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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

2

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis To help facility managers make sound decisions, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials assume discount rates and energy price projections determined

3

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

4

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs October 8, 2013 - 2:14pm Addthis The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-13 (for Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux). BLCC is programmed in Java with an XML file format. The user's guide is part of the BLCC Help system. BLCC version 5.3-13 contains the following modules: FEMP Analysis; Energy Project Federal Analysis; Financed Project Office of Management and Budget Analysis MILCON Analysis; Energy Project MILCON Analysis; Energy Conservation Investment Program Project MILCON Analysis; Non-Energy Project

5

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis; Non-Energy Project BLCC conducts economic analyses by evaluating the relative cost effectiveness of alternative buildings and building-related systems or components....

6

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Basics

8

Green Building- Efficient Life Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy saving does not just apply to traffic, production or agriculture. Buildings are also contributing to the climate change. The focus here is on the energy they use and on their CO2 emissions. Each year, Siemens invests more than two billion euros in the appropriate research and development. For customers, this means that Siemens is already providing them with energy efficient solutions that save resources and reduce emissions. Siemens Real Estate (SRE) has taken on the task of ensuring that Siemens AG will become 20 percent more energy efficient by 2011, and it has turned an efficiency program for existing real estate, which has been in existence since 2005, into an integrated green building initiative. This initiative comprises the components Sustainable Building Design, Life Cycle Cost Analysis, Green Building Certification and Natural Resources Management. These components are deliberately arranged around the life cycle of the real estate concerned. This allows a different emphasis to be placed on the different questions in each project phase and each phase of a buildings life and for them to be answered in a targeted manner. Sustainable Building Design comes into effect during the tasking and preliminary planning phase of a building project; and, by providing a specially developed sustainability manual, it helps with the definition of target values and the drawing up of efficiency strategies for the planning of the building. The manual epitomizes, and sets out clearly, the attitude of SRE to all building-specific sustainability matters. In addition, it is used in the offering of rewards for project competitions. As a result, through a selection of different energy-efficiency measures that have been roughly conceived beforehand, the primary energy consumption can already be restricted in the project definition phase. Life Cycle Cost Analysis comes into effect when the blueprint for buildings is being drawn up. Up to now, when components and systems were being chosen, the main focus was usually on the investment costs involved. By using a cost tool developed specifically to meet the needs of the company, SRE will in future be able to estimate the component-specific utilization costs such as cleaning, maintenance, and the use of energy at an early planning stage. Green Building Certification is used in building projects during the planning and implementation phase, and it thus ensures the quality of the new real estate over the long term. Siemens is implementing the Green Building Program of the European Commission in new building projects and renovation work in EU countries. In all other countries that are not taking part in the EU Green Building Program, SRE uses certification in accordance with LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). In the LEED certification, a transparent and easy-to-use catalog of criteria is employed to make an assessment of the use of energy and other aspects of sustainability, such as the selection of the plot of land, the efficient use of water, the quality of air within buildings, and the selection of materials. This ensures that a neutral and independent assessment is made of all new building and large-scale renovation projects. The action program Natural Resources Management rounds off the range of measures in the area of existing real estate. The aim of the program is to identify and highlight all latent efficiency potential in existing buildings. This includes, for instance, modernizing the control equipment used for the heating and ventilation systems. This entails replacing electrical power units with more efficient models, and retrofitting fans and pumps with frequency converters. Sixty buildings have now been inspected, and savings of almost eight million Euros have been achieved. The average payback period is less than two years. One example of this is an old Siemens building from the 1970s at the Munich-Perlach site. Through energy optimization, it has been possible to cu

Kohns, R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Life Cycle Inventory Database on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Life...

10

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Study of Possible Applications of Currently Available Building Information Modeling Tools for the Analysis of Initial Costs and Energy Costs for Performing Life Cycle Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of design, construction and maintenance of facilities is on continual rise. The demand is to construct facilities which have been designed by apply life cycle costing principles. These principles have already given strong decision making power to the manufacturing industry. The need to satisfy the environmental sustainability requirements, improve operational effectiveness of buildings and apply value engineering principles has increased the dependency on life cycle costing analysis. The objective is to obtain economically viable solutions by analyzing the alternatives during the design of a building. Though the LCCA process is able to give the desired results, it does have some problems which have stood as hindrances to the more widespread use of the LCCA concept and method. The literature study has highlighted that the problem areas are the lack of frameworks or mechanisms for collecting and storing data and the complexity of LCCA exercise, which involves the analysis of a thousand of building elements and a number of construction-type options and maintenance activities for each building element at detailed design stages. Building Information Modeling has been able to repeatedly answer the questions raised by the AEC industry. The aim of this study is to identify the areas where BIM can be effectively applied to the LCCA process and become a part of the workflow. In this study, initially four LCCA case studies are read and evaluated from the point of view of understanding the method in which the life cycle costing principles have been applied. The purpose, the type alternatives examined, the process of analysis, the type of software used and the results are understood. An attempt has been carried out to understand the workflow of the LCCA process. There is a confidence that Building Information Modeling is capable of handling changes during the design, construction and maintenance phases of the project. Since applying changes to any kind of information of the building during LCC analysis forms the core, it has become necessary to use computer building models for examining these changes. The building modeling softwares are enumerated. The case studies have highlighted that the evaluation of the alternatives are primarily to achieve energy efficient solutions for the buildings. Applying these solutions involves high initial costs. The return on investment is the means by which these solutions become viable to the owners of the facilities. This is where the LCCA has been applied. Two of the important cost elements of the LCC analysis are initial costs and the operating costs of the building. The collaboration of these modeling tools with other estimating software where the initial costs of the building can be generated is studied. The functions of the quantity take-off tools and estimating tools along with the interoperability between these tools are analyzed. The operating costs are generated from the software that focuses on sustainability. And the currently used tools for performing the calculations of the life cycle costing analysis are also observed. The objective is to identify if the currently available BIM tools and software can help in obtaining LCCA results and are able to offset the hindrances of the process. Therefore, the software are studied from the point of view of ease of handling data and the type of data that can be generated. Possible BIM workflows are suggested depending on the functions of the software and the relationship between them. The study has aimed at taking a snapshot the current tools available which can aid the LCCA process. The research is of significance to the construction industry as it forms a precursor to the application of Building Information Modeling to the LCCA process as it shows that it has the capacity of overcoming the obstacles for life cycle costing. This opens a window to the possibility of applying BIM to LCCA and furthering this study.

Mukherji, Payal Tapandev

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Federal Energy Management Program: Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings To help facility managers make sound decisions, FEMP provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials provided here assume discount rates and energy price projections (TXT 17 KB) determined annually by FEMP and the Energy Information Administration. Building Life Cycle Cost Software FEMP's Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) software can help you calculate life cycle costs, net savings, savings-to-investment ratio, internal rate of return, and payback period for Federal energy and water conservation projects funded by agencies or alternatively financed. BLCC also estimates emissions and emission reductions. An energy escalation rate calculator (EERC) computes an average escalation rate for energy savings performance contracts when payments are based on energy cost savings.

13

Pages that link to "Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program"...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Toolkit ( links) Financing Initiatives Toolkit ( links) Building Energy Assessment Toolkit ( links) BLCC (redirect page) ( links) Create...

14

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Life-Cycle Cost Analysis October 16, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis Constructed Costs of a Net-Zero Office Building Facility: Research Support Facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado Operational: August 2010 Constructed cost: $259/ft2 to achieve 50% less energy use than code Constructed cost of similar office buildings in area: $225 to $300/ft2 Reaching Net-Zero: A 1.27 MW photovoltaic system was added to the project in two phases to bring the system to net-zero. This system was financed through a power purchase agreement and did not add to the constructed cost of the building. If those costs were included in the capital costs, the total constructed cost would have been 291/ft2 to reach net-zero energy use. Learn more about the Research Support

15

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Ohio State Architect's Office In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The

16

An Investigation of Window and Lighting Systems using Life Cycle Cost Analysis for the Purpose of Energy Conservation in Langford Building A at Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Langford Building A forms part of the Langford Architectural Complex at Texas A & M University. Inefficient lighting fixtures and single pane windows in Langford Building A contribute to a considerable portion of the total cost of energy for this building. In the Southwestern United States, a building's windows can be responsible for a significant loss of energy. The windows and inefficient light bulbs can result in high utility costs and high labor charges from more frequent lighting maintenance than that required for efficient lighting. In Langford Building A, window system energy efficiency has not been improved since the building was constructed in 1977. This paper investigates the economic feasibility of using efficient lighting and window systems in Langford Building A. The cost for windows and new lighting tubes was analyzed and compared by using Life Cycle Cost Analysis. The payback periods, determined in this analysis, showed that more efficient lighting and window systems would reduce costs. As results of this analysis, the window film and LED lighting tube reduce building life cycle cost and short payback periods than other alternatives.

Hwang, Hea Yeon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Life-cycle cost analysis project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to demonstrate the impact of life-cycle costing in Ohio's residential building sector. Typical single-family, townhouse, and multifamily housing units were modeled using sophisticated computer programs to predict annual energy comsumption. Energy conservation techniques were applied to the typical units and the resulting utility savings were computed. Installed costs were estimated for each energy conservation technique.

Davies, G.R.; Temming, S.J.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher first costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches.

19

Energy life cycle cost analysis: Guidelines for public agencies  

SciTech Connect

The State of Washington encourages energy-efficient building designs for public agencies. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) supports this goal by identifying advances in building technology and sharing this information with the design community and public administrators responsible for major construction projects. Many proven technologies can reduce operating costs-and save energy-to an extent that justifies some increases in construction costs. WSEO prepared these Energy Life Cycle Cost Analysis (ELCCA) guidelines for the individuals who are responsible for preparing ELCCA submittals for public buildings. Key terms and abbreviations are provided in Appendix A. Chapters 1 and 2 serve as an overview-providing background, defining energy life cycle cost analysis, explaining which agencies and projects are affected by the ELCCA requirements, and identifying changes to the guidelines that have been made since 1990. They explain {open_quotes}what needs to happen{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}why it needs to happen.{close_quotes} Chapters 3 to 7 provide the {open_quotes}how to,{close_quotes} the instructions and forms needed to prepare ELCCA submittals.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Comparison of Life Cycle Costs for LLRW Management in Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a comparison of life-cycle costs of an assured isolation facility in Texas versus the life-cycle costs for a traditional belowground low-level radioactive waste disposal facility designed for the proposed site near Sierra Blanca, Texas.

Baird, R. D.; Rogers, B. C.; Chau, N.; Kerr, Thomas A

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Incorporating uncertainty in the Life Cycle Cost Analysis of pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) is an important tool to evaluate the economic performance of alternative investments for a given project. It considers the total cost to construct, maintain, and operate a pavement over its ...

Swei, Omar Abdullah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Improving the quality and transparency of building life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment, or LCA, is a powerful method for measuring and reducing a building's environmental impacts. Its widespread adoption among designers would allow the environmental component of sustainability to gain ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Water Wind Program Info State Missouri Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of Administration Several provisions of Missouri law govern energy efficiency in state facilities. In 1993 Missouri enacted legislation requiring life-cycle cost analysis for all new construction of state buildings and substantial

26

BuildingPI: A future tool for building life cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally building simulation models are used at the design phase of a building project. These models are used to optimize various design alternatives, reduce energy consumption and cost. Building performance assessment for the operational phase of a buildings life cycle is sporadic, typically working from historical metered data and focusing on bulk energy assessment. Building Management Systems (BMS) do not explicitly incorporate feedback to the design phase or account for any changes, which have been made to building layout or fabric during construction. This paper discusses a proposal to develop an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) compliant data visualization tool Building Performance Indicator (BuildingPI) for performance metric and performance effectiveness ratio evaluation.

O' Donnell, James; Morrissey, Elmer; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac,Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive...

28

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Interoperable, life-cycle tools for assuring building performance: An overview of a commercial building initiative  

SciTech Connect

A key impediment to improving the energy efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of buildings is the complexity and cost of managing information over the life cycle of a building. A surprisingly large fraction of the total cost of buildings is embodied in the decision making and information management process due to the structure of the building industry, the numerous people and companies involved in the process, the current nature of the building acquisition process, and the long time periods over which buildings operate once design and construction are completed. The authors suggest that new interoperable software tools could greatly facilitate and rationalize this complex process, thereby reducing time and cost, and greatly improving the habitability and environmental impact of these buildings. They describe a series of projects in which they are building and testing several prototype toolkits as part of a building life-cycle information system that will allow interoperable software tools to function more effectively throughout the design, construction, commissioning, and operations phases.

Selkowitz, S.; Piette, M.A.; Papamichael, K.; Sartor, D.; Hitchcock, R.; Olken, F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 (Rev. 5/10) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 May 2010 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2010 to March 31, 2011 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

31

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2005 April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-26 (Rev. 9/11) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2011 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special Publication 709 Barbara C. Lippiatt U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program September 2011 NISTIR 85-3273-26 ENERGY PRICE INDICES AND DISCOUNT FACTORS FOR LIFE-CYCLE COST ANALYSIS Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2012 Data for the Federal Methodology for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis, Title 10, CFR, Part 436, Subpart A; and for the Energy Conservation Mandatory Performance Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings,

32

Performance metrics and life-cycle information management for building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for over $85 billion per year in energy costs, which is far more energy than technically necessary. One of the primary reasons buildings do not perform as well as intended is that critical information is lost, through ineffective documentation and communication, leading to building systems that are often improperly installed and operated. A life-cycle perspective on the management of building information provides a framework for improving commercial building energy performance. This paper describes a project to develop strategies and techniques to provide decision-makers with information needed to assure the desired building performance across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element in this effort is the development of explicit performance metrics that quantitatively represent performance objectives of interest to various building stakeholders. The paper begins with a discussion of key problems identified in current building industry practice, and ongoing work to address these problems. The paper then focuses on the concept of performance metrics and their use in improving building performance during design, commissioning, and on-going operations. The design of a Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) is presented. BLISS is intended to provide an information infrastructure capable of integrating a variety of building information technologies that support performance assurance. The use of performance metrics in case study building projects is explored to illustrate current best practice. The application of integrated information technology for improving current practice is discussed.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Life Cycle Analysis Study of the Hennings Building at the University of British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Life Cycle Analysis Study of the Hennings Building at the University of British Columbia #12 .................................................................................................................9 Building Model............................................................................................................................19 Rockwool Insulation

35

Documenting performance metrics in a building life-cycle information system  

SciTech Connect

In order to produce a new generation of green buildings, it will be necessary to clearly identify their performance requirements, and to assure that these requirements are met. A long-term goal is to provide building decision-makers with the information and tools needed to cost-effectively assure the desired performance of buildings, as specified by stakeholders, across the complete life cycle of a building project. A key element required in achieving this goal is a method for explicitly documenting the building performance objectives that are of importance to stakeholders. Such a method should clearly define each objective (e.g., cost, energy use, and comfort) and its desired level of performance. This information is intended to provide quantitative benchmarks useful in evaluating alternative design solutions, commissioning the newly constructed building, and tracking and maintaining the actual performance of the occupied building over time. These quantitative benchmarks are referred to as performance metrics, and they are a principal element of information captured in the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS). An initial implementation of BLISS is based on the International Alliance for Interoperability`s (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations. Within BLISS, the IFC data model has been extended to include performance metrics and a structure for archiving changing versions of the building information over time. This paper defines performance metrics, discusses the manner in which BLISS is envisioned to support a variety of activities related to assuring the desired performance of a building across its life cycle, and describes a performance metric tracking tool, called Metracker, that is based on BLISS.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An expandable software model for collaborative decision making during the whole building life cycle  

SciTech Connect

Decisions throughout the life cycle of a building, from design through construction and commissioning to operation and demolition, require the involvement of multiple interested parties (e.g., architects, engineers, owners, occupants and facility managers). The performance of alternative designs and courses of action must be assessed with respect to multiple performance criteria, such as comfort, aesthetics, energy, cost and environmental impact. Several stand-alone computer tools are currently available that address specific performance issues during various stages of a building's life cycle. Some of these tools support collaboration by providing means for synchronous and asynchronous communications, performance simulations, and monitoring of a variety of performance parameters involved in decisions about a building during building operation. However, these tools are not linked in any way, so significant work is required to maintain and distribute information to all parties. In this paper we describe a software model that provides the data management and process control required for collaborative decision making throughout a building's life cycle. The requirements for the model are delineated addressing data and process needs for decision making at different stages of a building's life cycle. The software model meets these requirements and allows addition of any number of processes and support databases over time. What makes the model infinitely expandable is that it is a very generic conceptualization (or abstraction) of processes as relations among data. The software model supports multiple concurrent users, and facilitates discussion and debate leading to decision making. The software allows users to define rules and functions for automating tasks and alerting all participants to issues that need attention. It supports management of simulated as well as real data and continuously generates information useful for improving performance prediction and understanding of the effects of proposed technologies and strategies.

Papamichael, K.; Pal, V.; Bourassa, N.; Loffeld, J.; Capeluto, G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

44 44 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Greg Rosenquist, Katie Coughlin, Larry Dale, James McMahon, Steve Meyers Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 March 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ii iii ABSTRACT This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results

38

The estimation and management of cost over the life cycle of metallurgical research projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study is to determine whether all costs over the life cycle of metallurgical research projects are included in the initial (more)

Odendaal, Maria Magdalena

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Title Life-Cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial Unitary Air Conditioners Publication Type...

40

Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Public Facilities (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities using public funds for construction or renovation must undergo a life cycle analysis, which will consider energy efficiency and on-site energy equipment using the sun, wind, oil,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project U.S. Department of Energy Releases Revised Total System Life Cycle Cost Estimate and Fee Adequacy Report for Yucca Mountain Project August 5, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today released a revised estimate of the total system life cycle cost for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The 2007 total system life cycle cost estimate includes the cost to research, construct and operate Yucca Mountain during a period of 150 years, from the beginning of the program in 1983 through closure and decommissioning in 2133. The new cost estimate of $79.3 billion, when updated to 2007 dollars comes to $96.2 billion, a 38 percent

42

A building life-cycle information system for tracking building performance metrics  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. One key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended performance of a building. This paper describes the Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS); designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. BLISS is based on the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability. A BLISS extension to th e IFC that adds classes for building performance metrics is described. Metracker, a prototype tool for tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle, is presented.

Hitchcock, R.J.; Piette, M.A.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Guidance on Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Required by Executive Order...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

alternative 2. Federal Life-Cycle Cost Criteria (a) Discount rate (b) DOE energy price escalation rates (c) Use of constant dollars (d) Study period (e) Presumption of cost...

44

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 FY 2007 Total System Life Cycle Cost, Pub 2008 The Analysis of the Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program presents the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management's (OCRWM) May 2007 total system cost estimate for the disposal of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TSLCC analysis provides a basis for assessing the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) Fee as required by Section 302 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended. In addition, the TSLCC analysis provides a basis for the calculation of the Government's share of disposal costs for government-owned and managed SNF and HLW. The TSLCC estimate includes both historical costs and

45

LED Light Fixture Project FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break-even Analysis. #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC1 Director's Conference Room: Life Cycle Cost and Break,812 Maintenance Cost $620 $0 $97 $0 Life Cycle Cost $1,787 $1,693 $2,980 $2,980 #12;LED Light Fixture Project ­ FC

Hofmann, Hans A.

46

The development of a life cycle cost model for railroad tunnels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today, Life Cycle Costing is one of the most popular ways of assessing a project's or an investment's worth to a company. This method of assessment is often applied to all stages of a investment's lifecycle, starting from ...

Angeles, Jon Virgil V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Overhead Transmission Lines (LCCA) Version 1.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LCCA software is a tool to assist transmission line designers in selecting the optimized design for an overhead line by comparing the life-cycle cost of various design options. Windows2000, XP, and Vista Excel 2003 and 2007

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S....

50

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report describes the 2010 edition of energy price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in federal facilities.

51

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D....

52

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 (Rev. 510) Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2010 Annual Supplement to Amy S. Rushing NIST Handbook 135 and Joshua D. Kneifel NBS Special...

53

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The current insulation of the building was compared to improved insulation to meet the ResidentialLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ivan Yip.R. MacMillan building at the University of British Columbia (UBC). This study, completed in conjunction

54

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description In pursuit of the goal of reducing EGS costs, this project will facilitate the following: - A clear understanding of the current cost structure - Its dependence on markets - The benefits of innovation - The impact of synergistic process configurations, and - Widespread dissemination of the findings for use by the geothermal community

56

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Ficks second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Application of life cycle costing method to a renovation project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we have examined the application of Lee analysis method to the construction and renovation stages of a building project. The application of the Lee analysis is currently limited to the very early stages of ...

Taneda, Makoto

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Estimation and Analysis of Life Cycle Costs of Baseline Enhanced...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of innovation by forecasting technology evolution profiles based on patent analytics and analysis of R&D efforts around the major EGS (or analogous) cost components. - Explore...

59

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced hydrogen storage systems could also be a cost competitive alternative to pumped hydro and compressed air energy storage (CAES) under certain circumstances. Context: As...

60

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Title Development of the Household Sample for Furnace and Boiler Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-55088 Year of Publication 2005 Authors Whitehead, Camilla Dunham, Victor H. Franco, Alexander B. Lekov, and James D. Lutz Document Number LBNL-55088 Pagination 22 Date Published May 31 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated.The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

62

Life-Cycle Cost Study for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the life-cycle cost estimates for a proposed low-level radioactive waste disposal facility near Sierra Blanca, Texas. The work was requested by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority and performed by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program with the assistance of Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation.

B. C. Rogers; P. L. Walter (Rogers and Associates Engineering Corporation); R. D. Baird

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis- 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report provides tables of present-value factors for use in the life-cycle cost analysis of capital investment projects for federal facilities. It also provides energy price indices based on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) forecasts from 2012 to 2042.

64

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Methodology of CO{sub 2} emission evaluation in the life cycle of office building facades  

SciTech Connect

The construction industry is one of the greatest sources of pollution because of the high level of energy consumption during its life cycle. In addition to using energy while constructing a building, several systems also use power while the building is operating, especially the air-conditioning system. Energy consumption for this system is related, among other issues, to external air temperature and the required internal temperature of the building. The facades are elements which present the highest level of ambient heat transfer from the outside to the inside of tall buildings. Thus, the type of facade has an influence on energy consumption during the building life cycle and, consequently, contributes to buildings' CO{sub 2} emissions, because these emissions are directly connected to energy consumption. Therefore, the aim is to help develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. The results, based on the parameters used in this study, show that facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle, followed by brick facades covered with compound aluminum panels or ACM (Aluminum Composite Material), facades using structural glazing and reflective glass and brick facades with plaster coating. On the other hand, the typology of facade that emits less CO{sub 2} is brickwork and mortar because its thermal barrier is better than structural glazing facade and materials used to produce this facade are better than brickwork and ACM. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to verify the accuracy of the results attained. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We develop a methodology for evaluating CO{sub 2} emissions generated during the life cycle of office building facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This methodology is based in LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use an uncertainty analysis to verify the accuracy of the results attained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study three typologies of facades. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Facades using structural glazing and uncolored glass emit the most CO{sub 2} throughout their life cycle.

Taborianski, Vanessa Montoro; Prado, Racine T.A., E-mail: racine.prado@poli.usp.br

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate life-cycle cost for a standard (2 in. {times} 2 in. {times} 1 in.) glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA filter in the complex is $4,753.

Moore, P.; Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (Humphrey), McLean, VA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis-2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-28 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2013 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-28

68

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Technology Administration National Institute of Standards and Technology Prepared for United States Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program April 2005 NISTIR 85-3273-27 Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - 2012 Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook 135 and NBS Special Publication 709 Amy S. Rushing Joshua D. Kneifel Barbara C. Lippiatt Applied Economics Office Engineering Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.IR.85-3273-27

69

Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of ballast life-cycle cost and payback period  

SciTech Connect

The paper introduces an innovative methodology for evaluating the relative significance of energy-efficient technologies applied to fluorescent lamp ballasts. The method involves replacing the point estimates of life cycle cost of the ballasts with uncertainty distributions reflecting the whole spectrum of possible costs, and the assessed probability associated with each value. The results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses will help analysts reduce effort in data collection and carry on analysis more efficiently. These methods also enable policy makers to gain an insightful understanding of which efficient technology alternatives benefit or cost what fraction of consumers, given the explicit assumptions of the analysis.

McMahon, James E.; Liu, Xiaomin; Turiel, Ike; Hakim, Sajid; Fisher, Diane

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Analyzing the Life Cycle Energy Savings of DOE Supported Buildings Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the factors that would potentially help determine an appropriate analytical timeframe for measuring the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology (BT) benefits and presents a summary-level analysis of the life cycle savings for BTs Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) R&D program. The energy savings for three hypothetical building designs are projected over a 100-year period using Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS) to illustrate the resulting energy and carbon savings associated with the hypothetical aging buildings. The report identifies the tasks required to develop a long-term analytical and modeling framework, and discusses the potential analytical gains and losses by extending an analysis into the long-term.

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analyzing the Life Cycle Energy Savings of DOE Supported Buildings Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the factors that would potentially help determine an appropriate analytical timeframe for measuring the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technology (BT) benefits and presents a summary-level analysis of the life cycle savings for BTs Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) R&D program. The energy savings for three hypothetical building designs are projected over a 100-year period using Building Energy Analysis and Modeling System (BEAMS) to illustrate the resulting energy and carbon savings associated with the hypothetical aging buildings. The report identifies the tasks required to develop a long-term analytical and modeling framework, and discusses the potential analytical gains and losses by extending an analysis into the long-term.

Cort, Katherine A.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life Cycle Analysis: Power Studies Compilation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hour LC Life Cycle LCA Life Cycle Analysis LCC Life Cycle Costing LCI Life Cycle Inventory LCOE Levelized Cost of Delivered Electricity LNB Low NO x Burner LNG Liquefied...

73

OPTIMIZATION FOR COGENERATION SYSTEMS IN BUILDINGS BASED ON LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY: This paper presents a model that is developed to optimize the selection and operation of energy systems in commercial buildings based on their environmental performance. The model can be used for decision support regarding infrastructure in both design and operation of building energy systems. The approach is composed of energy simulation to generate buildings energy demand, life cycle assessment (LCA) to model different energy systems, and optimization model to optimize the selection and operation of these energy systems. The energy systems that are discussed in this paper are cogeneration systems, average electric grid, gas boilers, and absorption and electric chillers. The performance criteria presented in this paper are primary energy consumption (PEC) and tropospheric ozone precursor potential (TOPP).

J. Vanier; Ayat E. Osman; Phd C; Robert Ries; Assistant Professor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers of possible revisions to energy-efficiency standards. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. DOE's preferred approach involves comparing the total life-cycle cost (LCC) of owning and operating a more efficient appliance with the LCC for a baseline design. This study describes the method used to conduct the LCC analysis and presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design can reduce the LCC in each of the product classes considered.

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers,Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an analysis of the economic impacts of possible energy efficiency standards for commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps on individual customers in terms of two metrics: life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period (PBP). For each of the two equipment classes considered, the 11.5 EER provides the largest mean LCC savings. The results show how the savings vary among customers facing different electricity prices and other conditions. At 11.5 EER, at least 80% of the users achieve a positive LCC savings. At 12.0 EER, the maximum efficiency analyzed, mean LCC savings are lower but still positive. For the {ge} $65,000 Btu/h to <135,000 Btu/h equipment class, 59% of users achieve a positive LCC savings. For the $135,000 Btu/h to <240,000 Btu/h equipment class, 91% of users achieve a positive LCC savings.

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comparing Life-Cycle Costs of ESPCs and Appropriations-Funded Energy Projects: An Update to the 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect

A study was sponsored by FEMP in 2001 - 2002 to develop methods to compare life-cycle costs of federal energy conservation projects carried out through energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and projects that are directly funded by appropriations. The study described in this report follows up on the original work, taking advantage of new pricing data on equipment and on $500 million worth of Super ESPC projects awarded since the end of FY 2001. The methods developed to compare life-cycle costs of ESPCs and directly funded energy projects are based on the following tasks: (1) Verify the parity of equipment prices in ESPC vs. directly funded projects; (2) Develop a representative energy conservation project; (3) Determine representative cycle times for both ESPCs and appropriations-funded projects; (4) Model the representative energy project implemented through an ESPC and through appropriations funding; and (5) Calculate the life-cycle costs for each project.

Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Atkin, Erica [ORNL

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... economic analysis; energy conservation; energy economics; life cycle cost analysis; public buildings; renewable energy; water conservation ...

79

Life Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins, Dr. Alissa Kendall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

displacement. The cost of wastewater treatment using the ATS was estimated to be $1.23 per m3 wastewater Wastewater Processing Algae Processing Biogas Processing Equipment and Material Data Sources Fixed filmLife Cycle Environmental and Cost Impacts of Dairy Wastewater Treatment Using Algae Brendan Higgins

California at Davis, University of

80

Optimal design and allocation of electrified vehicles and dedicated charging infrastructure for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for minimum life cycle greenhouse gas emissions and cost Elizabeth Traut a,n , Chris Hendrickson b,1 , Erica reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by shifting energy demand from gasoline to electricity. GHG benefits. HEVs are optimal or near-optimal for minimum cost in most scenarios. High gas prices and low

Michalek, Jeremy J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

BuildingPI: A future tool for building life cycle analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a reduction in energy usage. The Irish governmentassociated with building energy usage and is employedreduction in building energy usage. Energy simulation models

O'Donnell, James; Morrissey, Elmer; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Influence of driving patterns on life cycle cost and emissions of hybrid and plug-in electric vehicle powertrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles a b s t r a c t We compare the potential of hybrid, extended-range plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles to reduce lifetime cost and life cycle greenhouse gas, 2009­04­11). Plug-in vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and battery electric

Michalek, Jeremy J.

83

Levelized life-cycle costs for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technology characterizations and life-cycle costs were obtained for four residue-collection systems and four gas-production systems. All costs are in constant 1981 dollars. The residue-collection systems were cornstover collection, wheat-straw collection, soybean-residue collection, and wood chips from forest residue. The life-cycle costs ranged from $19/ton for cornstover collection to $56/ton for wood chips from forest residues. The gas-production systems were low-Btu gas from a farm-size gasifier, solar flash pyrolysis of biomass, methane from seaweed farms, and hydrogen production from bacteria. Life-cycle costs ranged from $3.3/10/sup 6/ Btu for solar flash pyrolysis of biomass to $9.6/10/sup 6/ Btu for hydrogen from bacteria. Sensitivity studies were also performed for each system. The sensitivity studies indicated that fertilizer replacement costs were the dominate costs for the farm-residue collection, while residue yield was most important for the wood residue. Feedstock costs were most important for the flash pyrolysis. Yields and capital costs are most important for the seaweed farm and the hydrogen from bacteria system.

Thayer, G.R.; Rood, P.L.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Rollett, H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Specification and implementation of IFC based performance metrics to support building life cycle assessment of hybrid energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Minimizing building life cycle energy consumption is becoming of paramount importance. Performance metrics tracking offers a clear and concise manner of relating design intent in a quantitative form. A methodology is discussed for storage and utilization of these performance metrics through an Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) instantiated Building Information Model (BIM). The paper focuses on storage of three sets of performance data from three distinct sources. An example of a performance metrics programming hierarchy is displayed for a heat pump and a solar array. Utilizing the sets of performance data, two discrete performance effectiveness ratios may be computed, thus offering an accurate method of quantitatively assessing building performance.

Morrissey, Elmer; O' Donnell, James; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment: Neville Scarfe Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy required for the construction of the building was 192.6 Mega Joules per square foot undergone a series of upgrades and renovations; however, the original cost of the building was $1,103,877. The gross area of the original version of the Scarfe building totaled 70,127 square feet, including

87

MRS/IS facility co-located with a repository: preconceptual design and life-cycle cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

A program is described to examine the various alternatives for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) and interim storage (IS) of spent nuclear fuel, solidified high-level waste (HLW), and transuranic (TRU) waste until appropriate geologic repository/repositories are available. The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a preconceptual design for an MRS/IS facility that would become the principal surface facility for a deep geologic repository when the repository is opened, (2) to examine various issues such as transportation of wastes, licensing of the facility, and environmental concerns associated with operation of such a facility, and (3) to estimate the life cycle costs of the facility when operated in response to a set of scenarios which define the quantities and types of waste requiring storage in specific time periods, which generally span the years from 1990 until 2016. The life cycle costs estimated in this study include: the capital expenditures for structures, casks and/or drywells, storage areas and pads, and transfer equipment; the cost of staff labor, supplies, and services; and the incremental cost of transporting the waste materials from the site of origin to the MRS/IS facility. Three scenarios are examined to develop estimates of life cycle costs of the MRS/IS facility. In the first scenario, HLW canisters are stored, starting in 1990, until the co-located repository is opened in the year 1998. Additional reprocessing plants and repositories are placed in service at various intervals. In the second scenario, spent fuel is stored, starting in 1990, because the reprocessing plants are delayed in starting operations by 10 years, but no HLW is stored because the repositories open on schedule. In the third scenario, HLW is stored, starting in 1990, because the repositories are delayed 10 years, but the reprocessing plants open on schedule.

Smith, R.I.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Life cycle cost analysis for replacement of fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

1992-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

An Analysis of the Economic and Financial Life-Cycle Costs of Reverse-Osmosis Desalination in South Texas: A Case Study of the Southmost Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desalination provides a supply alternative for potable water for many communities, along with possible defenses against security threats potentially affecting clean water supplies. The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with building and operating the Southmost desalination facility (near Brownsville, TX) in South Texas are investigated using the spreadsheet model DESAL ECONOMICS. Primary data key to this analysis include actual initial construction costs, annual continued costs (i.e., for source-water acquisition and transport, pretreatment, purification, and delivery), capital replacement expenses, and desalination-process parameters. The input data used reflect the unique location and quality of source water, process-flow design, asset selection and configuration, management structure, local cost rates, and employed operational methods unique to the Southmost facility. Thus, the specific results are only applicable to the Southmost facility for a specific time, but do provide useful information and insight into life-cycle costs for public and commercial desalination facilities in a more general sense. Annuity equivalent costs are reported (on both a $/acre-foot (ac-ft) and $/1,000 gallons of finished water basis, f.o.b. (free on board) municipal delivery point) for seven individual operational/expense areas, as well as for the entire desalination facility. Results are also presented across different cost types, categories, and items. The baseline results are deterministic, but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses of useful life, initial construction costs, annual energy costs, and production efficiency rate, amongst others. The current estimated total annual life-cycle costs (in 2006 dollars) to produce and deliver desalinated water to a point in the municipal delivery-system infrastructure for the Southmost facility are $769.62/ac-ft {$2.3619/1,000 gal.}. These baseline estimates apply to the Southmost facility and are sensitive to changes in the production efficiency level, and costs incurred for energy, chemicals, initial construction, etc. Also, results indicate significant outlays, beyond those of Initial Construction, are involved with desalination. For the Southmost facility, when a commitment was made to build a facility for $26.2 million, an implicit commitment for another $39.1 million (basis 2006 dollars) was also made for Continued and Capital Replacement costs. Investigation into life-cycle costs during the design and planning stages of a desalination facility can assist with determining the least-cost asset configuration to adopt and operational methods to employ. Also included are modifications to certain key data-input parameters that provide modified results which facilitate a more fair basis of comparing facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to use when comparing to similarlycalculated values (for other facilities or technologies), are $615.01/ac-ft/yr {$1.8874/1,000 gal./yr} (basis 2006 dollars).

Sturdivant, A.; Rister, M.; Rogers, C.; Lacewell, R.; Norris, J.; Leal, J.; Garza, J.; Adams, J.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time costs of down time, decommissioning, and environmental= environmental costs C d = decommissioning BestPractices

Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and technologies." Energy and Buildings 35(2): 129-137.and Technologies. Energy and Buildings 35. pp. 129-137.design implications. Energy and Buildings Petersen, A. K. ,

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional first cost of energy efficiency design optionsS. Meyers, Cost and Energy Consumption of Energy Efficiencyadditional first cost of energy efficiency design options

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicles Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehiclestires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of separate costs for natural gas or oil, and electricity.receives oil-fired boilers INPUTS First Cost Inputs The flowfurnaces, and oil-fired furnaces, we scaled the cost for

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel1994). "Energy and carbon dioxide implications of buildingPingoud, R. Sathre (2006b). "Carbon dioxide balance of wood

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

avoid bias in the electricity bill calculations, we assignedarrive at an annual electricity bill. The difference betweenbill and multiplied it by the ratio of the total air conditioning energy use to the total building electricity

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Dynamic life-cycle costing in asset management of production equipments with emphasis om maintenance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the contemporary industry, companies need to make investments to grow their business volume. However each investment comes with its own risk. Cost of (more)

Chaudhary, Osman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

LBNL-54244 Life-cycle Cost and Payback Period Analysis for Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs (increased LCC). Moving towards the right on the axis, values greater than zero indicate reductions in LCC (LCC savings). LCC savings occur when increased total...

100

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system, (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................... 34 3.6.3 Selection of Specific Building Products from a Database EnergyStar, R2000 and EnerGuide, are listed as `ecolabels'. Ecolabels certify a product based is a comprehensive, publicly available LCI database developed using standardized data collection methodologies

Victoria, University of

102

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Optimal Life Cycle Cost Design for an Energy Efficient Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past twelve years, Texas Instruments has developed extensive energy management programs that have enabled them to reduce energy usage by 42%. Typically, these reductions have been a result of the application of microprocessor based energy management systems in existing facilities. Because of the nature of the electronics industry, i .e., light manufacturing and the continued use of more energy intensive technologies, it has become economically advantageous to take a more active role in the architectural design of new facilities. The goal is to incorporate those energy conservation features into the design having the lowest lifecycle costs.

Thompson, C. T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Life Cycle Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for green manufacturing and construction applications; conduct life cycle engineering assessments for energy efficiency and environmental ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

108

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Room Air Conditioner Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Screen capture of Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator The cost estimator compares high-efficiency room air conditioners to standard equipment in terms of life cycle cost. It provides an alternative to complicated building simulation models, while offering more precision than simplified estimating tools that are commonly available. The cost estimator assists decision-making regarding the purchase or replacement of room air conditioning equipment, by estimating a product�s lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Screen Shots Keywords air conditioner, life-cycle cost, energy performance, residential buildings, energy savings Validation/Testing Internal reviews at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

109

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

STATE-OF-THE-ART AND EMERGING TRUCK ENGINE TECHNOLOGIES FOR OPTIMIZED PERFORMANCE, EMISSIONS AND LIFE CYCLE COSTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The challenge for truck engine product engineering is not only to fulfill increasingly stringent emission requirements, but also to improve the engine's economical viability in its role as the backbone of our global economy. While societal impact and therefore emission limit values are to be reduced in big steps, continuous improvement is not enough but technological quantum leaps are necessary. The introduction and refinement of electronic control of all major engine systems has already been a quantum leap forward. Maximizing the benefits of these technologies to customers and society requires full use of parameter optimization and other enabling technologies. The next big step forward will be widespread use of exhaust aftertreatment on all transportation related diesel engines. While exhaust gas aftertreatment has been successfully established on gasoline (Otto cycle) engines, the introduction of exhaust aftertreatment especially for heavy-duty diesel engines will be much mo re demanding. Implementing exhaust gas aftertreatment into commercial vehicle applications is a challenging task but the emission requirements to be met starting in Europe, the USA and Japan in the 2005-2007 timeframe require this step. The engine industry will be able to implement the new technology if all stakeholders support the necessary decisions. One decision has already been taken: the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel being comparable with the elimination of lead in gasoline as a prerequisite for the three-way catalyst. Now we have the chance to optimize ecology and economy of the Diesel engine simultaneously by taking the decision to provide an additional infrastructure for a NOx reduction agent needed for the introduction of the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology that is already implemented in the electric power generation industry. This requires some effort, but the resulting societal benefits, fuel economy and vehicle life cycle costs are significantly better when compared to other competitive technologies. After long discussions this decision for SCR has been made in Europe and is supported by all truck and engine manufacturers. The necessary logistic support will be in place when it will be needed commercially in 2005. For the US the decision has to be taken this year in order to have the infrastructure available in 2007. It will enable the global engine industry to focus their R & D resources in one direction not only for 2007, but for the years beyond 2010 with the best benefit for the environment, the customers and the industry.

Schittler, M

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life-cycle cost comparisons of advanced storage batteries and fuel cells for utility, stand-alone, and electric vehicle applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of battery and fuel cell economics for ten different technologies. To develop an equitable economic comparison, the technologies were evaluated on a life-cycle cost (LCC) basis. The LCC comparison involved normalizing source estimates to a standard set of assumptions and preparing a lifetime cost scenario for each technology, including the initial capital cost, replacement costs, operating and maintenance (O M) costs, auxiliary energy costs, costs due to system inefficiencies, the cost of energy stored, and salvage costs or credits. By considering all the costs associated with each technology over its respective lifetime, the technology that is most economical to operate over any given period of time can be determined. An analysis of this type indicates whether paying a high initial capital cost for a technology with low O M costs is more or less economical on a lifetime basis than purchasing a technology with a low initial capital cost and high O M costs. It is important to realize that while minimizing cost is important, the customer will not always purchase the least expensive technology. The customer may identify benefits associated with a more expensive option that make it the more attractive over all (e.g., reduced construction lead times, modularity, environmental benefits, spinning reserve, etc.). The LCC estimates presented in this report represent three end-use applications: utility load-leveling, stand-alone power systems, and electric vehicles.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Life Cycle Inventory Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Commercial Buildings » Research Projects » Life Cycle Inventory Database Life Cycle Inventory Database The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database serves as a central repository for information about the total energy and resource impacts of developing and using various commercial building materials, components, and assemblies. The database helps manufacturers, building designers, and developers select energy-efficient and environmentally friendly materials, products, and processes for their projects based on the environmental impact of an item over its entire lifespan. The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the database in 2003 with input from a variety of partners. NREL maintains and updates the database with support from the

113

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Water Heating Systems: Life-Cycle Analyses and Opportunities for Cost Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conference paper regarding research in potential cost-savings measures for cold-climate solar domestic water hearing systems.

Burch, J.; Salasovich, J.; Hillman, T.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

TYLER ALGEO i Life Cycle Analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building envelope would recover the energy invested in additional insulation within less than two yearsTYLER ALGEO i Life Cycle Analysis of The Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building University envelope of the Civil and Mechanical Engineering (CEME) Building at the University of British Columbia (UBC

117

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject - Whole Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Sustainability A B E G K L S U Tool Applications Free Recently Updated Athena Model life cycle assessment, environment, building materials, buildings Free software. BEES environmental performance, green buildings, life cycle assessment, life cycle costing, sustainable development Free software. Software has been updated. Building Greenhouse Rating operational energy, greenhouse performance, national benchmark Free software. Building Performance Compass Commercial Buildings, Multi-family Residence, Benchmarking, Energy Tracking, Improvement Tracking, Weather Normalization BuildingAdvice Whole building analysis, energy simulation, renewable energy, retrofit analysis, sustainability/green buildings Software has been updated. ECO-BAT environmental performance, life cycle assessment, sustainable development Software has been updated.

119

An Integrated Life Cycle Engineering Model: Energy and Greenhouse...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Life Cycle Engineering Model: Energy and Greenhouse Gas Performance of Residential Heritage Buildings, and the Influence of Retrofit Strategies and Appliance...

120

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycleenables the integration of green manufacturing principlesKeywords Life cycle cost, green manufacturing, monitoring 1

Niggeschmidt, Stephan; Helu, Moneer; Diaz, Nancy; Behmann, Benjamin; Lanza, Gisela; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Life-Cycle Decision Making: Volume 1: Getting Started  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Decision Making (LCDM) 2.0 is a suite of integrated tools for making a wide range of decisions based on life-cycle costs and revenues. LCDM puts powerful methods and tools at the fingertips of employees, empowering them to quickly make better day-to-day business decisions based on the true costs and benefits to the company.

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

An Empirical comparison of life cycle cost of green school buildings and non-green school buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the major economic concerns today of the world is reduction of energy consumption because of depleting energy sources in the world. The construction (more)

Pushpala, Nitisha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Life Cycle Management of Chemicals: Conceptual Design for Information Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking the acquisition, use, and disposition of chemicals allows companies to reduce costs; manage risks to health, safety, and the environment; and improve compliance and reporting efficiency. This report provides a means of identifying and evaluating chemical life cycle information management needs. The conceptual design presented here will guide utilities through development of a custom system for managing chemical life cycle data.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Life Cycle Management Sourcebooks Volume 10: Feedwater Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for feedwater heaters.

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, Volume 5: Main Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of "Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks," each containing a compilation of industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for main generators.

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Plant Support Engineering: Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks - Chillers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience information and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). In addition, this sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost8212effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for chillers.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Photovoltaics: Life-cycle Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Life-cycle analysis is an invaluable tool for investigating the environmental profile of a product or technology from cradle to grave. Such life-cycle analyses of energy technologies are essential, especially as material and energy flows are often interwoven, and divergent emissions into the environment may occur at different life-cycle-stages. This approach is well exemplified by our description of material and energy flows in four commercial PV technologies, i.e., mono-crystalline silicon, multi-crystalline silicon, ribbon-silicon, and cadmium telluride. The same life-cycle approach is applied to the balance of system that supports flat, fixed PV modules during operation. We also discuss the life-cycle environmental metrics for a concentration PV system with a tracker and lenses to capture more sunlight per cell area than the flat, fixed system but requires large auxiliary components. Select life-cycle risk indicators for PV, i.e., fatalities, injures, and maximum consequences are evaluated in a comparative context with other electricity-generation pathways.

Fthenakis V. M.; Kim, H.C.

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reichl, H. Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher initial costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches. From scientific and technical point of view, the potential for wide applications of GSHP especially HGSHP in hot and humid climate is significant, especially towards building zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, this report presents gathering and analyzing data on the costs and benefits of GSHP/HGSHP systems utilized in southern states using a representative sample of building applications. The report outlines the detailed analysis to conclude that the application of GSHP in Florida (and hot and humid climate in general) shows a good potential.

Yong X. Tao; Yimin Zhu

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

134

Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The day-to-day pressures of operation, limited budgets, and regulatory scrutiny of nuclear power plants focus on the present or short term, and may preempt cost-beneficial activities with long-term pay-off. This guide to implementing life-cycle management (LCM) fosters long-range thinking and decision making focused on profitability in the new competitive era of electricity production.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

NETL Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis Fact Sheets Life Cycle Analysis Role of Alternative Energy Sources - Wind Technology Assessment PDF-372KB (Sept 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources -...

136

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fuel Cell Power Model Elucidates Life-Cycle Costs for Fuel Cell-Based Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power (CHHP) Production Systems (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in accurately modeling costs for fuel cell-based combined heat, hydrogen, and power systems. Work was performed by NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cost and benefit of energy efficient buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common misconception among developers and policy-makers is that "sustainable buildings" may not be financially justified. However, this report strives to show that building green is cost-effective and does make financial ...

Zhang, Wenying, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Metracker version 1.5: Life-cycle performance metricstracking  

SciTech Connect

Buildings often do not perform as well in practice as expected during pre-design planning, nor as intended at the design stage, nor even as measured during commissioning and maintenance operations. While this statement is generally considered to be true, it is difficult to quantify the impacts and long-term economic implications of a building in which performance does not meet expectations. This leads to a building process that is devoid of quantitative feedback that could be used to detect and correct problems both in an individual building and in the building process itself. A key element in this situation is the lack of a standardized method for documenting and communicating information about the intended and actual performance of a building. This deficiency leads to several shortcomings in the life-cycle management of building information. Planners have no means of clearly specifying their expectations. Designers do not concisely document their design intent. Commissioning personnel have no standardized method for documenting the results of performance testing. Post-occupancy building performance cannot readily be compared to expectations in an attempt to evaluate and improve design and operation decisions. Lastly, without quantification of the magnitude of performance problems it is difficult to motivate building process participants to alter their current practice. This document describes an information management concept and a prototype tool based on this concept that has been developed to address this situation. The Building Life-cycle Information System (BLISS) has been designed to manage a wide range of building related information across the life cycle of a building project. Metracker is a prototype implementation of BLISS based on the International Alliance for Interoperability's (IAI) Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). The IFC is an evolving data model under development by a variety of architectural, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry firms and organizations (IAI, 2001). Metracker has been developed to demonstrate and explore the process of tracking performance metrics across the building life cycle.

Hitchcock, Robert J.

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

GREET Life-Cycle Analysis of Biofuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Li Li 收件人 School of Chemical Engineering and the Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology Battery Recycling: How to Make It Happen Analysis can help identify a clear path for battery production and recycling  Purpose is to clear the road for mass-market introduction of battery-powered vehicles by identifying any roadblocks on the way  Life cycle analysis (LCA) is used to identify significant environmental issues  Availability of recycling processes can:  Assure against major waste problems at end-of-life  Reduce environmental impacts  Reduce raw material supply issues  Reduce net material costs  Create viable business opportunities  Economic and institutional constraints must also be accounted for

143

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation factsheet Download the Fact Sheet The U.S. Department of Energy enlisted NREL to review and "harmonize" life cycle assessments (LCA) of electricity generation technologies. Hundreds of assessments have been published, often with considerable variability in results. These variations in approach, while usually legitimate, hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Learn more about life cycle assessments of energy technologies. By harmonizing this data, NREL seeks to reduce the uncertainty around estimates for environmental impacts of renewables and increase the value of

144

Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites  

SciTech Connect

Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites is gaining momentum with the pressure to lightweight vehicles, however energy-intensity and cost remain some of the major barriers before this material could be used in large-scale automotive applications. A representative automotive part, i.e., a 30.8 kg steel floor pan having a 17% weight reduction potential with stringent cash performance requirements has been considered for the life cycle energy and emissions analysis based on the latest developments occurring in the precursor type (conventional textile-based PAN vs. renewable-based lignin), part manufacturing (conventional SMC vs. P4) and fiber recycling technologies. Carbon fiber production is estimated to be about 14 times more energy-intensive than conventional steel production, however life cycle primary energy use is estimated to be quite similar to the conventional part, i.e., 18,500 MJ/part, especially when considering the uncertainty in LCI data that exists from using numerous sources in the literature. Lignin P4 technology offers the most life cycle energy and CO2 emissions benefits compared to a conventional stamped steel technology. With a 20% reduction in energy use in the lignin conversion to carbon fiber and free availability of lignin as a by-product of ethanol and wood production, a 30% reduction in life cycle energy use could be obtained. A similar level of life cycle energy savings could also be obtained with a higher part weight reduction potential of 43%.

Das, Sujit [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Cloud Life Cycle and Overlap Structure Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National...

146

Automotive Magnesium Applications and Life Cycle Environmental ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 22, 2008 ... Life cycle energies and emissions are compared for steel, aluminum and ... 3rd International Conference on SF6 and the Environment, 2004.

147

Measuring testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study software testing as a distributed component of the software life cycle, developing a technique for estimating testing validity. The goal of this paper is to build measures for testing result estimation, to find how tested properties influence ... Keywords: Software quality, diagnostics, estimation, software life cycle, testing, validation

M. Burgin; N. Debnath; H. K. Lee

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

LIFE-CYCLE COSTING WORKSHOP FOR ENERGY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... analyses throughout the government, it is required under the FEMP rule (10 ... been included along with energy conservation as a designated goal for ...

2001-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

The principles of life-cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect

Decisionmakers representing government agencies must balance competing objectives when deciding on the purchase and sale of assets. The goal in all cases should be to make prudent or financially {open_quotes}cost-effective{close_quotes} decisions. That is, the revenues from the purchase or sale of assets should exceed any out-of-pocket costs to obtain the revenues. However, effects external to these financial considerations such as promoting environmental quality, creating or maintaining jobs, and abiding by existing regulations should also be considered in the decisionmaking process. In this paper, we outline the principles of life-cycle analysis (LCA), a framework that allows decisionmakers to make informed, balanced choices over the period of time affected by the decision, taking into account important external effects. Specifically, LCA contains three levels of analysis for any option: (1) direct financial benefits (revenues) and out-of-pocket costs for a course of action; (2) environmental and health consequences of a decision; and (3) other economic and socio-institutional effects. Because some of the components of LCA are difficult to value in monetary terms, the outcome of the LCA process is not generally a yes-no answer. However, the framework allows the decisionmaker to at least qualitatively consider all relevant factors in analyzing options, promoting sound decisionmaking in the process.

Hill, L.J.; Hunsaker, D.B.; Curlee, T.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Life Cycle Management Sourcebooks Volume 9: Main Turbine Electro-Hydraulic Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each compiling industry experience and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for main turbine electro-hydraulic control (EHC) and overspeed protection systems.

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

EMPS-2.1 Computer Program for Residential Building Energy Analysis, Engineering Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating the projected energy efficiency of residential building designs and equipment options requires a sophisticated analytic methodology. Techniques described in this manual analyze building thermal loads, heating and cooling systems, water heaters, and life-cycle costs and electric rates.

1988-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energypractice of building commissioning is a particularly potentefficiency. Although commissioning has earned increased

Mills, Evan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

NREL: Energy Analysis: Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life cycle assessment (LCA) harmonization helps lenders, utility executives, and lawmakers get the best, most precise information on greenhouse gas emissions from various sources of energy. LCA has been used to estimate and compare GHG emissions from utility-scale power systems for three decades, often with considerable variability in results. Harmonization provides more exact estimates of greenhouse-gas emissions for renewable and conventional electricity generation technologies, clarifying inconsistent and conflicting estimates in the published literature and reducing uncertainty. Highlights of Recent Studies Chart that compares published and harmonized lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster.

154

Sustainable NREL: Laboratory Life Cycle Assessment of Environmental Footprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has used life cycle assessment to create a carbon dioxide (CO2) environmental footprint. Transportation, water, natural gas and electricity, and solid waste disposal are the major CO2 emission contributors at the Laboratory. In FY 2003 (October 2002-September 2003), these categories yielded a total of 29 million kg CO2 -equivalent. The major components were electricity, 22.3 million kg CO2-equivalent.; and natural gas, 3.275 million kg CO2 (these yield 77% and 11%, respectively, to the CO2 footprint). Other contributors were domestic air travel and commuter travel, both of which came in at 5%, and international air travel at 2%. Solid waste disposal, water, and fleet vehicle emissions were negligible in relation to the other components. NREL is enacting several measures to reduce emissions at the front end of the material life cycle. Green purchasing, reducing water use, reducing the need for travel, and purchasing alternative fuel fleet vehicles are all ways to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions. In addition, recycling helps reduce CO2 emissions in the final stage of the waste disposal life cycle. The large area of interest is obviously the electricity and natural gas consumed at the Laboratory. The Laboratory has implemented almost all life cycle cost effective energy efficiency measures and all new construction is state of the practice. The Laboratory continues to examine ways of simultaneously reducing energy use and maintaining the integrity of its research and development activities.

Huffnagle, S.; Westby, R.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Impacts of the Manufacturing and Recycling Stages on Battery Life Cycles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPACTS OF THE MANUFACTURING AND RECYCLING STAGES ON BATTERY IMPACTS OF THE MANUFACTURING AND RECYCLING STAGES ON BATTERY LIFE CYCLES J. B. Dunn 1 , L. Gaines 1 , M. Barnes 2 , and J.L. Sullivan 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division 9700 South Cass Avenue, Building 362 Argonne, IL 60439-4815, USA 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering The Pennsylvania State University 157E Hammond Building University Park, PA 16802 Keywords: battery, materials, manufacturing, life cycle, recycling Abstract

156

life cycle inventory | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

life cycle inventory life cycle inventory Dataset Summary Description Datasets are for the US electricity grid system for eGrid regions (AKGD, AKMS, AZNM, CAMX, ERCT, FRCC, HIMS, HIOA, MROE, MROW, NEWE, NWPP, NYCW, NYLI, NYUP, RFCE, RFCM, RFCW, RMPA, SPNO, SPSO, SRMV, SRMW, SRSO, SRTV, SRVC) for 2008. The data is provided in life cycle inventory forms (xls and xml) . A module report and a detailed spreadsheet are also included.Datasets include generation and transmission of electricity for each of the eGrid regions. It is representative of the year 2008 mix of fuels used for utility generations for each of the eGrid regions Source USLCI Database Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords eGrid Electricity grid LCI life cycle inventory US Data application/zip icon egrid_electricity_lci_datasets_2008.zip (zip, 7 MiB)

157

The Life Cycle of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle of the background (nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosol. The authors assume the particles are formed by homogeneous nucleation near the tropical tropopause and are carried aloft into the stratosphere. The ...

Patrick Hamill; Eric J. Jensen; P. B. Russell; Jill J. Bauman

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Life Cycles of Moist Baroclinic Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between moisture and baroclinic eddies was examined through eddy life-cycle experiments using a global, primitive equation model. How condensation affects the structural evolution of eddies, their fluxes of heat, moisture, and ...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Lee E. Branscome; Douglas A. Stewart

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Life cycle evolution and systematics of Campanulariid hydrozoans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to study campanulariid life cycle evolution and systematics. The Campanulariidae is a hydrozoan family with many life cycle variations, and provide an excellent model system to study life cycle ...

Govindarajan, Annette Frese, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Related Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Below are links to life cycle inventory (LCI) databases, life cycle assessment (LCA) information, LCA tools, research institutes utilizing LCA, labeling initiatives and organizations, international LCA initiatives, LCA online forums. Life Cycle Inventory Data Ecoinvent: Swiss Centre for Life Cycle Inventories IVAM LCA Data 4: Dutch LCA Database KITECH (Korea Institute of Industrial Technology): Korea National Cleaner Production Center LCI Database Life Cycle Assessment Information IERE (The Institute for Environmental Research and Education): The American Center for Life Cycle Assessment SETAC (Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry): SETAC Life Cycle Assessment SPOLD (Society for Promotion of Life-cycle Assessment Development): 2.0 LCA Consultants homepage

162

Vehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions of future transportation modes. These resultsVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycleVehicle Manufacturing Futures in Transportation Life-cycle

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Name NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005...

164

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Life Cycle Inventory Home About the Project Database Publications Life Cycle Assessments Related Links...

165

Enabling streamlined life cycle assessment : materials-classification derived structured underspecification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As environmental footprint considerations for companies gain greater importance, the need for quantitative impact assessment tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) has become a higher priority. Currently, the cost and ...

Rampuria, Abhishek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: solar heating; cost analysis; cost effectiveness; incentives; life-cycle cost analysis; solar energy Abstract: This ...

168

Frostbite Theater - Monarch Butterflies - Life Cycle of the Monarch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Measure the Diameter of the Sun! Previous Video (Let's Measure the Diameter of the Sun!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Monarch Butterfly Pupation) Monarch Butterfly Pupation Life Cycle of the Monarch Butterfly Follow the life cycle of the Monarch butterfly from egg to adult! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a field that used to house a bunch of ugly trailers that were used for office space. A couple of years ago the Lab tore them down and in an effort to cut the cost of lawn maintanence, they planted a bunch of wild flowers in their place. Steve: Last year Joanna and I planted this plant. This is milkweed. It's a

169

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Partner Resources You are here Home Buildings & Plants Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policy Secondary...

170

Life cycle support for sensor network applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing applications for sensor networks is a challenging task. Most programming systems narrowly focus on programming issues while ignoring that programming represents only a tiny fraction of the typical life cycle of an application. Furthermore, ... Keywords: assessment, middleware, sensor networks, separation of concerns, software engineering

Urs Bischoff; Gerd Kortuem

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Life Cycle Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impacts of products, processes, and services. Its quality depends on the life cycle inventory (LCI) data it uses. "In principle, all decisions that affect or are meant to improve...

172

Life-Cycle Analysis Process Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Example of a life-cycle inventory for an unspecified product...70 Nontoxic chemicals 2,000 Water effluents, mg COD 1,000 BOD 150 Acid, as H + 75 Nitrates 5 Metals 300 Ammonium ions 5 Chloride ions 120 Dissolved organics 20 Suspended solids 400 Oil 100 Hydrocarbons 100 Phenol 1 Dissolved solids 400 Phosphate 5 Other nitrogen 10 Sulfate ions 10 COD, chemical...

173

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Planning Documents U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap, February 2009 U.S. Life Cycle Inventory User Survey, February 2009 U.S. LCI Database Factsheet, March...

174

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

Deru, M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with ...

Elizabeth M. Stone; William J. Randel; John L. Stanford

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Investigation of the Integration of Interstitial Building Spaces on Costs and Time of Facility Maintenance for U.S. Army Hospitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) has used the interstitial building system (IBS) as a design component for some of the hospitals in its healthcare infrastructure portfolio. Department of Defense (DoD) leadership is aware of increases in healthcare costs and understands the importance of safely reducing costs, which may be possible through design initiatives. An analysis was performed on facility maintenance metrics for ten different U.S. Army hospitals, including IBS design and conventional / non-interstitial building system (NIBS) design. Statistical analysis indicated a significant difference in cost and time data between IBS and NIBS for most of the building systems considered (HVAC, electrical, plumbing, and interior). Scheduled maintenance for the plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in costs; scheduled maintenance for the HVAC and plumbing building system was not found to have a significant difference in time expended. The data in this study showed that facility maintenance cost and time were generally lower for IBS than NIBS. Time spent (and associated cost) for scheduled maintenance of the electrical and plumbing building systems were slightly higher in IBS, though not significantly higher for plumbing. It may be easier to reach the plumbing and electrical building systems due to the greater accessibility afforded by IBS design. While a cost premium is estimated for integrating IBS design, the savings provided by life cycle facility maintenance is estimated to be up to three and a half times the initial cost premium.

Leveridge, Autumn Tamara

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 11:06am Addthis For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type. When deciding what resource to use for developing energy- and cost-savings estimates, a program should consider items detailed in Table 1. Table 1.Resources for Estimating Energy Savings Resource Items to consider Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Based on representative building models of commercial buildings. Guidance available for a limited number of building types using the most common technologies.

178

The Life Cycle Assessment of Copper Metallurgical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Estimation of Waste Packaging Containers Generated by Households in Taiwan The Life Cycle Assessment of Copper Metallurgical Processes.

179

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Dataset Additions - November...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Inventory Database Dataset Additions - Type Category Dataset Name Chemical Manufacturing Polylactide Biopolymer Resin, at plant Chemical Manufacturing Recycled...

180

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Toward energy sustainability in Hong Kong : a life-cycle cost analysis case study on low thermal energy transfer envelopes for a mid-rise commercial building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xiv, 102, [62] leaves : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis CIVL 2004 Rybkow Within the past two decades, sustainable development, once a (more)

Rybkowski, Zofia Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

183

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Title The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6181E Year of Publication...

184

The role of life cycle analysis in considering product change  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle analysis is an important tool for determining the environmental impacts of products and packaging. A complete life cycle analysis consists of three phases: life cycle inventory, impact analysis, and improvement analysis. Life cycle inventory examines the energy and resource usage and environmental releases associated with a product system from cradle to grave, that is, from the extraction of raw materials through raw material processing; manufacture, transportation, and use of the product; and, finally, disposal, reuse, or recycling of the product. Life cycle inventory results can be used to identify areas for improving product and packaging systems in terms of reducing energy usage, resource usage, and environmental releases.

Rethmeyer, D.A. (Franklin Associates, Ltd., Prairie Village, KS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Low-Cost Printable Wireless Sensors for Buildings Applications  

Low-Cost Printable Wireless Sensors for Buildings Applications Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

186

ARM - Field Campaign - Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL govCampaignsAerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL Campaign Links Images Wiki 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Sedlacek 2011 ASR STM Presentation: Springston 2010 ASR Fall Meeting: Sedlacek News, June 14, 2011: Next-generation Aerosol-sampling Stations to Head for India Related Campaigns Aerosol Life Cycle: Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer - CIMS 2011.07.10, Lee, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: HR-ToF-AMS 2011.06.15, Zhang, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: ARM Mobile Facility 2 Aerosol Observing System 2011.06.15, Sedlacek, OSC Aerosol Life Cycle: UV-APS and Nano-SMPS 2011.06.10, Hallar, OSC Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aerosol Life Cycle IOP at BNL 2011.06.01 - 2011.08.31 Lead Scientist : Arthur Sedlacek For data sets, see below.

187

NREL: Energy Analysis - Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Concentrating Solar Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Factsheet) Cover of the Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Download the Factsheet Flowchart that shows the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power systems. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Figure 1. Process flow diagram illustrating the life cycle stages for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The yellow box defined by the grey line shows the systems boundaries assumed in harmonization. Enlarge image NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review literature on life cycle assessments of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, identify

188

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Life Cycle Assessments of Energy Technologies Learn about how NREL research analysts are evaluating various LCA studies in the Life Cycle Analysis Harmonization Project. NREL is a leader in the field of life cycle assessment (LCA) of energy technologies, both renewable and conventional. Life cycle assessment is a standardized technique that tracks all material, energy, and pollutant flows of a system-from raw material extraction, manufacturing, transport, and construction to operation and end-of-life disposal. Life cycle assessment can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate comparisons of energy technologies. Life cycle assessments provide a well-established and comprehensive framework to compare renewable energy technologies with fossil-based and

189

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database - About the LCI Database Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the LCI Database Project About the LCI Database Project The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database is a publicly available database that allows users to objectively review and compare analysis results that are based on similar data collection and analysis methods. Finding consistent and transparent LCI data for life cycle assessments (LCAs) is difficult. NREL works with LCA experts to solve this problem by providing a central source of critically reviewed LCI data through its LCI Database Project. NREL's High-Performance Buildings research group is working closely with government stakeholders, and industry partners to develop and maintain the database. The 2009 U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Data Stakeholder meeting was an important step in the ongoing improvement of the database. Prior to that event, NREL conducted a poll of current and

190

NREL: Energy Analysis - Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Nuclear Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Over the last 30 years, analysts have conducted life cycle assessments on the environmental impacts associated with a variety of nuclear power technologies and systems. These life cycle assessments have had wide-ranging results. To better understand greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from nuclear power systems, NREL completed a comprehensive review and analysis of life cycle assessments focused on light water reactors (LWRs)-including both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs)-published between 1980 and 2010. NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions

191

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - April 2008. Annual Supplement to NIST Handbook ...

192

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keyword, Title, energy price escalation. Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost Analysis - April 2008. ...

193

Exploring decisions' influence on life-cycle performance to aid design for Multi-X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem addressed in this paper is that design decisions can have a propagation effect spanning multiple life-phases influencing life-cycle metrics such as cost, time, and quality. It introduces a computational framework of a Knowledge of ... Keywords: Concurrent Synthesis, DFX, KICAD, Knowledge Modelling, Providence

Jonathan C. Borg; Xiu-Tian Yan; Neal P. Juster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Gasoline Vehicles Project ID: 143 Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Brief Description: Examines the social, environmental and economic impacts of hydrogen fuel cell and gasoline vehicles. Purpose This project aims to investigate fuel cell vehicles through environmental impact, life cycle assessment, sustainability, and thermodynamic analyses. The project will assist in the development of highly qualified personnel in such areas as system analysis, modeling, methodology development, and applications. Performer Principal Investigator: Ibrahim Dincer Organization: University of Ontario Institute of Technology

195

NREL: Energy Analysis - Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biopower Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Bioenergy OpenEI: Data,...

196

NREL: Energy Analysis - Hydropower Results - Life Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Hydropower OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas...

197

Life Cycle Assessment Comparing the Use of Jatropha Biodiesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

both of NREL, lent their expertise in life cycle assessment modeling and Jatropha production, and Dr. Mark Pitterle of Symbiotic Engineering aided in the literature survey...

198

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.) How will future transportation energy production impact water resource availability in the US? b.)...

199

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Life Cycle ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... This report was prepared by Pricewaterhouse Coopers, LLP/Ecobalance for Nickel Industry LCA Group. The report describes the life cycle...

200

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Life Cycle ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2008 ... This document provides the most comprehensive life-cycle information for the North American aluminum industry. Carried out for the calendar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Life cycle assessment parameters adaptation for Brazilian electricity production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity is a major concern in the life cycle assessment (LCA) of most products since it is a required input for production of almost all (more)

Coelho, Carla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Integrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life Cycle Performance Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manufacturing and Sustainability, University of CaliforniaIntegrating Green and Sustainability Aspects into Life CycleManufacturing and Sustainability, University of California

Niggeschmidt, Stephan; Helu, Moneer; Diaz, Nancy; Behmann, Benjamin; Lanza, Gisela; Dornfeld, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NREL: Energy Analysis - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

image Published Results The published life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) estimates for hydropower, ocean, geothermal, biopower, solar (crystalline silicon photovoltaic, thin...

204

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and...

205

The Life Cycle of Steel (LCA/LCI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 3, 2008 ... A life cycle inventory (LCI) looks at the resources, energy and emissions from the steel production to the end of its life. The International Iron...

206

Life Cycle Inventory Report for the North American Aluminum ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2008 ... This document provides the most comprehensive life-cycle information for the North American aluminum industry. Carried out for the calendar...

207

Global Primary Aluminium Industry 2010 Life Cycle Inventory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within this framework, the Primary Aluminium Industry has established a global Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) data set. Inventory flows include inputs of raw materials ...

208

Plant Support Engineering: Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks: Medium-Voltage (MV) Cables and Accessories (Terminations and Splices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is producing a series of Life Cycle Management Planning Sourcebooks, each containing a compilation of industry experience information and data on aging degradation and historical performance for a specific type of system, structure, or component (SSC). This sourcebook provides information and guidance for implementing cost-effective life cycle management (LCM) planning for medium-voltage (MV) cables and accessories (terminations and field splices)

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

209

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Life-cycle of Operons  

SciTech Connect

Operons are a major feature of all prokaryotic genomes, but how and why operon structures vary is not well understood. To elucidate the life-cycle of operons, we compared gene order between Escherichia coli K12 and its relatives and identified the recently formed and destroyed operons in E. coli. This allowed us to determine how operons form, how they become closely spaced, and how they die. Our findings suggest that operon evolution is driven by selection on gene expression patterns. First, both operon creation and operon destruction lead to large changes in gene expression patterns. For example, the removal of lysA and ruvA from ancestral operons that contained essential genes allowed their expression to respond to lysine levels and DNA damage, respectively. Second, some operons have undergone accelerated evolution, with multiple new genes being added during a brief period. Third, although most operons are closely spaced because of a neutral bias towards deletion and because of selection against large overlaps, highly expressed operons tend to be widely spaced because of regulatory fine-tuning by intervening sequences. Although operon evolution seems to be adaptive, it need not be optimal: new operons often comprise functionally unrelated genes that were already in proximity before the operon formed.

Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

212

Life Cycle Nitrogen Trifluoride Emissions from Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous- and nanocrystalline-silicon thin-film photovoltaic modules are made in high-throughput manufacturing lines that necessitate quickly cleaning the reactor. Using NF{sub 3}, a potent greenhouse gas, as the cleaning agent triggered concerns as recent reports reveal that the atmospheric concentrations of this gas have increased significantly. We quantified the life-cycle emissions of NF{sub 3} in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing, on the basis of actual measurements at the facilities of a major producer of NF{sub 3} and of a manufacturer of PV end-use equipment. From these, we defined the best practices and technologies that are the most likely to keep worldwide atmospheric concentrations of NF{sub 3} at very low radiative forcing levels. For the average U.S. insolation and electricity-grid conditions, the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manufacturing and using NF{sub 3} in current PV a-Si and tandem a-Si/nc-Si facilities add 2 and 7 g CO{sub 2eq}/kWh, which can be displaced within the first 1-4 months of the PV system life.

Fthenakis, V.

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Commissioning of energy-efficiency measures: Costs and benefits for 16 buildings  

SciTech Connect

Building systems and energy-efficiency measures (EEMs) often don`t perform as well in practice as expected at the design stage. This fact has become clear to many organizations concerned with ensuring building performance. What to do about these problems is less clear. Several electric utilities around the U.S. have begun to take action to address the start-up, control, and operational problems that are found in nearly every building. One of the most beneficial periods to intervene in the building life cycle is during the start-up phase of a now building. Building commissioning during start up is such an intervention. Commissioning can be defined as: a set of procedures, responsibilities, and methods to advance a system from static installation to full working order in accordance with design intent. In broad terms, commissioning can extend from design reviews through operations and maintenance planning and training. With such a broad scope aimed at the entire building life cycle, commissioning is often likened to {open_quotes}Total Quality Management{close_quotes} Yet the heart of commissioning are the procedures developed and executed to ensure that all building systems function as intended. The incorporation of energy-efficiency criteria into building commissioning is a new development.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.; Greenberg, S.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Semantic modelling of dependency relations between life cycle analysis processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. This methodology relies on the decomposition of a studied system into interdependent processes. Several organisations provide processes ... Keywords: environmental information management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Marian Scuturici; Jean-Marie Pinon; Emmanuel Risler

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and module manufacturing. · System/Plant Decommissioning · Disposal · PowerPlant Decommissioning · Waste life cycle GHG emissions from solar PV systems are similar to other renewables and nuclear energy.nrel.gov/harmonization. · Life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si and TF PV technologies appear broadly similar; the small number

217

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

218

Literature Review of Data on the Incremental Costs to Design and Build Low-Energy Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes findings from a literature review into the incremental costs associated with low-energy buildings. The goal of this work is to help establish as firm an analytical foundation as possible for the Building Technology Program's cost-effective net-zero energy goal in the year 2025.

Hunt, W. D.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Life Cycle | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Home > Our Mission > Managing the Stockpile > Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear Weapons Life Cycle Nuclear weapons are developed, produced, and maintained in the stockpile, and then retired and dismantled. This sequence of events is known as the

220

Life Cycle Management Value Planning Tool (LcmVALUE) Code, Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of equipment aging or life cycle management (LCM) planning is the comparison of the long term economics of alternative plans, all of which satisfy safety and reliability requirements. These economic evaluations must be performed on a net present value basis, and must include factors such as failure rates, value of lost production, consequential costs of potential regulatory sanctions and adverse public relations, and the costs of planned preventive maintenance (PM) and unplanned corre...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Buildings Sector Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency 1

222

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Title Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Masanet, Eric R., Yuan Chang, Anand R. Gopal, Peter H. Larsen, William R. Morrow, Roger Sathre, Arman Shehabi, and Pei Zhai Journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources Volume 38 Date Published 2013 Keywords electricity, energy policy, environmental analysis, life-cycle impact, life-cycle inventory Abstract The application of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to electric power (EP) technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts. While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use, LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life-cycle energy, GHG emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water use implications of EP technologies. With continued progress, LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically-thorough and environmentally-holistic manner for more robust deployment decisions. This article summarizes: (1) major challenges in applying LCA to EP technologies thus far, (2) LCA results to date on the various impacts of EP technologies, and (3) opportunities for improving LCAs as applied to EP technologies moving forward.

223

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Building Cost and Performance Metrics: Data Collection Protocol, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the process for selecting and applying the building cost and performance metrics for measuring sustainably designed buildings in comparison to traditionally designed buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Solana, Amy E.; Spees, Kathleen L.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

General Buildings Information Handover Guide:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and life cycle cost reductions and efficiencies in capital projects from concept to design, construction, operation, decommissioning and dismantling ...

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

Life Cycle Assessment of microalgal basedbiofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of high-value molecules (such as beta-carotenes) or dietary supplement (Spirulina or Chlorella can that Botryococcus braunii and Scenedesmus sp. could grow using flue gas as source of carbon. Energetic costs et al., 2011) include to their study the costs of purification and transport. hal-00854438,version1

228

Life-cycle energy analyses of electric vehicle storage batteries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of several life-cycle energy analyses of prospective electric vehicle batteries are presented. The batteries analyzed were: Nickel-zinc; Lead-acid; Nickel-iron; Zinc-chlorine; Sodium-sulfur (glass electrolyte); Sodium-sulfur (ceramic electrolyte); Lithium-metal sulfide; and Aluminum-air. A life-cycle energy analysis consists of evaluating the energy use of all phases of the battery's life, including the energy to build it, operate it, and any credits that may result from recycling of the materials in it. The analysis is based on the determination of three major energy components in the battery life cycle: Investment energy, i.e., The energy used to produce raw materials and to manufacture the battery; operational energy i.e., The energy consumed by the battery during its operational life. In the case of an electric vehicle battery, this energy is the energy required (as delivered to the vehicle's charging circuit) to power the vehicle for 100,000 miles; and recycling credit, i.e., The energy that could be saved from the recycling of battery materials into new raw materials. The value of the life-cycle analysis approach is that it includes the various penalties and credits associated with battery production and recycling, which enables a more accurate determination of the system's ability to reduce the consumption of scarce fuels. The analysis of the life-cycle energy requirements consists of identifying the materials from which each battery is made, evaluating the energy needed to produce these materials, evaluating the operational energy requirements, and evaluating the amount of materials that could be recycled and the energy that would be saved through recycling. Detailed descriptions of battery component materials, the energy requirements for battery production, and credits for recycling, and the operational energy for an electric vehicle, and the procedures used to determine it are discussed.

Sullivan, D; Morse, T; Patel, P; Patel, S; Bondar, J; Taylor, L

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles for Canada Project Summary Full Title: Life Cycle Analysis of Vehicles Powered by a Fuel Cell and by Internal Combustion Engine for Canada Project ID: 117 Principal Investigator: Xianguo Li Purpose In this study, a full life cycle analysis of an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV) and a fuel cell vehicle (FCV) has been carried out. The impact of the material and fuel used in the vehicle on energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions is analyzed for Canada. Four different methods of obtaining hydrogen were analyzed; using coal and nuclear power to produce electricity and extraction of hydrogen through electrolysis and via steam reforming of natural gas in a natural gas plant and in a hydrogen refueling station.

230

title Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems journal Annual Review of Environment and Resources volume year month abstract p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy GHG emissions air pollutant emissions and water use implications of EP technologies With continued progress LCA offers promise for assessing and comparing EP technologies in an analytically thorough and environmentally holistic manner for more robust deployment

231

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner Barbara Adams In this presentation we describe the prospective life-cycle modeling of metal-organic frameworks (MOF), a novel type of material with the potential for efficiently capturing CO2. Life-cycle modeling of emerging technologies, conducted early in the innovation process, can generate knowledge that can feed back to inform scientific discovery and development. We discuss the challenges of credibly modeling a system that does not yet exist, and describe methodological approaches including parametric system modeling (quantifying relations between system elements), scenario projections (defining plausible pathways for system scale-up),

232

NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Geothermal Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Geothermal Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for geothermal technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal power generation Credit: Goldstein, B., G. Hiriart, R. Bertani, C. Bromley, L. Gutiérrez-Negrín, E. Huenges, H. Muraoka, A. Ragnarsson, J. Tester, V. Zui, 2011: Geothermal Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 4.6 Enlarge image

233

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone This seminar starts by providing a short introduction to the field of Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) through a practical example of packaging. It will then develop the case of the Life Cycle Benefits and Impacts of the Internet; raising the different scientific challenges that LCA faces to provide relevant results for innovative technologies.--The rapid development of the Internet and the related potential impacts on and benefits for the environment deserves attention. The infrastructure that supports a university's use of the Internet has been comprehensively

234

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

235

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Environmental Assessment of the Internet: The Benefits and Impacts of Innovative Technologies Speaker(s): Oliver Jolliet Date: July 15, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90...

236

Life cycle analysis of shea butter biodiesel using GREET software.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, life cycle analysis (LCA) of shea butter biodiesel from Well-to-Pump (WTP) is considered utilizing information gathered from Anuanom Industrial Bio Products Ltd. (more)

Quansah, Solomon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Mesoscale Kinetic Energy Spectrum of a Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum is investigated through numerical simulations of an idealized baroclinic wave life cycle, from linear instability to mature nonlinear evolution and with high horizontal and vertical resolution (?x ...

Michael L. Waite; Chris Snyder

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Life Cycle and Mesoscale Frontal Structure of an Intermountain Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution analyses and MesoWest surface observations are used to examine the life cycle and mesoscale frontal structure of the Tax Day Storm, an intermountain cyclone that produced the second lowest sea level pressure observed in Utah ...

Gregory L. West; W. James Steenburgh

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Response of Baroclinic Life Cycles to Barotropic Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclonic barotropic shear of incrementally increasing magnitude is imposed on an idealized midlatitude jet, and the life cycles of baroclinically unstable wavenumber 6 perturbations growing on these jets are studied. When the barotropic shear ...

Dennis L. Hartmann; Peter Zuercher

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Life Cycle of the South American Monsoon System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South American monsoon system (SAMS) life cycle plays an important role in the distribution and duration of the rainy season mainly over southwestern Amazonia, and the central west and southeast Brazil regions, affecting the economy through ...

Adma Raia; Iracema Fonsecade Albuquerque Cavalcanti

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Life Cycle of the MaddenJulian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite life cycle of the MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO) is constructed from the cross covariance between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind, and temperature. To focus on the role of convection, the composite is based on episodes when a ...

Harry H. Hendon; Murry L. Salby

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal electricity production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle analysis (LCA) is presented for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fossil energy use associated with geothermal electricity production with a special focus on operational GHG emissions from hydrothermal flash and dry steam plants. The analysis includes results for both the plant and fuel cycle components of the total life cycle. The impact of recent changes to California's GHG reporting protocol for GHG emissions are discussed by comparing emission rate metrics derived from post and pre revision data sets. These metrics are running capacity weighted average GHG emission rates (g/kWh) and emission rate cumulative distribution functions. To complete our life cycle analysis plant cycle results were extracted from our previous work and added to fuel cycle results. The resulting life cycle fossil energy and greenhouse gas emissions values are compared among a range of fossil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prospective Life-Cycle Modeling of Novel Carbon Capture Materials Speaker(s): Roger Sathre Date: December 5, 2011 - 3:30pm Location: 90-4133 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Anita...

245

An Overview of Biodiesel and Petroleum Diesel Life Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the findings from a study of the life cycle inventories for petroleum diesel and biodiesel. It presents information on raw materials extracted from the environment, energy resources consumed, and air, water, and solid waste emissions generated.

Sheehan, J. (NREL); Camobreco, V. (Ecobalance); Duffield, J. (USDA); Shapouri, H. (USDA); Graboski, M. (CIFER); Tyson, K. S. (NREL Project Manager)

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

246

Life-cycle assessment of wastewater treatment plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprints analysis of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. In previous research, the issue of global warming is often related ...

Dong, Bo, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Role of Recycling in the Life Cycle of Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES ROLE OF RECYCLING IN THE LIFE CYCLE OF BATTERIES J.L. Sullivan, L. Gaines, and A. Burnham Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division Keywords: battery, materials, recycling, energy Abstract Over the last few decades, rechargeable battery production has increased substantially. Applications including phones, computers, power tools, power storage, and electric-drive vehicles are either commonplace or will be in the next decade or so. Because advanced rechargeable batteries, like those

248

U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY DATABASE ROADMAP rsed e Goals of the U.S. LCI Database Project * Maintain data quality and transparency. * Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data. * Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making tool. * Maintain compatibility with international LCI databases. * Provide exceptional data accessibility.

249

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL 53950 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lutz, James D., Alexander B. Lekov, Peter Chan, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Stephen Meyers, and James E. McMahon Document Number LBNL...

250

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy Efficiency Design Options...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on...

251

230 Improving Pump Efficiency and Lowering Life Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandblasting combined with coating the internal pump casing restores the remaining 50%. This study ..... 186 Wireline Failures in Oil & Gas Wells - Case Studies.

252

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, Florida...

253

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy from the battery ter- most common, produces results close to the av- minals (including regenerative

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Life cycle cost modeling of automotive paint systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle coating is an important component of automotive manufacturing. The paint shop constitutes the plurality of initial investment in an automotive assembly plant, consumes the majority of energy used in the plant's ...

Leitz, Christopher W. (Christopher William), 1976-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mi/kwh battery, from city Passenger capacity Power train dcS/kwh nominal rated capacity of or Battery energydensity,and the capacity of the battery. Faster charging essaryfor

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Davis I. (1988) R. ETX-II propulsion system industry..,sulfur batteryfor the ETX-II propuLsion system. Proca. ,9thsulphur battery, in the ETX-II test vehicle. The ETX-II test

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Life-Cycle Analysis and Energy Efficiency in State Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View...

260

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Distributed Control System Life Cycle Management: Guidelines for Planning and Managing the Life Cycle of Distributed Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power producers are often not concerned with the life cycle of a control system until they receive a notification from the manufacturer that the system is no longer supported. This situation results in a reactive effort to gain information, develop a plan, obtain funding, and execute an upgrade project. Effectively managing the life cycle of a control system requires a proactive approach, including gaining information about the installed system and its expected life span and the available ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Scope De?nition and Inventory Analysis; Internationalin life- cycle inventories using hybrid approaches. Environ.Reichl, H. Life Cycle Inventory Analysis and Identi?cation

Krishnan, Nikhil; Boyd, Sarah; Somani, Ajay; Dornfeld, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Low cost performance evaluation of passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An approach to low-cost instrumentation and performance evaluation of passive solar heated buildings is presented. Beginning with a statement of the need for a low-cost approach, a minimum list of measured quantities necessary to compute a set of recommended performance factors is developed. Conflicts and confusion surrounding the definition of various performance factors are discussed and suggestions are made for dealing with this situation. Available instrumentation and data processing equipment is presented. The recommended system would monitor approximately ten variables and compute numerous performance factors on site at a projected system cost of less than $3,000 per installation.

Palmiter, L.S.; Hamilton, L.B.; Holtz, M.J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Sustainable Buildings and Campuses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Campuses and Campuses Sustainable Buildings and Campuses October 4, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Sustainable Buildings and Campuses The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides strategies, best practices, and resources to help Federal agencies implement sustainable design practices within Federal buildings and facilities. Learn about: Sustainable building design basics Federal requirements Sustainability for existing buildings Sustainable design for new construction and major renovations Life cycle cost analysis for sustainability Energy security planning Case studies Interagency Sustainability Working Group. Also see Sustainable Building Contacts. Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Training Breaks New Ground Sustainable Building Contacts Commissioning Training Available

265

A Review of Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: Battery Life-Cycle Analysis: State of Knowledge and Critical Needs ANL/ESD/10-7 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express

266

Technology Analysis - Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis diagram of the battery recycling life cycle Several types of recycling processes are available, recovering materials usable at different stages of the production cycle- from metallic elements to materials that can be reused directly in new batteries. Recovery closer to final usable form avoids more impact-intensive process steps. Portions courtesy of Umicore, Inc. To identify the potential impacts of the growing market for automotive lithium-ion batteries, Argonne researchers are examining the material demand and recycling issues related to lithium-ion batteries. Research includes: Conducting studies to identify the greenest, most economical recycling processes, Investigating recycling practices to determine how much of which

267

NREL: U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map Photo of a green field with an ocean in the background. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database NREL and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) Database to help life cycle assessment (LCA) practitioners answer questions about environmental impact. This database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with producing a material, component, or assembly in the U.S. The goals of the U.S. LCI Database project are: Maintain data quality and transparency Cover commonly used materials, products, and processes in the United States with up-to-date, critically reviewed LCI data Support the expanded use of LCA as an environmental decision-making

268

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Cover of the LWind LCA Harmonization Fact Sheet Download the Fact Sheet Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization To better understand the state of knowledge of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale wind power systems, NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a meta-analytical process called "harmonization." Over the last 30 years, several hundred life cycle assessments have been conducted for wind power technologies with wide-ranging results. Harmonization for onshore and offshore wind power systems was performed by adjusting published greenhouse gas estimates to achieve:

269

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

270

Design and life-cycle considerations for unconventional-reservoir wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of design and life-cycle considerations for certain unconventional-reservoir wells. An overview of unconventional-reservoir definitions is provided. Well design and life-cycle considerations are addressed from three aspects: upfront reservoir development, initial well completion, and well-life and long-term considerations. Upfront-reservoir-development issues discussed include well spacing, well orientation, reservoir stress orientations, and tubular metallurgy. Initial-well-completion issues include maximum treatment pressures and rates, treatment diversion, treatment staging, flowback and cleanup, and dewatering needs. Well-life and long-term discussions include liquid loading, corrosion, refracturing and associated fracture reorientation, and the cost of abandonment. These design considerations are evaluated with case studies for five unconventional-reservoir types: shale gas (Barnett shale), tight gas (Jonah feld), tight oil (Bakken play), coalbed methane (CBM) (San Juan basin), and tight heavy oil (Lost Hills field). In evaluating the life cycle and design of unconventional-reservoir wells, 'one size' does not fit all and valuable knowledge and a shortening of the learning curve can be achieved for new developments by studying similar, more-mature fields.

Miskimins, J.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Information Resources: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products This March 28, 2013 webcast reviewed DOE's recently completed three-part study of the life-cycle energy and environmental impacts of LED lighting products relative to incandescent and CFL alternatives. The reports for Parts 1 and 2 were published in February 2012 and June 2012, respectively, providing a literature review and life-cycle assessment (LCA) for lamps utilizing these three light source technologies. Presenters Jason Tuenge of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Brad Hollomon of Compa Industries focused on findings from Part 3, which augments the LCA results with chemical analysis of a variety of lamps using standard testing procedures from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of California. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different lamps, were tested to ascertain whether potentially toxic elements are present in concentrations that exceed regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste.

272

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking to significantly influence the environmental burdens of all fluids, energy consumption was relatively constant and consumed without long-distance transportation. MWF Production Each MWF is composed of lubricant oil

Clarens, Andres

273

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovcs; S. Kopcsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Weakly Nonlinear Primitive Equation Baroclinic Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A weakly nonlinear baroclinic life cycle is examined with a spherical, multilevel, primitive equation model. The structure of the initial zonal jet is chosen so that the disturbance grows very slowly, that is, linear growth rate less than 0.1 day?...

Steven B. Feldstein

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave activity diagnostics are calculated for four different baroclinic wave life cycles, including the LC1 and LC2 cases studied by Thorncroft, Hoskins, and McIntyre. The wave activity is a measure of the disturbance relative to some zonally ...

Gudrun Magnusdottir; Peter H. Haynes

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life Cycle Variations of Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Americas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using GOES-7 ISCCP-B3 satellite data for 198788, the authors studied the evolution of the morphological and radiative properties of clouds over the life cycles of deep convective systems (CS) over the Americas at both tropical and middle ...

L. A. T. Machado; W. B. Rossow; R. L. Guedes; A. W. Walker

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modelling life cycle and population dynamics of Nostocales (cyanobacteria)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales found in lakes in temperate regions are generally assumed to benefit from climate change. To predict their future development under varying environmental conditions, we developed a mathematical model that simulates ... Keywords: Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, Hasse diagram, Life cycle, Nostocales, Population dynamics, Shallow lake

K. D. Jhnk; R. Brggemann; J. Rcker; B. Luther; U. Simon; B. Nixdorf; C. Wiedner

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment of Biogas from Separated slurry Lorie Hamelin, Marianne Wesnæs and Henrik AND ALTERNATIVES 28 2.2.1 Reference Scenario (Scenario A) 28 2.2.2 Biogas from raw pig slurry and fibre fraction from chemical- mechanical separation (Scenario F) 29 2.2.3 Biogas from raw cow slurry and fibre

279

Life Cycle Human Capital Formation, Search Intensity, and Wage Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents and estimates a unified model where both human capital investment and job search are endogenized. This unification not only enables me to quantify the relative contributions of each mechanism to life cycle wage dynamics, but also to investigate potential interactions between human capital investment and job search. Within the unified framework, the expectation of rising rental rates of human capital through searching in the future gives workers more incentive to invest in human capital. In the meantime, unemployed workers reduce their reservation rates to leave unemployment quickly to take advantage of human capital accumulation on the job. The results show that these interactions are well supported by data. Allowing for these interactions as well as heterogeneity in search technology, the unified model predicts that both human capital accumulation and job search contribute significantly to the wage growth over the life cycle with human capital accumulation accounting for 40 % of total wage growth and job search accounting for 50%. The remaining 10 % is due to the interactions of the two forces. Furthermore, job search dominates wage growth earlier in the life cycle while human capital accumulation dominates later in the life cycle. ?This paper is one of the chapters in my Ph.D. thesis. I thank my committee members, Audra Bowlus, Hiroyuki Kasahara, and Lance Lochner for their continuous guidance and support. I would also like to thank Chris Robinson, Fabien Postel-Vinay, Todd Stinebrickner, Ben Lester as well as

Huju Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development » Commercial Development » Commercial Site Map Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) evaluates published model codes and standards to help states and local jurisdictions better understand the impacts of updating commercial building energy codes and standards. A methodology was used for evaluating the energy and economic performance of commercial energy codes and standards and proposed changes thereto. This method serves to ensure DOE proposals are both energy efficient and cost-effective. The DOE methodology contains two primary assessments: Energy savings Cost-effectiveness Energy and economic calculations are performed through a comparison of

282

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in the United States? EIA publishes estimates for the capital costs for different types of electricity ...

283

Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieving Higher Performance Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Agenda * Imagine Homes - An Overview * 2010 Occupied Test House - Objectives - From Modeling through Monitoring * 2012 Occupied Test House - Objectives - What's Next * Closing Remarks Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Overview: * San Antonio, TX * 68 Homes in 2011 * $140k - $425k * 1,300 - 4,500 ft 2 Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Environment: * Hot-Humid * 2,996 CDD * 1,546 HDD * 31" Rainfall Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Imagine Homes History: * Established 2006 * Partnership with Beazer Homes * Builders Challenge * Building America

284

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... price indices and discount factors for performing life-cycle cost analyses of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects in ...

285

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Arizona Department of Commerce Arizona law requires that new state building projects over six thousand square feet follow prescribed solar design standards. Solar improvements should be evaluated on the basis of life cycle costs. Affected buildings include buildings designed and constructed by the department of

286

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Life Cycle Analysis: Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant Revision 2, March 2012 DOE/NETL-2012/1551 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or

287

Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Life-Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Eric Masanet, 1 Yuan Chang, 1 Anand R. Gopal, 2 Peter Larsen, 2,3 William R. Morrow III, 2 Roger Sathre, 2 Arman Shehabi, 2 and Pei Zhai 2 1 McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208; email: eric.masanet@northwestern.edu, yuan.chang@northwestern.edu 2 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720; email: argopal@lbl.gov, wrmorrow@lbl.gov, rsathre@lbl.gov, ashehabi@lbl.gov, pzhai@lbl.gov 3 Management Science and Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: phlarsen@lbl.gov Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2013. 38:107-36 First published online as a Review in Advance on August 7, 2013 The Annual Review of Environment and Resources is online at http://environ.annualreviews.org

288

The Velocity of Money in a Life-Cycle Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determinants of the velocity of money have been examined based on life-cycle hypothesis. The velocity of money can be expressed by reciprocal of the average value of holding time which is defined as interval between participating exchanges for one unit of money. This expression indicates that the velocity is governed by behavior patterns of economic agents and open a way to constructing micro-foundation of it. It is found that time pattern of income and expense for a representative individual can be obtained from a simple version of life-cycle model, and average holding time of money resulted from the individual's optimal choice depends on the expected length of relevant planning periods.

Wang, Y; Wang, Yougui; Qiu, Hanqing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Life Cycle Assessment of Amonix 7700 HCPV Systems  

SciTech Connect

We estimated the energy payback time (EPBT) and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the life cycle of the Amonix high-concentration photovoltaic (HCPV) system with III-V solar cells. For a location in the southwest United States, the Amonix 7700 has an EPBT of only 0.86 yrs and GHG emissions of 24g CO{sub 2}-eq./kWh we expect further decreases in both by 2011.

Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. (2011). Utilities and Building Energy Codes: Air QualityUtility Programs and Building Energy Codes: How utilityUtility Programs and Building Energy Codes: How utility

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

payback time versus building size Project costs and energyPayback time (commissioning cost/annual energy savings) lessenergy payback time of 41 years, while the proper allocation of costs and

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: doe2.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software References: DOE2 Home Page[1] Perform detailed comparative analysis of building designs and technologies by applying sophisticated building energy use simulation techniques; does not require extensive experience in building performance modeling. DOE-2 is a freeware building energy analysis program that can predict the

294

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

295

InertiaGravity Waves Spontaneously Generated by Jets and Fronts. Part I: Different Baroclinic Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spontaneous generation of inertiagravity waves in idealized life cycles of baroclinic instability is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Two substantially different life cycles of baroclinic instability are ...

Riwal Plougonven; Chris Snyder

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Two Types of Baroclinic Life Cycles during the Southern Hemisphere Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy life cycles of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) summer are investigated with NCEPNCAR reanalysis data. A composite analysis is performed for the years 1980 through 2004. Individual life cycles are identified by local maxima in ...

Woosok Moon; Steven B. Feldstein

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Life cycle assessment of materials and construction in commercial structures : variability and limitations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment has become an important tool for determining the environmental impact of materials and products. It is also useful in analyzing the impact a structure has over the course of its life cycle. The ...

Hsu, Sophia Lisbeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmenta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and...

299

Life Cycle Assessment goes to Washington : lessons from a new regulatory design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a quantitative tool that measures the bundled impact of an individual product over its entire life cycle, from "cradle-to-grave." LCA has been developed over many decades to improve industry's ...

Edwards, Jennifer Lynn, M. C. P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Life Cycle Assessments Confirm the Need for Hydropower and Nuclear Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the use of life cycle assessments to confirm the need for hydropower and nuclear energy.

Gagnon, L.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures with using various measures to improve the efficiency of residential buildings. This database offers

302

Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program is to develop 'LOW COST THIN FILM BUILDING-INTEGRATED PV SYSTEMS'. Major focus was on developing low cost solution for the commercial BIPV and rooftop PV market and meet DOE LCOE goal for the commercial market segment of 9-12 cents/kWh for 2010 and 6-8 cents/kWh for 2015. We achieved the 2010 goal and were on track to achieve the 2015 goal. The program consists of five major tasks: (1) modules; (2) inverters and BOS; (3) systems engineering and integration; (4) deployment; and (5) project management and TPP collaborative activities. We successfully crossed all stage gates and surpassed all milestones. We proudly achieved world record stable efficiencies in small area cells (12.56% for 1cm2) and large area encapsulated modules (11.3% for 800 cm2) using a triple-junction amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon/nanocrystalline silicon structure, confirmed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We collaborated with two inverter companies, Solectria and PV Powered, and significantly reduced inverter cost. We collaborated with three universities (Syracuse University, University of Oregon, and Colorado School of Mines) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and improved understanding on nanocrystalline material properties and light trapping techniques. We jointly published 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals and International Conference Proceedings. We installed two 75kW roof-top systems, one in Florida and another in New Jersey demonstrating innovative designs. The systems performed satisfactorily meeting/exceeding estimated kWh/kW performance. The 50/50 cost shared program was a great success and received excellent comments from DOE Manager and Technical Monitor in the Final Review.

Dr. Subhendu Guha; Dr. Jeff Yang

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure systems are critical to a countrys prosperity. It is extremely important to manage the infrastructure systems efficiently in order to avoid wastage and to maximize benefits. Deterioration of infrastructure systems is one of the primary issues in civil engineering today. This problem has been widely acknowledged by engineering community in numerous studies. We need to evolve efficient strategies to tackle the problem of infrastructure deterioration and to efficiently operate infrastructure. In this research, we propose stochastic models to predict the process of deterioration in engineering systems and to perform life-cycle analysis (LCA) of deteriorating engineering systems. LCA has been recognized, over the years, as a highly informative tool for helping the decision making process in infrastructure management. In this research, we propose a stochastic model, SSA, to accurately predict the effect of deterioration processes in engineering systems. The SSA model addresses some of the important and ignored areas in the existing models such as the effect of deterioration on both capacity and demands of systems and accounting for different types of failures in assessing the life-span of a deteriorating system. Furthermore, this research proposes RTLCA, a renewal theory based LCA model, to predict the life-cycle performance of deteriorating systems taking into account not only the life-time reliability but also the costs associated with operating a system. In addition, this research investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge. Thereafter, the RTLCA model along with SSA model is used to study the life-cycle of an example RC bridge located in seismic regions accounting for seismic degradation. It is expected that the models proposed in this research will be helpful in better managing our infrastructure systems.

Ramesh Kumar, - 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Background and Reflections on the Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the ever-growing body of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature on electricity generation technologies, inconsistent methods and assumptions hamper comparison across studies and pooling of published results. Synthesis of the body of previous research is necessary to generate robust results to assess and compare environmental performance of different energy technologies for the benefit of policy makers, managers, investors, and citizens. With funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory initiated the LCA Harmonization Project in an effort to rigorously leverage the numerous individual studies to develop collective insights. The goals of this project were to: (1) understand the range of published results of LCAs of electricity generation technologies, (2) reduce the variability in published results that stem from inconsistent methods and assumptions, and (3) clarify the central tendency of published estimates to make the collective results of LCAs available to decision makers in the near term. The LCA Harmonization Project's initial focus was evaluating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from electricity generation technologies. Six articles from this first phase of the project are presented in a special supplemental issue of the Journal of Industrial Ecology on Meta-Analysis of LCA: coal (Whitaker et al. 2012), concentrating solar power (Burkhardt et al. 2012), crystalline silicon photovoltaics (PVs) (Hsu et al. 2012), thin-film PVs (Kim et al. 2012), nuclear (Warner and Heath 2012), and wind (Dolan and Heath 2012). Harmonization is a meta-analytical approach that addresses inconsistency in methods and assumptions of previously published life cycle impact estimates. It has been applied in a rigorous manner to estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from many categories of electricity generation technologies in articles that appear in this special supplemental supplemental issue, reducing the variability and clarifying the central tendency of those estimates in ways useful for decision makers and analysts. Each article took a slightly different approach, demonstrating the flexibility of the harmonization approach. Each article also discusses limitations of the current research, and the state of knowledge and of harmonization, pointing toward a path of extending and improving the meta-analysis of LCAs.

Heath, G. A.; Mann, M. K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MARVEL: A PC-based interactive software package for life-cycle evaluations of hybrid/electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

As a life-cycle analysis tool, MARVEL has been developed for the evaluation of hybrid/electric vehicle systems. It can identify the optimal combination of battery and heat engine characteristics for different vehicle types and performance requirements, on the basis of either life-cycle cost or fuel efficiency. Battery models that allow trade-offs between specific power and specific energy, between cycle life and depth of discharge, between peak power and depth of discharge, and between other parameters, are included in the software. A parallel hybrid configuration, using an internal combustion engine and a battery as the power sources, can be simulated with a user-specified energy management strategy. The PC-based software package can also be used for cost or fuel efficiency comparisons among conventional, electric, and hybrid vehicles.

Marr, W.W.; He, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Energy Code Compliance in New Mexico's Buildings.Improving Energy Code Compliance in New Mexico's Buildings.Energy Code Ambassadors Program. Building Codes Assistance Project and New Mexico

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Energy Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer logo. Provides quick economic analysis for commercial and industrial buildings. Building Energy Analyzer (BEA) estimates annual and monthly loads and costs associated with air-conditioning, heating, on-site power generation, thermal storage, and heat recovery systems for a given building and location. The user can compare the performance of standard and high efficiency electric chillers, variable speed electric chillers, absorption chillers, engine chillers, thermal storage, on-site generators, heat recovery, or desiccant systems. The user can also prepare side-by-side economic comparisons of different energy options and equipment life cycle cost analysis. The BEA is a system screening tool. It is a tool that is

308

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Buildings consume approximately 40% of the energy, and nearly 70% of the electricity used in the United States. Building surfaces are well suited to renewable energy ...

309

Life cycle assessment of bagasse waste management options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bagasse is mostly utilized for steam and power production for domestic sugar mills. There have been a number of alternatives that could well be applied to manage bagasse, such as pulp production, conversion to biogas and electricity production. The selection of proper alternatives depends significantly on the appropriateness of the technology both from the technical and the environmental points of view. This work proposes a simple model based on the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impacts of various alternatives for dealing with bagasse waste. The environmental aspects of concern included global warming potential, acidification potential, eutrophication potential and photochemical oxidant creation. Four waste management scenarios for bagasse were evaluated: landfilling with utilization of landfill gas, anaerobic digestion with biogas production, incineration for power generation, and pulp production. In landfills, environmental impacts depended significantly on the biogas collection efficiency, whereas incineration of bagasse to electricity in the power plant showed better environmental performance than that of conventional low biogas collection efficiency landfills. Anaerobic digestion of bagasse in a control biogas reactor was superior to the other two energy generation options in all environmental aspects. Although the use of bagasse in pulp mills created relatively high environmental burdens, the results from the LCA revealed that other stages of the life cycle produced relatively small impacts and that this option might be the most environmentally benign alternative.

Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongsuchoto, Porntip [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: prasert.p@chula.ac.th

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BEES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using the ASTM standard life-cycle cost method, which covers the costs of initial investment, replacement, operation, maintenance and repair, and disposal. Environmental...

311

Whole Building Cost and Performance Measurement: Data Collection Protocol Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This protocol was written for the Department of Energys Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to be used by the public as a tool for assessing building cost and performance measurement. The primary audiences are sustainable design professionals, asset owners, building managers, and research professionals within the Federal sector. The protocol was developed based on the need for measured performance and cost data on sustainable design projects. Historically there has not been a significant driver in the public or private sector to quantify whole building performance in comparable terms. The deployment of sustainable design into the building sector has initiated many questions on the performance and operational cost of these buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Spees, Kathleen L.; Kora, Angela R.; Rauch, Emily M.; Hathaway, John E.; Solana, Amy E.

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

312

Building technologies program. 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability A B E G K L S U Tool Applications Free Recently Updated Athena Model life cycle assessment, environment, building materials, buildings Free software. BEES...

314

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:09am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 When estimating the cost of implementing the greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies, Federal agencies should consider the life-cycle costs and savings of the efforts. The major cost elements associated with developing and implementing a project are identified in Table 1. Table 1. Major Costs for Project Development and Implementation Cost Element Description Variables Project planning costs Preparatory work by building owners and design team. Benchmarking activities. Building audits. Developing statements of work for subcontractors. Selecting contractors. Integrated design process (for major renovations). Type of project; previous team experience; local markets; number of stakeholders

315

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the 2009 IECC. Washington, DC : Building Codes AssistanceBuilding Energy Codes. Washington, DC : Institute for MarketGuide for Policy Makers. Washington, DC : U.S. Department of

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

To Recycle or Not to Recycle: That Is the Question - Insights from Life-Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MRS BULLETIN MRS BULLETIN * VOLUME 37 * APRIL 2012 * www.mrs.org/bulletin © 2012 Materials Research Society MANUFACTURING * RECYCLING Why recycle? The most commonly stated reason for recycling is to reduce burdens associated with the disposal of our never-ending stream of wastes. Waste disposal potentially causes air and water pollution and is costly; moreover, landfi lls compete with other land uses. In addition, recycling can extend our supply of materials to alleviate scarcity and to moderate rising prices of raw materials. Furthermore, recycling is often more environmentally benign than using virgin raw materials and can reduce energy use and emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Life-cycle analysis Despite these positive attributes, not all recycling processes

319

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model [1] NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model This model calculates the 2005 national average life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for petroleum-based fuels sold or distributed in the United

320

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policy Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

322

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: COMFIE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

architects ; COMFIE is also linked to a life cycle assessment software (EQUER) allowing environmental evaluation of the building. Weaknesses Equipment is modeled very simply...

323

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Home CU Marketing Summaries. Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. About; Search; Categories (15) Advanced Materials; Biomass and Biofuels; Building ...

325

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 -...

326

Life Cycle Assessment of a Pilot Scale Farm-Based Biodiesel Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study used environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate waste vegetable oil (WVO) biodiesel production at the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus, Centre for (more)

Wasserman, Eli Shawn Jordan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

328

Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Li-Ion Battery Recycling Processes by Life-Cycle Analysis Electric Vehicles and the Environment...

329

Life-cycle Environmental Inventory of Passenger Transportation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inLife?Cycle InventoriesUsingHybridApproaches. EEA2006]EmissionInventoryGuidebook;Activities080501?I:NationalLightingInventoryand EnergyConsumption

Chester, Mikhail V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance and optimization are essential elements of any serious technological endeavor, including efforts to improve energy efficiency. Commissioning is an important tool in this respect. The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver-if not exceed-the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, one-time or repeated commissioning (often called retrocommissioning) identifies the almost inevitable drift in energy performance and puts the building back on course, often surpassing the original design intent. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to improving performance, rather than a discrete technology.

Mills, Evan

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA Clean Energy-Environment Guide to Actio: Policies, BestIn EPA Clean Energy-Environment Guide to Actio: Policies,Program. Building Energy Codes Resource Guide for Policy

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Residential Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

types. National energy savings are reported, in addition to economic metrics by state and climate zone. In considering cost-effectiveness, longer term energy savings are balanced...

334

Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Key Role of Lower-Level Meridional Shear in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of idealized nonlinear life cycle experiments is performed to compare changes in life cycle behavior caused by upper-level and near-surface meridional shear of the initial zonal wind. It is shown that both the eddy kinetic energy and the ...

Dennis L. Hartmann

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part I: Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a two-part series in which the life cycles of numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The life cycle data for six clouds with a range of cloud-top heights are isolated from an ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Experiences with early life-cycle performance modeling for architecture assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe our preliminary experiences of a performance modeling "Blending" approach for early life-cycle architecture assessment and risk mitigation in a large enterprise integration project. The goal was to use performance modeling to ... Keywords: blended performance modeling, early life-cycle risk mitigation

Paul C. Brebner

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Integrating fuzzy multicriteria analysis and uncertainty evaluation in life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interpretation phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies is often hampered by the number and the heterogeneity of impact assessment results as well as by the uncertainties arising from data, models and practitioner's choices. While decision-aiding ... Keywords: Electricity, Fuzzy sets, LCA, Life cycle assessment, Multicriteria analysis, NAIADE, Noise

Enrico Benetto; Christiane Dujet; Patrick Rousseaux

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Short communication: Application of symmetric fuzzy linear programming in life cycle assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is known to entail multiple objective decision-making in the analysis of tradeoffs between different environmental impacts. The work of Azapagic and Clift in the late 1990s illustrates the use of multiple objective linear ... Keywords: Fuzzy linear programming, Life cycle assessment

Raymond R. Tan

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Electricity Generation Technologies Speaker(s): Garvin Heath Date: April 11, 2011 - 10:00am Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Eric Masanet One barrier to the full support and deployment of alternative energy systems and the development of a sustainable energy policy is the lack of robust conclusions about the life cycle environmental impacts of energy technologies. A significant number of life cycle assessments (LCA) of energy technologies have been published, far greater than many are aware. However, there is a view held by many decision-makers that the state of the science in LCA of energy technologies is inconclusive because of perceived and real variability and uncertainty in published estimates of life cycle

343

Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle  

SciTech Connect

Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

Avery, K.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective energy codes and standards to increase efficiency in residential and commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a series of cost analyses for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1: Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings - the commercial model energy code. The cost analyses compare Standard 90.1-2010 to the prior 2007 edition, based on six prototype buildings in five representative U.S. climate zones. PNNL also conducted energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2010 and the commercial requirements of the

346

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. Building America has effectively guided the nation's home builders to embrace whole-house ventilation by developing low-cost options that adapt well to their production processes. When the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research teams began

347

Energy and Cost Savings of Retro-Commissioning and Retrofit Measures for Large Office Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy and cost savings of seven retro-commissioning measures and 29 retrofit measures applicable to most large office buildings. The baseline model is for a hypothetical building with characteristics of large office buildings constructed before 1980. Each retro-commissioning measure is evaluated against the original baseline in terms of its potential of energy and cost savings while each retrofit measure is evaluated against the commissioned building. All measures are evaluated in five locations (Miami, Las Vegas, Seattle, Chicago and Duluth) to understand the impact of weather conditions on energy and cost savings. The results show that implementation of the seven operation and maintenance measures as part of a retro-commissioning process can yield an average of about 22% of energy use reduction and 14% of energy cost reduction. Widening zone temperature deadband, lowering VAV terminal minimum air flow set points and lighting upgrades are effective retrofit measures to be considered.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Moser, Dave; Liu, Guopeng; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

Find cost-effective investments | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lamps and can save 10 per sign annually in electricity costs. Swap out incandescent light bulbs with ENERGY STAR certified CFLs or LEDs in your desk, task, and floor lamps....

349

Model standards interoperability across domains, the life cycle ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Schedule Cost classification by Work Breakdown Structure MIL-STD-881 for systems (but hybrid breakdown) Operations ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

351

Draft Final Phase II Report: Review of Life Cycle and Technology Applications of the Office of Environmental Managements Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A1-1 A1-1 APPENDIX 1 Charge Summary Issue Suggested Activities Expected Output/ Work Product Notes Charge 1 Modeling for Life-Cycle Analysis This task entails reviewing the modeling approaches for determining tank waste remediation life-cycle costs at both SRS and Hanford. This includes evaluating assumptions in system plans for completing tank waste missions at Hanford and SRS, as well as the rigor of the models for identifying activities and costs through the end of each site's program. Recommendation(s) At Hanford, LAW vitrification capital and operating costs are potentially substantially greater than competing technologies. A second LAW vitrification plant is currently part of the baseline in order to treat the balance of the

352

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

353

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DOE Sponsored Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Sponsored Tools DOE Sponsored Tools The Department of Energy sponsors continued development of a variety of building energy software tools. See the following for more information about software tools now under development: Whole-Building Energy Performance Simulation EnergyPlus A new-generation building energy simulation program from the creators of BLAST and DOE-2. DOE-2 An hourly, whole-building energy analysis program which calculates energy performance and life-cycle cost of operation. The current version is DOE-2.1E. Building Design Advisor Provides building decision-makers with the energy-related information they need beginning in the initial, schematic phases of building design through the detailed specification of building components and systems. SPARK Models complex building envelopes and mechanical systems that are beyond

355

Probabilistic Models for Life Cycle Management of Energy Infrastructure Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The degradation of aging energy infrastructure systems has the potential to increase the risk of failure, resulting in power outage and costly unplanned maintenance work. (more)

Datla, Suresh Varma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Market disruption, cascading effects, and economic recovery:a life-cycle hypothesis model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper builds upon previous work [Sprigg and Ehlen, 2004] by introducing a bond market into a model of production and employment. The previous paper described an economy in which households choose whether to enter the labor and product markets based on wages and prices. Firms experiment with prices and employment levels to maximize their profits. We developed agent-based simulations using Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool developed at Sandia, to demonstrate that multiple-firm economies converge toward the competitive equilibria typified by lower prices and higher output and employment, but also suffer from market noise stemming from consumer churn. In this paper we introduce a bond market as a mechanism for household savings. We simulate an economy of continuous overlapping generations in which each household grows older in the course of the simulation and continually revises its target level of savings according to a life-cycle hypothesis. Households can seek employment, earn income, purchase goods, and contribute to savings until they reach the mandatory retirement age; upon retirement households must draw from savings in order to purchase goods. This paper demonstrates the simultaneous convergence of product, labor, and savings markets to their calculated equilibria, and simulates how a disruption to a productive sector will create cascading effects in all markets. Subsequent work will use similar models to simulate how disruptions, such as terrorist attacks, would interplay with consumer confidence to affect financial markets and the broader economy.

Sprigg, James A.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: FRESA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FRESA FRESA A first-order screening tool to identify potentially cost-effective applications of renewable energy technology on a building and facility level. FRESA (Federal Renewable Energy Screening Assistant) is useful for determining which renewable energy applications require further investigation. Technologies represented include: active solar heating, active solar cooling, solar hot water, daylighting with windows, daylighting with skylights, photovoltaic, solar thermal electric (parabolic dish, parabolic trough, central power tower), wind electricity, small hydropower, biomass electricity (wood, waste, etc.), and cooling load avoidance (multiple glazing, window shading, increased wall insulation, infiltration control). Life-cycle cost calculations comply with 10 CFR 436.

359

Interannual Seesaw between the Aleutian and Icelandic Lows. Part I: Seasonal Dependence and Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal dependence and life cycle of the well-known interannual seesawlike oscillation between the intensities of the surface Aleutian and Icelandic lows (AL and IL, respectively) are investigated, based on the National Meteorological Center ...

Meiji Honda; Hisashi Nakamura; Jinro Ukita; Izumi Kousaka; Kensuke Takeuchi

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Life Cycle of Baroclinic Eddies in a Storm Track Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of baroclinic eddies in a controlled storm track environment has been examined by means of long model integrations on a hemisphere. A time-lagged regression that captures disturbances with large meridional velocities has been ...

Isidoro Orlanski; Brian Gross

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Methods for managing uncertainly in material selection decisions : robustness of early stage life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing alternative materials is an important tactic to improve the environmental performance of products. Currently a growing array of materials candidates confronts today's product designer. While life-cycle assessment ...

Nicholson, Anna L. (Anna Louise)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Composite Life Cycle of Maritime Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems in Scatterometer and Microwave Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines scatterometer-observed surface wind divergence and vorticity, along with precipitable water (PW), across the life cycle of tropical maritime mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) as resolved in 0.5 data. Simple composites were ...

Brian Mapes; Ralph Milliff; Jan Morzel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

144 Figure 63: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Life-Cycle157 Figure 64: Impact of Hydroelectricity on the Water68 Table 14: Hydroelectricity-Related FWSE (Data Source: (

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Prediction of the Life Cycle of a Supertyphoon with a High-Resolution Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Supertyphoon Hope (1979) from a tropical depression stage to intensification and its eventual weakening after land-fall, some 6 days later, is followed in a real-data numerical prediction experiment. The predictions are carried ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; D. Oosterhof

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Life Cycle of Thunderstorm Gust Fronts as Viewed with Doppler Radar and Rawinsonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the time-dependent analysis of the thunderstorm gust front with the use of Project NIMROD data. RHI cross sections of reflectivity and Doppler velocity are constructed to determine the entire vertical structure. The life cycle ...

Roger M. Wakimoto

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Life Cycle of a Simulated Marine Cyclone: Energetics and PV Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of an intense marine cyclone is documented in this paper. The departure of the moist dynamics from the dry baroclinic dynamics is explored from an energetics point of view. The contributions of various physical processes through ...

G. Balasubramanian; M. K. Yau

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Life Cycle of Northern Hemisphere Downward Wave Coupling between the Stratosphere and Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The life cycle of Northern Hemisphere downward wave coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere via wave reflection is analyzed. Downward wave coupling events are defined by extreme negative values of a wave coupling index based on the ...

Tiffany A. Shaw; Judith Perlwitz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Effect of Storm Life Cycle on Satellite Rainfall Estimation Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study uses storm tracking information to evaluate error statistics of satellite rain estimation at different maturity stages of storm life cycles. Two satellite rain retrieval products are used for this purpose: (i) NASAs Multisatellite ...

Alemu Tadesse; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Response of Idealized Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles to Stratospheric Flow Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamical stratospheretroposphere coupling through a response of baroclinic waves to lower stratospheric flow conditions is investigated from an initial value approach. A series of adiabatic and frictionless nonlinear baroclinic wave life cycles ...

Torben Kunz; Klaus Fraedrich; Frank Lunkeit

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Life Cycle and Internal Structure of a Mesoscale Convective Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the life cycle and precipitation structure of a Mesoscale Convective Complex (MCC) that passed through the data-collecting network of the Texas portion of the High Plains Cooperative Program (HIPLEX) on 8 June 1980. The MCC ...

Colleen A. Leary; Edward N. Rappaport

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A Local Energetics Analysis of the Life Cycle Differences between Consecutive, Explosively Deepening, Continental Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Local energetics diagnostics of the life cycles of consecutive, explosively deepening, extratropical cyclones that migrated across central North America in April 2001 are presented. Both storms developed rapidly and followed nearly identical ...

Steven G. Decker; Jonathan E. Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Finite-Amplitude Lagrangian-Mean Wave Activity Diagnostics Applied to the Baroclinic Eddy Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian-mean wave activity diagnostics are applied to the nonlinear baroclinic eddy life cycle in a simple general circulation model of the atmosphere. The growth of these instabilities through baroclinic conversion of potential temperature ...

Abraham Solomon; Gang Chen; Jian Lu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

375

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction.....................................................................................................................................................................................20 3 Transportation biofuels

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

376

Life Cycles of Persistent Anomalies. Part I: Evolution of 500 mb Height Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have conducted observational analysts to identify systematic aspects of the life cycles of persistent anomalies of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation. In the present study, we focus on the typical characteristics of ...

Randall M. Dole

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Deducing Anomalous Wave Source Regions during the Life Cycles of Persistent Flow Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous wave source regions are identified during the life cycles of persistent flow anomalies occurring over the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans during boreal winter. These cases project strongly upon the PacificNorth American and ...

Robert X. Black

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation of probabilistic underspecification as a method for incorporating uncertainty into comparative life cycle assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle assessments are quickly becoming a crucial method through which the environmental impacts of products or processes are evaluated. A concern with current practice, however, is that the use of deterministic values ...

Wildnauer, Margaret T. (Margaret Thea)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text Alternative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comparison of life cycle impact assessment tools in the case of biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) tools exist, each with different methodologies. These tools often provide different results, thus making it difficult for the LCA practitioner to determine which results yield the best or most likely estimate ...

Amy E. Landis; Thomas L. Theis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Life cycle analysis study of solar pv systems: an example ofa 2.7 kwp distributed solar pv system in singapore. Solarcycle analysis of solar pv based electricity generation: a

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Literature Review and Sensitivity Analysis of Biopower Life-Cycle Assessments and Greenhouse Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolios for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopowers life-cycle GHG emissions has been published.Phase A of this project performed an exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielding 117 references that ...

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Plant Engineering: Users Guide for the Development of Life Cycle Management Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides direction for the user in the development, implementation, and maintenance of life cycle management plans (LCMPs). The guide includes an appendix containing a template that users can employ in the development of their plant-specific LCMPs.BackgroundEPRI report TR-106109, Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide, was issued in November 1998. Since the publication of that report, the industry has gained much ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

Survey of life-cycle measures and metrics for concurrent product and process design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concurrent Engineering needs a series of measures (or measurement criteria) that are distinct to each process, and a set of metrics to check (and validate) the outcome when two or more of the life-cycle processes are overlapped or required to be executed ... Keywords: Concurrent Engineering, Knowledge-based Systems, Life-cycle Measures and Metrics, Rule-based Optimization, Rule-based Simulation

Biren Prasad

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

State of the Science of Biopower Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass power offers utilities a potential pathway to increase their renewable generation portfolio for compliance with renewable energy standards and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to current fossil-based technologies. To date, a large body of life-cycle assessment (LCA) literature assessing biopower's life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions has been published. An exhaustive search of the biopower LCA literature yielded 117 references that passed quality and relevance screening criteria. ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Life-cycle energy savings potential from aluminum-intensive vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The life-cycle energy and fuel-use impacts of US-produced aluminum-intensive passenger cars and passenger trucks are assessed. The energy analysis includes vehicle fuel consumption, material production energy, and recycling energy. A model that stimulates market dynamics was used to project aluminum-intensive vehicle market shares and national energy savings potential for the period between 2005 and 2030. We conclude that there is a net energy savings with the use of aluminum-intensive vehicles. Manufacturing costs must be reduced to achieve significant market penetration of aluminum-intensive vehicles. The petroleum energy saved from improved fuel efficiency offsets the additional energy needed to manufacture aluminum compared to steel. The energy needed to make aluminum can be reduced further if wrought aluminum is recycled back to wrought aluminum. We find that oil use is displaced by additional use of natural gas and nonfossil energy, but use of coal is lower. Many of the results are not necessarily applicable to vehicles built outside of the United States, but others could be used with caution.

Stodolsky, F.; Vyas, A.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy Standards for Public Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Standards for Public Buildings Energy Standards for Public Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Many states and local governments, as well as the federal government, have chosen to lead by example by requiring new government buildings to meet strict energy standards. DSIRE includes policies that have established green building standards, energy-reduction goals, equipment procurement requirements, and/or life-cycle cost analyses for publicly-owned buildings. Many of these policies require that new government buildings (and renovated buildings, in some cases) attain a certain level of certification under the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. Equipment-procurement policies often mandate the use of the most efficient equipment, such as equipment that meets the federal

393

Costs and benefits from utility-funded commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the costs and savings of commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings. A total of 46 EEMs were commissioned for all 16 buildings and 73 deficiencies were corrected. On average, commissioning was marginally cost effective on energy savings alone, although the results were mixed among all 16 buildings. When considered as a stand-alone measure, the median simple payback time of 6.5 years under the low energy prices in the Pacific Northwest. Under national average prices the median payback time is about three years. In estimating the present value of the energy savings from commissioning we considered low and high lifetimes for the persistence of savings from deficiency corrections. Under the low- lifetime case the average present value of the energy savings ($0. 21/ft{sup 2}) were about equal to the average commissioning costs ($0. 23/ft{sup 2}). Under the high-lifetime case the savings ($0.51/ft{sup 2}) were about twice the costs. Again, the savings would be about twice as large under national average prices. The results are subject to significant uncertainty because of the small sample size and lack of metered data in the evaluation. However, the findings suggest that investments in commissioning pay off. Building owners want buildings that work as intended, and are comfortable, healthy, and efficient. It is likely that the non-energy benefits, which are difficult to quantify, are larger than the energy-savings benefits.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effective, low-cost HVAC controls upgrade in a small bank building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the measured results from a field study of the performance of a low-cost controls retrofit in a small bank building in Knoxville, TN. The retrofit consisted of a simple upgrade of heating and cooling system controls and new operating strategies. The project was undertaken to better understand how commercial energy use measurement studies should be performed and to demonstrate the effectiveness of a low-cost controls retrofit in a small commercial building. This report describes the details of the project, including building and building system characteristics, the HVAC control changes made, energy end use patterns, and the heating and cooling energy savings achieved. An improved control strategy involving thermostat setback/setup and on/off control was devised around a single replacement programmable thermostat. The strategy allowed thermostat setback/setup control of the primary HVAC system in the building and provided on/off (time-of-day) control for the two secondary systems. The energy efficiency improvements provided a 33% reduction in heating and a 21% reduction in cooling energy consumptions. Simple payback for the retrofit, including installation cost, was under 1 year. In addition to reducing the energy needs of the building, the replacement electronic thermostat provided improved interior comfort. 9 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Sharp, T.R.; MacDonald, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Environmental Energy Technologies Division 2012 ACEEEsuitable building energy technologies in different regionssuitable building energy technologies for different building

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Public Buildings. Energy and Buildings (41), 426435.and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as buildings energy load profile, citys solar radiationthe buildings energy load profiles. The annual energythe buildings energy load profiles. The Chinese residential

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

APPLICATION OF DOE-2 TO RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

One important requirement emerging from national and international efforts to shift from our present energy-intensive way of life to an energy conservation mode is the development of standards for assessing and regulating energy use and performance in buildings. This paper describes a life-cycle-cost approach to Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS) calculated by using DOE-2: The Energy Use Analysis of Buildings Computer Program. The procedure outlined raises important questions that must be answered before the energy budgets devised from this approach can be reliably used as a policy tool, The DOE-2 program was used to calculate the energy consumption in prototype buildings and in their modified versions in which energy conservation measures were effected. The energy use of a modified building with lowest life-cycle-cost determines the energy budget for all buildings of that type. These calculations were based on a number of assumptions that may be controversial. These assumptions regard accuracy of the model, comparison of the DOE-2 program with other programs, stability of the energy budget, and sensitivity of the results to variations in the building parameters.

Lokmanhekim, M.; Goldstein, D. B.; Levine, M. D.; Rosenfield, A. H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy and cost analysis of commercial building shell characteristics and operating schedules  

SciTech Connect

Eight prototypical commercial buildings were considered, and estimates of the energy savings realized from various conservation measures are presented. For each of four building types (hospital, office, educational, and retail) two building designs representative of both pre- and post-embargo construction were analyzed. The ongoing program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to develop an engineering-economic model to forecast annual energy use in the US commercial sector. This particular study was undertaken to define relationships among energy-conservation measures, energy savings, and capital costs. Buildings were modeled and analyzed using NECAP (NASA Energy-Cost Analysis Program) based on hourly weather data in Kansas City (selected as typical of the entire country). Energy-conservation measures considered include night and weekend thermostat setback, reduction in ventilation, reduction in lighting, window alterations (shading, dual panes, and size reduction), economizer cycle, reset of supply temperature based on zone demand, and improvements in equipment efficiencies. Results indicate energy savings as a function of the capital cost of each energy-conservation measure for each of the eight buildings considered.

Johnson, W.S.; Pierce, F.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Estimate of Cost-Effective Potential for Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in 13 Major World Economies Energy Savings, Environmental and Financial Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. , 2002. A life-cycle cost analysis for setting energyM. , Nicholas Bojda, 2012b. Cost Effectiveness of High-31 Summary of Cost Effective

Letschert, Virginie E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Towards a unified cost optimal methodology for designing low energy buildings in the mediterranean sea region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing sustainability problems our world faces because of the thoughtless energy consumption and emissions production puts an increasing pressure for immediate and drastic energy saving measures. Although the consumption of energy - through appropriate ... Keywords: cost optimal, design methodology, low energy building, mediterranean

Stratis Kanarachos; Ahmed Medhat; Georgette Kanarachou; Mona Fanny

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assuring Building Performance: Creating BLISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

life cycle. The initial focus will be on developing a chiller commissioning module. A new building on the UC Berkeley campus will provide a living laboratory for developing and...

403

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates in

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Building technolgies program. 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. We have focused our past efforts on two major building systems, windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed by researchers and designers to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. In addition, we are now taking more of an integrated systems and life cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity-factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout every space in a building, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Window and lighting systems are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program.

Selkowitz, S.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

407

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Utility-Scale Wind Power: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale wind power systems was performed to determine the causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening of approximately 240 LCAs of onshore and offshore systems yielded 72 references meeting minimum thresholds for quality, transparency, and relevance. Of those, 49 references provided 126 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. Published estimates ranged from 1.7 to 81 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with median and interquartile range (IQR) both at 12 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh. After adjusting the published estimates to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the total range was reduced by 47% to 3.0 to 45 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh and the IQR was reduced by 14% to 10 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, while the median remained relatively constant (11 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh). Harmonization of capacity factor resulted in the largest reduction in variability in life cycle GHG emission estimates. This study concludes that the large number of previously published life cycle GHG emission estimates of wind power systems and their tight distribution suggest that new process-based LCAs of similar wind turbine technologies are unlikely to differ greatly. However, additional consequential LCAs would enhance the understanding of true life cycle GHG emissions of wind power (e.g., changes to other generators operations when wind electricity is added to the grid), although even those are unlikely to fundamentally change the comparison of wind to other electricity generation sources.

Dolan, S. L.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Specification and cost manual for energy retrofits on small commercial and multifamily buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This specification/cost manual was prepared as part of DOE's technical assistance to the states, utilities and other groups participating in the Commercial and Apartment Conservation Service (CACS) program. The intention is to provide a set of standardized specifications and cost information for the CACS program measures. The material was designed to be used primarily by contractors and others in preparing cost estimates at the request of CACS utilities. This information can also be used by CACS participants in preparing state plans, analyzing which measures are best-suited for their particular climates, computing paybacks, and carrying out audits. In addition, this publication may be of interest to the wider audience involved in the energy retrofit field, ranging from architects and engineers to energy auditors and building inspectors. Each specification contains several categories of information: title; description; recommendations; materials; installation; maintenance; cost information; material cost variables, installation cost variables, regional variables, and safety/hazard issues. The document is divided into six sections: building envelope and service insulation measures; HVAC measures: simple systems; HVAC measures: complex systems; lighting system measures; active solar system measures; and passive solar system measures.

Bircher, C.; Carlisle, N.; Hunter, K.; MacDonald, M.; Shapira, H.; Vineyard, T.A.; Kolb, J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

TY JOUR T1 Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems Life Cycle Assessment of Electric Power Systems JF Annual Review of Environment and Resources A1 Eric R Masanet A1 Yuan Chang A1 Anand R Gopal A1 Peter H Larsen A1 William R Morrow A1 Roger Sathre A1 Arman Shehabi A1 Pei Zhai KW electricity KW energy policy KW environmental analysis KW life cycle impact KW life cycle inventory AB p The application of life cycle assessment LCA to electric power EP technologies is a vibrant research pursuit that is likely to continue as the world seeks ways to meet growing electricity demand with reduced environmental and human health impacts While LCA is an evolving methodology with a number of barriers and challenges to its effective use LCA studies to date have clearly improved our understanding of the life cycle energy

412

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models ofthe National Building Stock. Golden, Colorado: Nationaland Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BLCC BLCC BLCC logo. Provides comprehensive economic analysis of proposed capital investments that are expected to reduce long-term operating costs of buildings or buildings systems. BLCC5 and BLCC4 are the main programs in a set of six National Institute of Standards computer programs that are especially useful for evaluating energy and water conservation projects in buildings. The programs calculate Lowest Life-Cycle Cost, Net Savings, Savings-to-Investment Ratio, Adjusted Internal Rate of Return, and Payback Period. The recently released BLCC5 is a windowed version of the DOS-based BLCC4. It contains modules to evaluate agency-funded projects according to 10CFR436A and projects that are financed through ESPC or utility contracts as directed by Executive Order 13123. The remaining modules, now in BLCC4

414

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The state of Iowa is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

415

Statewide Savings Projections from the Adoption of Commercial Building Energy Codes in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. A number of jurisdictions in the state of Illinois are considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as their commercial building energy code. This report builds on the results of a previous study, "Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions," to estimate the total potential impact of adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as a statewide commercial building code in terms of Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) savings, total primary energy savings, and pollution emissions reductions.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy technologies evaluation for the EDD Los Angeles Building. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluated the feasibility of potential energy efficiency measures (EEM`s) for the proposed EDD office building located at 5401 Crenshaw in Los Angeles, CA. The 26,748 ft{sup 2} single-story building is currently in the final design phase. Key building energy features include uninsulated exterior concrete block walls, R19 insulated roof, glazing on north and east orientations only, multiple air source rooftop packaged heat pumps, and electric resistance water heaters. For this project, DEG evaluated seven potential EEM`s from both performance and 30 year life cycle cost (LCC) perspectives.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Development of British Columbia wood pellet life cycle inventory and its utilization in the evaluation of domestic pellet applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An in-house life cycle inventory (LCI) database for British Columbia (BC) wood pellets is established. The LCI database is used to compare the performance of (more)

Pa, Ann An

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

InterTechnology Corporation report of solar energy systems installation costs for selected commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study in which the primary objective was to determine actual costs associated with the installation of solar collector and thermal energy storage subsystems in specific non-residential building applications are presented. A secondary objective of the study was to assemble details of existing solar collector and storage subsystem installations, including caveats concerning cost estimating, logistics and installation practices. The study began with the development of an exhaustive listing and compilation of basic data and contacts for non-residential applications of solar heating and cooling of buildings. Both existing projects and those under construction were surveyed. Survey summary sheets for each project encountered are provided as a separate appendix. Subsequently, the rationale used to select the projects studied in-depth is presented. The results of each of the detailed studies are then provided along with survey summary sheets for each of the projects studied. Installation cost data are summarized and the significance of the differences and similarities between the reported projects is discussed. After evaluating the data obtained from the detailed studies, methods for reducing installation labor costs are postulated based on the experience of the study. Some of the methods include modularization of collectors, preplumbing and preinsulating, and collector placement procedures. Methods of cost reduction and a summary discussion of prominent problems encountered in the projects are considered.(WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency in Texas State-Owned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Energy Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency" in Texas State-owned buildings project was begun in the spring of 1984 as a part of a multipronged effort to reduce rising energy costs in State operations. Energy audits of 21 million square feet (22% of total conditioned space) were conducted by three energy engineering firms and Texas Engineering Extension Service personnel under contract to the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Retrofits totaling $15.6 million with annual savings of $9.2 million were identified (59% ROI). This paper will detail the objectives of the project, summarize audit results, and outline financing options for individual projects.

Ponder, W. M.; Verdict, M. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Utility Activities for Nuclear Power Plant Life Cycle Management and License Renewal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to nuclear utilities on steps to take, industry activities undertaken, and products developed for life cycle management and license renewal (LCM/LR) activities. It provides information for establishing LCM/LR programs and may be useful to those underway.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS LIFE-CYCLE MANAGEMENT OF WIND TURBINES BASED ON STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING K. Smarsly1) strategies can enable wind turbine manufacturers, owners, and operators to precisely schedule maintenance behavior of wind turbines and to reduce (epistemic) uncertainty. Both the resistance parameters

Stanford University

424

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Proceedings of 2001 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and plant value. Results of applying life-cycle management (LCM) at four plants are summarized.

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Climatology of Cyclone Size Characteristics and Their Changes during the Cyclone Life Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatology of the atmospheric cyclone sizes and their change over the cyclone life cycle is analyzed on the basis of tracking 57 yr of NCEPNCAR reanalysis sea level pressure data over the Northern Hemisphere. To quantify the atmospheric cyclone ...

Irina Rudeva; Sergey K. Gulev

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Simple Model for the Baroclinic Life Cycle of Meridionally Elongated Eddies in Uniform Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly simplified model for the wavemean flow interaction in a baroclinic wave life cycle is derived from the quasigeostrophic two-layer system. The simplification is based on a sheared disturbance embedded in a zonal mean flow with uniform ...

Thomas Frisius

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hurricane Juan (2003). Part I: A Diagnostic and Compositing Life Cycle Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis of the complex life cycle of Hurricane Juan (in 2003) is undertaken to elucidate the structures and forcings that prevailed over the period leading up to the hurricanes landfall in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Despite the ...

Ron McTaggart-Cowan; Eyad H. Atallah; John R. Gyakum; Lance F. Bosart

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part II: Mixing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series in which life cycles of six numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The six clouds, selected from a single realization of a large-eddy simulation, grow as a series of ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium. Mainly due to the growing demand for lightweight and powerful batteries, lithium has become such a metal. While supplies of lithium have historically been mined from pegmatites, brine extraction from salars

431

Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering University of Maryland AC Autoclave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALCE® Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering CB Citizens Band CBGA Ceramic Ball Grid Array CCA Circuit Card Assembly CCD Charge Coupled Device CCGA Ceramic Column Grid Array CDM Charged Device Model Industry Association ELD Electroluminiscent Displays EMC Electromagnetic Compatibility EMC Encapsulated

Shapiro, Benjamin

432

System dynamics modelling of product carbon footprint life cycles for collaborative green supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments, environmental groups and industry associations are reducing greenhouse gas emissions to insure environmental sustainability. Manufacturing plays an important role in economic development but is a main cause of global warming since production ... Keywords: economic inputoutput life cycle assessment, mass customisation, product carbon footprint, system dynamics

AmyJ. C. Trappey; CharlesV. Trappey; Chih-Tung Hsiao; JerryJ. R. Ou; Chin-Tsung Chang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Surface Pressure and Precipitation Life Cycle Characteristics of PRE-STORM Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive observations of the MayJune 1985 OklahomaKansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central (OK PRE-STORM) are used to examine the life cycle characteristics of 16 mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The primary focus is on the ...

Scot M. Loehrer; Richard H. Johnson

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment of hydrogen production via natural gas steam reforming was performed to examine the net emissions of greenhouse gases as well as other major environmental consequences. LCA is a systematic analytical method that helps identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of a specific process or competing processes.

Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

435

Security Evaluation for Software System with Vulnerability Life Cycle and User Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes the definition of a security criterion and security assessment based on the criterion. More precisely, we present a stochastic model with a vulnerability life-cycle model and a user profile using continuous-time Markov chains. The ... Keywords: vulnerability, security evaluation, user profile

Hiroyuki Okamura; Masataka Tokuzane; Tadashi Dohi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that makes great strides in clarifying inconsistent and conflicting GHG emission estimates in the published literature while providing more precise estimates of GHG emissions from utility-scale CSP systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Wolf Creek Generating Station: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp. with an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at Wolf Creek Power Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Callaway Nuclear Plant: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Ameren UE with an optimized LCM plan for the main generator and exciter at Callaway Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Plan for a Nuclear Power Industry Life Cycle Management and Nuclear Asset Management Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database development plan in this report is the first phase of providing plants with a useful computerized compendium of existing worldwide equipment reliability, aging, and other life cycle management (LCM) and nuclear asset management (NAM) data for risk-based nuclear asset and project evaluation.

2003-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at South Texas Project: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides an optimized LCM plan for the main generators and exciters at the South Texas Project Power Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES--INTEGRATED LIFE-CYCLE OPTIMIZATION INITIATIVES FOR THE HANFORD RIVER PROTECTION PROJECT--WASTE TREATMENT PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the ongoing integrated life-cycle optimization efforts to achieve both design flexibility and design stability for activities associated with the Waste Treatment Plant at Hanford. Design flexibility is required to support the Department of Energy Office of River Protection Balance of Mission objectives, and design stability to meet the Waste Treatment Plant construction and commissioning requirements in order to produce first glass in 2007. The Waste Treatment Plant is a large complex project that is driven by both technology and contractual requirements. It is also part of a larger overall mission, as a component of the River Protection Project, which is driven by programmatic requirements and regulatory, legal, and fiscal constraints. These issues are further complicated by the fact that both of the major contractors involved have a different contract type with DOE, and neither has a contract with the other. This combination of technical and programmatic drivers, constraints, and requirements will continue to provide challenges and opportunities for improvement and optimization. The Bechtel National, Inc. team is under contract to engineer, procure, construct, commission and test the Waste Treatment Plant on or ahead of schedule, at or under cost, and with a throughput capacity equal to or better than specified. The Department of Energy is tasked with the long term mission of waste retrieval, treatment, and disposal. While each mission is a compliment and inextricably linked to one another, they are also at opposite ends of the spectrum, in terms of expectations of one another. These mission requirements, that are seemingly in opposition to one another, pose the single largest challenge and opportunity for optimization: one of balance. While it is recognized that design maturation and optimization are the normal responsibility of any engineering firm responsible for any given project, the aspects of integrating requirements and the management of issues across contract boundaries is a more difficult matter. This aspect, one of a seamless systems approach to the treatment of tank wastes at the Hanford site, is the focus of the Optimization Studies. This ''big O''Optimization of Life-Cycle operations is what is meant when the term ''optimization'' is used on the River Protection Project and initiatives cited in this paper. From the early contractor centric methods and processes used to move toward an integrated solution, through extensive partnering approaches, to the current quality initiatives with multi-organizational participation, significant progress is being made towards achieving the goal of truly integrated life-cycle optimization for the Department of Energy's River Protection Project and Waste Treatment Plant.

Auclair, K. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Update on maintenance and service costs of commercial building ground-source heat pump systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier paper showed that commercial ground-source heat pump systems have significantly lower service and maintenance costs than alternative HVAC systems. This paper expands on those results by adding 13 more buildings to the original 25 sites and by comparing the results to the latest ASHRAE survey of HVAC maintenance costs. Data from the 38 sites are presented here including total (scheduled and unscheduled) maintenance costs in cents per square foot per year for base cost, in-house, and contractor-provided maintenance. Because some of the new sites had maintenance costs that were much higher than the industry norm, the resulting data are not normally distributed. Analysis (O'Hara Hines 1998) indicated that a log-normal distribution is a better fit; thus, the data are analyzed and presented here as log-normal. The log-mean annual total maintenance costs for the most recent year of the survey ranged from 6.07 cents per square foot to 8.37 cents per square foot for base cost and contractor-provided maintenance, respectively.

Cane, D.; Garnet, J.M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 FURNACE AND BOILER TECHNOLOGY19 Furnace and Boiler Lifetimes Used in the LCC Analysis (PBP RESULTS FOR GAS BOILERS USING ALTERNATIVE INSTALLATION

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equipment = furnace Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orequipment = boiler Heating fuel = oil Home type = single orHOME HEATING FUEL CON 3 NATURAL GAS FROM UNDERGROUND PIPES = 1 BOTTLED GAS (LPG OR PROPANE) = 2 FUEL OIL

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cost structures and life cycle impacts of algal biomass and biofuel production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Development and extraction of energy sources, energy production and energy use have huge economic, environmental and geopolitical impacts. Increasing energy demands in tandem with reductions (more)

Christiansen, Katrina Lea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Comparative analysis of the VRF system and conventional HVAC systems, focused on life-cycle cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As concern for the environment has been dramatically raised over the recent decade, all fields have increased their efforts to reduce impact on environment. The (more)

Park, Jaesuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for project alternatives over their designated study period. ... At the request of FEMP, EIA extrapolated energy ... t = index used to designate the year of ...

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

449

Energy Price Indices and Discount Factors for Life-Cycle Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for project alternatives over their designated study period ... FEMP, EIA extrapolated energy prices after the year ... o t = index used to designate the year ...

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By DesignSupply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By DesignSupply Fan Motor Median Mean LCC Savings Ranges By Design

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy from the battery ter- most common, produces results close to the av- minals (including regenerative

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 2.3.1 Electricity Price19 2.3.2 Electricity PriceELECTRICITY PRICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1) space-conditioning annual energy consumption, 2) equipment efficiency, 3) average electricity price, and 4) marginal electricity price. All four of these inputs are used in...

454

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-1 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEOC.1.2 Residential Electricity Price Forecast (AEO 2003) AEOdoes not require electricity price trends and discount

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

37 RESULTS USING TARIFF-BASED ELECTRICITYHourly-based Electricity Price Models Tariff-based HourlyRESULTS USING TARIFF-BASED ELECTRICITY PRICES LCC Results

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Estimating future electricity rates is very difficult,payback, the required electricity rate is only for the yearcase, the year 2008. The electricity rate used in the PBP

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices Computed from Air Conditioning Load Reductions UsingRefrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE),

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Business Case for Fast Charging of Industrial Lift Truck Fleets: Life Cycle Cost Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In industrial settings, up to three battery packs are required per electric industrial lift truck: one in use, another being charged, and a third being cooled. Many industry experts see this as a financial barrier in selling electric over internal combustion (IC) industrial lift trucks. EPRI sponsored this study to provide a thorough evaluation of the economics in support of a business case for fast charging lift truck fleets.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .AND PAYBACK PERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICEUSING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICE SCENARIOS C.1 INTRODUCTION

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 1 filings. http://Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) website through Form 714annual data submitted to FERC from regulated utilities and

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building life-cycle cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EERE Releases Well-to-Wheels and Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Light ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

462

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Name 2002 Winter Meeting of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), January 11-16, 2002 Date Published 102001...

463

Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumping systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stavale et al. 2001) for a cooling tower application at thisparameters. The cooling tower pumping system serves asecond system for another cooling tower. To date, the actual

Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Consumer Life-Cycle Cost Impacts of Energy-Efficiency Standards...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump...

465

NISTIR6327 Modelling Service Life and Life-Cycle Cost of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was held in the Hilton Hotel, Gaithersburg, Maryland ... used, is an activation energy (U) detennined ... R Latanision (ed.), NACE, Houston, Texas, 1998. ...

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mi/kwh battery, from city Passenger capacity Power train dcS/kwh nominal rated capacity of or Battery energydensity,and the capacity of the battery. Faster charging essaryfor

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Retrofitting an old warehouse using vacuum insulation panels - Hygrothermal analysis and life cycle cost assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to global warming and climate change, it is now pressing to reduce the harmful anthropogenic impacts on environment. The daily consumed energy is still (more)

Lauby, Augustine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy expenses based upon electricity prices that customers may pay if electricity markets become deregulated. Electricity price trends:

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Life-cycle cost analysis of energy efficiency design options for residential furnaces and boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND PAYBACK PERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICEPERIOD RESULTS USING ALTERNATIVE ENERGY PRICE SCENARIOS C.1and payback results using alternative energy price scenarios

Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Chan, Peter; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Davis I. (1988) R. ETX-II propulsion system industry..,sulfur batteryfor the ETX-II propuLsion system. Proca. ,9thsulphur battery, in the ETX-II test vehicle. The ETX-II test

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Tool for Chem/Bio Protection of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Bio protection strategies based on user-defined scenarios. ... produces the types of analysis results that ... Based on the analyses performed, the results ...

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Engineer- an electric car practical with existingN. (1987) The BMW electric car--current devel- for electricinfrastructure for electric cars. TRRL Report LR812.

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground water source), electrically operated, unitary central air conditioners and central air conditioning heat pumps

Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Electric Vehicles: Performance, Life-Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sealed lead-acid electric and vehicle battery development.A. (1987a) ture for electric vehicles. In Resources ElectricInternational Conference. Electric Vehicle De- Universityof

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boilers > 100 Million Btu/hr_No. 2 oil fired Boilers oil fired Region: PacificElectricity Distillate (diesel) oil preheater kiln Natural

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additives in concrete) and organic substances that are emitted during or shortly after the concrete manufacturing

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fraction of national energy use, resource consumption, andfraction of national energy use, resource consumption, andLCI. Energy consumption data are aggregated into national

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxygen furnace S_DRI Direct reduced iron S_Scrap S_DRI_EAFToxic emissions Direct Reduced Iron Inputs Raw materialsEutrophication Direct Reduced Iron GWP Ozone Land use Human

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Life-Cycle Evaluation of Concrete Building Construction as a Strategy for Sustainable Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5. Map of California climate zones with average HDD and CDDaverage across climate zones) . 36 Figure 4-7.between steel and concrete frames by climate zone and

Stadel, Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Livscykelanalys fr koldioxidutslpp frn flerbostadshus; Life Cycle Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Residential Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Today, about 15 to 20 percent of Swedens total emission of carbon dioxide can be traced to the household sector. By examining apartment blocks (more)

Palmborg, Sofia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for t