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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaMiscellaneous FloorAreaMiscellaneous Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 445 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 250 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 254 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,629 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 175 + Sweden Building 05K0040 + 869 + Sweden Building 05K0044 + 1,234 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,039 + Sweden Building 05K0051 + 1,489.92 + Sweden Building 05K0052 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 140 + Sweden Building 05K0063 + 654 + Sweden Building 05K0068 + 746 + Sweden Building 05K0071 + 293 +

2

Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail" Showing 1 page using this...

3

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

4

Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaRestaurants" Showing 13 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1,990 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 215 + Sweden Building 05K0038 + 345 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 330 + Sweden Building 05K0060 + 256 + Sweden Building 05K0065 + 520 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 98 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 155 + Sweden Building 05K0098 + 170 + Sweden Building 05K0105 + 2,450 + Sweden Building 05K0114 + 400 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants&oldid=285973#SMWResults"

5

Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaShops" Showing 19 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 800 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1,587 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 154 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3,150 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 245 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 5,600 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 292 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 940 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0086 + 920 + Sweden Building 05K0088 + 1,170 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 976 + Sweden Building 05K0092 + 360 +

6

Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 °C) Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages" Showing 15 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 400 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 3,300 + Sweden Building 05K0031 + 2,331 + Sweden Building 05K0033 + 465 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,276 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 130 + Sweden Building 05K0039 + 580 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,076 + Sweden Building 05K0048 + 340 + Sweden Building 05K0061 + 90 + Sweden Building 05K0067 + 856 + Sweden Building 05K0093 + 2,880 +

7

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

8

Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaOffices FloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaOffices" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 5,000 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,360 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,150 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 21,765 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,500 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 33,955 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 14,080 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 20,978 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 15,632 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,101 +

9

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

10

Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises" Showing 6 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0021 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0050 + 760 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 1,200 + Sweden Building 05K0080 + 2,000 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0102 + 234 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises&oldid=285964#SMWResults" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

11

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

12

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Floors | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floors Floors The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_floors.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

13

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

14

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

15

Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999" B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings ","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",4657,2348,1110,708,257,145,59,23,7 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",327,119,61,52,49,30,10,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",174,138,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

16

Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" 4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1897,272,"Q","Q","Q",164 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,802,222,17,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,506,121,51,12,"Q",17 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,184,33,15,15,"Q","Q"

17

Construction of a global disaggregated dataset of building energy use and floor area in 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the construction of a dataset of energy use in 2010 by buildings in 10 regions spanning the entire world, broken down by sector (residential and commercial), end use (space heating, space cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, and miscellaneous (mostly plug) loads) and energy source (fossil fuels, district heat, biofuels, solar and geothermal heat, and electricity). Combined with estimates of the residential and commercial floor area and of population in each region, this 4-dimensional disaggregation gives an estimate of building energy intensities (kWh/m2/yr) or per capita energy use for each end use/energy source combination in each sector and region. This dataset provides a starting point that can be used in scenarios of future building energy demand but also serves to highlight discrepancies, uncertainties, and areas where improved data collection is needed.

L.D. Danny Harvey; Katarina Korytarova; Oswaldo Lucon; Volha Roshchanka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

19

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",67338,43343,10582,3574,3260,4811,1769 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5358,857,"Q","Q","Q",512 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5952,1630,137,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,7812,1982,784,"Q","Q",296

20

Efficient 3D building model generation from 2D floor plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D building models are beneficial to architects, interior designers, and ordinary people in visualizing indoor space in three dimensions. 3D building models appear to be more aesthetic to ordinary people than architectural ...

Kashlev, Dmitry

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table B10. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" 0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings ................",4657,2376,807,683,487,174,90,39 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1567,482,226,66,"Q","Q","N" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,511,180,249,144,"Q","Q","N" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,250,105,146,157,46,"Q","Q"

22

Table B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999" B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999" "All Buildings ................",4657,419,499,763,665,774,846,690 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,227,270,359,321,367,413,390 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,107,102,240,166,193,156,145 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,63,90,97,84,130,179,65 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,13,20,39,53,44,43,44 "50,001 to 100,000 ............",145,7,9,19,24,26,33,27

23

Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,657 4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1 Outpatient .................................................. 116 64 Q Q 7 Q Q Q Q Lodging ........................................................ 153 Q 38 27 32 11 4 3 Q Mercantile .................................................... 667 316 146 141 28 20 13 2 1 Retail (Other Than Mall) ............................ 534 308 103 100 11 6 5 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ...........................

24

Innovative accessible sunken floor systems for multi-story steel buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the demands of telecommunications and computer equipment, building owners and designers are facing an increasingly difficult problem for wire management in today's electronic workplace. This thesis is to investigate ...

Kwan, Henry K

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

This form must be filled out in its entirety and returned to your academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014 FORM to enroll form with their academic advisor by April 1 for the fall semester and permission to enroll form must be completed and routed to your academic advisor

Zhou, Yaoqi

26

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelors thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Table B16. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings ................",4657,1362,142,67338,26049,7101 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,604,"Q",6774,1706,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,297,"Q",8238,2211,"Q"

28

Table B36. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 6. Refrigeration Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Refrigeration Equipment","Type of Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets",,,"Walk-In","Open Cases or Cabinets","Closed Cases or Cabinets" "All Buildings ................",4657,950,658,255,719,67338,25652,19713,8808,19938 "Building Floorspace"

29

Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings  

SciTech Connect

Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8560 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Policy Statement Number: PS-49 Title/Topic: Building Coordinator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 10. Report all landscape maintenance problems, including drainage problems or grounds upkeep group responsible for coordinating maintenance requests and activities within that building or building Coordinators are responsible for coordinating maintenance requests and activities within the building

Harms, Kyle E.

31

Hanford Facility Beryllium Fact Sheet Building Number/Name:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

still present: NO Beryllium present: NO Current building occupancyactivity: Completed building demolition on 9302009. Maximum Estimated Current Be Exposure from Routine...

32

Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acceptable? Seal when closed? #12;Indoor Air Quality Forms 196 BuildingIndoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building in relation to indoor air quality. Page 1 of 14 Needs Attention Not ApplicableOKComponent Comments Outside Air

33

Hanford Facility Beryllium Fact Sheet Building Number/Name:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations: NONE Basis for above information: Beryllium Characterization Report ADS Unit Building 2736ZB 512011 and reference information from the Beryllium Facility Assessment...

34

Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decladding and dissolution of NPR fuel elements. (2) Beryllium (in liquid matrix) for Atomic Absorption analysis. Building monitoring data summary: None identified. Personnel...

35

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

36

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

37

Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" . Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","North- east","Midwest ","South","West","All Buildings","North- east","Midwest","South","West" "All Buildings ................",4657,686,1188,1762,1021,67338,12360,16761,23485,14731 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,305,620,916,506,6774,901,1835,2536,1503 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,169,273,413,255,8238,1302,2045,3058,1834 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,130,188,260,130,11153,1954,2881,4194,2124

38

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

39

Thermal capacity of composite floor slabs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Thermal building simulation tools take account of the thermal capacity of the walls and floors by a one-dimensional characterization. The objective was to obtain thermal equivalent parameters for ribbed or composite slab elements that can be input into one-dimensional models. Method Transient finite element calculations (FEM) were used to establish the heat transfer to and from composite floors using four deck profiles and for daily heating cycles in compartments with defined heat gains and operating conditions. Results The performance of composite slabs was compared to a concrete flat slab for a typical office in the UK and Germany. It was shown that a deep ribbed slab generates a maximum heat flux of 30.5W/m2 for a 5C temperature variation about the mean, and that the daily heat absorbed by a typical composite slab was 220Wh/m2 floor area. Conclusions Using the thermal capacity of the ribbed floor slabs, the comfort conditions defined in terms of the number of hours over 25C are acceptable for many classes of offices. Practical implications Thermally equivalent properties of ribbed slabs can be used in conventional software to predict the thermal performance.

B. Doering; C. Kendrick; R.M. Lawson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Property:Number of Build Out Units Deployed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Build Out Units Deployed Build Out Units Deployed Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Build Out Units Deployed Property Type String Pages using the property "Number of Build Out Units Deployed" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 50 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 20 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 3700 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 450 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 2350 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 2851 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 1260 + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 1 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 3802 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 4942 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 1400 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Usage of Assignable Space 78 Number of Buildings and Square Metres 79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of University of Toronto Students in Residence 81 77 #12;USAGE OF ASSIGNABLE SPACE 2008-09 ST. GEORGE 2009 NUMBER OF NET ASSIGNABLE NET SQUARE GROSS BUILDINGS SQUARE METRES METRES SQUARE METRES University St. George 120 617,032 1,004,611 1,170,350 Leased St. George 5 3,052 3,786 4,255 Scarborough 33 63

Sun, Yu

42

First Floor1 Second Floor2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Center Financial Counseling & Infusion Center Scheduling Lactation Room Meditation Garden Infusion Center Clinical Lab Waiting Playground Registration Infusion Center Waiting Second Floor Research Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Conference Room 2250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Financial Counseling & Infusion

Gleeson, Joseph G.

43

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Features | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Score Score Features Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Features The Asset Scoring Tool evaluates buildings by use type. The initial version of the Asset Scoring Tool included: office, school, retail, and unrefrigerated warehouse buildings. Phase II currently under development, which will be used for the 2013 Pilot, includes library, lodging, multi-family housing, and courthouse buildings, as well as mixed-use types of buildings that incorporate Phase I and II. You can enter small and large commercial buildings, and an Asset Score will be equally applicable to new and existing buildings. Inputs You can enter these building characteristics: General information-number of floors, footprint dimension, orientation, and use type Envelope components-roof, exterior wall, and floor types and

44

User ESH Support (UES)/Floor Coordinators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators Bruce Glagola, Group Leader Building 431, Room Z005 Phone: 630-252-9797 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: glagola@aps.anl.gov Nena Moonier Building 431, Room Z008 Phone: 630-252-8504 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: nmoonier@aps.anl.gov Karen Kucer Building 401, Room C3257C Phone: 630-252-9091 Fax: 630-252-5948 E-mail: kucer@aps.anl.gov Floor Coordinators Bruno Fieramosca Building 432, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0201 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site page: 4-0201 E-mail: bgf@aps.anl.gov Shane Flood Building 436, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0600 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0600 E-mail: saf@aps.anl.gov Patti Pedergnana Building 434, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0401 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0401 E-mail: neitzke@aps.anl.gov Wendy VanWingeren Building 435, Room C001

45

Key to University of Bristol building numbers Academic Registry, Senate House .................................................................. 43  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering, Queen's Building ...................................................... 20 ALSPAC - Children ................................................................ 23 Audio Visual Aids (AVA), entry via 3-5 Woodland Road .................................. 58 Avon Civil Engineering, Queen's Building ................................................................ 20

46

(TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevator (TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building 1st Floor Stage to parking lot Nursing TV Parking Lot and Cougar Garden Admissions Elevator Elevator Commons To the East Building Mac Lab Vet Center Professional Programs Student Affairs Nursing Lab Media Services Lobby West Building 2nd Floor (TWST = Tri

Collins, Gary S.

47

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 22, 2007 ... block diagram shows the location and dimensions of the building and .... where the material handling transportation between floors is executed...

Marc Goetschalckx and Takashi Irohara

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

48

NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWMU 161 C-743 Trainina Trailer Comolex- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: . REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of C-743 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 200 feet...

49

The Lovejoy Building  

Portland, OR Originally built in 1910 as the stables for the Marshall-Wells Hardware Company, the Lovejoy Building is the home of Opsis Architects. The owner/architects purchased and renovated the historic building to house their growing business and to provide ground-floor office lease space and second-floor offices for their firm. Opsis wanted to use the building to experience and demonstrate the technologies and practices it promotes with clients.

50

Improvement in impact insulation ratings of common floor/ceiling assemblies in multi?family dwellings with standard floor coverings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improvement in the field?rated impact insulation class [FIIC] was measured for several common floor/ceiling assemblies in existing multi?family buildings utilizing several standard grades of carpet pad and various vinyl products. Testing included determination of FIIC ratings with existing floor coverings and with other more effective floor coverings including ordinary cushioned vinyl thickly cushion?backed vinyl and vinyl products with fiber board and particle board underlayment. Test results indicate that a significant improvement in the FIIC ratings of existing vinyl covered floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by the superposition of an appropriate cushioned vinyl on top of the existing standard vinyl. The test results also indicate that a significant increase in FIIC ratings of existing carpeted floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by appropriate selection of new pad and carpet. Test data from measurements performed in accordance with ISO recommendation R140 are presented in the paper for several representative configurations.

Stanley M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Common Use Areas All floored areas in the building for circulation and standard facilities provided and the like. These are extracts of NWPC standard method of measurement of building areas with an addition fromSection S ANNEXURE 4 MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS 1. GROSS BUILDING

Wang, Yan

52

Usage of Assignable Space 78 Number of Buildings and Square Metres 79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROSS BUILDINGS SQUARE METRES METRES SQUARE METRES University St. George 118 613,098 996,494 1 OF ASSIGNABLE SPACE 2007-08 ST. GEORGE MISSISSAUGA SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS CAMPUS CAMPUS Teaching & Research 54% 32,160,753 Leased St. George 5 3,052 3,786 4,255 Scarborough 27 59,428 92,043 107,328 Mississauga 47 90,134 150

Sun, Yu

53

Smart Buildings: Business Case and Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switch Floor1 GSA Smart Buildings Report April 8, 2009 PageDE-AC02-05CH11231. GSA Smart Buildings Report April 8, 2009National Laboratory, Building Intelligence Group and Noblis.

Ehrlich, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Design of a flooring removal system for asbestos backed flooring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF A FLOORING REMOVAL SYSTEM FOR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis bi PATHANJALI SAI PUDURU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AJsM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN OF A FLOORING REIyIOVAL SYSTEUil F' OR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis PATHAX. JALI SAI Pl DI. RF Approved as to style ansi r ontent bp David G. . ansson (C'barr of C'omrnittee) Alan...

Puduru, Pathanjali Sai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration Kangseok Kim1, 2 , Wenjun of software/hardware technologies and wireless networking, there is coming a need for ubiquitous collaboration computing paradigms and collaborative applications, a workspace for working together is being expanded from

56

Walking on daylight : the application of translucent floor systems as a means of achieving natural daylighting in mid and low rise architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the introduction of quality daylight to buildings by means of translucency in the horizontal planes or floors within the building. Since people began to build, the concept of translucency in ...

Widder, James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Building Address Locations -Assumes entire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housman Building 80 E. Concord St R BU School of Medicine, Instructional Building 80 E. Concord St L BU JBuilding Address Locations - Assumes entire building unless noted Designation Submit through* 560, 4 BU Crosstown Center 801 Massachusetts Ave Floor 1, 2 BMC BCD Building 800 Harrison Avenue BCD BMC

Guenther, Frank

58

Vibrations of raised access floors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raised access floors play a critical role in modern cleanroom design. They have unique mechanical properties that make them respond to dynamic loading in a manner quite different from conventional floors. For example an unbraced floor is much more flexible horizontally than in the vertical direction. Horizontal vibration amplitudes with walker excitation may exceed 100??m/s in an unbraced floor exceeding the sensitivity of 1000 inspection microscopes by as much as an order of magnitude. Issues such as these become important when moderately vibration?sensitive instruments such as optical microscopes are supported on access floors typically the case in cleanrooms. This paper presents results of experimental studies involving a 3?m3?m segment of floor and a large floor installed in a cleanroom both of which were subjected to dynamic loads using a shaker. Both drive?point and propagation properties were examined. In addition data are presented for variations in bracing and bolting using the 3?m3?m segment.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermal performance of phase change material energy storage floor for active solar water-heating system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional active solar water-heating floor system contains a big water tank to store energy in the day time for heating at night, which takes much building space and is very heavy. In order to reduce the w...

Ruolang Zeng; Xin Wang; Wei Xiao

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Office Buildings, Advanced Energy Design Guides: Office Buildings (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing new office buildings that result in 50% less energy use than conventional designs meeting minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use office buildings with gross floor areas up to 100,000 ft2 (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller office buildings with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of office buildings.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

62

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

63

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the building substation into floor-level electricalline (12kV) from the neighborhood substation connectsthe building substation to the grid. Once inside the

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

65

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

66

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

67

CUSTODIAL SERVICES BUILDING REFUSE POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CUSTODIAL SERVICES BUILDING REFUSE POLICY · Building refuse is removed according to a schedule outlined on colored floor plan maps provided to the custodian(s). Building users can obtain cleaning and circulation areas have the trash removed daily. · Anything in or on top of or in contact with a standard desk

Dyer, Bill

68

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

69

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

70

Mobile Building Energy Audit and Modeling Tools: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-00441  

SciTech Connect

Broadly accessible, low cost, accurate, and easy-to-use energy auditing tools remain out of reach for managers of the aging U.S. building population (over 80% of U.S. commercial buildings are more than 10 years old*). concept3D and NREL's commercial buildings group will work to translate and extend NREL's existing spreadsheet-based energy auditing tool for a browser-friendly and mobile-computing platform. NREL will also work with concept3D to further develop a prototype geometry capture and materials inference tool operable on a smart phone/pad platform. These tools will be developed to interoperate with NREL's Building Component Library and OpenStudio energy modeling platforms, and will be marketed by concept3D to commercial developers, academic institutions and governmental agencies. concept3D is NREL's lead developer and subcontractor of the Building Component Library.

Brackney, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/PEW_EnergyEfficiency_FullReport.pdf References: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency[1] FROM SHOP FLOOR TO TOP FLOOR: BEST BUSINESS PRACTICES IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Pew Center on Global Climate Change. William R. Prindle. April 2010. In the last decade, rising and volatile energy prices coupled with

72

ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED ALL SHADED FIELDS ARE REQUIRED U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Asset Score 2013 Pilot Data Collection Form Version: 6/14/2013 Building Name: Data collected by: Email, phone: Date of Data Collection: HOW TO USE THIS DATA COLLECTION FORM This form is intended to facilitate your data collection. The Energy Asset Scoring Tool uses the "block" concept to simplify your building geometry. Most buildings can be scored as one block un- less at least one of the follow situations applies: a. The building has sections with different numbers of floors Example: A portion of the building is 3 story and the other portion is 10 story. b. Different parts of the building are served by different HVAC systems Example: A portion of the building uses a local chiller, the other portion uses packaged DX

73

Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-11-422  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this CRADA work is to support Eaton Innovation Center (Eaton) efforts to develop advanced load identification, management technologies, and solutions to reduce building energy consumption by providing fine granular visibility of energy usage information and safety protection of miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) in commercial and residential buildings. MELs load identification and prediction technology will be employed in a novel 'Smart eOutlet*' to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and design tools and building power management systems. The work scoped in this CRADA involves the following activities: development and validation of business value proposition for the proposed technologies through voice of customer investigation, market analysis, and third-party objective assessment; development and validation of energy saving impact as well as assessment of environmental and economic benefits; 'smart eOutlet' concept design, prototyping, and validation; field validation of the developed technologies in real building environments. (*Another name denoted as 'Smart Power Strip (SPS)' will be used as an alternative of the name 'Smart eOutlet' for a clearer definition of the product market position in future work.)

Gentile-Polese, L.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

USF Tampa -Unisex Toilet Restroom Locations Buildings identified on this map as having unisex restrooms represent only those with public access. Other  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

restroom. 2. AOC- Andros Office Classroom Building, second floor,AOC 229. This is a unisex restroom. 3. BEH

Meyers, Steven D.

75

Building Name BuildingAbbr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capture/InstrCam ClassroomCapture/TechAsst SkypeWebcam NOTES for R&R Only Room Detail Building Times Weekend and Evening BldgBuilding Name BuildingAbbr RoomNumber SeatCount DepartmentalPriority SpecialNeedsSeating Special Detail Building Contacts Event Scheduling Detail BI 02010 104 NR Y 52 61 81 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 94

Parker, Matthew D. Brown

76

MANCHESTER METROPOLITAN UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS DISABLED ACCESS AROUND MMU Version 5 March 2011(Please see notes at end of database)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 4 th & 6 th floor enclosed staircases 1, 2, 3,4,5,6 floor staircases. No communication devices Yes of Services All Saints Kenneth Green Library 2nd & 3rd floor enclosed staircase 1,2,3,4 lift lobbies. Telephone communication on 3rd floor only Yes No general information signage on facilities Identification

77

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

78

UC Davis Health System Education Building 4610 X Street, Sacramento, CA 95817 Admissions Office Phone Number: (916) 734-4800  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Exit 7) 2) Turn Left on 34th Street ­ Stay in Immediate Right Lane 3) Turn Right at light on T Street 4 Exit 2) Turn Left on 34th Street ­ Stay in Immediate Right Lane 3) Take Right at Light onto T Street 4UC Davis Health System Education Building 4610 X Street, Sacramento, CA 95817 Admissions Office

Leistikow, Bruce N.

79

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Case Study, The Philip Merrill Environmental Center, Annapolis, Maryland (Office) Building Design Floor Area: 31,000 SF Floors: 2 Footprint: 220 ft. x (1) 2 Floors of open office space Attached pavilion containing: Meeting space Kitchen Staff dining Conference room Shell Windows U-Factor SHGC (2) Type: Double Pane, Low-e, Argon Filled Insulating Glass 0.244 0.41 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value Interior Wall plywood, gypsum, SIP foam, and sheathing 28.0 Exterior Wall gypsum and insulated metal framing 9.3 Roof plywood, gypsum, SIP foam, and sheathing 38.0 HVAC 18 ground source heat pumps fin and tube radiators connected to a propane boiler 1 air condtioning unit Lighting Power Densities (W/SF) First Floor: 1.2 Second Floor: 1.6 Conference Room: 1.4 Energy/Power PV System: 4.2 kW thin-film system

80

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DMBC: Introductions ATLAS Building Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DMBC: Introductions ATLAS Building Facilities 3rd Floor - Film Editing Bays (South Hallway://tam.colorado.edu/checkout.php · ATLAS Building: Main Office (Room 223) · Checkout times: M-F, 1:00pm - 4:00pm Redwood Server Access it running. o Once connected, you may log into the Redwood server from off campus. File Management ATLAS

Stowell, Michael

82

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

83

STATE OF CALIFORNIA BUILDING ENVELOPE SEALING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATE OF CALIFORNIA BUILDING ENVELOPE SEALING CEC- CF-4R-ENV-20 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-20 Building Envelope Sealing.819 x (CFM50H / Conditioned Floor Area in ft2 ) per Residential ACM Manual Equation R3-16 Building

84

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Building Technologies Office: Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Photo of the Denver skyline with Wells Fargo Center building in the center of the image and the Rocky Mountains in the background. A local law firm upgraded one floor of their offices in the Wells Fargo Center (center) in Denver as part of Commercial Building Partnerships. Renovation, retrofit and refurbishment of existing buildings represent an opportunity to upgrade the energy performance of commercial building assets for their ongoing life. Often retrofit involves modifications to existing commercial buildings that may improve energy efficiency or decrease energy demand. In addition, retrofits are often used as opportune time to install distributed generation to a building. Energy efficiency retrofits can reduce the operational costs, particularly in older buildings, as well as help to attract tenants and gain a market edge.

86

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

87

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

88

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

89

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a 10-floor high-rise multi-family building [10,13]. Theand a multi-family residential building in different climateU.S. DOE multi-family apartment prototype building, as well

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Use Tables Buildings Use Tables (24 pages, 129 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 12. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 13. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1995 Table 14. Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 15. Weekly Operating Hours, Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 17. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the

91

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingSim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BuildingSim BuildingSim BuildingSim logo BuildingSim allows users to model a building and analyze the heating and cooling energy costs in any climate. Users can create any building—from a one-room apartment up to a 100+ floor skyscraper--and account for everything from window coverings to shade trees. BuildingSim uses actual hourly weather data from over 90 climates around the world to numerically solve the full thermodynamic differential equations every minute of the year, giving the user the actual energy use down to the cent. The simulation algorithm fully accounts for thermostat and HVAC controls, allowing the user to analyze the effects of different thermostat algorithms (programmable thermostats, setback, split-zone, etc.) on the energy costs for a specific building and climate. Screen Shots

92

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of...

93

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe Grass Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R Pharmacy S Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering T Politics

Paxton, Anthony T.

94

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Accommodation Queen's University Belfast Campus Map The Lanyon Building The Students' Union The David Keir Building School Offices A Biological Sciences B Chemistry and Chemical Engineering C Education D

Müller, Jens-Dominik

95

University Buildings Landmark Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KEY University Buildings Landmark Buildings The Lanyon Building Roads Footpath Cafe University Engineering N Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences P Music and Sonic Arts Q Nursing and Midwifery R and Student Affairs 3 Administration Building 32 Ashby Building 27 Belfast City Hospital 28 Bernard Crossland

Paxton, Anthony T.

96

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

97

Measurement and prediction of train-induced vibrations in a full-scale building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings located close to transportation corridors experience structure-borne sound and vibration due to passing traffic which can be disruptive to operation of sensitive equipment in manufacturing, and medical facilities. Structure-borne sound and vibrations, when high may also be annoying to human occupants in residential, office, and commercial buildings. Hence, there is a growing need for cost effective sound and vibration predictions to evaluate the need for mitigation. The research focuses on in-situ testing of a full-scale building for verification of a previously developed impedance-based methodology and to create a prediction model to study ground-borne vibrations in the test building. A mitigation methodology was also examined using the verified prediction model. Impedance modeling involves the propagation of axial waves through columns combined with the impedance of the intermediate floor slabs. The vibration transmission in the building was characterized and predicted using a single column model with attached floors. Train-induced floor vibrations in an existing four-story building in Boston were measured and compared with predictions of the impedance model. The impedance model predictions closely matched with the measured floor responses. A previously suggested mitigation method was investigated analytically using the impedance model. A thickened floor referred as the blocking floor was used on the lower elevation of the building and the reduction in vibration at the upper floors of the building was compared for various thicknesses of the blocking floor, to study its efficiency. The blocking floor has high impedance and reflects a major portion of the vibration transmitting in the columns preventing it from reaching the upper floors. The blocking floor was found to mitigate the transmission of ground-borne vibrations to upper floors.

Masoud Sanayei; Anish Kayiparambil P.; James A. Moore; Cory R. Brett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Experimental simulation of wind driven cross-ventilation in a naturally ventilated building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A device was designed and constructed to simulate cross-ventilation through a building due to natural wind. The wind driver device was designed for use with a one tenth scale model of an open floor plan office building in ...

Hult, Erin L. (Erin Luelle), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FY 2004 Energy Use and Recommended Energy Conservation Measures - Environmental Technology and National Security Buildings at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the question of why the ETB on PNNL's campus used about 20% more electricity than the NSB in FY 2004, even though ETB has more energy conservations installed than NSB and the two buildings were built using nearly identical floor plans. It was determined that the difference in electricity use between the two buildings was due to the large number of computers in the basement of ETB. It was further determined that ETB's high electricity consumption rate cannot be remedied until these computers can be relocated to a more suitable facility.

Olson, Norman J.; Hadley, Donald L.; Routh, Richard M.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Floor tube corrosion in recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect

Lower sulfur emissions at a pulp mill result in higher sulfidity levels and in the enrichment of potassium in the mill`s liquor system. The sulfidity values at Scandinavian kraft mills previously fluctuated between 28 and 35%; today they exceed 45%. Viscosity measurements show that the viscosity decreases drastically when the sulfidity increases from 30 mole% to 40 mole%, its potassium and chlorine levels are high enough, and the char bed is low, the smelt flows easily and may penetrate the char bed, approaching the floor tubes. In extreme cases, the hot smelt destroys the layer of solidified smelt on the floor tube`s surface and reacts very rapidly with the floor tube.

Klarin, A. [A. Ahistrom Corp., Helsinki (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4011,1841,2029,141,635,46,164,425 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2272,980,1205,87,280,"Q",77,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,783,384,375,"Q",106,"Q","Q",87

102

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

103

Special Building Renovations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A number of building types have specific energy uses and needs, and as such the renewable opportunities may be different from a typical office building. This section briefly discusses the following...

104

Building 32 35 Building 36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 10 Building 13 Building 7 LinHall Drive Lot R10 Lot R12 Lot 207 Lot 209 LotR9 Lot 205 Lot 203 LotBuilding30 Richland Avenue 39 44 Building 32 35 Building 36 34 Building 18 Building 19 11 12 45 29 15 Building 5 8 9 17 Building 16 6 Building 31 Building 2 Ridges Auditorium Building 24 Building 4

Botte, Gerardine G.

105

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

106

Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Multibuilding Facilities, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities",,"All Buildings*","Buildings on Multibuilding Facilities" ,,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant",,"All Buildings","With Central Physical Plant" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,1477,116,64783,24735,6604 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,771,"Q",6789,2009,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,259,"Q",6585,1912,"Q"

107

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

109

Religious Worship Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Religious Worship Religious Worship Characteristics by Activity... Religious Worship Religious worship buildings are those in which people gather for religious activities. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Religious Worship Buildings... 93 percent of religious worship buildings were less than 25,000 square feet. The oldest religious worship buildings were found in the Northeast, where the median age was over two and half times older than those in South, where religious worship buildings were the newest. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Top Number of Religious Worship Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of worship buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

110

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

111

Analysis of composite tube cracking in recovery boiler floors  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of co-extruded (generally identified as composite) floor tubes in kraft black liquor recovery boilers was first observed in Scandinavia, but this problem has now been found in many North American boilers. In most cases, cracking in the outer 304L stainless steel has not progressed into the carbon steel, but the potential for such crack propagation is a cause of concern. A multidimensional study has been initiated to characterize the cracking seen in composite floor tubes, to measure the residual stresses resulting from composite tube fabrication, and to predict the stresses in tubes under operating conditions. The characterization studies include review of available reports and documents on composite tube cracking, metallographic examination of a substantial number of cracked tubes, and evaluation of the dislocation structure in cracked tubes. Neutron and X-ray diffraction are being used to determine the residual stresses in composite tubes from two major manufacturers, and finite element analysis is being used to predict the stresses in the tubes during normal operation and under conditions where thermal fluctuations occur.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

113

Mechanical decontamination techniques for floor drain systems  

SciTech Connect

The unprecedented nature of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) following the 1979 accident has necessitated the development of new techniques to deal with radiation and contamination in the plant. One of these problems was decontamination of floor drain systems, which had become highly contaminated with various forms of dirt and sludge containing high levels of fission products and fuel from the damaged reactor core. The bulk of this contamination is loosely adherent to the drain pipe walls; however, significant amounts of contamination have become incorporated into pipe wall oxide and corrosion layers and embedded in microscopic pits and fissures in the pipe wall material. The need to remove this contamination was recognized early in the TMI-2 cleanup effort. A program consisting of development and laboratory testing of floor drain decontamination techniques was undertaken early in the cleanup with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Based on this initial research, two techniques were judged to show promise for use at TMI-2: a rotating brush hone system and a high-pressure water mole nozzle system. Actual use of these devices to clean floor drains at TMI-2 has yielded mixed decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness that has been obtained is highly dependent on the nature of the contamination in the drain pipe and the combination of decontamination techniques used.

Palau, G.L.; Saigusa, Moriyuki

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Buildings*","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,2552,889,738,241,129,65,25,7 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",386,162,56,60,48,39,16,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",226,164,44,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

115

Buildings","Building Size"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" A5. Building Size, Number of Buildings for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings ................",4859,2586,948,810,261,147,74,26,8 "Principal Building Activity" "Education ....................",386,162,56,60,48,39,16,5,"Q" "Food Sales ...................",226,164,44,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N","N"

116

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Education","Food Sales","Food Service","Health Care",,"Lodging","Retail (Other Than Mall)" ,,,,,"Inpatient","Outpatient" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,386,226,297,8,121,142,443 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,162,164,202,"N",56,38,241 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,56,44,65,"N",38,21,97 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,60,"Q",23,"Q",19,38,83

117

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL BUILDING ENERGY ASSET SCORE 1 SUMMARY BUILDING INFORMATION Example Building 2000 A St., Chicago, IL 60601 Building Type: Mixed-Use Gross Floor Area: 140,000 ft 2 Year Built: 2005 Office: 100,000 ft 2 Retail: 40,000 ft 2 Report #: IL-1234567 Score Date: 02/2013 Building ID #: XXXXX ASSET SCORE DATA LEVEL: ¨ Simple Score ¨ Advanced Score ¨ Verified Advanced Score Current Score Potential Score BUILDING USE TYPES: This report includes a Score for the entire building as well as individual Scores for each of the separate use types. CONTENTS BUILDING ASSET SCORE: * Summary.......................................................... Page 1 * Score................................................................ Pages 2-4 * Upgrade Opportunities

118

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Case Study, The Cambria Department of Environmental Protection Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania (Office) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Open office space (1) File storage area Two small labratories Conference rooms Break room Storage areas Two mechanical rooms Telecom room Shell Windows Material: Triple Pane, low-e with Aluminum Frames and Wood Frames Triple Pane Triple Pane Aluminum Frames Wood Frames U-Factor 0.24 U-Factor 0.26 Wall/Roof Primary Material R-Value Wall : Insulating Concrete Forms 27.0 Roof: Decking and Insulation 33.0 HVAC Total Capacities(thousand Btu/hr) 12 Ground Source Heat Pumps 644 (2) 12 Auxiliary Electric Resistance Heaters 382 (3) Lighting Power Densities(W/SF) Open Office Area: 0.75 Office Area Task Lighting(4): 0.5 Energy/Power PV System: 18.2 kW grid-tie system (5)

119

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Title Performance of thermal distribution systems in large commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-44331 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William J. Fisk, Jennifer A. McWilliams, Duo Wang, and Mark P. Modera Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 215-226 Abstract This paper presents major findings of a field study on the performance of five thermal distribution systems in four large commercial buildings. The five systems studied are typical single-duct or dual-duct constant air volume (CAV) systems and variable air volume (VAV) systems, each of which serves an office building or a retail building with floor area over 2,000 m2. The air leakage from ducts are reported in terms of effective leakage area (ELA) at 25 Pa reference pressure, the ASHRAE-defined duct leakage class, and air leakage ratios. The specific ELAs ranged from 0.7 to 12.9 cm2 per m2 of duct surface area, and from 0.1 to 7.7 cm2 per square meter of floor area served. The leakage classes ranged from 34 to 757 for the five systems and systems sections tested. The air leakage ratios are estimated to be up to one-third of the fan- supplied airflow in the constant-air-volume systems. The specific ELAs and leakage classes indicate that air leakage in large commercial duct systems varies significantly from system to system, and from system section to system section even within the same thermal distribution system. The duct systems measured are much leakier than the ductwork specified as "unsealed ducts" by ASHRAE. Energy losses from supply ducts by conduction (including convection and radiation) are found to be significant, on the scale similar to the losses induced by air leakage in the duct systems. The energy losses induced by leakage and conduction suggest that there are significant energy-savings potentials from duct-sealing and insulation practice in large commercial buildings

120

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conservation Tables Conservation Tables (16 pages, 86 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 41. Energy Conservation Features, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 42. Building Shell Conservation Features, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 43. Building Shell Conservation Features, Floorspace, 1995 Table 44. Reduction in Equipment Use During Off Hours, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

122

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Geographic Location Tables Geographic Location Tables (24 pages, 136kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 4. Census Region and Division, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace, 1995 Table 6. Climate Zone, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 7. Metropolitan Status, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings

123

Building Automation Systems Design. Guidelines for Systems with Complex Requirements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings today are becoming more and more advanced and the demands on building services are increasing. A modern building is expected to provide a number (more)

Kensby, Johan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develops Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analyti- cal and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results.

125

Case Study of Continuous Commissioning in an Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The case study building is a two-story office facility with total floor area of 31000 square feet, of which most is open space office. The HVAC system operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. An energy audit was conducted to evaluate the building...

Pang, X.; Zheng, B.; Liu, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

127

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Title Data summary report of commercial building experiments in Salt Lake City, UT from May 17 to June 10, 2002 Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Black, Douglas R., Tracy L. Thatcher, William W. Delp, Elisabeth A. Derby, Sheng-Chieh Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Abstract Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to provide all or part of a building with collective- protection against harmful chemical or biological (CB) agents. Collective-protection, as opposed to individual protection, uses the building -- its architecture, ventilation system, and control components -- to safeguard the health of the building occupants in the event of an indoor or outdoor release of toxic agents. In this study, we investigate the movement of tracer gases within a six-story building. The building was retrofitted to provide collective-protection on the upper two floors. To achieve this protection, the upper floors were over-pressurized using outside air that had passed through military specification carbon canisters and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The four lower floors were outside the collective-protection area and had a ventilation system that was retrofitted to provide response modes in the event of a CB release. These response modes (e.g. building flush and shelter in place) were designed to reduce the exposure of occupants on the lower floors without compromising the collective-protection zones. Over the course of four weeks, 16 tracer gas experiments were conducted to evaluate the collective- protection system (CPS) of the building's upper two floors and the ventilation response modes of the lower floors. Tracer gas concentrations were measured at a rate of 50 Hz in up to 30 locations in each experiment, which provided data with very high spatial and temporal resolution. Differential pressure and temperature measurements were also made throughout the building. Experiments showed that the CPS maintained a positive pressure differential between the upper two floors and the lower floors with various meteorological conditions and within specified settings of the HVAC fans serving the lower floors. However, the tracer experiments did show that a CB agent could enter the first zone of the decontamination areas on each CPS floor. Tracer gas analysis also showed that the shelter in place HVAC mode provided protection of lower floor occupants from an outdoor release by significantly lowering the air exchange rates on those floors. It was also determined that the efficacy of a flush mode triggered by an agent sensor depends greatly on the location of the sensor

128

Sandia National Laboratories: Building a Microgrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cold thermal storage. "All will interconnect with our building through a control room and building management system," Barrera said. A number of Japanese companies are...

129

Buildings*","Principal Building Activity"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Selected Principal Activity: Part 2, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Principal Building Activity" ,,"Office","Public Assembly","Public Order and Safety","Religious Worship","Service","Warehouse and Storage" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,824,277,71,370,622,597 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,503,119,37,152,434,294 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,127,67,"Q",104,100,110 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,116,69,"Q",83,66,130 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,43,9,"Q",27,17,27

130

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

131

Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse Benchmarking Building Performance & the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating Scheme Speaker(s): Paul Bannister Date: August 21, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Stephen Selkowitz (Two topics): Benchmarking Building Performance: In a variety of voluntary and regulatory initiatives around the globe, including the introduction of the European Building Performance Directive, the question of how to assess the performance of commercial buildings has become a critical issue. There are presently a number of initiatives for the assessment of actual building performance internationally, including in particular US Energy Star Buildings rating tools and the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating scheme. These schemes seek to assess building energy performance on the

132

Behavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gravity based sys- tems suspension mechanisms or linear spring based systems coil springs or rubber unitsBehavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems Shenlei Cui, M.ASCE1 ; Michel of bidirectional spring units used as isolators in a kind of isolated floor system, three types of characterization

Bruneau, Michel

133

Investigation of the Use of Solar Thermal Buffer Zone in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering a one-third model of a typical floor in a building located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, our results obtained using an average winter day solar intensity show that the TBZ could result...

Asad Jan; Mohamed S. Hamed; Ghani Razaqpur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

135

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

136

Passive Solar Building Design Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The difference between a passive solar home and a conventional home is design. Passive solar homes and other buildings are designed to take advantage of the local climate. Passive solar design-also known as climatic design-involves using a building's windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. Learn how passive solar design techniques work. Direct Gain Direct gain is the process by which sunlight directly enters a building through the windows and is absorbed and temporarily stored in massive floors or walls. Indirect Gain Indirect gain is the process by which the sun warms a heat storage

137

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study of Green Coast Enterprises, who worked with Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to build moisture- and flood-resistant HERS- 65 affordable homes on pier foundations, with borate pressure-treated lumber, wind-resistant OSB sheathing, hurricane strapping, roofing membrane, and closed-cell spray foam in attic, walls, and under floor.

138

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Case Study, The Thermal Test Facility, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (Office/Laboratory) Building Design Floor Area: 10,000 SF Floors(1): 2 Aspect Ratio: 1.75 Offices Laboratories Conference Room Mechanical Level Shell Windows Material U-factor SHGC(2) Viewing Windows: Double Pane, Grey Tint, Low-e 0.42 0.44 Clerestory Windows: Double Pane, Clear, Low-e 0.45 0.65 Window Area(SF) North 38 South(3) 1,134 East 56 West 56 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value North Wall Concrete Slab/Rigid Polystyrene 5.0 South/East/West Steel Studs/Batt Insulation/Concrete 23.0 Roof: Built-up/Polyisocianurate Covering/Steel Supports 23.0 HVAC VAV air handling unit Hot water supply paralell VAV boxes Direct and Indirect evaporative cooling system Single zone roof top unit(4) Hot Water Coil(4)

139

The Research Building Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Research Building Blocks For Teaching Children to Read Third Edition Put Reading First Kindergarten Through Grade 3 Third Edition #12;#12;The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read Centers Program, PR/Award Number R305R70004, as administered by the Office of Educational Research

Rau, Don C.

140

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, one individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

142

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible for transporting the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking lot and in close

Rock, Chris

143

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

144

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Disaggregated Principal Building  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities Disaggregated Principal Building Activities The 1999 CBECS collected information for 20 general building activities. Five of the activities were aggregated and data for 16 activities are displayed in the detailed tables. Within the aggregated warehouse and storage category, nonrefrigerated warehouses greatly exceeded refrigerated warehouses both in amount of floorspace and number of buildings (compare Figure 1 with Figure 2). Within the mercantile category, the number of retail buildings greatly exceeded strip shopping buildings which, in turn, greatly exceeded enclosed shopping malls (Figure 2). The amount of mercantile floorspace was more evenly distributed (Figure 1) because of differences in average building size-enclosed malls were largest and retail buildings the smallest.

145

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

BUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'S BUILDING PHYSICS BUILDING BAXTER'S LODGE INSTITUTE BUILDING CONSERVATION WORKS R.D.WATT BUILDING MACLEAYBUILDING NAME HEYDON-LAURENCE BUILDING PHARMACY AND BANK BUILDING JOHN WOOLEY BUILDING OLD TEARCHER BUILDING THE QUARANGLE BADHAM BUILDING J.D. STEWART BUILDING BLACKBURN BUILDING MADSEN BUILDING STORE

Viglas, Anastasios

147

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structure Tables Structure Tables (16 pages, 93 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 8. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 9. Building Size, Floorspace, 1995 Table 10. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 11. Year Constructed, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the United States. The 1995 CBECS was the sixth survey in a series begun in 1979. The data were collected from a sample of 6,639 buildings representing 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of commercial floorspace in the U.S. The 1995 data are available for the four Census

148

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

149

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings. Since they comprised 7 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their energy intensity was slightly above average. Lodging buildings were one of the few...

150

THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. Hudson Beare Building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Accessible and standard toilets are also available. Introduction. The Hudson Beare Building housesTHE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH. Hudson Beare Building. (King's Buildings). A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES. Address: Hudson Beare Building, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, E,H,9 3,J,F. Telephone number: 0131

Edinburgh, University of

151

Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » Buildings Commercial Buildings » Buildings Performance Database » Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools The Buildings Performance Database will offer four analysis tools for exploring building data and forecasting financial and energy savings: a Peer Group Tool, a Retrofit Analysis Tool, a Data Table Tool, and a Financial Forecasting Tool. Available now: Peer Group Tool The Peer Group Tool allows users to peruse the BPD, define peer groups, and analyze their performance. Users can create Peer Groups by filtering the dataset based on parameters such as building type, location, floor area, age, occupancy, and system characteristics such as lighting and HVAC type. The graphs show the energy performance distribution of those

152

Johannesburg First Floor, 17 Baker Street,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Array Processor Building, housing the MeerKAT computing services and back-up power diesel rotary UPS of the infrastructure elements required to operate the radio telescopes in the reserve; including roads, power, reticulation of power and optical fibre, and links to the national optical fibre network. The Astronomy Reserve

Jarrett, Thomas H.

153

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

154

Property:Building/InteriorHeight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building/InteriorHeight Building/InteriorHeight Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Interior height, m Pages using the property "Building/InteriorHeight" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.8 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.2 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 3 +

155

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

156

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and cycle time analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A medical device company challenged a research team to reduce the manufacturing floor space required for an occlusion system product by one third. The team first cataloged equipment location and size, detailed the processes ...

Peterson, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jeanne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules  

SciTech Connect

A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per and lower energy usage was reviewed. This factor is contained in the adopted Green Building Code Section 9 for the May 5, 2010 California Energy Commission business meeting. Thank you. John LaTorra Building Inspection

159

U.S. DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Quick Start Guide To create a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) for your building you need to complete the following six (6) steps using the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool). Although you are not required to carry out these steps in a specific order, the following sequence will most likely save you time. Input Basic Building Information * Click the New Building button to begin. * Enter building name, location, gross floor area, and year of construction. * Click the button to continue. Identify Building Use Type(s) * Select all applicable use types. * Choose from a variety of options including office, retail, multi-family, education, and

160

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

162

Conversion of three-dimensional graphic building models into input data for building energy calculation program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and total floor area using the revision screens must to be emphasized. Figures 6 and 7 show the EnerCAD 92. 06 revision screens. 28 1. Proj. : OFFICE BUILDING 2. Site: ROCHESTER, NBW YORK 8 3. Rev. No. : SAMPLE CASE PAGE 1 4. Building Type: Office... and E. ter for MAIN MENU 08-30-1993 00 46 34 Fig. 6. EnerCAD 92. 06 first revision screen Proj . OFFICE BUILDING Sate. ROCHESTER, NEW YORK 4 Rev. No SAMpLE CAsE PAGE 2 The followrng d:faults were derrved f om your Input. Occ p ol' = 290 persors H W...

Hayek, Raja Fares

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CONTAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTAM CONTAM CONTAM logo. Multi-zone (nodal) airflow and contaminant transport analysis program. CONTAM consists of two components � a graphical user interface (GUI) and a simulation engine. The GUI is centered on a SketchPad that provides for the input of building topology via a set of drawing tools geared towards producing schematic representations of building floor plans. Drawing tools are used to draw walls, ducts and simplified control networks as well as to create iconic representations of building elements including flow paths, source/sinks and occupants. These drawing tools were designed to provide a robust means to create a well-formed multi-zone description of a building to be used by the simulation engine. Once a building representations is developed it is �passed� to the simulation engine to calculate zone

164

LSUHSC-NO Office of Research Services Helpful Administrative Information Animal Welfare Assurance Number A3094-01; date of assurance 12/12/12; (expires 12/31/16)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) LA-001 DAN (Disposition Authority) Number 0700321127 DUNS (Dun & Bradstreet) Number 782627814 Officer Ella Lee, Assistant Director, Sponsored Projects 433 Bolivar Street, 6th Floor New Orleans, LA

165

Released: June 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 0. Number of Floors, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors","All Build- ings*","One Floor","Two Floors","Three Floors","Four to Nine Floors","Ten or More Floors" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3136,1031,339,128,12,64783,25981,16270,7501,10085,4947 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2014,411,115,"Q","N",6789,5192,1217,343,"Q","N"

166

Sustainable Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction and real estate sectors are in a state of change: ... operated differently, i.e. more sustainably. Sustainable building means to build intelligently: the focus ... comprehensive quality concept t...

Christine Lemaitre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

168

Building technologies  

SciTech Connect

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

169

Building technologies  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

Jackson, Roderick

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

The effect of simplifying the building description on the numerical modeling of its thermal performance  

SciTech Connect

A thermal building simulation program is a numerical model that calculates the response of the building envelopes to weather and human activity, simulates dynamic heating and cooling loads, and heating and cooling distribution systems, and models building equipment operation. The scope of the research is to supply the users of such programs with information about the dangers and benefits of simplifying the input to their models. The Introduction describes the advantages of modeling the heat transfer mechanisms in a building. The programs that perform this type of modeling have, however, limitations. The user is therefore often put in the situation of simplifying the floor plans of the building under study, but not being able to check the effects that this approximation introduces in the results of the simulation. Chapter 1 is a description of methods. It also introduces the floor plans for the office building under study and the ``reasonable`` floor plans simplifications. Chapter 2 presents DOE-2, the thermal building simulation program used in the sensitivity study. The evaluation of the accuracy of the DOE-2 program itself is also presented. Chapter 3 contains the sensitivity study. The complicated nature of the process of interpreting the temperature profile inside a space leads to the necessity of defining different building modes. The study compares the results from the model of the detailed building description with the results from the models of the same building having simplified floor plans. The conclusion is reached that a study of the effects of simplifying the floor plans of a building is important mainly for defining the cases in which this approximation is acceptable. Different results are obtained for different air conditioning/load regimes of the building. 9 refs., 24 figs.

Stetiu, C.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Case Study, The Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio (Education) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Footprint: 3 Classrooms (1) 1 Conference Room 1 Adminstration Office Auditorium, 100 seats 6 Small Offices Atrium Wastewater Treatment Facility Shell Windows Material: Green Tint Triple Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Grey Tint Double Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Fenestration(square feet) Window Wall (2) window/wall l Atrium, Triple Pane (3) Building, Double Pane North 1,675 4,372 38% l U-Factor 0.34 U-Factor 0.46 South 2,553 4,498 58% l SHGC 0.26 SHGC 0.46 East 1,084 2,371 46% l West 350 2,512 14% l Overall 6,063 43% l Wall/Roof Main Material R-Value Wall : Face Brink 19 Roof: Steel/Stone Ballast 30 HVAC COP(4) Offices/Classrooms: Individual GSHPs (5) 3.9-4.6

172

Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Case Study, The Solaire, New York, New York (Apartments/Multi-Family) Building Design Floor Area: 357,000 SF Units: 293 Maximum Occupancy: 700 Floors: 27 Site Size: 0.38 Acres Typical Occupancy(1): 578 Black-Water Treatment Facility (2) Shell Windows Material: Double Glazed, Low-e, Thermal Breaks with Insulated Spacers Operable Windows Fixed Windows Visual Transminttance 0.68 0.68 Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.35 0.35 U-Factor 0.47 0.41 Wall/Roof Material R-Value Exterior Walls: Insulated brick and concrete block 8.4 Roof: Roof top garden(green roof) 22.7 HVAC Two direct-fired natural gas absorption chillers 4-Pipe fan-coil units in individual aparments Power/Energy(3) PV System(4): 1,300 SF (76 custom panels) of west facing PV rated for 11 kW . These panels are integrated into the building facade.

173

2401-W Waste storage building closure plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes the performance standards met and closure activities conducted to achieve clean closure of the 2401-W Waste Storage Building (2401-W) (Figure I). In August 1998, after the last waste container was removed from 2401-W, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) notified Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) in writing that the 2401-W would no longer receive waste and would be closed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit (98-EAP-475). Pursuant to this notification, closure activities were conducted, as described in this plan, in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 and completed on February 9, 1999. Ecology witnessed the closure activities. Consistent with clean closure, no postclosure activities will be necessary. Because 2401-W is a portion of the Central Waste Complex (CWC), these closure activities become the basis for removing this building from the CWC TSD unit boundary. The 2401-W is a pre-engineered steel building with a sealed concrete floor and a 15.2-centimeter concrete curb around the perimeter of the floor. This building operated from April 1988 until August 1998 storing non-liquid containerized mixed waste. All waste storage occurred indoors. No potential existed for 2401-W operations to have impacted soil. A review of operating records and interviews with cognizant operations personnel indicated that no waste spills occurred in this building (Appendix A). After all waste containers were removed, a radiation survey of the 2401-W floor for radiological release of the building was performed December 17, 1998, which identified no radiological contamination (Appendix B).

LUKE, S.M.

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

EERE's Building Technologies PowerPoint Presentation Template  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 2008 April 2008 1 Application of Building Energy Consumption Data in Low-Energy Building Research Drury B. Crawley U. S. Department of Energy April 2008 2 Key Areas of Interest * Energy Use Intensity * What is energy use per floor area? * Floor-area weighting * What is average square foot vs. average building? * End use * What equipment is using the energy? * Climate zone distributions * How are buildings distributed in climate zones per ASHRAE Standard 169-2006? April 2008 3 * Mechanical equipment detail * What systems and component types are being used? * Schedules * How does occupancy and operation vary over time? * Utility pricing structures * What are demand, energy, and service charges really like? Key Areas of Interest (continued) April 2008 4 ASHRAE Standard 169 Climate Zones April 2008

175

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

176

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

177

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

178

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

179

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Science Education Roadmap Building America Building Science Education Roadmap This roadmap outlines steps that U.S. Department of Energy Building America program must take...

180

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

182

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

183

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

184

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

185

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

186

Friday March 8th, 2013 Michael Smith Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Friday March 8th, 2013 9am to 3pm Michael Smith Building (main floor) 2185 East Mall UBC Register Online! bioteach.ubc.ca The Michael Smith Laboratories are pleased to announce a one day Scientific Smith Labs. We can accommodate up to 100 students and registration is free of charge. To enroll, please

Handy, Todd C.

187

Page 1 of 42 BUILDING ENERGY RESEARCH GRANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the UC Davis Engineering Shop, and John McNamara of Lightning Demolition were essential to onPage 1 of 42 BUILDING ENERGY RESEARCH GRANT (BERG) PROGRAM BERG FINAL REPORT Improving Cost Effectiveness of Radiant Floor Cooling University of California, Davis Western Cooling Efficiency Center 1450

California at Davis, University of

188

Passive solar concepts for multistory buildings  

SciTech Connect

Multistory buildings long in the east-west direction and short in the north-south direction offer good opportunity for passive solar application. If each unit within the building is designed so that the Solar Savings Fraction is the same, each will respond to the weather the same way and no unit-to-unit heat distribution is needed. A numerical example for Denver is given indicating excellent thermal performance and a several-day thermal response time. Solutions involving distribution of heat from unit to unit are also discussed as well as top-floor and south-wall variations.

Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Monitoring of microfloor vibrations in a new research building Dryver R. Huston*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards and with measurements taken at nearby reinforced concrete buildings. The success of efforts, such as building mechanical systems (HVAC, plumbing), human movement, and machinery. These vibrations can contain of the literature, it is apparent that there are no widely accepted standards for quantifying and regulating floor

Huston, Dryver R.

190

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

191

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

192

Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End-Use Equipment End-Use Equipment The types of space heating equipment used in office buildings were similar to those of the commercial buildings sector as a whole (Table 8 and Figure 5). Furnaces were most used followed by packaged heating systems. Individual space heaters were third-most used but were primarily used to supplement the building's main heating system. Boilers and district heat systems were more often used in larger buildings. Table 8. Types of Heating Equipment Used in Office Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings* All Office Buildings All Buildings 4,645 824 64,783 12,208 All Buildings with Space Heating 3,982 802 60,028 11,929 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)

193

Buildings Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Buildings Database Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Contact Us Home About All Projects...

194

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

195

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

196

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

197

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

198

Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor Volcanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

4 February 1971 research-article Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor...environment. Instead it is postulated that the viscosity exercises a control by limiting the range...magmas (to those with a sufficiently low viscosity) which is capable of penetrating the...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym Madison WI 53706 (608) 262-4503 http://msc.wisc.edu 1 FOLLOW OUR of witnesses may always go before you and walk beside you. We bestow a red and white kente stole upon all of our graduates. Red, for passion and sacrifice. White, for initiation and new beginnings. Each stole

Sheridan, Jennifer

200

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman Barták Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

Bartak, Roman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

202

Farm Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... is intended to guide the American farmer and agricultural student in designing and constructing farm buildings. It is stated that farm ... . It is stated that farm buildings have had their most rapid development in America in the years since 1910. Prior ...

1923-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

203

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

204

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

205

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

206

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

207

Lunar floor-fractured craters: Classification, distribution, origin and implications for magmatism and shallow crustal structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) are a class of lunar craters characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures; additional interior features are moats, ridges, and patches of ...

Jozwiak, Lauren M.

208

Sweden Building 05K0001 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Several buildings Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19657.0 OID, m2 20246.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1921 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19657.0 Total 19657.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1399.0 District heating 2067.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

209

Sweden Building 05K0003 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweden Building 05K0003 Sweden Building 05K0003 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4855.0 OID, m2 4920.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4360.0 - Warehouses 94.0 Total 4454.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

210

Hammer Award Honors a Federal Building's Energy-Efficient Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hammer Award Honors a Federal Building's Energy-Efficient Retrofit Figure 1: Each floor of the 21-story Phillip Burton Federal Office Building in San Francisco is more than 60,000 square feet. The lighting controls testbed occupies the third, fourth and fifth floors. Vice President Al Gore's National Performance Review has given a Hammer Award to a team of private and public entities, including several Center researchers. The team is working to turn San Francisco's Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Avenue into a showcase of energy-efficient technologies that could cut the federal government's annual energy bill by a billion dollars. The Hammer Award recognizes teams of federal, state, and local employees and private citizens who have made government more efficient and

211

Property:Building/Oid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oid Oid Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. OID, m2 Pages using the property "Building/Oid" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 20,246 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,700 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,920 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 26,420 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,395 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,957 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 25,162 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 8,040 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 35,830 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 460 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,780 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 23,220 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 20,156 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,487 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,608 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,786 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 21,860 +

212

Geometric, topological & semantic analysis of multi-building floor plan data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating a comprehensive model of a university campus or other large urban space is a challenging undertaking due to the size, geometric complexity, and levels of rich semantic information contained in inhabited environments. ...

Whiting, Emily J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

office. The equipment loads follow the schedules of theload is 10.8 W/m 2 and it follows the load shown in Table 3.interior zone follows the internal heat load, i.e. people

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

215

Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House graphic...

216

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Building America Building Science Education Roadmap April 2013 Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3 Background ................................................................................................................................. 4 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 5 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 6 Problem ...................................................................................................................................... 7

217

Buildings*","Energy Used For  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,3625,3472,801,119 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,1841,1715,354,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,732,725,155,29 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,629,607,127,28 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,216,217,69,"Q" "50,001 to 100,000 ............",129,123,118,119,50,8

218

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

219

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

174 10 12 92 UNIT NAME: C-745-K Low Level Storage Area REGULATORY STAU: -AOC LOCATION: Inside Security Fence , South of C-333 Cascade Building. APPROXIMATE...

220

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 feet wide by 30 feet long FUNCTION: Provide cooling water for computer systems and HVAC systems various plant buildings. OPERATIONAL STATUS: Active DATES OPERATED: 1953 to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2NT00041628 2NT00041628 Final Report Covering research during the period 1 June, 2002 through 30 September, 2008 Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project Submitted by: University of Mississippi Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology 310 Lester Hall, University, MS 38677 Principal Authors: J. Robert Woolsey, Thomas M. McGee, Carol B. Lutken Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy ii SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT DOE Award Number DE-FC26-02NT41628 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

222

Better Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Challenge National leadership Initiative Better Information MOU with the Appraisal Foundation Better Tax Incentives/Credits New :179d eligibility and tool; Announced in March Better Financing With Small Business...: engaging in ESCO financing with low interest bonds) ?Tenant/Employee behaviors at odds with efficiency goals ?Split incentives ?Not enough/qualified workforce Better Buildings strategies to overcome barriers and drive action 4 Better Buildings...

Neukomm, M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

SciTech Connect

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

224

Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes 101: An Introduction Codes 101: An Introduction In order to provide a basic introduction to the varied and complex issues associated with building energy codes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program, with valued assistance from the International Codes Council and ASHRAE, has prepared Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction. This guide is designed to speak to a broad audience with an interest in building energy efficiency, including state energy officials, architects, engineers, designers, and members of the public. Publication Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 BECP_Building Energy Codes 101_February2010_v00.pdf Document Details Last Name: Britt Initials: M Affiliation: PNNL Document Number: PNNL-70586 Focus: Adoption Code Development Compliance Building Type:

225

Overview of the DOE studies of recovery boiler floor tube cracking  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of coextruded 304L/SA210 recovery boiler floor tubes has been observed in an increasing number of black liquor recovery boilers. Because failure of such tubes is a serious safety concern as well as an economic issue, this project was initiated with the objective of identifying alternate materials or process changes that would prevent tube cracking. Tensile stresses are essential for the most likely failure mechanisms, i.e., fatigue or stress corrosion cracking, therefore stresses were measured at room temperature and modeling was used to predict stresses under operating conditions. Laboratory studies have identified conditions under which composite tubes crack due to thermal fatigue and stress corrosion. Floor tube temperature measurements have defined the magnitude and frequency of temperature fluctuations experienced by such tubes, and smelt corrosion studies have measured the degradation rate when molten smelt comes in contact with tubes. Based on these observations, certain materials appear more likely to resist cracking and certain process changes should help avoid conditions that cause composite tube cracking.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed... in home installations. Six common floor covering materials-solid .sheet vinyls, rubber tiles, vinyl-asbestos tiles, J linoleums, corks and asphalt tiles-were used to construct 63 test specimens 2 x 2 feet in size. 1 T'ariations in specimens were...

Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Refinishing contamination floors in Spent Nuclear Fuels storage basins  

SciTech Connect

The floors of the K Basins at the Hanford Site are refinished to make decontamination easier if spills occur as the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is being unloaded from the basins for shipment to dry storage. Without removing the contaminated existing coating, the basin floors are to be coated with an epoxy coating material selected on the basis of the results of field tests of several paint products. The floor refinishing activities must be reviewed by a management review board to ensure that work can be performed in a controlled manner. Major documents prepared for management board review include a report on maintaining radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, a waste management plan, and reports on hazard classification and unreviewed safety questions. To protect personnel working in the radiation zone, Operational Health Physics prescribed the required minimum protective methods and devices in the radiological work permit. Also, industrial hygiene safety must be analyzed to establish respirator requirements for persons working in the basins. The procedure and requirements for the refinishing work are detailed in a work package approved by all safety engineers. After the refinishing work is completed, waste materials generated from the refinishing work must be disposed of according to the waste management plan.

Huang, F.F.; Moore, F.W.

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

231

Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Supermarket  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

232

Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 3. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment Types (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incand- escent","Standard Fluor- escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4248,2184,3943,941,455,565 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2261,1070,2068,382,101,205 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,821,416,772,148,88,107 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,716,412,665,189,105,123 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,231,145,223,102,60,55

233

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAECA NAECA The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, 42 USC 6291 et seq., as amended, Public Law 100-12. NAGDM National Association of Garage Door Manufacturers. NCSBCS The National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards. NEEA Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. NEEP Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships. Net Wall Area The net wall area includes the opaque wall area of all above-grade walls enclosing conditioned spaces, the opaque area of conditioned basement walls less than 50% below grade (including the below-grade portions), and peripheral edges of floors. The net wall area does not include windows, doors, or other such openings, because they are treated separately. NFPA National Fire Protection Association. NFRC National Fenestration Rating Council.

235

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight Glazing Daylight Glazing Exterior glazing over 6 feet above the finished floor. DDC See Direct Digital Control. Deadband The temperature range in which no heating or cooling is used. Decorative Lighting Lighting that is purely ornamental and installed for aesthetic effect. Decorative lighting shall not include general lighting. Degree Day See "Heating Degree Days." Degree Day Base 50F For any one day, when the mean temperature is more than 50°F, there are as many degree days as degrees Fahrenheit temperature difference between the mean temperature for the day and 50°F. Annual cooling degree days (CDDs) are the sum of the degree days over a calendar year. Demand The highest amount of power (average kilowatt over an interval) recorded for a building or facility in a selected time frame.

236

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

237

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies

Marnay, Chris

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

239

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

240

Buildings","All Heated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" 2. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Heated Buildings","Heating Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Heat Pumps","Furnaces","Individual Space Heaters","District Heat","Boilers","Packaged Heating Units","Other" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,492,1460,894,96,581,1347,185 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,240,783,397,"Q",146,589,98 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,100,387,183,"Q",144,302,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,81,206,191,19,128,253,22

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools to someone by E-mail Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

242

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

243

Hidden buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to charge to research grants a portion of the costs of constructing and financing new buildings. What this means is that institutions confident that their researchers would be well supported ... that institutions confident that their researchers would be well supported have

1991-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME C-333 North Side PCB Soil Contamination REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: North side of C-333 Building APPROXIMATE OIMENSIONS: 150 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Dust Palliative...

245

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME C-720 Inactive TCE Oegreaser REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: C-720 Building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: Approx. 10 ft by 10 ft by 20 f1: deep FUNCTION: Used for cleaning...

246

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 UNIT NAME: C-331 PCB Soil Contamination -West Side REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West side C-331 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 100 feet wide by 420 feet long FUNCTION: Dust...

247

Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Fall Injury on January 3, 2006, at the K-25 Building, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On Tuesday, January 3, 2006, at 1:55 pm, a Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) iron worker accidentally fell through a degraded concrete floor panel while working in the K-25 Building at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).

248

Sweden Building 05K0026 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26 26 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.0 OID, m2 1482.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.0 Total 1338.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

249

Sweden Building 05K0002 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1999 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7160.0 OID, m2 7700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1999 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5000.0 - Shops 900.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 900.0 - Miscellaneous 360.0 Total 7160.0

250

Sweden Building 05K0076 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 888.0 OID, m2 892.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 888.0 Total 888.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 104.0 District heating 56.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

251

Sweden Building 05K0063 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2900.0 OID, m2 3049.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2246.0 - Miscellaneous 654.0 Total 2900.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 477.44 District heating 254.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

252

Sweden Building 05K0040 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2960.0 OID, m2 3112.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1936 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1890 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1851.0 - Daytime health services 240.0 - Miscellaneous 869.0 Total 2960.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 239.7 District heating 367.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

253

Sweden Building 05K0015 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

878 878 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1550.0 OID, m2 1608.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1550.0 Total 1550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.0 District heating 145.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

254

Sweden Building 05K0019 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

93 93 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24000.0 OID, m2 24735.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18400.0 - Shops 5600.0 Total 24000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 898.6 District heating 1326.0

255

Sweden Building 05K0018 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 18679.0 OID, m2 19081.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18434.0 - Shops 245.0 Total 18679.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 709.8 District heating 959.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

256

Sweden Building 05K0067 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11474.0 OID, m2 11666.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10618.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 856.0 Total 11474.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1195.8

257

Sweden Building 05K0020 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2761.0 OID, m2 2810.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1981 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1981 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2059.0 - Warehouses 200.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 202.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 300.0 Total 2761.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

258

Sweden Building 05K0057 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1103.0 OID, m2 1136.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2005 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1800 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1103.0 Total 1103.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 78.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

259

Sweden Building 05K0017 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1987 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 21200.0 OID, m2 21860.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18050.0 - Shops 3150.0 Total 21200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

260

Sweden Building 05K0006 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 13048.0 OID, m2 13957.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13048.0 - Other retail 1300.0 Total 14348.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 843.1 District heating 1727.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sweden Building 05K0045 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2195.0 OID, m2 2270.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2195.0 Total 2195.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 93.4 District heating 234.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

262

Sweden Building 05K0101 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

One building One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 3410.0 OID, m2 3510.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2003 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3410.0 Total 3410.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 424.0 District heating 374.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

263

Sweden Building 05K0010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

777 777 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 437.0 OID, m2 460.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1777 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 437.0 Total 437.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 66.52 District heating 61.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

264

Sweden Building 05K0012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2000 2000 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 22565.0 OID, m2 23220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2000 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 20978.0 - Shops 1587.0 Total 22565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 809.65 District heating 1185.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

265

Sweden Building 05K0011 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95 95 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 15310.0 OID, m2 15780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 14080.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 1220.0 Total 15300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 391.0

266

Sweden Building 05K0007 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24155.0 OID, m2 25162.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 1990.0 - Offices 21765.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 400.0 Total 24155.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1487.0

267

Sweden Building 05K0079 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 4263.0 OID, m2 4296.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4263.0 Total 4263.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 582.104 District heating 401.2 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

268

Sweden Building 05K0016 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

700 700 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2546.0 OID, m2 2786.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1700 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2101.0 - Miscellaneous 445.0 Total 2546.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 83.191 District heating 268.0

269

Sweden Building 05K0051 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 5286.5 OID, m2 5450.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1920 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3298.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 496.64 - Miscellaneous 1489.92 Total 5284.56 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

270

Sweden Building 05K0077 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 3606.0 OID, m2 3617.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3606.0 Total 3606.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 243.5 District heating 360.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

271

Sweden Building 05K0078 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2425.0 OID, m2 2500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2425.0 Total 2425.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 181.098 District heating 365.862 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

272

Sweden Building 05K0044 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78 78 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 6026.0 OID, m2 7096.0 Interior height, m 5.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3948.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 844.0 - Miscellaneous 1234.0 Total 6026.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 452.0

273

Sweden Building 05K0094 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11550.0 OID, m2 11896.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 11550.0 Total 11550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1900.0 District heating 876.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

274

Sweden Building 05K0014 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.3 OID, m2 1487.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.3 Total 1338.3 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 227.66 District heating 154.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

275

Sweden Building 05K0013 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

850 850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19551.0 OID, m2 20156.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 215.0 - Offices 15632.0 - Shops 154.0 - Miscellaneous 3550.0 Total 19551.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1199.0

276

Sweden Building 05K0009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 34755.0 OID, m2 35830.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 33955.0 - Shops 800.0 Total 34755.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1963.0 District heating 2176.0

277

Sweden Building 05K0008 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7800.0 OID, m2 8040.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 300.0 - Offices 7500.0 Total 7800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 315.0 District heating 844.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

278

Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of error floor of LDPC codes under LP decoding over the BSC  

SciTech Connect

We consider linear programming (LP) decoding of a fixed low-density parity-check (LDPC) code over the binary symmetric channel (BSC). The LP decoder fails when it outputs a pseudo-codeword which is not a codeword. We propose an efficient algorithm termed the instanton search algorithm (ISA) which, given a random input, generates a set of flips called the BSC-instanton and prove that: (a) the LP decoder fails for any set of flips with support vector including an instanton; (b) for any input, the algorithm outputs an instanton in the number of steps upper-bounded by twice the number of flips in the input. We obtain the number of unique instantons of different sizes by running the ISA sufficient number of times. We then use the instanton statistics to predict the performance of the LP decoding over the BSC in the error floor region. We also propose an efficient semi-analytical method to predict the performance of LP decoding over a large range of transition probabilities of the BSC.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chilappagari, Shashi [UNIV OF AZ; Vasic, Bane [UNIV OF AZ; Stepanov, Mikhail [UNIV OF AZ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

282

Green Buildings Project Terms of Reference Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advancement of green building practices was identified at the Regional District of Nanaimo Saturday, April 3, 2004 Sustainability Workshop 1 as one of the possible ways of making the region a more sustainable place to live. What is a Green Building? Green buildings are buildings that require less energy to operate, contribute fewer emissions to the environment, conserve water, generate less solid waste, and provide more comfortable and productive environments for their inhabitants. The definition of what is a green building is somewhat subjective, but different rating systems have been developed and are becoming more common in their use to assess a buildings greenness. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) appears to be the most well-known and widely used system to rate the greenness of buildings. It is a voluntary, consensus based self-assessment tool that has been embraced nationally and internationally as the green building design standard 2 . LEED establishes a system in which a specified number of points are assigned according to the particular attributes of the building in five performance areas: the sustainability of the building site, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. Depending upon the number of points accumulated, and hence the sustainability of the building, buildings are classified as LEED Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum.

unknown authors

283

Energy consumption of bioclimatic buildings in Argentina during the period 20012008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy performance of two bioclimatic buildings located in Santa Rosa city, a temperate semi-arid agricultural region of central Argentina, is analysed. The bioclimatic design included direct solar gain, thermal inertia, natural ventilation, thermal insulation, external shading, building orientation, and dwelling grouping. Each double-story building is aligned on an EastWest axis and it has a compact shape with 350m2 of useful floor area (58m2/apartment). The solar collection area is around 18% of the apartment's useful area on the ground floor and 14% on the upper floor. This paper describes the energy performance of the buildings during the period 20012008. The analysis includes: (a) the energy consumption (natural gas and electricity) during 20012007 (natural gas: annually, bimonthly; electricity: monthly); (b) the natural gas consumption and the thermal behaviour during the winters of year 2001 (between July 27 and August 3) and 2008 (between August 8 and 13); (c) the daily natural gas consumption and the thermal behaviour during 2001 and 2008 winters; (d) the comparison between the energy consumption for heating in bioclimatic and conventional buildings. The authors concluded that the results confirm the large potential of solar buildings design to reach significant levels of energy saving. The comparison of solar and conventional buildings in terms of natural gas consumption demonstrates the magnitude of such potential.

C. Filippn; S. Flores Larsen; M. Canori

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

285

Building Software Tools with Interoperability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Building Software Tools with Interoperability Vladimir Bazjanac, Ricardo Goncalves and Manfred Koethe. Vladimir Bazjanac (left) chairs the open IAI research advisory committee meeting held at San Diego in June. Next to him are Ricardo Goncalves, UNINOVA, and Manfred Koethe, DEC. Recently, architects and engineers (A&E) have begun to make building design and energy simulation software an indispensable part of their toolbox. Most A&E firms now use commercial, off-the-shelf design assistance programs. An increasing number of building professionals are also using software developed at the Center's Building Technology Program: the whole-building energy simulation program DOE-2 to design more energy-efficient structures, RADIANCE for simulating lighting designs, and WINDOW for calculating the

286

THERMAL EVALUATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID ONTO CELL FLOORS  

SciTech Connect

For the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP), postulated events in the new Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) can result in spilling liquids that contain Cs-137 and organics onto cell floors. The parameters of concern are the maximum temperature of the fluid following a spill and the time required for the maximum fluid temperature to be reached. Control volume models of the various process cells have been developed using standard conduction and natural convection relationships. The calculations are performed using the Mathcad modeling software. The results are being used in Consolidated Hazards Analysis Planning (CHAP) to determine the controls that may be needed to mitigate the potential impact of liquids containing Cs-137 and flammable organics that spill onto cell floors. Model development techniques and the ease of making model changes within the Mathcad environment are discussed. The results indicate that certain fluid spills result in overheating of the fluid, but the times to reach steady-state are several hundred hours. The long times allow time for spill clean up without the use of expensive mitigation controls.

(NOEMAIL), J

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Three Building Energy Modeling Programs:andD. Zhu. Buildingenergymodelingprogramscomparison:Comparison of building energy modeling programs: HVAC

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies, integrated design, building operation andperformance, integrated buildingdesignandoperation,Integrated Design and Operation for Very Low Energy Buildings,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Building Energy Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Building energy simulationphysics-based calculation of building energy consumptionis a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency.

290

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y (2008). DeSTAn integrated building simulation toolkit,Part ? : Fundamentals. Building Simulation, 1: 95 ? 110.Y (2008). DeSTAn integrated building simulation toolkit,

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

292

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2007 ... Abstract: The block layout problem for a multi-floor facility is an important sub ... Category 2: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences...

Marc Goetschalckx

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of ozonation on fungal resistance of bamboo and oak flooring materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic materials are gaining increased interest as renewable sources of building materials. However, chemical and microbiological degradation can occur when lignocellulosic materials are exposed to environmental stressors such as ozone and elevated humidity. In this study, the effects of ozone treatment and solvent extraction on fungal growth rates of bamboo and oak flooring materials were investigated. One set of samples was extracted with a mixture of cyclohexane and ethanol solvents for 72h to remove extractable compounds. Another set of materials was exposed continuously to ozone (2000?Lm?3 or 2000ppbv) for one to five weeks. Solvent-extracted and ozone-treated samples were incubated in closed chambers at 85% or 55% RH and 30C. Incubated samples were removed at regular time intervals for fungal growth evaluation. Ozone treatment caused chemical changes in bamboo and oak, which appeared to reduce bamboo's resistance to fungal attack. Longer ozone exposure led to higher susceptibility to fungal growth. Untreated and ozone-treated oak showed no evidence of fungal growth, suggesting that this material may contain fungi-inhibitory compounds that are not removed by these treatments. Also, a delay in fungal growth on cyclohexane/ethanol-extracted bamboo was observed, probably due to the extraction process removing substances that enhanced fungal growth.

Chi Hoang; Tinh Nguyen; Deborah Stanley; Andrew Persily; Richard L. Corsi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Seismic reliability analysis of reinforced concrete framed buildings deteriorated by chloride ingress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to propose an evaluation method that can be used for analysing the time-dependent seismic reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings located in a corrosive environment with high seismic hazard. In this study, several models have been developed to investigate the deterioration induced by chloride ingress in order to estimate the initiation stage and rate of corrosion and to analyse the structural capacity of columns and beams with corroded reinforcing bars; then, the seismic evaluation for RC framed buildings was used for calculating the story shear capacity of each floor in a building. In addition, the hazard curve of the story shear demand for each floor obtained from the seismic hazard analysis was adopted; consequently, a Monte Carlo simulation was carried out for estimating the annual failure probability and seismic reliability index of the concerned building; in other words, a time-dependent seismic reliability function could be built.

Chien-Kuo Chiu; Wen-Yu Jean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment Low-Carbon & Green Buildings: The Path to a Sustainable Built Environment in China Speaker(s): Baizhan Li Date: June 28, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Wei Feng Sammi Leung With rapid urbanization and economic growth, great changes have taken place in China, resulting in new challenges for energy-efficient, low-carbon buildings. On March 31, 2008, the China Green Building Council was established in Beijing. After that, green building standards, an evaluation index system, and policies were developed. In 2012, 389 projects with total floor space of 41 million m2 were labeled as green buildings, using China's green building rating system. Thermal comfort is one of the key factors in building energy use. In Chongqing, the absence of centralized

296

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

297

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Acoustics Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acoustics Program Acoustics Program Developed to help designers accurately model the sound level reaching building tenant's ears, the Trane Acoustics Program (TAP) "projects" equipment sound power data through the surroundings (e.g., floors, ductwork, walls), to estimate the sound level that will be heard. Industry-standard calculations published by ASHRAE's 1991 Algorithms for HVAC Acoustics handbook are the basis for this estimate. In TAP, you can model the conditions of an HVAC system by choosing specific equipment and building component criteria. TAP will analyze the sound path and calculate the total effect for the enclosed space. You can continuously adjust the data and system design criteria to compare the results effortlessly. TAP will even plot presentation quality graphs of

299

Building Technologies Office: Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Buildings Hub Efficient Buildings Hub This model of a renovated historic building-Building 661-in Philadelphia will house the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub. The facility's renovation will serve as a best practices model for commercial building design, historic adaptive re-use, and energy efficiency innovation through continuous retrofit. The U.S. Department of Energy created the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to promote regional job creation and economic growth while also improving the energy efficiency of commercial buildings. Established in 2011, the Energy Efficient Buildings Hub seeks to demonstrate how innovating technologies can help building owners and operators can save money by adopting energy efficient technologies and techniques. The goal is to enable the nation to cut energy use in the commercial buildings sector by 20% by 2020.

300

Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Special Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Building Renovations Special Building Renovations Special Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis A number of building types have specific energy uses and needs, and as such the renewable opportunities may be different from a typical office building. This section briefly discusses the following Federal building types with specific design considerations for renewable energy: data centers, historic buildings, hospitals, laboratories, remote facilities, residential, and warehouses and service buildings. Data Centers Because data centers account for an ever-growing amount of energy consumption, designing high efficiency data centers is both a sustainable and economic option. Coupled with energy efficiency measures, renewable energy technologies can provide some opportunities for data centers. Since

304

Home | Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Lab Buildings & Urban Systems Buildings Technology & Urban Systems Department Search Search Home About Us Groups Tools & Guides Facilities Publications News Links Contact Us Staff The Building Technology and Urban Systems Department (BTUS) works closely with industry to develop technologies for buildings that increase energy efficiency, and improve the comfort, health, and safety of building occupants. Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013 As part of TechWomen 2013, emerging leaders from around the world toured a number of scientific facilities in the Bay Area, including the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab. Pho Read More The Retrocommissioning Sensor Suitcase Brings Energy Efficiency to Small Commercial Buildings The data module communicates wirelessly with the smart pad, which launches

305

Model Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I begin with some general discussion of model building in particle theory, emphasizing the need for motivation and testability. Three illustrative examples are then described. The first is the Left-Right model which provides an explanation for the chirality of quarks and leptons. The second is the 331-model which offers a first step to understanding the three generations of quarks and leptons. Third and last is the SU(15) model which can accommodate the light leptoquarks possibly seen at HERA.

Paul H. Frampton

1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

P:\\Room Numbering Standard\\MSU Room Number Standard 2012.doc 3/12/2012 Page 1 MSU Room Numbering Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other spaces in university facilities. Numbering standards ensure continuity within the buildings is a customized standard that: · Accommodates a logical flow and pedestrian movement through buildings Numbering Standard. Minor renovations or additions to an existing building may continue to use existing room

Maxwell, Bruce D.

307

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

308

Agent-based modeling of commercial building stocks for energy policy and demand response analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Managing a sustainable built environment with a large number of buildings rests on the ability to assess and improve the performance of the building stock (more)

Zhao, Fei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 498,407 square feet and 12 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 15.94 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

310

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are designed to provide a consistent baseline to compare building performance in energy-use simulations. The benchmark building had 53,608 square feet and 3 floors. Benchmark interior lighting energy = 10.7 thousand Btu/SF. Interior equipment energy consumption = 18.85 thousand Btu/SF. DOE/EERE/BT, Commercial Building Benchmark Models, Version 1.3_5.0, Nov. 2010, accessed January 2012 at

311

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) or linear spring based systems (coil springs or rubber units used for restoration force), with viscousEXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS Shenlei Cui1 , Michel the mechanical behavior of bi-directional spring units used as isolators in a kind of such isolated floor systems

Bruneau, Michel

312

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: -hall with shelved storage cupboard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: - hall with shelved storage cupboard - fully oak flooring in the living/dining room and varnished floorboards in the hall and double bedroom regarded restaurants and a Waitrose supermarket. Recreational facilities can be found at Warrender Swimming

Edinburgh, University of

313

Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot...

Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Awards for Sabbatical Study The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust (OMT) awards a limited number of grants each year to support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Awards for Sabbatical Study The Oppenheimer Memorial Trust (OMT) awards a limited number of grants with the Trust's reporting procedures. The Manager Oppenheimer Memorial Trust First Floor, No. 9 St. David's Park

315

Building Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Webinars Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Webinars on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Webinars on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database

316

Identification of the building parameters that influence heating and cooling energy loads for apartment buildings in hot-humid climates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identifying the building parameters that significantly impact energy performance is an important step for enabling the reduction of the heating and cooling energy loads of apartment buildings in the design stage. Implementing passive design techniques for these buildings is not a simple task in most dense cities; their energy performance usually depends on uncertainties in the local climate and many building parameters, such as window size, zone height, and features of materials. For this paper, a sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the most significant parameters for buildings in hot-humid climates by considering the design of an existing apartment building in Izmir, Turkey. The Monte Carlo method is selected for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses with the Latin hypercube sampling (LHC) technique. The results show that the sensitivity of parameters in apartment buildings varies based on the purpose of the energy loads and locations in the building, such as the ground, intermediate, and top floors. In addition, the total window area, the heat transfer coefficient (U) and the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of the glazing based on the orientation have the most considerable influence on the energy performance of apartment buildings in hot-humid climates.

Yusuf Y?ld?z; Zeynep Durmu? Arsan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Building and Buildings, Scotland: Draft Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations, 1961  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These regulations, made under the Building (Scotland) Act, 1959, prescribe standards for buildings for the purposes of Part II of that Act. The matters in relation to which standards have been prescribed are described in ...

Her Majesty's Stationary Office

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

OpenEI - buildings  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/488 Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers.  Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions.  Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. 

License

319

NREL: News Feature - Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building July 17, 2009 Photo of a line of four large metal tubes coming out of the ground in a construction site with blue sky, hills and buildings in the background. Early photos show the first few reclaimed gas pipes being erected at the RSF construction site. Using these recycled pipes will be help the building attain LEED platinum status. Credit: Carl Cox Building a support structure of something, tried, true and tested like "off the shelf" steel is standard practice in building construction. NREL's effort to create the most energy efficient and "green" office building is putting a twist on an old standard. The columns that will carry the weight of floors and walls in the new Research Support Facilities (RSF) are

320

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings...

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

322

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

323

Lighting Controls : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls Lighting Controls Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Lighting Controls The lighting controls scope of work is based upon the philosophy that occupants of commercial office buildings prefer natural light to electric light. The lighting controls system specified by the Times Company for its new headquarters building is a DALI (Digital Addressable Lighting Interface) based system with dimmable fixtures throughout the interior space. This allows the system to dim down the electric lighting in response to daylight admittance. It also provides for variable target set points for illuminance levels at the work plane. The Times Company intends to establish and adjust target set points on a departmental basis. The lighting control sequences are described within the specification 16575. These sequences utilize occupancy sensors, photo sensors, switches and a time clock to control the lighting in the interior space on each floor. The emergency lighting system is also described within the specification. The lighting control sequences are tied to Control Intent Diagrams that divide up the space on each floor into its various control zones. The overall intent is to provide electric light only when the space is occupied and to provide as little electric light as is necessary to achieve the target set point for the work plane in a given department. A department usually occupies multiple floors.

324

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

325

Home | Better Buildings Workforce  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Search form Search Search Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Workforce Home Framework Resources Projects Participate Home Framework Resources Projects Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Buildings Re-tuning Training ANSI Energy Efficiency Standards Collaborative Energy Performance-Based Acquisition Training Participate For a detailed project overview, download the Better Buildings Workforce Guidelines Fact Sheet Home The Better Buildings Initiative is a broad, multi-strategy initiative to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient over the next 10 years. DOE is currently pursuing strategies across five pillars to catalyze change and accelerate private sector investment in energy

326

Buildings without energy bills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In European Union member states, by 31 december 2020, all new buildings shall be nearly zero-energy consumption building. For new buildings occupied and owned by public authorities this shall comply by 31 december 2018. The buildings sectors represents ... Keywords: energy efficiency, low energy buildings, passive houses design, sustainable development

Ruxandra Crutescu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Academic Buildings Student & Admin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic Buildings Student & Admin. Services Residence Public Parking Permit Parking GatheringCampusRoad Shrum Science Centre South Sciences Building Technology & Science Complex 2 Greenhouses Science Research AnnexBee Research BuildingAlcan Aquatic Research Technology & Science Complex 1 C Building B Building P

328

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

329

Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2011 1, 2011 Opportunities to Apply Phase Change Materials to Building Enclosures Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-950-6757; Pass code: 6420234 1 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov Building America: Introduction November 11, 2011 Chuck Booten Chuck.Booten@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program 2 | Building America Program www.buildingamerica.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved

330

Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Building Subscribe to Building America Updates to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Subscribe to Building America Updates on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

331

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Building Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: BuildingComparison of Building Energy Modeling Programs: Buildingof comparing three Building Energy Modeling Programs (BEMPs)

Zhu, Dandan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

333

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

334

Sweden Building 05K0106 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 8700.0 OID, m2 8970.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8090.0 - Shops 610.0 Total 8700.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 560.0 District heating 1021.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

335

Sweden Building 05K0117 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

98 98 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1925.0 OID, m2 1984.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1898 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1865.0 - Residential 60.0 Total 1925.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 160.0 District heating 221.0

336

Sweden Building 05K0041 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

71 71 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 7733.81 OID, m2 7973.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 7733.81 Total 7733.81 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 414.0 District heating 858.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

337

Sweden Building 05K0075 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1747.0 OID, m2 1794.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Jönköping County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.84166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1381.0 - Miscellaneous 366.0 Total 1747.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 362.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

338

Sweden Building 05K0082 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 1721.75 OID, m2 1775.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1979 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1721.75 Total 1721.75 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 415.0 District heating 230.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

339

Sweden Building 05K0122 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

891 891 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2906.0 OID, m2 3129.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1891 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1793.0 - Residential 1113.0 Total 2906.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.6 District heating 305.1

340

Sweden Building 05K0034 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

758 758 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2760.0 OID, m2 2906.0 Interior height, m 3.4 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1758 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2760.0 Total 2760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.351 District heating 276.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sweden Building 05K0120 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 19400.0 OID, m2 19990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19000.0 - Miscellaneous 400.0 Total 19400.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2078.0 District heating 788.0

342

Sweden Building 05K0036 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2066.1 OID, m2 2130.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2066.0 Total 2066.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 486.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

343

Sweden Building 05K0089 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38 38 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4567.0 OID, m2 4708.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1938 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 155.0 - Offices 3436.0 - Shops 976.0 Total 4567.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 337.35 District heating 314.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

344

Sweden Building 05K0090 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

920 920 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6078.0 OID, m2 6266.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2683.02 - Miscellaneous 3395.0 Total 6078.02 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 4699.0 District heating 238.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

345

Sweden Building 05K0091 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

58 58 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9301.0 OID, m2 9580.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1958 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8000.0 - Warehouses 1300.0 Total 9300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 936.0 District heating 611.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

346

Sweden Building 05K0025 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 3120.0 OID, m2 3213.6 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/07/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/06/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2866.0 - Miscellaneous 254.0 Total 3120.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 266.0 District heating 295.0

347

Sweden Building 05K0064 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

74 74 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 5565.0 OID, m2 5675.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.20833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5565.0 Total 5565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 280.0 District heating 371.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

348

Sweden Building 05K0095 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 660.0 OID, m2 680.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.175 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 660.0 Total 660.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 53.0 District heating 172.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

349

Sweden Building 05K0062 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 7130.0 OID, m2 7230.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1976 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6150.0 - Shops 940.0 - Miscellaneous 140.0 Total 7230.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 802.666 District heating 500.1

350

Sweden Building 05K0070 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1052.0 OID, m2 1369.0 Interior height, m 0.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1052.0 Total 1052.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 58.93 District heating 103.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

351

Sweden Building 05K0071 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1689.0 OID, m2 2160.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1396.0 - Miscellaneous 293.0 Total 1689.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 122.909 District heating 58.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

352

Sweden Building 05K0068 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

12 12 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3177.0 OID, m2 3923.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3177.0 - Miscellaneous 746.0 Total 3923.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 413.381 District heating 95.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

353

Sweden Building 05K0029 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 8970.0 OID, m2 9244.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8970.0 Total 8970.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 700.0 District heating 380.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

354

Sweden Building 05K0027 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

027 027 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1956 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4440.0 OID, m2 4664.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1956 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4440.0 Total 4440.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 519.065

355

Sweden Building 05K0049 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1242.0 OID, m2 1280.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1242.0 Total 1242.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.8 District heating 80.17 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

356

Sweden Building 05K0073 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1469.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1469.0 Total 1469.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 221.0 District heating 280.02 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

357

Sweden Building 05K0074 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1579.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1579.0 Total 1579.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 206.7 District heating 258.48 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

358

Sweden Building 05K0021 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5100.0 OID, m2 5130.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4150.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 - Miscellaneous 250.0 Total 5100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

359

Sweden Building 05K0116 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page General Information Year of construction 1978 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3590.0 OID, m2 3700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1978 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3590.0 Total 3590.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 202.0

360

Sweden Building 05K0115 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

115 115 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 13820.0 OID, m2 14250.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13820.0 Total 13820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sweden Building 05K0022 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 16900.0 OID, m2 17000.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13700.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 3300.0 Total 17000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1078.109 District heating 789.0

362

Sweden Building 05K0059 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Start Page Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3100.0 OID, m2 3200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.71 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2005/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2670.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 530.0 Total 3200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

363

Sweden Building 05K0105 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 11815.0 OID, m2 11400.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 2450.0 - Offices 9125.0 - Shops 240.0 Total 11815.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 672.0 District heating 809.0

364

Sweden Building 05K0109 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62 62 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6160.0 OID, m2 6350.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1962 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4120.0 - Miscellaneous 2040.0 Total 6160.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1042.0 District heating 543.0

365

Sweden Building 05K0054 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29 29 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5940.0 OID, m2 6118.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2001 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5940.0 Total 5940.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 806.0 District heating 771.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

366

Sweden Building 05K0028 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

K0028 K0028 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5500.0 OID, m2 5665.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1960 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5500.0 Total 5500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

367

Sweden Building 05K0123 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

72 72 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5219.0 OID, m2 5375.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Jämtland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 2.0 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4052.0 - Miscellaneous 1167.0 Total 5219.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 741.0 District heating 671.0

368

Sweden Building 05K0039 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5820.0 OID, m2 6200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1984 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5240.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 580.0 Total 5820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 550.0 District heating 207.9

369

Sweden Building 05K0033 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3041.0 OID, m2 3140.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2576.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 465.0 Total 3041.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 372.0 District heating 324.0

370

Sweden Building 05K0035 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 10184.0 OID, m2 10406.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6937.0 - Shops 292.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 50.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 1276.0 - Miscellaneous 1629.0 Total 10184.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

371

Sweden Building 05K0121 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

889 889 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2100.0 OID, m2 2150.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1889 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2100.0 Total 2100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 186.0 District heating 217.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

372

Sweden Building 05K0056 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 13566.0 OID, m2 13756.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13566.0 Total 13566.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1423.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 1466.0

373

Sweden Building 05K0098 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5192.0 OID, m2 5347.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1957 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Hotels 330.0 - Restaurants 170.0 - Offices 4392.0 - Daytime health services 300.0 Total 5192.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

374

Sweden Building 05K0046 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4800.0 OID, m2 4656.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1953 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1910 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 200.0 - Offices 4070.0 - Shops 530.0 Total 4800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 392.83 District heating 467.882

375

Sweden Building 05K0118 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 9200.0 OID, m2 9500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1968 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1968 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.98333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 9200.0 Total 9200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1130.96 District heating 1384.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

376

Sweden Building 05K0024 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30 30 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1500.0 OID, m2 1580.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1975 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1930 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1500.0 Total 1500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 110.9 District heating 142.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

377

Sweden Building 05K0096 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 861.0 OID, m2 886.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.275 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 861.0 Total 861.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 34.0 District heating 80.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

378

Sweden Building 05K0108 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 2111.0 OID, m2 2145.0 Interior height, m 2.9 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1983 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2111.0 Total 2111.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 92.5 District heating 246.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

379

Sweden Building 05K0107 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6852.0 OID, m2 6990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6852.0 Total 6852.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 965.1 District heating 487.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

380

Sweden Building 05K0100 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1900 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1414.0 OID, m2 1429.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1414.0 Total 1414.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

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381

Sweden Building 05K0102 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5044.0 OID, m2 5200.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1950 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5044.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 234.0 Total 5278.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 242.0

382

Sweden Building 05K0032 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1220.0 OID, m2 1220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1220.0 Total 1220.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 108.5 District heating 58.7 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

383

Sweden Building 05K0104 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3418.0 OID, m2 3491.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1940 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.34166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3418.0 Total 3418.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.5 District heating 385.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

384

Sweden Building 05K0030 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 2544.5 OID, m2 2555.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2434.5 Total 2434.5 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 208.444 District heating 226.19 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

385

Sweden Building 05K0099 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 760.0 OID, m2 772.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 760.0 Total 760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 48.233 District heating 78.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

386

Sweden Building 05K0061 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1290.0 OID, m2 1320.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1943 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1943 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1246.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 90.0 Total 1336.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 117.639 District heating 145.8

387

Sweden Building 05K0004 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 25650.0 OID, m2 26420.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) The date "2000-2004" was not understood.The date "2000-2004" was not understood. Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1914 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 25650.0 Total 25650.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

388

Sweden Building 05K0052 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 1190.0 OID, m2 1225.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 990.0 - Miscellaneous 200.0 Total 1190.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.0 District heating 287.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

389

Sweden Building 05K0058 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 11170.0 OID, m2 11182.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 330.0 - Offices 10750.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 1200.0 Total 12280.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2013.781

390

Sweden Building 05K0080 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1988 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9619.0 OID, m2 9907.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5727.0 - Daytime health services 117.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 687.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 2000.0

391

Sweden Building 05K0081 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4928.0 OID, m2 5075.84 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.89166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 98.0 - Offices 3350.0 - Shops 530.0 - Warehouses 250.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 Total 4928.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

392

Sweden Building 05K0042 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 25 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4600.0 OID, m2 5118.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1925 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 1.75 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4600.0 Total 4600.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 652.083692308 District heating 370.723 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

393

Sweden Building 05K0111 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1419.0 OID, m2 1443.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1950 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1419.0 Total 1419.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.3 District heating 184.33 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

394

Sweden Building 05K0114 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

69 69 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5588.0 OID, m2 5705.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 400.0 - Offices 3415.0 - Shops 1773.0 Total 5588.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.6 District heating 1107.0

395

Sweden Building 05K0112 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 5422.0 OID, m2 5590.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5422.0 Total 5422.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 338.0 District heating 706.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

396

Sweden Building 05K0050 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91 91 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4044.0 OID, m2 4078.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3528.0 - Warehouses 516.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 760.0 Total 4804.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

397

Sweden Building 05K0043 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1860.0 OID, m2 1883.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1860.0 Total 1860.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.86 District heating 215.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

398

Sweden Building 05K0093 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 37800.0 OID, m2 38900.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1992 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 32447.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2880.0 Total 35327.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 3263.0 District heating 1099.0

399

Sweden Building 05K0038 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6040.0 OID, m2 6225.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 345.0 - Offices 5690.0 Total 6035.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 621.0 District heating 596.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

400

Sweden Building 05K0086 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5607.0 OID, m2 5780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4687.0 - Shops 920.0 Total 5607.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 453.5 District heating 332.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sweden Building 05K0084 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80 80 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1065.0 OID, m2 1115.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1880 County Västra Götaland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.3 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1065.0 Total 1065.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 77.61 District heating 130.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

402

Sweden Building 05K0087 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9591.0 OID, m2 9888.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5771.0 - Miscellaneous 3820.0 Total 9591.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1003.0 District heating 623.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

403

Sweden Building 05K0088 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9795.0 OID, m2 10089.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1967 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1967 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8625.0 - Shops 1170.0 Total 9795.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 750.3 District heating 646.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

404

Sweden Building 05K0072 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3659.0 OID, m2 4200.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3659.0 - Miscellaneous 541.0 Total 4200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 533.1 District heating 430.189 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

405

Sweden Building 05K0065 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88 88 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 14520.0 OID, m2 15972.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 520.0 - Offices 14000.0 Total 14520.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1752.84 District heating 1505.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

406

Sweden Building 05K0066 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1822.0 OID, m2 1853.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.4 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1822.0 Total 1822.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 325.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

407

Sweden Building 05K0031 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 12629.0 OID, m2 12900.0 Interior height, m 2.6 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1964 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/09/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/08/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10298.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2331.0 Total 12629.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1072.0 District heating 953.0

408

Sweden Building 05K0037 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3152.5 OID, m2 3250.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2713.0 - Warehouses 135.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 130.0 - Miscellaneous 175.0 Total 3153.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

409

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Buildings - Full Report Office Buildings - Full Report file:///C|/mydocs/CBECS2003/PBA%20report/office%20report/office_pdf.html[9/24/2010 3:33:25 PM] Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a

410

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Breaking new ground in energy efficiency #12;Building Technologies Research To enjoy a sustainable energy and environmental future, America must these enormous challenges. Today, through the Building Technologies and Research Integration Center (BTRIC

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

411

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low energy buildings, with site EUI of 40 or lowerbuildings in the US (EUI of 90 kBtu/ft). Thisthe bubble represents the EUI. These buildings were

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Thermal simulation and system optimization of a chilled ceiling coupled with a floor containing a phase change material (PCM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The integration of phase change materials (PCMs) for cooling applications in buildings reduces the amplitude of indoor air temperature fluctuations due to solar and internal gains, enabling passive solar, HVAC system downsizing or off-peak cooling designs. This work studies the use of radiant systems for discharging heat stored in a PCM; this approach differs from the typical practice of accomplishing this task by either night cooling ventilation or embedding an active heat exchanger into the PCM of the wall. In this study, a PCM is incorporated into the floor, and a hydronic radiant ceiling system is used as the energy discharge system. The advantages and disadvantages of this configuration in terms of cooling energy demands and thermal comforts of occupants are analyzed using the simulation software TRNSYS. Five design parameters are optimized using the software GENOPT. The simulation reveals that when accompanied by an air-to-air heat recovery system, this configuration can significantly reduce the cooling energy demand (more than 50% compared to the cooling energy demand of the same building without PCM) and can thus significantly reduce the energy consumption. However, the degrees of occupant comfort will inevitably vary (i.e., the predicted percent dissatisfied (PPD) increases by 25%).

J.F. Belmonte; P. Egua; A.E. Molina; J.A. Almendros-Ibez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Building a Molecule Building Structures in Moe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Chapter 3 Building a Molecule #12;15 Building Structures in Moe Dorzolamide Exercise 1 #12;16 Open the Molecule Builder · Open the Molecule Builder panel using MOE | Edit | Build | Molecule, the chiral center will be either R or S, and one of the two will be highlighted in green. The green

Fischer, Wolfgang

414

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

415

Buildings*","Year Constructed"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2003" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,330,527,562,579,731,707,876,334 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,174,315,331,298,350,438,481,165 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,71,107,90,120,180,98,158,66 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,55,64,90,95,122,103,151,58 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,19,23,26,33,48,32,39,21

416

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

417

Building Technologies Office Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roland Risser Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving Building Performance Research & Development Developing High Impact Technologies Standards & Codes Locking in the Savings Market Stimulation Accelerating Tech-to- Market 3 Building Technologies Office Goal: Reduce building energy use by 50% (compared to a 2010 baseline) 4 Building Technologies Office Working to Overcome Challenges Information Access * Develop building performance tools, techniques, and success stories, such as case studies * Form market partnerships and programs to share best practices * Solution Centers * Certify the workforce to ensure quality work

418

Building Technologies Office: Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources to someone by Resources to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Resources on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Resources on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Resources on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Resources on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Resources on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Partner Log In Become a Partner Criteria Partner Locator Resources Housing Innovation Awards Events Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes

419

Building Performance Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEEDNCCertifiedBuildings (courtesyNewBuildingInstitute) Figure3MeasuredEnergyUseIntensitiesofBig?BoxRetailsinUSandCanada(

Hong, Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

GSA Building Energy Strategy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rapid Building Assessments Green Button 12 Remote Building Analytics Platform First Fuel Dashboard 13 Data Center Ronald Reagan Detail Summary First Fuel Analysis 14...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

SciTech Connect

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

423

Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America 2013 Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research

424

Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energys Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

BUILDINGS INVENTORY -CASUARINA CAMPUS Amendment: A July 2008 * Additions to Original List  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDINGS INVENTORY - CASUARINA CAMPUS Amendment: A July 2008 * Additions to Original List Precinct & Building Number Database Coding Former Building Number Description Drawing No Drawing Title Orange 1 OR1 29 General Purpose Building - Teaching & Administration BD OR1 - 01 to 04 Levels 1 to 4 PLANS * Orange 1A OR1

426

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

427

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

428

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

429

Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE FEDERAL LEADERSHIP IN HIGH PERFORMANCE and SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING PURPOSE: With this Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), signatory agencies commit to federal leadership in the design, construction, and operation of High- Performance and Sustainable Buildings. A major element of this strategy is the implementation of common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The signatory agencies will also coordinate with complementary efforts in the private and public sectors. BACKGROUND AND FEDERAL POLICY: The Federal government owns approximately 445,000 buildings with total floor space of over 3.0 billion square feet, in addition to leasing an additional 57,000 buildings comprising 374 million square feet of

430

Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Hall Building City Hall Building Destroyed in the tornado, City Hall was completed in October 2009 and built to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum designation. The 4,700-square-foot building serves as a symbol of Greensburg's vitality and leadership in becoming a sustainable community where social, environmental, and economic concerns are held in balance. It houses the City's administrative offices and council chambers, and serves as a gathering place for town meetings and municipal court sessions. According to energy analysis modeling results, the new City Hall building is 38% more energy efficient than an ASHRAE-compliant building of the same size and shape. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * A well-insulated building envelope with an

431

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meetings Meetings Photo of people watching a presentation on a screen; the foreground shows a person's hands taking notes on a notepad. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program hosts open meetings and webinars for industry partners and stakeholders that provide a forum to exchange information about various aspects of residential building research. Upcoming Meetings Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Webinars Expert Meetings Upcoming Meetings There are no Building America meetings scheduled at this time. Please subscribe to Building America news and updates to receive notification of future meetings. Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting: April 2013 This meeting showcased world-class building science research for high performance homes in a dynamic new format. Researchers from Building America teams and national laboratories presented on key issues that must be resolved to deliver homes that reduce whole house energy use by 30%-50%. View the presentations.

432

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program logo. The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is helping over 40 competitively selected state and local governments develop sustainable programs to upgrade the energy efficiency of more than 100,000 buildings. These leading communities are using innovation and investment in energy efficiency to expand the building improvement industry, test program delivery business models, and create jobs. New Materials and Resources January 2014 Read the January issue of the Better Buildings Network View See the new story about Austin Energy Read the new Focus Series with Chicago's EI2 See the new webcast Read the latest DOE blog posts Get Inspired! Hear why Better Buildings partners are excited to bring the benefits of energy upgrades to their neighborhoods.

433

Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Business Incubator Building Business Incubator Building Completed in May 2009, the SunChips ® Business Incubator building not only achieved the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ® ) Platinum status with greater than 50% energy savings-it became the first LEED Platinum certified municipal building in Kansas. The 9,580-square-foot building features five street-level retail shops and nine second-level professional service offices. It provides an affordable, temporary home where businesses can grow over a period of several years before moving out on their own to make way for new start-up businesses. The building was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Frito-Lay SunChips division, and actor Leonardo DiCaprio.

434

Office Buildings - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF PDF Office Buildings Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the office sub-category information in the detailed tables we make information

435

building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

436

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-4 Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation Yanli Ren1, Deying Li2, Yufeng Zhang1 1...

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Production system improvement at a medical devices company : floor layout reduction and manpower analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the low demand and the need to introduce other production lines in the floor, the medical devices company wants to optimize the utilization of space and manpower for the occlusion system product. This thesis shows ...

AlEisa, Abdulaziz A. (Abdulaziz Asaad)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

Chang, William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter....

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

partners to share best practices and learn from one another to increase the number of homes that are energy efficient. Better Buildings Residential programs and partners have...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Step 4. Inspect the Building During and After Construction | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4. Inspect the Building During and After Construction 4. Inspect the Building During and After Construction A number of website resources offer checklists to help officials organize the many energy-code-related areas to inspect on the construction site. Several examples of different checklists are listed below. When applicable and approved for use, REScheck and COMcheck inspection checklists should be provided as part of the energy code compliance documentation for the building. REScheck/COMcheck checklists. The REScheck and COMcheck software programs generate reports that list the energy-code-related items to be inspected. The lists include mandatory items such as air leakage control, duct insulation and sealing, temperature controls, and lighting requirements, and can be used by officials to assist during on-site

442

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

443

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 2 Table 2. Photocopiers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Photocopiers (thousand) Photocopiers per Million Square Feet Photocopiers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 4,934 73 60 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 433 50 48 Food Sales 174 994 980 41 42 42 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 Q Q 26 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 401 138 65 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 187 100 56 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 214 204 75 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 78 17 33 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 526 51 46

444

Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Buildings to Grid Integration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to address the integration and optimization of buildings with the nation's energy grid. Buildings and the Energy Grid As electricity demand continues to increase, integrating buildings and the electricity grid is a key step to increasing energy efficiency. Intermittent and/or variable generation sources and loads, such as those of electric vehicles, are being installed on the grid in increasing numbers and at more distributed locations. For example, the U.S. government, many states, municipalities, and utility service areas are diversifying and distributing their generation mix, including a larger percentage of

446

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2003 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2003 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics In the 2003 CBECS, the survey procedures for strip shopping centers and enclosed malls ("mall buildings") were changed from those used in previous surveys, and, as a result, mall buildings are now excluded from most of the 2003 CBECS tables. Therefore, some data in the majority of the tables are not directly comparable with previous CBECS tables, all of which included mall buildings. Some numbers in the 2003 tables will be slightly lower than earlier surveys since the 2003 figures do not include mall buildings. See "Change in Data Collection Procedures for Malls" for a more detailed

447

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

448

Buildings to Grid Integration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to address the integration and optimization of buildings with the nation's energy grid. Buildings and the Energy Grid As electricity demand continues to increase, integrating buildings and the electricity grid is a key step to increasing energy efficiency. Intermittent and/or variable generation sources and loads, such as those of electric vehicles, are being installed on the grid in increasing numbers and at more distributed locations. For example, the U.S. government, many states, municipalities, and utility service areas are diversifying and distributing their generation mix, including a larger percentage of

449

A Look at Education Buildings - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? Are they on multibuilding complexes? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) EDUCATION BUILDINGS There were an estimated 309,000 education buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), education buildings include those that are used for academic or technical classroom instruction. They include preschools, elementary schools, middle or junior high schools, high schools, vocational schools, and college or university classrooms.

450

New Hampshire | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information The New Hampshire commercial code is the 2009 IECC with direct reference for compliance to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. 103.5 compliance except any structure three stories or less above grade plane in height and less than 4,000 square feet in gross floor area is permitted to show envelope compliance based on Chapter 4. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of New Hampshire (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 04/01/2010 Adoption Date 12/11/2009 Code Enforcement Mandatory

451

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

452

Building Technology MSc Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this programme is on the design of innovative and sustainable building components and their integration

Langendoen, Koen

453

Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America America Climate-Specific Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Climate-Specific Guidance on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education

454

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Alliance Laboratory Fume Hood Specification on AddThis.com...

455

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database Analysis Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

456

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Commercial About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database

457

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

458

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sumary Comparison Table Sumary Comparison Table Return to: A Look at CBECS Building Activities SUMMARY COMPARISON TABLE Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Average Square Feet per Building (thousand) Total Workers (thousand) Average Square Feet per Worker All Commercial Buildings 4,579 58,772 12.8 76,767 766 Building Activity Retail and Service 1,289 12,728 9.9 13,464 945 -- Retail 704 9,127 13.0 8,675 1,052 --- Strip Mall 130 2,887 22.3 3,529 818 --- Enclosed Mall 12 1,817 Q 1,814 1,001 --- Other Retail 562 4,423 7.9 3,332 1,328 --Service 585 3,601 6.2 4,788 752 Office 705 10,478 14.9 27,053 387 Warehouse 580 8,481 14.6 4,904 1,730 Public Assembly 326 3,948 12.1 2,997 1,317 Education 309 7,740 25.1 10,096 767

459

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

460

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

462

A Look at Office Buildings - Index  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Office Office Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? Are they on multibuilding complexes? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) OFFICE BUILDINGS There were an estimated 705,000 office buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), office buildings include buildings used for general office space, professional offices, and administrative offices. For example, an office may be a computer center, bank, consultant's office, law office, or medical office. An office building may also be part of a campus or complex, such as an administrative building on a college campus. (See Description of Building Types on the main CBECS page for a more detailed description.)

463

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News to someone by News to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: News on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: News on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: News on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program Building Energy Software Tools Directory High Performance Buildings Database Financial Opportunities Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Funding Opportunities Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings

464

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

465

DOE - Better Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo U.S. Department of Energy | Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Update July 2013 Inside this edition: Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum Recap: Better Buildings Summit for State & Local Communities Launching the Better Buildings Webinar Series Better Buildings Challenge Implementation Models and Showcase Projects Updated Better Buildings Websites New Members Highlights from the 2013 Efficiency Forum More than 170 people attended the second annual Better Buildings Efficiency Forum for commercial and higher education Partners in May at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado-the nation's largest net-zero energy office building. DOE thanks all Better Buildings Alliance Members and Better Buildings Challenge Partners that participated in the Efficiency Forum.

466

Fact Sheet- Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact Sheet - Better Buildings Residential, from U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

467

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

John Anderson Campus UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 1 McCance Building 2 Collins Building 3 Livingstone Tower 4 Accommodation Office 5 Graham Hills Building 6 Turnbull Building 7 Royal College Building 8 Students' Union 9 Centre for Sport & Recreation 10 St Paul's Building/Chaplaincy 11 Thomas Graham Building

Mottram, Nigel

468

Building America System Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America System Building America System Research Eric Werling, DOE Ren Anderson, NREL eric.werling@ee.doe.gov, 202-586-0410 ren.anderson@nrel.gov, 303-384-7443 April 2, 2013 Building America System Innovations: Accelerating Innovation in Home Energy Savings 2 | Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Project Relevance 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Building America Fills Market Need for a High-Performance Homes HUB of Innovation

469

Building Technologies Office: Building Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Education Science Education Photo of students investigating building enclosure moisture problems at a field testing facility in British Columbia. Students study moisture building enclosure issues at the Coquitlam Field Test facility in Vancouver, British Columbia. Credit: John Straube The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to:

470

Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honest Buildings Honest Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Honest Buildings Agency/Company /Organization: Honest Buildings Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.honestbuildings.com/ Web Application Link: www.honestbuildings.com/ Cost: Free Honest Buildings Screenshot References: Honest Buildings[1] Logo: Honest Buildings Honest Buildings is a software platform focused on buildings. It brings together building service providers, occupants, owners, and other stakeholders onto a single portal to exchange information, offerings, and needs. It provides a voice for everyone who occupies buildings, works with buildings, and owns buildings globally to comment, display projects, and

471

Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

472

Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

used to improve energy performance of building envelopes while dealing with issues like ice damming during exterior "overcoat" insulation retrofits? How can deep energy retrofits...

473

Commercial Building Tenant Energy Usage Aggregation and Privacy  

SciTech Connect

A growing number of building owners are benchmarking their building energy use. This requires the building owner to acquire monthly whole-building energy usage information, which can be challenging for buildings in which individual tenants have their own utility meters and accounts with the utility. Some utilities and utility regulators have turned to aggregation of customer energy use data (CEUD) as a way to give building owners whole-building energy usage data while protecting customer privacy. Meter profile aggregation adds a layer of protection that decreases the risk of revealing CEUD as the number of meters aggregated increases. The report statistically characterizes the similarity between individual energy usage patterns and whole-building totals at various levels of meter aggregation.

Livingston, Olga V.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Anderson, David M.; Wang, Na

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

User's manual for RESRAD-BUILD version 3.  

SciTech Connect

The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material. The transport of radioactive material within the building from one compartment to another is calculated with an indoor air quality model. The air quality model considers the transport of radioactive dust particulates and radon progeny due to air exchange, deposition and resuspension, and radioactive decay and ingrowth. A single run of the RESRAD-BUILD code can model a building with up to three compartments, four source geometries (point, line, area, and volume), 10 distinct source locations, and 10 receptor locations. The volume source can be composed of up to five layers of different materials, with each layer being homogeneous and isotropic. A shielding material can be specified between each source-receptor pair for external gamma dose calculations. The user can select shielding material from eight different material types. Seven exposure pathways are considered in the RESRAD-BUILD code: (1) external exposure directly from the source, (2) external exposure to materials deposited on the floor, (3) external exposure due to air submersion, (4) inhalation of airborne radioactive particulates, (5) inhalation of aerosol indoor radon progeny and tritiated water vapor, (6) inadvertent ingestion of radioactive material directly from the source, and (7) ingestion of materials deposited on the surfaces of the building compartments. Various exposure scenarios may be modeled with the RESRAD-BUILD code. These include, but are not limited to, office worker, renovation worker, decontamination worker, building visitor, and residency scenarios. Both deterministic and probabilistic dose analyses can be performed with RESRAD-BUILD, and the results can be shown in both text and graphic reports.

Yu, C.; LePoire, D. J.; Cheng, J. J.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Arnish, J.; Biwer, B. M.; Zielen, A. J.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A., III; Peterson, H. T., Jr.

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

476

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Whole-Building Energy Diagnostics Research Project on AddThis.com...

477

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyPeriscope  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnergyPeriscope EnergyPeriscope Logo for EnergyPeriscope EnergyPeriscope is a professional-level performance estimating and financial analysis engine. Use it to create financial performance reports for single- or multiple-technology energy solutions. EnergyPeriscope accommodates retrofit applications, new construction buildings, and "Energy Farms" for selling PV- or wind-generated electricity. Model PV, solar water heating, solar pool/spa heating, solar hydronic radiant floor systems, wind turbines and energy efficiency projects. Screen Shots Keywords Renewable energy performance analysis, financial analysis, sales proposals Validation/Testing Data results were validated against RETScreen, PVWatts and other energy analysis tools. Reports are available. Expertise Required

478

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter provides information on Federal building energy consumption, characteristics, and expenditures, as well as information on legislation affecting said consumption. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In FY 2007, Federal buildings accounted for 2.2% of all building energy consumption and 0.9% of total U.S. energy consumption.

479

Computer-aided design of energy-efficient buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of computers in the design of energy-efficient buildings has become a necessity because of the large number of parameters such designs involve and the need to meet standards that call for computer use. This paper shows how an initial design, developed in accordance with the proposed ASHRAE Standard 90.1 P 'Energy efficient design of new buildings except low-rise residential buildings', is modified to reduce the building's energy costs.

Radu Zmeureanu; Paul Fazio

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 5. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings ................",4657,3239,1546,1520,110,62,130 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1456,795,574,"Q","Q","Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,778,317,429,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,574,265,274,14,9,31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building number floor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" 0. Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",4657,4016,1880,2380,377,96,307,94 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1982,926,1082,214,"Q",162,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,946,379,624,73,"Q",88,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,629,324,389,52,19,42,"Q"

482

Energy Efficient Buildings Hub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Henry C. Foley Henry C. Foley April 3, 2013 Presentation at the U.S. DOE Building Technologies Office Peer Review Meeting Purpose and Objectives * Problem Statement - Building energy efficiency has not increased in recent decades compared to other sectors especially transportation - Building component technologies have become more energy efficient but buildings as a whole have not * Impact of Project - A 20% reduction in commercial building energy use could save the nation four quads of energy annually * Project Focus - This is more than a technological challenge; the technology needed to achieve a 10% reduction in building energy use exists - The Hub approach is to comprehensively and systematically address

483

Public Assembly Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Assembly Assembly Characteristics by Activity... Public Assembly Public assembly buildings are those in which people gather for social or recreational activities, whether in private or non-private meeting halls. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Public Assembly Buildings... Most public assembly buildings were not large convention centers or entertainment arenas; about two-fifths fell into the smallest size category. About one-fifth of public assembly buildings were government-owned, mostly by local governments; examples of these types of public assembly buildings are libraries and community recreational facilities. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

484

DOE Building Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview Overview September 2013 Buildings.energy.gov/BPD BuildingsPerformanceDatabase@ee.doe.gov 2 * The BPD statistically analyzes trends in the energy performance and physical & operational characteristics of real commercial and residential buildings. The Buildings Performance Database 3 Design Principles * The BPD contains actual data on existing buildings - not modeled data or anecdotal evidence. * The BPD enables statistical analysis without revealing information about individual buildings. * The BPD cleanses and validates data from many sources and translates it into a standard format. * In addition to the BPD's analysis tools, third parties will be able to create applications using the

485

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING A&S BUILDING EXTENSIO N P7 P5.1 P5 P2 P3.1 P3.2 P6 P8 P4 P2 P2 P4 P8 P2.4 PARKING MAP GRENFELL

deYoung, Brad

486

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

487

Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

| Building Technologies Program | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Federal Opportunities to Leverage the Commercial Building Energy Alliance Brian Holuj Building Technologies Program March 15, 2012 IATF Technology Deployment Working Group - Commercial Building Energy Alliance Building owners and operators, efficiency organizations and DOE target common energy efficiency challenges and opportunities Retail and Food Commercial Real Estate Hospitals Service and Hospitality * 55 members * 2.2+ billion ft 2 * 95 members * 5.3+ billion ft 2 * 51 members * 0.5+ billion ft 2 Strength in numbers → Higher Ed sector added in 2011; new members join regularly www.commercialbuildings.energy.gov/alliances 1 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Approx. market % from member reported ft

488

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

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