location of the sensor

135

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

136

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

137

High-Tech Buildings - Market Transformation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tech Buildings - Market Transformation Project Title High-Tech Buildings - Market Transformation Project Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-49112 Year of Publication...

138

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,824,277,71,370,622,597 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,503,119,37,152,434,294 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,127,67,"Q",104,100,110 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,116,69,"Q",83,66,130 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,43,9,"Q",27,17,27

139

Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor Cooling System Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant FloorBauman F. 2013. Impact of Solar Heat Gain on Radiant Floor

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sensor fusion for flexible human-portable building-scale mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a system enabling rapid multi-floor indoor map building using a body-worn sensor system fusing information from RGB-D cameras, LIDAR, inertial, and barometric sensors. Our work is motivated by rapid ...

Fallon, Maurice Francis

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

142

The Building Design Advisor  

SciTech Connect

The Building Design Advisor (BDA) is a software environment that supports the integrated use of multiple analysis and visualization tools throughout the building design process, from the initial, schematic design phases to the detailed specification of building components and systems. Based on a comprehensive design theory, the BDA uses an object-oriented representation of the building and its context, and acts as a data manager and process controller to allow building designers to quickly navigate through the multitude of descriptive and performance parameters addressed by the analysis and visualization tools linked to the BDA. Through the Browser the user can edit the values of input parameters and select any number of input and/or output parameters for display in the Decision Desktop. The Desktop allows building designers to compare multiple design alternatives with respect to any number of parameters addressed by the tools linked to the BDA.

Papamichael, K.; LaPorta, J.; Chauvet, H.; Collins, D.; Trzcinski, T.; Thorpe, J.; Selkowitz, S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating Scheme Speaker(s): Paul Bannister Date: August 21, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Selkowitz (Two topics): Benchmarking Building Performance: In a variety of voluntary and regulatory initiatives around the globe, including the introduction of the European Building Performance Directive, the question of how to assess the performance of commercial buildings has become a critical issue. There are presently a number of initiatives for the assessment of actual building performance internationally, including in particular US Energy Star Buildings rating tools and the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating scheme. These schemes seek to assess building energy performance on the

144

A number of organizations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buying power to purchase green power. The city of Chicago has formed an alliance with 47 other local installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green to competition, the city of Chicago and 47 other local government agencies formed the Local Government Power

145

Passive Solar Building Design Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The difference between a passive solar home and a conventional home is design. Passive solar homes and other buildings are designed to take advantage of the local climate. Passive solar design-also known as climatic design-involves using a building's windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. Learn how passive solar design techniques work. Direct Gain Direct gain is the process by which sunlight directly enters a building through the windows and is absorbed and temporarily stored in massive floors or walls. Indirect Gain Indirect gain is the process by which the sun warms a heat storage

146

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

147

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Case Study, The Thermal Test Facility, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (Office/Laboratory) Building Design Floor Area: 10,000 SF Floors(1): 2 Aspect Ratio: 1.75 Offices Laboratories Conference Room Mechanical Level Shell Windows Material U-factor SHGC(2) Viewing Windows: Double Pane, Grey Tint, Low-e 0.42 0.44 Clerestory Windows: Double Pane, Clear, Low-e 0.45 0.65 Window Area(SF) North 38 South(3) 1,134 East 56 West 56 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value North Wall Concrete Slab/Rigid Polystyrene 5.0 South/East/West Steel Studs/Batt Insulation/Concrete 23.0 Roof: Built-up/Polyisocianurate Covering/Steel Supports 23.0 HVAC VAV air handling unit Hot water supply paralell VAV boxes Direct and Indirect evaporative cooling system Single zone roof top unit(4) Hot Water Coil(4)

148

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

149

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

150

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and cycle time analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A medical device company challenged a research team to reduce the manufacturing floor space required for an occlusion system product by one third. The team first cataloged equipment location and size, detailed the processes ...

Peterson, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jeanne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Moisture Control in Insulated Raised Floor Systems in Southern Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polyisocyanurate foam, open-cell sprayed polyurethane foams of vary- ing vapor permeance, closed-cell sprayed in guidance for insulating raised floors in the hot and humid climate of the Gulf Houses with pier foundations

152

Test Plan for K Basin floor sludge consolidated sampling equipment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the test procedure for the function and acceptance testing of the K Basin Floor Sludge Consolidated Sampling Equipment. This equipment will be used to transfer K Basin floor sludge to a sludge sampling container for subsequent shipment to an analysis or testing facility. This equipment will provide sampling consistent with data quality objectives and sampling plans currently being developed.

OLIVER, J.W.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

154

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

155

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

156

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Disaggregated Principal Building  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities The 1999 CBECS collected information for 20 general building activities. Five of the activities were aggregated and data for 16 activities are displayed in the detailed tables. Within the aggregated warehouse and storage category, nonrefrigerated warehouses greatly exceeded refrigerated warehouses both in amount of floorspace and number of buildings (compare Figure 1 with Figure 2). Within the mercantile category, the number of retail buildings greatly exceeded strip shopping buildings which, in turn, greatly exceeded enclosed shopping malls (Figure 2). The amount of mercantile floorspace was more evenly distributed (Figure 1) because of differences in average building size-enclosed malls were largest and retail buildings the smallest.

157

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

159

Table 2. Number of U.S. Housing Units by Census Region and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2. Number of U.S. ...

160

Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » Buildings Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools The Buildings Performance Database will offer four analysis tools for exploring building data and forecasting financial and energy savings: a Peer Group Tool, a Retrofit Analysis Tool, a Data Table Tool, and a Financial Forecasting Tool. Available now: Peer Group Tool The Peer Group Tool allows users to peruse the BPD, define peer groups, and analyze their performance. Users can create Peer Groups by filtering the dataset based on parameters such as building type, location, floor area, age, occupancy, and system characteristics such as lighting and HVAC type. The graphs show the energy performance distribution of those

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structure Tables Structure Tables (16 pages, 93 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 8. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 9. Building Size, Floorspace, 1995 Table 10. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 11. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. The 1995 data are available for the four Census

162

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

163

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

164

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

165

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

166

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

167

Property:Building/InteriorHeight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building/InteriorHeight Building/InteriorHeight Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Interior height, m Pages using the property "Building/InteriorHeight" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.8 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.2 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 3 +

168

Energy Efficient Building Ventilation Systems: Innovative Building-Integrated Enthalpy Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: A2 is developing a building moisture and heat exchange technology that leverages a new material and design to create healthy buildings with lower energy use. Commercial building owners/operators are demanding buildings with greater energy efficiency and healthier indoor environments. A2 is developing a membrane-based heat and moisture exchanger that controls humidity by transferring the water vapor in the incoming fresh air to the drier air leaving the building. Unlike conventional systems, A2 locates the heat and moisture exchanger within the depths of the buildings wall to slow down the air flow and increase the surface area that captures humidity, but with less fan power. The systems integration into the wall reduces the size and demand on the air conditioning equipment and increases liable floor area flexibility.

None

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Building Airtightness: Research and Practice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiscal Year 2014. Title Building Airtightness: Research and Practice Publication Type Book Chapter LBNL Report Number LBNL-53356 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H.,...

170

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

171

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

172

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

173

Decommissioning of the Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Special Metallurgical Building at Mound Laboratory, a building of 18,515 sq ft of floor space, was decommissioned. This decommissioned facility formerly housed 238PU processes for the fabrication of radioisotopic fueled heat sources. The 238PU work was conducted in 585 linear ft of gloveboxes occupying approximately 12,600 sq ft of the building. All of the gloveboxes, process services, building services, interior walls, and ceilings were removed to the point of exit at the roof. Eighty-five percent of the filter banks occupying 700 sq ft of floor space was also removed. Special procedures and special equipment were used to reduce the amount of 238PU in the building from approximately 100,000 Ci at the start of the effort to less than 0.3 Ci without a significant release to the environment.

Harris, W. R.; Kokenge, B. R.; Marsh, G. C.

1965-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Quick Start Guide To create a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) for your building you need to complete the following six (6) steps using the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool). Although you are not required to carry out these steps in a specific order, the following sequence will most likely save you time. Input Basic Building Information * Click the New Building button to begin. * Enter building name, location, gross floor area, and year of construction. * Click the button to continue. Identify Building Use Type(s) * Select all applicable use types. * Choose from a variety of options including office, retail, multi-family, education, and

175

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CONTAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTAM CONTAM CONTAM logo. Multi-zone (nodal) airflow and contaminant transport analysis program. CONTAM consists of two components � a graphical user interface (GUI) and a simulation engine. The GUI is centered on a SketchPad that provides for the input of building topology via a set of drawing tools geared towards producing schematic representations of building floor plans. Drawing tools are used to draw walls, ducts and simplified control networks as well as to create iconic representations of building elements including flow paths, source/sinks and occupants. These drawing tools were designed to provide a robust means to create a well-formed multi-zone description of a building to be used by the simulation engine. Once a building representations is developed it is �passed� to the simulation engine to calculate zone

176

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

177

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

178

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors","All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3136,1031,339,128,12,64783,25981,16270,7501,10085,4947 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2014,411,115,"Q","N",6789,5192,1217,343,"Q","N"

179

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

180

Building America  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The effect of simplifying the building description on the numerical modeling of its thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

A thermal building simulation program is a numerical model that calculates the response of the building envelopes to weather and human activity, simulates dynamic heating and cooling loads, and heating and cooling distribution systems, and models building equipment operation. The scope of the research is to supply the users of such programs with information about the dangers and benefits of simplifying the input to their models. The Introduction describes the advantages of modeling the heat transfer mechanisms in a building. The programs that perform this type of modeling have, however, limitations. The user is therefore often put in the situation of simplifying the floor plans of the building under study, but not being able to check the effects that this approximation introduces in the results of the simulation. Chapter 1 is a description of methods. It also introduces the floor plans for the office building under study and the ``reasonable`` floor plans simplifications. Chapter 2 presents DOE-2, the thermal building simulation program used in the sensitivity study. The evaluation of the accuracy of the DOE-2 program itself is also presented. Chapter 3 contains the sensitivity study. The complicated nature of the process of interpreting the temperature profile inside a space leads to the necessity of defining different building modes. The study compares the results from the model of the detailed building description with the results from the models of the same building having simplified floor plans. The conclusion is reached that a study of the effects of simplifying the floor plans of a building is important mainly for defining the cases in which this approximation is acceptable. Different results are obtained for different air conditioning/load regimes of the building. 9 refs., 24 figs.

Stetiu, C.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

183

Prototype Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SDC D buildings, designed for Seattle, Washington, used special moment frames (SMFs) with reduced beam section (RBS) connections. ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Floor Sweeper-Scrubbers: Demonstration of Advanced Lead-Acid Batteries and High-Power Charging in Commercial Warehouse Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric walk-behind and riding floor scrubbers are in widespread and growing use in the commercial and industrial building sectors. This demonstration indicates that the weight, bulk, and battery capacity of existing equipment could be significantly reduced in equipment used for certain "spot-cleaning" and other limited use duty-cycles. Further, results show that for sealed lead-acid batteries, recharge rates on the same order as discharge rates are sufficient for extending peak daily run-time to 200 pe...

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

185

EERE's Building Technologies PowerPoint Presentation Template  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 2008 April 2008 1 Application of Building Energy Consumption Data in Low-Energy Building Research Drury B. Crawley U. S. Department of Energy April 2008 2 Key Areas of Interest * Energy Use Intensity * What is energy use per floor area? * Floor-area weighting * What is average square foot vs. average building? * End use * What equipment is using the energy? * Climate zone distributions * How are buildings distributed in climate zones per ASHRAE Standard 169-2006? April 2008 3 * Mechanical equipment detail * What systems and component types are being used? * Schedules * How does occupancy and operation vary over time? * Utility pricing structures * What are demand, energy, and service charges really like? Key Areas of Interest (continued) April 2008 4 ASHRAE Standard 169 Climate Zones April 2008

186

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Case Study, The Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio (Education) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Footprint: 3 Classrooms (1) 1 Conference Room 1 Adminstration Office Auditorium, 100 seats 6 Small Offices Atrium Wastewater Treatment Facility Shell Windows Material: Green Tint Triple Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Grey Tint Double Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Fenestration(square feet) Window Wall (2) window/wall l Atrium, Triple Pane (3) Building, Double Pane North 1,675 4,372 38% l U-Factor 0.34 U-Factor 0.46 South 2,553 4,498 58% l SHGC 0.26 SHGC 0.46 East 1,084 2,371 46% l West 350 2,512 14% l Overall 6,063 43% l Wall/Roof Main Material R-Value Wall : Face Brink 19 Roof: Steel/Stone Ballast 30 HVAC COP(4) Offices/Classrooms: Individual GSHPs (5) 3.9-4.6

187

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Case Study, The Solaire, New York, New York (Apartments/Multi-Family) Building Design Floor Area: 357,000 SF Units: 293 Maximum Occupancy: 700 Floors: 27 Site Size: 0.38 Acres Typical Occupancy(1): 578 Black-Water Treatment Facility (2) Shell Windows Material: Double Glazed, Low-e, Thermal Breaks with Insulated Spacers Operable Windows Fixed Windows Visual Transminttance 0.68 0.68 Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.35 0.35 U-Factor 0.47 0.41 Wall/Roof Material R-Value Exterior Walls: Insulated brick and concrete block 8.4 Roof: Roof top garden(green roof) 22.7 HVAC Two direct-fired natural gas absorption chillers 4-Pipe fan-coil units in individual aparments Power/Energy(3) PV System(4): 1,300 SF (76 custom panels) of west facing PV rated for 11 kW . These panels are integrated into the building facade.

188

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

189

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

190

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

191

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

192

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building) Building 41, formally known as the Stafford Cripps Building, has been transformed into a new Learning and Teaching Facility. Proposed ground

193

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

194

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

195

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

196

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

197

17-storey building fold blasting demolition and safety technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the successful experience of the directional blasting demolition of 17- storey frame shear wall structure building, and it analyzes and elucidates the blasting program determination, the pre-demolition and treatment, the burst altitude ... Keywords: Floors,Delay,Vibrations,Safety,Concrete,Damping

Xu Shunxiang, Chen Dezhi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

200

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Passive solar concepts for multistory buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multistory buildings long in the east-west direction and short in the north-south direction offer good opportunity for passive solar application. If each unit within the building is designed so that the Solar Savings Fraction is the same, each will respond to the weather the same way and no unit-to-unit heat distribution is needed. A numerical example for Denver is given indicating excellent thermal performance and a several-day thermal response time. Solutions involving distribution of heat from unit to unit are also discussed as well as top-floor and south-wall variations.

Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

203

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

204

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

205

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

206

Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Title Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

207

Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Title Validation of the Window Model of the Modelica Buildings Library Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number...

208

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

209

Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US ASHRAE, ASHRAE Handbook - Fundamentals, American Society18, table 18 of ASHRAE Handbook - Fundamentals [8]. Table 1

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design day zone cooling load profile is evaluated for anThe zone cooling load profiles and the thermal performanceaffects the zone cooling load profile and the peak cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Geometric, topological & semantic analysis of multi-building floor plan data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating a comprehensive model of a university campus or other large urban space is a challenging undertaking due to the size, geometric complexity, and levels of rich semantic information contained in inhabited environments. ...

Whiting, Emily J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

214

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

217

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

218

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

219

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

220

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

222

Case Study: Sick Building Syndrome in a Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An indepth environmental investigation was conducted at a four-story building officing 1200 employees in Oklahoma. A preassessment and walkthrough of the facility revealed extensive ongoing renovations throughout the building. Renovations consisted of installations of new partitions, carpeting, ceiling tiles, and repainting. Management was receiving numerous complaints related to the indoor air quality from all parts of the building, particularly the unrenovated areas. The majority of employee complaints originated from the unrenovated second floor; in contrast, few complaints had been submitted from the finished fourth floor area. Due to the disparity in employee complaints from these two floors, the investigation focused on a comparison of the air quality on the second and fourth floors. The initial walkthrough revealed inordinate amounts of dust in the occupied space of the second floor. High humidity levels were measured throughout the building. Other potential problems -- i.e., poor lighting, job stress, poor air circulation, stuffy air, thermal discomfort. smokers in the area --were also noted at this point. Questionnaires were made available to occupants on both floors to attain a better understanding of employee problems and assist in formulating an investigation plan. Collectively the nonspecificity of the responses tended to indicate building-related problems often described by the term ''Sick Building Syndrome" (SBS). Based on the questionnaire responses, the walkthrough observations, and the lack of specific illnesses, the investigation focused on identification of and testing for sources of chemical and particulate emissions and possible inadequacies of the mechanical ventilation system in providing the necessary amount of outside air. Although the building investigation revealed few signs of biological contamination, problems of this nature are not uncommon in climates with high humidity. The potential for biological proliferation in buildings with excessive humidity are discussed in the paper. The SBS causation was multifactorial and thus could not be attributed to a single etiologic factor. Temperature and humidity problems were partially attributed to the inadequate provision of chilled water (at a low enough temperature) to ensure proper tempering and dehumidification of the supply air. These periodic excursions in temperature and relative humidity were compounded by an associated reduction in outside air which exacerbated the situation. Other recommendations had to do with improving the filtration system, balancing of the air handling system, improving the ventilation efficiency, separation of smokers and nonsmokers, and the infusion of a fastidious cleaning and maintenance program combined with an adequate supply of fresh air per ASHRAE 62-89 specifications.

Shaughnessy, R. J.; Levetin, E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2NT00041628 2NT00041628 Final Report Covering research during the period 1 June, 2002 through 30 September, 2008 Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project Submitted by: University of Mississippi Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology 310 Lester Hall, University, MS 38677 Principal Authors: J. Robert Woolsey, Thomas M. McGee, Carol B. Lutken Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy ii SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT DOE Award Number DE-FC26-02NT41628 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

224

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

225

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

226

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

227

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

228

Sweden Building 05K0001 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Several buildings Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19657.0 OID, m2 20246.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1921 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19657.0 Total 19657.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1399.0 District heating 2067.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

229

Sweden Building 05K0003 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweden Building 05K0003 Sweden Building 05K0003 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4855.0 OID, m2 4920.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4360.0 - Warehouses 94.0 Total 4454.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

230

Hammer Award Honors a Federal Building's Energy-Efficient Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hammer Award Honors a Federal Building's Energy-Efficient Retrofit Figure 1: Each floor of the 21-story Phillip Burton Federal Office Building in San Francisco is more than 60,000 square feet. The lighting controls testbed occupies the third, fourth and fifth floors. Vice President Al Gore's National Performance Review has given a Hammer Award to a team of private and public entities, including several Center researchers. The team is working to turn San Francisco's Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Avenue into a showcase of energy-efficient technologies that could cut the federal government's annual energy bill by a billion dollars. The Hammer Award recognizes teams of federal, state, and local employees and private citizens who have made government more efficient and

231

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings from research conducted at NREL to assess the technical potential for zero-energy building technologies and practices to reduce the impact of commercial buildings on the U.S. energy system. Commercial buildings currently account for 18% of annual U.S. energy consumption, and energy use is growing along with overall floor area. Reducing the energy use of this sector will require aggressive research goals and rapid implementation of the research results.

Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.; Ryan, J.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Property:Building/Oid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oid Oid Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. OID, m2 Pages using the property "Building/Oid" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 20,246 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,700 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,920 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 26,420 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,395 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,957 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 25,162 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 8,040 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 35,830 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 460 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,780 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 23,220 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 20,156 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,487 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,608 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,786 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 21,860 +

233

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

234

Building Technologies Office: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Delicious Rank Building...

235

Building Technologies Office: Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Webmaster on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Delicious Rank Building...

236

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

237

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

238

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting in Denver, Colorado, on...

239

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

240

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Building America Building Science Education Roadmap April 2013 Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3 Background ................................................................................................................................. 4 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 5 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 6 Problem ...................................................................................................................................... 7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Efficiency: Transportation and Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a condensed version of the American Physical Society's 2008 analysis of energy efficiency in the transportation and buildings sectors in the United States with updated numbers. In addition to presenting technical findings

Michael S. Lubell; Burton Richter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deRis, JL; Fire-Resistance and Sound-Insulation Ratings for Walls, Partitions, and Floors. ... Testing of Gypsum/Steel-Stud Wall Assemblies. ...

243

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Boyd, CF; diMarzo, M. Fire-Resistance and Sound-Insulation Ratings for Walls, Partitions, and Floors. TRBM 44; 52 p. 1944. ...

244

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in intensity of the sound as it travels through the wall. This paper gives the fire-resistance and sound-insulation ratings of walls, partitions, and floors ...

245

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nuclear reactor building  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

Gou, Perng-Fei (Saratoga, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Sirtori, IT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Buildings*","Energy Used For  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,3625,3472,801,119 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,1841,1715,354,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,732,725,155,29 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,629,607,127,28 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,216,217,69,"Q" "50,001 to 100,000 ............",129,123,118,119,50,8

248

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

249

Building debris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes 101: An Introduction Codes 101: An Introduction In order to provide a basic introduction to the varied and complex issues associated with building energy codes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program, with valued assistance from the International Codes Council and ASHRAE, has prepared Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction. This guide is designed to speak to a broad audience with an interest in building energy efficiency, including state energy officials, architects, engineers, designers, and members of the public. Publication Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 BECP_Building Energy Codes 101_February2010_v00.pdf Document Details Last Name: Britt Initials: M Affiliation: PNNL Document Number: PNNL-70586 Focus: Adoption Code Development Compliance Building Type:

251

An energy performance index for historic buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reports studies conducted on historic buildings from the 1880 to 1900 era. These buildings were recently renovated and many more years of service are expected. Derivation of an energy demand prediction index was the primary study goal. Texas Historic Commission files were a primary data source to probe the second study goal; definition of data base needs for technical studies using state historic office files. A statistically valid prediction equation was produced which covers buildings between 10,000 and 30,000 square feet in floor area. Buildings from Austin and Galveston, Texas were used in the derivation; thus, these findings are limited to climates similar to those locations. The second goal was also achieved since the file data available were sufficient to support the study. The input data file design provides a proven example for development of a final data base specification. Field audits validated method accuracy and reinforced the starting hypothesis, reused historic buildings are examples of sustainability in action. The massive construction of these buildings furnished 30?% of building energy demand. Also infiltration was found to be a minor energy demand factor for these climates. This last finding supports preserving historic windows and doors rather than replacing them with very efficient but historically inaccurate models.

Campbell, Scott

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4248,2184,3943,941,455,565 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2261,1070,2068,382,101,205 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,821,416,772,148,88,107 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,716,412,665,189,105,123 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,231,145,223,102,60,55

253

Low Floor Americans with Disabilities Compliant Alternate Fuel Vehicle Project  

SciTech Connect

This project developed a low emission, cost effective, fuel efficient, medium-duty community/transit shuttle bus that meets American's with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements and meets National Energy Policy Act requirements (uses alternative fuel). The Low Profile chassis, which is the basis of this vehicle is configured to be fuel neutral to accommodate various alternative fuels. Demonstration of the vehicle in Yellowstone Park in summer (wheeled operation) and winter (track operation) demonstrated the feasibility and flexibility for this vehicle to provide year around operation throughout the Parks system as well as normal transit operation. The unique configuration of the chassis which provides ADA access with a simple ramp and a flat floor throughout the passenger compartment, provides maximum access for all passengers as well as maximum flexibility to configure the vehicle for each application. Because this product is derived from an existing medium duty truck chassis, the completed bus is 40-50% less expensive than existing low floor transit buses, with the reliability and durability of OEM a medium duty truck.

James Bartel

2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAECA NAECA The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, 42 USC 6291 et seq., as amended, Public Law 100-12. NAGDM National Association of Garage Door Manufacturers. NCSBCS The National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards. NEEA Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. NEEP Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships. Net Wall Area The net wall area includes the opaque wall area of all above-grade walls enclosing conditioned spaces, the opaque area of conditioned basement walls less than 50% below grade (including the below-grade portions), and peripheral edges of floors. The net wall area does not include windows, doors, or other such openings, because they are treated separately. NFPA National Fire Protection Association. NFRC National Fenestration Rating Council.

255

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight Glazing Daylight Glazing Exterior glazing over 6 feet above the finished floor. DDC See Direct Digital Control. Deadband The temperature range in which no heating or cooling is used. Decorative Lighting Lighting that is purely ornamental and installed for aesthetic effect. Decorative lighting shall not include general lighting. Degree Day See "Heating Degree Days." Degree Day Base 50F For any one day, when the mean temperature is more than 50°F, there are as many degree days as degrees Fahrenheit temperature difference between the mean temperature for the day and 50°F. Annual cooling degree days (CDDs) are the sum of the degree days over a calendar year. Demand The highest amount of power (average kilowatt over an interval) recorded for a building or facility in a selected time frame.

256

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. Round 2. Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. ...

258

USDOE energy standard compliance test on two-story office building  

SciTech Connect

There exists some skepticism in the design community regarding the ability to design an aesthetically pleasing building that meets the interim energy conservation standard for new commercial buildings initiated by the US Department of Energy. In response to this, a study was undertaken to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean giving up the architectural intent of a building. An unusual and architecturally pleasing building design was chosen for this study. This two-story office building has a large, central atrium, made almost entirely of glass. It is the building`s focal point, lending an inviting atmosphere to the interior spaces but also poses a considerable challenge to the HVAC system to keep the building comfortable. The building was simulated and easily complied with the Standard, based on an annual energy cost comparison. Alterations to the original design affected neither the interior floor plan nor exterior elevations.

Bailey, S.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analytes measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, G.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analytes measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar Technologies and the Building Envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in on-site renewable energy technology have brought the concept of zero-energy buildings within reach. Many single-story residential and commercial buildings have enough favorably oriented roof area to make achieving zero energy technically feasible, assuming no major solar obstructions exist and that energy efficiency has been aggressively implemented in the building design. As the number of stories increases, the potential to have a zero-energy building within the building's footprint decreases. As efficiencies of photovoltaic (PV) cells increase, the potential to have zero-energy buildings increases.

Torcellini, P. A.; Pless, S. D.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" 2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,492,1460,894,96,581,1347,185 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,240,783,397,"Q",146,589,98 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,100,387,183,"Q",144,302,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,81,206,191,19,128,253,22

265

Glossary Term - Atomic Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Previous Term (Alpha Particle) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Avogadro's Number) Avogadro's Number Atomic Number Silver's atomic number is 47 The atomic number is equal to...

266

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools to someone by E-mail Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

267

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

268

Sweden Building 05K0101 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

One building One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 3410.0 OID, m2 3510.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2003 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3410.0 Total 3410.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 424.0 District heating 374.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

269

Sweden Building 05K0010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

777 777 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 437.0 OID, m2 460.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1777 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 437.0 Total 437.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 66.52 District heating 61.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

270

Sweden Building 05K0012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2000 2000 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 22565.0 OID, m2 23220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2000 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 20978.0 - Shops 1587.0 Total 22565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 809.65 District heating 1185.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

271

Sweden Building 05K0011 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95 95 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 15310.0 OID, m2 15780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 14080.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 1220.0 Total 15300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 391.0

272

Sweden Building 05K0007 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24155.0 OID, m2 25162.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 1990.0 - Offices 21765.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 400.0 Total 24155.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1487.0

273

Sweden Building 05K0079 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 4263.0 OID, m2 4296.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4263.0 Total 4263.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 582.104 District heating 401.2 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

274

Sweden Building 05K0016 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

700 700 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2546.0 OID, m2 2786.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1700 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2101.0 - Miscellaneous 445.0 Total 2546.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 83.191 District heating 268.0

275

Sweden Building 05K0051 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 5286.5 OID, m2 5450.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1920 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3298.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 496.64 - Miscellaneous 1489.92 Total 5284.56 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

276

Sweden Building 05K0077 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 3606.0 OID, m2 3617.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3606.0 Total 3606.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 243.5 District heating 360.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

277

Sweden Building 05K0078 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2425.0 OID, m2 2500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2425.0 Total 2425.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 181.098 District heating 365.862 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

278

Sweden Building 05K0026 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26 26 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.0 OID, m2 1482.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.0 Total 1338.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

279

Sweden Building 05K0002 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1999 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7160.0 OID, m2 7700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1999 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5000.0 - Shops 900.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 900.0 - Miscellaneous 360.0 Total 7160.0

280

Sweden Building 05K0076 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 888.0 OID, m2 892.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 888.0 Total 888.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 104.0 District heating 56.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sweden Building 05K0063 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2900.0 OID, m2 3049.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2246.0 - Miscellaneous 654.0 Total 2900.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 477.44 District heating 254.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

282

Sweden Building 05K0040 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2960.0 OID, m2 3112.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1936 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1890 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1851.0 - Daytime health services 240.0 - Miscellaneous 869.0 Total 2960.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 239.7 District heating 367.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

283

Sweden Building 05K0015 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

878 878 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1550.0 OID, m2 1608.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1550.0 Total 1550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.0 District heating 145.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

284

Sweden Building 05K0019 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

93 93 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24000.0 OID, m2 24735.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18400.0 - Shops 5600.0 Total 24000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 898.6 District heating 1326.0

285

Sweden Building 05K0018 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 18679.0 OID, m2 19081.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18434.0 - Shops 245.0 Total 18679.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 709.8 District heating 959.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

286

Sweden Building 05K0067 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11474.0 OID, m2 11666.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10618.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 856.0 Total 11474.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1195.8

287

Sweden Building 05K0020 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2761.0 OID, m2 2810.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1981 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1981 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2059.0 - Warehouses 200.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 202.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 300.0 Total 2761.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

288

Sweden Building 05K0057 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1103.0 OID, m2 1136.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2005 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1800 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1103.0 Total 1103.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 78.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

289

Sweden Building 05K0017 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1987 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 21200.0 OID, m2 21860.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18050.0 - Shops 3150.0 Total 21200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

290

Sweden Building 05K0006 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 13048.0 OID, m2 13957.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13048.0 - Other retail 1300.0 Total 14348.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 843.1 District heating 1727.0

291

Sweden Building 05K0045 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2195.0 OID, m2 2270.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2195.0 Total 2195.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 93.4 District heating 234.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

292

Sweden Building 05K0044 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78 78 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 6026.0 OID, m2 7096.0 Interior height, m 5.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3948.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 844.0 - Miscellaneous 1234.0 Total 6026.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 452.0

293

Sweden Building 05K0094 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11550.0 OID, m2 11896.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 11550.0 Total 11550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1900.0 District heating 876.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

294

Sweden Building 05K0014 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.3 OID, m2 1487.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.3 Total 1338.3 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 227.66 District heating 154.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

295

Sweden Building 05K0013 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

850 850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19551.0 OID, m2 20156.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 215.0 - Offices 15632.0 - Shops 154.0 - Miscellaneous 3550.0 Total 19551.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1199.0

296

Sweden Building 05K0009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 34755.0 OID, m2 35830.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 33955.0 - Shops 800.0 Total 34755.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1963.0 District heating 2176.0

297

Sweden Building 05K0008 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7800.0 OID, m2 8040.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 300.0 - Offices 7500.0 Total 7800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 315.0 District heating 844.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

298

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Building Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a number of environmentally progressive features, such as natural ventilation, energy recovery, a biological wastewater treatment process, and ...

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

302

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention. To examine the thermodynamic performance of the floor radiant cooling system, we measured the operational conditions including the minimum floor surface temperature, the cooling capacity, and the indoor temperature field distribution under different outdoor temperatures in Beijing. Because the ground temperature changes with the mean temperature of the supplied and returned water and room temperature, the mean temperature of the supplied and retuned water was obtained. Finally, we analyzed the phenomenon of dewing and developed measures for preventing it. The dry air layer near the floor formed by a displacement ventilation system can effectively prevent dews on the surface of the floor in the wet and hot days in summer. In addition, for the sake of the displacement ventilation system, the heat transfer effect between floor and space is enhanced. Our analysis pointed out that floor radiant cooling system combined with displacement ventilation ensures good comfort and energy efficiency.

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

304

Building Software Tools with Interoperability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Building Software Tools with Interoperability Vladimir Bazjanac, Ricardo Goncalves and Manfred Koethe. Vladimir Bazjanac (left) chairs the open IAI research advisory committee meeting held at San Diego in June. Next to him are Ricardo Goncalves, UNINOVA, and Manfred Koethe, DEC. Recently, architects and engineers (A&E) have begun to make building design and energy simulation software an indispensable part of their toolbox. Most A&E firms now use commercial, off-the-shelf design assistance programs. An increasing number of building professionals are also using software developed at the Center's Building Technology Program: the whole-building energy simulation program DOE-2 to design more energy-efficient structures, RADIANCE for simulating lighting designs, and WINDOW for calculating the

305

48 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

306

59 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

59 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

307

83 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

83 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

308

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

309

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

310

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Events on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

311

Building Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

312

Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper, a kind of enclosed phase change material (PCM) used in solar and low-temperature hot water radiant floor heating is investigated. On the basis of obtaining the best performance of PCM properties, a new radiant heating structure of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot water temperatures. With the method of enthalpy , the PCM thermal storage time is studied under different supply water temperatures, supply water flows, distances between water wipe in the floor construction, floor covers and insulation conditions.

Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

314

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future...

315

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our...

316

Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment in China Speaker(s): Baizhan Li Date: June 28, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Wei Feng Sammi Leung With rapid urbanization and economic growth, great changes have taken place in China, resulting in new challenges for energy-efficient, low-carbon buildings. On March 31, 2008, the China Green Building Council was established in Beijing. After that, green building standards, an evaluation index system, and policies were developed. In 2012, 389 projects with total floor space of 41 million m2 were labeled as green buildings, using China's green building rating system. Thermal comfort is one of the key factors in building energy use. In Chongqing, the absence of centralized

317

Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. Building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/ Energy Information Administration survey data, Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data.

Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Continuous Commissioning Results Verification and Follow-up For an Institutional Building: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kleberg Building on the Texas A&M University campus is a teaching/research facility consisting of classrooms, offices and laboratories, with a total floor area of approximately 165,030 ft2. Continuous Commissioning (CC) was performed on the building in August 1996 with additional follow-up in April 1999 and significant savings were achieved. Subsequently, the building chilled water and hot water energy consumption increased due to later building operational changes. This paper presents the verification and follow-up efforts, which identified control problems in air handling units and laboratory variable air volume (VAV) systems and provided recommendations currently being implemented to restore HVAC optimization.

Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to power our country's commercial buildings. Unfortunately, much of this energy and money is wasted; a typical commercial building could save 20% on its energy bills simply by...

320

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Software Tools...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Links This directory provides information on 404 building software tools for evaluating energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainability in buildings. The energy tools...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

322

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

323

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for technical information on building products, materials, new technologies, business management, and housing systems. DOE's Residential Building Energy Codes - Resource for...

324

Building Technologies Office: Building America Market Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Building Technologies Office Search Search Help Building Technologies Office HOME...

325

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Planning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science...

326

Building Technologies Office: Building Envelope Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy efficiency. Research in building envelope technologies includes: Foundations Insulation Roofing and Attics Walls Foundations Photo of the concrete foundation of a building...

327

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power data through the surroundings (e.g., floors, ductwork, walls), to estimate the sound level that will be heard. Industry-standard calculations published by ASHRAE's 1991 Algorithms for HVAC Acoustics handbook are the basis for this estimate. In TAP, you can model the conditions of an HVAC system by choosing specific equipment and building component criteria. TAP will analyze the sound path and calculate the total effect for the enclosed space. You can continuously adjust the data and system design criteria to compare the results effortlessly. TAP will even plot presentation quality graphs of

328

Attributes of the Federal Energy Management Program's Federal Site Building Characteristics Database  

SciTech Connect

Typically, the Federal building stock is referred to as a group of about one-half million buildings throughout the United States. Additional information beyond this level is generally limited to distribution of that total by agency and maybe distribution of the total by state. However, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is required as the Federal sector seeks ways to implement efficiency projects to reduce energy and water use intensity as mandated by legislation and Executive Order. Using a Federal facility database that was assembled for use in a geographic information system tool, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is provided including information regarding the geographical distribution of sites, building counts and percentage of total by agency, distribution of sites and building totals by agency, distribution of building count and floor space by Federal building type classification by agency, and rank ordering of sites, buildings, and floor space by state. A case study is provided regarding how the building stock has changed for the Department of Energy from 2000 through 2008.

Loper, Susan A.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Attributes of the Federal Energy Management Program's Federal Site Building Characteristics Database  

SciTech Connect

Typically, the Federal building stock is referred to as a group of about one-half million buildings throughout the United States. Additional information beyond this level is generally limited to distribution of that total by agency and maybe distribution of the total by state. However, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is required as the Federal sector seeks ways to implement efficiency projects to reduce energy and water use intensity as mandated by legislation and Executive Order. Using a Federal facility database that was assembled for use in a geographic information system tool, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is provided including information regarding the geographical distribution of sites, building counts and percentage of total by agency, distribution of sites and building totals by agency, distribution of building count and floor space by Federal building type classification by agency, and rank ordering of sites, buildings, and floor space by state. A case study is provided regarding how the building stock has changed for the Department of Energy from 2000 through 2008.

Loper, Susan A.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

STRENGTHENING OF TRENCH COVER PLATES FOR SWITCHGEAR BUILDING  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to strengthen the existing trench cover plates of the Electrical Switchgear Building (BLDG 5010) of the Exploratory Studies Facility. A remodeling effort will change the portion of the facility that has the trenches for electrical cables to a craft/shop area. The users of the building will be using a forklift in this area (Clark CGP 30 forklift with a capacity of 3 tons). The trench covers require strengthening to support the wheel loads from the forklift. The output of this calculation will be sketches revising the floor plate details of DWG YMP-025-1-7007-ST103, Rev 02. (Details 4 and 5).

M.S. RUBEN

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

333

Monitoring and Optimization of Building Operations of a Low-Energy School Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ambitious design and energy concept of the new Gebhard-Mller-Schule (GMS) school building in Biberach/Riss, Germany proved itself during the first three school years of operation. The intended target value of 30 kWh/(m2a) overall heating energy consumption was almost met during the second year of operation in 2006 and finally achieved in 2007, due to well-working optimization measures, which were identified through monitoring of the building operation. Heating and cooling energy is mainly provided by a groundwater well plant, which serves as a heat source for two heat pumps as well as a direct cooling source for supplying the radiant heating and cooling system that is integrated in the concrete floor and ceiling slabs (thermally activated building component systems TABS). Indoor air conditioning and server room cooling are also connected to the groundwater cooling system. The main component of the groundwater well plant is a submersible pump on the bottom of the well which is located underneath the building. The pump supplies the building reliably with geothermal energy, but also consumes a significant amount of electricity. Monitoring and optimization of the buildings operation, funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology in Germany, revealed fundamental findings about the operation of the system and the possibilities to improve the buildings performance. Since 2005, the measurements show a continuous increase in efficiency, particularly in the field of auxiliary energies. This significantly increased performance clearly shows the potential of the use of groundwater for heating and cooling purposes and of thermally activated building component systems. In addition the measurements reveal the sensitivity of the system efficiency in terms of operating parameters.

Koenigsdorff, R.; Heinrich, S.; Baumann, O.; Reiser, C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and techniques. The goal is to enable the nation to cut energy use in the commercial buildings sector by 20% by 2020.

335

Home | Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department Search Search Home About Us Groups Tools & Guides Facilities Publications News Links Contact Us Staff The Building Technology and Urban Systems Department (BTUS) works closely with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health, and safety of building occupants. Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013 As part of TechWomen 2013, emerging leaders from around the world toured a number of scientific facilities in the Bay Area, including the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab. Pho Read More The Retrocommissioning Sensor Suitcase Brings Energy Efficiency to Small Commercial Buildings The data module communicates wirelessly with the smart pad, which launches

336

Special Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Building Renovations Special Building Renovations Special Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis A number of building types have specific energy uses and needs, and as such the renewable opportunities may be different from a typical office building. This section briefly discusses the following Federal building types with specific design considerations for renewable energy: data centers, historic buildings, hospitals, laboratories, remote facilities, residential, and warehouses and service buildings. Data Centers Because data centers account for an ever-growing amount of energy consumption, designing high efficiency data centers is both a sustainable and economic option. Coupled with energy efficiency measures, renewable energy technologies can provide some opportunities for data centers. Since

337

1752 Columbia Rd. NW, Fourth Floor Washington, DC 20009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.powershift.org Driving clean energy market breakthroughs and building the grassroots base to stop global warming. SAN-profit organization dedicated to promoting clean energy to address air pollution. BENEFITS TO CONSUMERS San Diego kW system that they install. Because Energy Efficient Mortgages create an incentive for consumers

Kammen, Daniel M.

338

84 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

84 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: LCEA009449 Keywords:

339

87 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

87 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: STRO000469 Keywords:

340

80 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

80 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

75 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

75 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC400003 Keywords:

342

75 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

75 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

343

97 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

97 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC500027 Keywords:

344

78 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

78 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... Asset Rating. Author: BRE Subject: BREC200470 Keywords:

345

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Response Operations ... Safety Investigation of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ...

346

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structural analysis; structural damage; structural response ...

347

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structures; thermal response; flameproofing; radiative ...

348

Safety of Building Occupants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems have evolved in response to specific ... behavior, needs of emergency responders, or ... behavior during building emergencies, the Building ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems; surface temperature; deflection; insulation; thermometers; structural ... effects of fires in buildings, for use ... the analysis of building response to ...

350

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building materials; thermal conductivity; databases; insulation; building technology; density; fibrous glass; guarded hot plate; heat flow; insulation ...

351

Glossary Term - Avogadro's Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic Number Previous Term (Atomic Number) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Beta Decay) Beta Decay Avogadro's Number Avogadro's number is the number of particles in one mole of a...

352

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 498,407 square feet and 12 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.94 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

353

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 53,608 square feet and 3 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 18.85 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

354

Experiment System Analysis of an Indirect Expansion Solar Assisted Water Source Heat Pump Radiant Floor Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar assisted water source heat pump for Radiant Floor Heating (SWHP-RFH) experimental system with heat pipe vacuum tube solar collector as heating source and radiant floor as terminal device is proposed in the paper. The Mathematics Model of dynamic ... Keywords: solar energy, water source heat pump, radiant floor heating systems, system dynamic COP

Qu Shilin; Ma Fei; Liu Li; Yue Jie

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

356

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

357

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

NREL: News Feature - Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building July 17, 2009 Photo of a line of four large metal tubes coming out of the ground in a construction site with blue sky, hills and buildings in the background. Early photos show the first few reclaimed gas pipes being erected at the RSF construction site. Using these recycled pipes will be help the building attain LEED platinum status. Credit: Carl Cox Building a support structure of something, tried, true and tested like "off the shelf" steel is standard practice in building construction. NREL's effort to create the most energy efficient and "green" office building is putting a twist on an old standard. The columns that will carry the weight of floors and walls in the new Research Support Facilities (RSF) are

359

OpenEI - buildings  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/488 Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers.  Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions.  Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. 

License

360

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

362

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Title The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6181E Year of Publication...

363

Property:Buildings/ReportNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Showing 2 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 50% Energy Savings Technical Support Document 2009 + NRELTP-550-46100 + Grocery Store 50% Energy Savings...

364

Production system improvement at a medical devices company : floor layout reduction and manpower analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the low demand and the need to introduce other production lines in the floor, the medical devices company wants to optimize the utilization of space and manpower for the occlusion system product. This thesis shows ...

AlEisa, Abdulaziz A. (Abdulaziz Asaad)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pressure Fluctuations on the Open-Ocean Floor off the Gulf of California: Tides, Earthquakes, Tsunamis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper supplements an initial article on sea-floor pressure observations conducted with a sensitive though not perfectly stable transducer. A variety of examples are used to demonstrate that a wide range of research subjects in the fields ...

Jean H. Filloux

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

367

Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more comfortable. First, the authors devised an experimental scheme and set up the laboratory. Second, we collected a great deal of data on the system in different situations. Finally, we conclude that such heating system is feasible and one of the best heating methods.

Wu, Z.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

369

Home | Better Buildings Workforce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Workforce Home Framework Resources Projects Participate Home Framework Resources Projects Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Buildings Re-tuning Training ANSI Energy Efficiency Standards Collaborative Energy Performance-Based Acquisition Training Participate For a detailed project overview, download the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Fact Sheet Home The Better Buildings Initiative is a broad, multi-strategy initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years. DOE is currently pursuing strategies across five pillars to catalyze change and accelerate private sector investment in energy

370

Toward a virtual building laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve in a timely manner the large energy and dollar savings technically possible through improvements in building energy efficiency, it will be necessary to solve the problem of design failure risk. The most economical method of doing this would be to learn to calculate building performance with sufficient detail, accuracy and reliability to avoid design failure. Existing building simulation models (BSM) are a large step in this direction, but are still not capable of this level of modeling. Developments in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques now allow one to construct a road map from present BSM's to a complete building physical model. The most useful first step is a building interior model (BIM) that would allow prediction of local conditions affecting occupant health and comfort. To provide reliable prediction a BIM must incorporate the correct physical boundary conditions on a building interior. Doing so raises a number of specific technical problems and research questions. The solution of these within a context useful for building research and design is not likely to result from other research on CFD, which is directed toward the solution of different types of problems. A six-step plan for incorporating the correct boundary conditions within the context of the model problem of a large atrium has been outlined. A promising strategy for constructing a BIM is the overset grid technique for representing a building space in a CFD calculation. This technique promises to adapt well to building design and allows a step-by-step approach. A state-of-the-art CFD computer code using this technique has been adapted to the problem and can form the departure point for this research.

Klems, J.H.; Finlayson, E.U.; Olsen, T.H.; Banks, D.W.; Pallis, J.M.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Building America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

374

Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-950-6757; Pass code: 6420234 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America: Introduction November 11, 2011 Chuck Booten Chuck.Booten@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved

375

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Building Subscribe to Building America Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

376

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS for Architects Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) and the American...

377

Massachusetts' Green Buildings Kevin Porter, Exeter Associates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building. The preferred benchmark is the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy ABOUT THIS CASE STUDY SERIES A number of U.S. states have recently established clean energy funds of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03- 76SF

378

Sweden Building 05K0096 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 861.0 OID, m2 886.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.275 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 861.0 Total 861.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 34.0 District heating 80.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

379

Sweden Building 05K0108 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 2111.0 OID, m2 2145.0 Interior height, m 2.9 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1983 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2111.0 Total 2111.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 92.5 District heating 246.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

380

Sweden Building 05K0107 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6852.0 OID, m2 6990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6852.0 Total 6852.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 965.1 District heating 487.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sweden Building 05K0100 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1900 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1414.0 OID, m2 1429.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1414.0 Total 1414.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

382

Sweden Building 05K0102 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5044.0 OID, m2 5200.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1950 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5044.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 234.0 Total 5278.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 242.0

383

Sweden Building 05K0032 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1220.0 OID, m2 1220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1220.0 Total 1220.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 108.5 District heating 58.7 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

384

Sweden Building 05K0104 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3418.0 OID, m2 3491.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1940 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.34166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3418.0 Total 3418.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.5 District heating 385.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

385

Sweden Building 05K0030 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 2544.5 OID, m2 2555.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2434.5 Total 2434.5 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 208.444 District heating 226.19 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

386

Sweden Building 05K0099 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 760.0 OID, m2 772.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 760.0 Total 760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 48.233 District heating 78.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

387

Sweden Building 05K0061 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1290.0 OID, m2 1320.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1943 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1943 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1246.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 90.0 Total 1336.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 117.639 District heating 145.8

388

Sweden Building 05K0004 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 25650.0 OID, m2 26420.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) The date "2000-2004" was not understood.The date "2000-2004" was not understood. Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1914 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 25650.0 Total 25650.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

389

Sweden Building 05K0052 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 1190.0 OID, m2 1225.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 990.0 - Miscellaneous 200.0 Total 1190.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.0 District heating 287.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

390

Sweden Building 05K0058 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 11170.0 OID, m2 11182.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 330.0 - Offices 10750.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 1200.0 Total 12280.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2013.781

391

Sweden Building 05K0080 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1988 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9619.0 OID, m2 9907.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5727.0 - Daytime health services 117.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 687.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 2000.0

392

Sweden Building 05K0081 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4928.0 OID, m2 5075.84 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.89166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 98.0 - Offices 3350.0 - Shops 530.0 - Warehouses 250.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 Total 4928.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

393

Sweden Building 05K0106 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 8700.0 OID, m2 8970.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8090.0 - Shops 610.0 Total 8700.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 560.0 District heating 1021.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

394

Sweden Building 05K0117 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

98 98 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1925.0 OID, m2 1984.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1898 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1865.0 - Residential 60.0 Total 1925.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 160.0 District heating 221.0

395

Sweden Building 05K0041 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

71 71 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 7733.81 OID, m2 7973.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 7733.81 Total 7733.81 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 414.0 District heating 858.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

396

Sweden Building 05K0075 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1747.0 OID, m2 1794.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Jönköping County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.84166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1381.0 - Miscellaneous 366.0 Total 1747.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 362.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

397

Sweden Building 05K0082 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 1721.75 OID, m2 1775.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1979 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1721.75 Total 1721.75 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 415.0 District heating 230.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

398

Sweden Building 05K0122 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

891 891 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2906.0 OID, m2 3129.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1891 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1793.0 - Residential 1113.0 Total 2906.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.6 District heating 305.1

399

Sweden Building 05K0034 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

758 758 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2760.0 OID, m2 2906.0 Interior height, m 3.4 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1758 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2760.0 Total 2760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.351 District heating 276.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

400

Sweden Building 05K0120 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 19400.0 OID, m2 19990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19000.0 - Miscellaneous 400.0 Total 19400.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2078.0 District heating 788.0

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401

Sweden Building 05K0036 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2066.1 OID, m2 2130.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2066.0 Total 2066.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 486.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

402

Sweden Building 05K0089 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38 38 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4567.0 OID, m2 4708.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1938 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 155.0 - Offices 3436.0 - Shops 976.0 Total 4567.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 337.35 District heating 314.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

403

Sweden Building 05K0090 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

920 920 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6078.0 OID, m2 6266.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2683.02 - Miscellaneous 3395.0 Total 6078.02 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 4699.0 District heating 238.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

404

Sweden Building 05K0091 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

58 58 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9301.0 OID, m2 9580.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1958 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8000.0 - Warehouses 1300.0 Total 9300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 936.0 District heating 611.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

405

Sweden Building 05K0025 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 3120.0 OID, m2 3213.6 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/07/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/06/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2866.0 - Miscellaneous 254.0 Total 3120.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 266.0 District heating 295.0

406

Sweden Building 05K0064 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

74 74 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 5565.0 OID, m2 5675.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.20833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5565.0 Total 5565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 280.0 District heating 371.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

407

Sweden Building 05K0095 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 660.0 OID, m2 680.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.175 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 660.0 Total 660.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 53.0 District heating 172.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

408

Sweden Building 05K0062 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 7130.0 OID, m2 7230.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1976 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6150.0 - Shops 940.0 - Miscellaneous 140.0 Total 7230.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 802.666 District heating 500.1

409

Sweden Building 05K0070 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1052.0 OID, m2 1369.0 Interior height, m 0.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1052.0 Total 1052.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 58.93 District heating 103.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

410

Sweden Building 05K0071 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1689.0 OID, m2 2160.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1396.0 - Miscellaneous 293.0 Total 1689.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 122.909 District heating 58.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

411

Sweden Building 05K0068 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

12 12 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3177.0 OID, m2 3923.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3177.0 - Miscellaneous 746.0 Total 3923.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 413.381 District heating 95.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

412

Sweden Building 05K0029 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 8970.0 OID, m2 9244.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8970.0 Total 8970.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 700.0 District heating 380.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

413

Sweden Building 05K0027 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

027 027 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1956 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4440.0 OID, m2 4664.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1956 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4440.0 Total 4440.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 519.065

414

Sweden Building 05K0049 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1242.0 OID, m2 1280.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1242.0 Total 1242.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.8 District heating 80.17 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

415

Sweden Building 05K0073 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1469.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1469.0 Total 1469.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 221.0 District heating 280.02 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

416

Sweden Building 05K0074 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1579.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1579.0 Total 1579.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 206.7 District heating 258.48 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

417

Sweden Building 05K0021 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5100.0 OID, m2 5130.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4150.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 - Miscellaneous 250.0 Total 5100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

418

Sweden Building 05K0116 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page General Information Year of construction 1978 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3590.0 OID, m2 3700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1978 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3590.0 Total 3590.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 202.0

419

Sweden Building 05K0115 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

115 115 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 13820.0 OID, m2 14250.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13820.0 Total 13820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

420

Sweden Building 05K0022 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 16900.0 OID, m2 17000.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13700.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 3300.0 Total 17000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1078.109 District heating 789.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Sweden Building 05K0059 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Start Page Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3100.0 OID, m2 3200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.71 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2005/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2670.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 530.0 Total 3200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

422

Sweden Building 05K0105 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 11815.0 OID, m2 11400.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 2450.0 - Offices 9125.0 - Shops 240.0 Total 11815.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 672.0 District heating 809.0

423

Sweden Building 05K0109 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62 62 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6160.0 OID, m2 6350.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1962 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4120.0 - Miscellaneous 2040.0 Total 6160.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1042.0 District heating 543.0

424

Sweden Building 05K0054 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29 29 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5940.0 OID, m2 6118.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2001 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5940.0 Total 5940.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 806.0 District heating 771.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

425

Sweden Building 05K0028 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

K0028 K0028 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5500.0 OID, m2 5665.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1960 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5500.0 Total 5500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

426

Sweden Building 05K0123 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

72 72 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5219.0 OID, m2 5375.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Jämtland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 2.0 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4052.0 - Miscellaneous 1167.0 Total 5219.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 741.0 District heating 671.0

427

Sweden Building 05K0039 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5820.0 OID, m2 6200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1984 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5240.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 580.0 Total 5820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 550.0 District heating 207.9

428

Sweden Building 05K0033 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3041.0 OID, m2 3140.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2576.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 465.0 Total 3041.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 372.0 District heating 324.0

429

Sweden Building 05K0035 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 10184.0 OID, m2 10406.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6937.0 - Shops 292.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 50.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 1276.0 - Miscellaneous 1629.0 Total 10184.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

430

Sweden Building 05K0121 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

889 889 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2100.0 OID, m2 2150.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1889 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2100.0 Total 2100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 186.0 District heating 217.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

431

Sweden Building 05K0056 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 13566.0 OID, m2 13756.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13566.0 Total 13566.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1423.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 1466.0

432

Sweden Building 05K0098 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5192.0 OID, m2 5347.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1957 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Hotels 330.0 - Restaurants 170.0 - Offices 4392.0 - Daytime health services 300.0 Total 5192.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

433

Sweden Building 05K0046 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4800.0 OID, m2 4656.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1953 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1910 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 200.0 - Offices 4070.0 - Shops 530.0 Total 4800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 392.83 District heating 467.882

434

Sweden Building 05K0118 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 9200.0 OID, m2 9500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1968 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1968 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.98333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 9200.0 Total 9200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1130.96 District heating 1384.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

435

Sweden Building 05K0024 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30 30 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1500.0 OID, m2 1580.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1975 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1930 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1500.0 Total 1500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 110.9 District heating 142.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

436

Sweden Building 05K0042 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 25 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4600.0 OID, m2 5118.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1925 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 1.75 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4600.0 Total 4600.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 652.083692308 District heating 370.723 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

437

Sweden Building 05K0111 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1419.0 OID, m2 1443.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1950 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1419.0 Total 1419.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.3 District heating 184.33 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

438

Sweden Building 05K0114 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

69 69 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5588.0 OID, m2 5705.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 400.0 - Offices 3415.0 - Shops 1773.0 Total 5588.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.6 District heating 1107.0

439

Sweden Building 05K0112 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 5422.0 OID, m2 5590.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5422.0 Total 5422.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 338.0 District heating 706.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

440

Sweden Building 05K0050 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91 91 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4044.0 OID, m2 4078.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3528.0 - Warehouses 516.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 760.0 Total 4804.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sweden Building 05K0043 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1860.0 OID, m2 1883.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1860.0 Total 1860.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.86 District heating 215.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

442

Sweden Building 05K0093 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 37800.0 OID, m2 38900.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1992 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 32447.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2880.0 Total 35327.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 3263.0 District heating 1099.0

443

Sweden Building 05K0038 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6040.0 OID, m2 6225.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 345.0 - Offices 5690.0 Total 6035.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 621.0 District heating 596.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

444

Sweden Building 05K0086 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5607.0 OID, m2 5780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4687.0 - Shops 920.0 Total 5607.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 453.5 District heating 332.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

445

Sweden Building 05K0084 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80 80 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1065.0 OID, m2 1115.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1880 County Västra Götaland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.3 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1065.0 Total 1065.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 77.61 District heating 130.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

446

Sweden Building 05K0087 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9591.0 OID, m2 9888.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5771.0 - Miscellaneous 3820.0 Total 9591.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1003.0 District heating 623.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

447

Sweden Building 05K0088 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9795.0 OID, m2 10089.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1967 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1967 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8625.0 - Shops 1170.0 Total 9795.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 750.3 District heating 646.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

448

Sweden Building 05K0072 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3659.0 OID, m2 4200.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3659.0 - Miscellaneous 541.0 Total 4200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 533.1 District heating 430.189 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

449

Sweden Building 05K0065 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88 88 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 14520.0 OID, m2 15972.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 520.0 - Offices 14000.0 Total 14520.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1752.84 District heating 1505.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

450

Sweden Building 05K0066 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1822.0 OID, m2 1853.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.4 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1822.0 Total 1822.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 325.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

451

Sweden Building 05K0031 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 12629.0 OID, m2 12900.0 Interior height, m 2.6 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1964 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/09/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/08/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10298.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2331.0 Total 12629.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1072.0 District heating 953.0

452

Sweden Building 05K0037 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3152.5 OID, m2 3250.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2713.0 - Warehouses 135.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 130.0 - Miscellaneous 175.0 Total 3153.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

453

Analysis of US commercial building energy use trends, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

Over the past two decades energy consumption in commercial buildings has been the fastest growing segment among the major end-use sectors in the US. This paper provides a decomposition of the major factors behind the trends in commercial energy use over this period. It examines the impact on overall commercial sector energy intensity from: (1) new buildings, (2) changes in the composition of buildings by geographic region and building type, (3) the growth in office equipment and computers, and (4) the influence of several common envelope conservation measures. A statistical decomposition of historical monthly electricity and gas consumption data is developed to separate energy use into heating, cooling, and ventilation (HVAC) and other components (non-HVAC). This data is then used in conjunction with historical commercial building floor space estimates to derive end-use intensities for these components of energy consumption. Deterministic analyses are performed to estimate the impacts of other factors. The impact of new buildings is measured by estimating the average improvement in heating efficiencies for buildings built after 1980. The effect of building composition on aggregate commercial building energy intensity is based upon estimates of historical floor space by building type and region and building-specific intensities derived from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Stocks of various types of office equipment were constructed from industry statistics and independent surveys. The stocks of selected office equipment were combined with estimates of unit energy consumption to estimate the impact on total commercial electricity consumption. For estimating changes in energy intensity due to the building retrofits, the study utilizes a new energy simulation tool developed as part of the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system for the US Department of Energy.

Belzer, D.B.; Marsh, T.L.; Sands, R.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstrationenergy-efficient office building  

SciTech Connect

In July 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) and China's Ministry of Science of Technology (MOST) signed a Statement of Work (SOW) to collaborate on the design and construction of an energy-efficient demonstration office building and design center to be located in Beijing. The proposed 13,000 m{sup 2} (140,000 ft{sup 2}) nine-story office building would use U.S. energy-efficient materials, space-conditioning systems, controls, and design principles that were judged to be widely replicable throughout China. The SOW stated that China would contribute the land and provide for the costs of the base building, while the U.S. would be responsible for the additional (or marginal) costs associated with the package of energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements to the building. The project was finished and the building occupied in 2004. Using DOE-2 to analyze the energy performance of the as-built building, the building obtained 44 out of 69 possible points according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating, including the full maximum of 10 points in the energy performance section. The building achieved a LEED Gold rating, the first such LEED-rated office building in China, and is 60% more efficient than ASHRAE 90.1-1999. The utility data from the first year's operation match well the analysis results, providing that adjustments are made for unexpected changes in occupancy and operations. Compared with similarly equipped office buildings in Beijing, this demonstration building uses 60% less energy per floor area. However, compared to conventional office buildings with less equipment and window air-conditioners, the building uses slightly more energy per floor area.

Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstrationenergy-efficient office building  

SciTech Connect

In July 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) and China's Ministry of Science of Technology (MOST) signed a Statement of Work (SOW) to collaborate on the design and construction of an energy-efficient demonstration office building and design center to be located in Beijing. The proposed 13,000 m{sup 2} (140,000 ft{sup 2}) nine-story office building would use U.S. energy-efficient materials, space-conditioning systems, controls, and design principles that were judged to be widely replicable throughout China. The SOW stated that China would contribute the land and provide for the costs of the base building, while the U.S. would be responsible for the additional (or marginal) costs associated with the package of energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements to the building. The project was finished and the building occupied in 2004. Using DOE-2 to analyze the energy performance of the as-built building, the building obtained 44 out of 69 possible points according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating, including the full maximum of 10 points in the energy performance section. The building achieved a LEED Gold rating, the first such LEED-rated office building in China, and is 60% more efficient than ASHRAE 90.1-1999. The utility data from the first year's operation match well the analysis results, providing that adjustments are made for unexpected changes in occupancy and operations. Compared with similarly equipped office buildings in Beijing, this demonstration building uses 60% less energy per floor area. However, compared to conventional office buildings with less equipment and window air-conditioners, the building uses slightly more energy per floor area.

Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

457

Energy Efficiency Standards for Federal Buildings | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulations Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Determinations Federal Buildings Manufactured Housing Resource Center Energy Efficiency Standards...

458

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

459

Thick Buildings [Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Occupant Behavior in Buildings, New Directions forSacramento, is a thin building that surrounds an atrium. (Performance of a Green Building," Urban UndQune 1992): 23-

Coffin, Christie Johnson

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Buildings*","Year Constructed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2003" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,330,527,562,579,731,707,876,334 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,174,315,331,298,350,438,481,165 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,71,107,90,120,180,98,158,66 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,55,64,90,95,122,103,151,58 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,19,23,26,33,48,32,39,21

462

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

463

Building Technologies Office Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roland Risser Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving Building Performance Research & Development Developing High Impact Technologies Standards & Codes Locking in the Savings Market Stimulation Accelerating Tech-to- Market 3 Building Technologies Office Goal: Reduce building energy use by 50% (compared to a 2010 baseline) 4 Building Technologies Office Working to Overcome Challenges Information Access * Develop building performance tools, techniques, and success stories, such as case studies * Form market partnerships and programs to share best practices * Solution Centers * Certify the workforce to ensure quality work

464

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

465

Buildings Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office building windows, clean room, infrared thermograph, data graphic Buildings Energy Efficiency Researchers, in close cooperation with industry, develop technologies for...

466

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events ICMA 99th Annual Conference September 22-25, 2013 Register Now for the 2013...

467

Food Sales Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings, though they comprised only 1 percent of commercial floorspace. Their total energy intensity was the third highest of all the building types, and their electricity...

468

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was just slightly below the commercial average. Public assembly buildings...

469

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of this building in two challenging North American climates. ... building in its native climate were performed ... were formulated-a single-zone model with ...

470

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Planning for Construction and Building R&D. National Planning for Construction and Building R&D. (576 K) Wright ...

471

Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kristen Taddonio DOEEEREBTOCommercial Program Kristen.Taddonio@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Better Buildings Alliance BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office...

472

Building Technologies Program - Energy  

2 Background And Outline Background Building Technology Program (BTP) focused on a goal of zero-net energy homes (2020) and commercial buildings (2025)

473

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These estimates, and other analyses of energy consumption in office buildings, are based on building energy analysis programs such as DOE-2. ...

474

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... keynote address entitled "Green Buildings - The White House Perspective ... in the areas of building materials, lighting, and indoor air ... Selected Papers. ...

475

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leading to Lessons Learned 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives - Program Problem Statement: Buildings consume 40% of energy in the United...

476

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... will build an instrument that will provide the building industry with better measurement capabilities to judge the effectiveness of thermal insulation ...

477

CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-20 Building Envelope Sealing (Page 1 of 1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per minute (cfm) at 50 pascals for the dwelling with air distribution registers unsealed. SLA = 3.819 x (CFM50H / Conditioned Floor Area in ft2 ) per Residential ACM Manual Equation R3-16 Building and ventilation air and vented in accordance with manufacturers' installation instructions and all applicable

478

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

479

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

480

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.