National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for building insulation windows

  1. Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Windows and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    including the cost of sensor and lighting Reduce ... * Smart shadings * Highly insulated windows * Windows attachment 8 Building Envelope R&D Priorities Technology 2025 ...

  2. R-5 Highly-Insulating Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-30

    Introduces DOE's Building Technologies fenestration RD&D program, and describes the highly insulated R-5 Windows and Low-e Storm Windows Volume Purchase solicitation.

  3. Vacuum Insulation for Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 29 Highly Insulating Transparent Fenestration Testing * Ultimately need to perform ASTM standards to compare VI with other products * ASTM Standard C1199 - 12 "Standard Test ...

  4. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with ...

  5. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in "kit" form.

  6. Apparatus for insulating windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, R.A.

    1984-06-19

    Apparatus for insulating window openings through walls and the like includes a thermal shutter, a rail for mounting the shutter adjacent to the window opening and a coupling for connecting the shutter to the rail. The thermal shutter includes an insulated panel adhered to frame members which surround the periphery of the panel. The frame members include a hard portion for providing the frame and a soft portion for providing a seal with that portion of the wall adjacent to the periphery of the opening. The coupling means is preferably integral with the attachment rail. According to a preferred embodiment, the coupling means includes a continuous hinge of reduced thickness. The thermal shutter can be permanently attached, hinged, bi-folded, or sliding with respect to the window and wall. A distribution method is to market the apparatus in kit'' form. 11 figs.

  7. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  8. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  9. Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a framed basement wall with insulation ...

  10. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Robert Hart, rghart@lbl.gov Stephen Selkowitz, seselkowitz@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Kevin Gaul, GaulKJ@pella.com Pella Corporation Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 04/01/2013 Planned end date: 03/31/2016 Key Milestones 1. Measured thermal performance of static prototype windows is within 0.03 Btu/hr-ft2F (NFRC tolerance) of design specifications 09/30/2014

  11. Windows and Building Envelope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows and Building Envelope Windows and Building Envelope About the Portfolio Next-generation windows and building envelope technologies have substantial technical potential to reduce energy consumption in buildings. However, to make significant progress toward the program goal, any next-generation technologies must be developed with a specific emphasis on achieving a market-acceptable installed cost to facilitate mass-market adoption. Activities in windows and building envelope will focus on

  12. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Learn more Video: Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) Hackathon PDF icon 2014 BTO Peer Review Presentation - Highly Insulating Residential Windows using Smart ...

  13. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

  14. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with integrated sensors, control logic and a motorized shade between glass panes. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 3 Residential Smart Window with integrated sensors, control logic and a motorized shade between glass panes. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3 of 3

  15. High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a window air ...

  16. Research and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope Cover of windows and envelope report, depicting a house, ...

  17. Vacuum Insulation for Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The target is to achieve an R-20 film that can be applied to existing windows. With the life expectancy of installed windows being greater than 30 years, decades and tens of ...

  18. Side-by-Side Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-08-01

    To examine the energy, air leakage, and thermal performance of highly insulating windows, a field evaluation was undertaken in a matched pair of all-electric, factory-built “Lab Homes” located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in Richland, Washington. The “baseline” Lab Home B was retrofitted with “standard” double-pane clear aluminum-frame slider windows and patio doors, while the “experimental” Lab Home A was retrofitted with Jeld-Wenź triple-pane vinyl-frame slider windows and patio doors with a U-factor of 0.2 and solar heat gain coefficient of 0.19. To assess the window, the building shell air leakage, energy use, and interior temperatures of each home were compared during the 2012 winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The measured energy savings in Lab Home B averaged 5,821 watt-hours per day (Wh/day) during the heating season and 6,518 Wh/day during the cooling season. The overall whole-house energy savings of Lab Home B compared to Lab Home A are 11.6% ± 1.53% for the heating season and 18.4 ± 2.06% for the cooling season for identical occupancy conditions with no window coverings deployed. Extrapolating these energy savings numbers based on typical average heating degree days and cooling degree days per year yields an estimated annual energy savings of 12.2%, or 1,784 kWh/yr. The data suggest that highly insulating windows are an effective energy-saving measure that should be considered for high-performance new homes and in existing retrofits. However, the cost effectiveness of the measure, as determined by the simple payback period, suggests that highly insulating window costs continue to make windows difficult to justify on a cost basis alone. Additional reductions in costs via improvements in manufacturing and/or market penetration that continue to drive down costs will make highly insulating windows much more viable as a cost-effective energy efficiency measure. This study also illustrates that highly insulating windows have important impacts on peak load, occupant comfort, and condensation potential, which are not captured in the energy savings calculation. More consistent and uniform interior temperature distributions suggest that highly insulated windows, as part of a high performance building envelope, may enable more centralized duct design and downsized HVAC systems. Shorter, more centralized duct systems and smaller HVAC systems to yield additional cost savings, making highly insulating windows more cost effective as part of a package of new construction or retrofit measures which achieve significant reductions in home energy use.

  19. Thermal insulation for buildings. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Demonstration of the Performance of Highly Insulating (R-5) Windows in a Matched Pair of Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.

    2013-12-05

    Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home’s windows has the potential to significantly improve the home’s overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high-quality installation will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the building envelope, decreasing infiltration and thus contributing to reduced heat transmission through building envelope. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. In addition to improvements in energy efficiency, highly insulating windows can have important impacts on occupant comfort by minimizing or eliminating the cold draft many homeowners experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably cooler than the room air temperature. Energy efficiency measures, such as highly insulating windows, also have the potential to decrease peak energy use in a home, which can lead to measurable peak load decreases for a utility service territory if implemented on a large scale. High-performance windows now feature triple-pane glass, double low-e coatings, and vinyl insulated frames to achieve U-factors as low as 0.2 , as compared to double-pane clear glass windows with a U-factor of 0.67, which are common in existing homes across the United States. The highly insulating windows (as they will be referred to in this document) are now available from several manufacturers and show promise to yield considerable energy savings and thermal comfort improvements in homes.

  1. Field Evaluation of Highly Insulating Windows in the Lab Homes: Winter Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Widder, Sarah H.; Bauman, Nathan N.

    2012-06-01

    This field evaluation of highly insulating windows was undertaken in a matched pair of 'Lab Homes' located on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus during the 2012 winter heating season. Improving the insulation and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows has the potential to significantly improve the home's building envelope and overall thermal performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer) through the windows. A high quality installation and/or window retrofit will also minimize or reduce air leakage through the window cavity and thus also contribute to reduced heat loss in the winter and cooling loss in the summer. These improvements all contribute to decreasing overall annual home energy use. Occupant comfort (non-quantifiable) can also be increased by minimizing or eliminating the cold 'draft' (temperature) many residents experience at or near window surfaces that are at a noticeably lower temperature than the room air temperature. Lastly, although not measured in this experiment, highly insulating windows (triple-pane in this experiment) also have the potential to significantly reduce the noise transmittance through windows compared to standard double-pane windows. The metered data taken in the Lab Homes and data analysis presented here represent 70 days of data taken during the 2012 heating season. As such, the savings from highly insulating windows in the experimental home (Lab Home B) compared to the standard double-pane clear glass windows in the baseline home (Lab Home A) are only a portion of the energy savings expected from a year-long experiment that would include a cooling season. The cooling season experiment will take place in the homes in the summer of 2012, and results of that experiment will be reported in a subsequent report available to all stakeholders.

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Nonresidential Window Stock and Sales, by Glass Type Existing U.S. Stock Vision Area of New Windows (Million Square Feet) Type (% of buildings) 1995 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 Single Pane 56 57 48 56 60 48 Insulating Glass (1) 294 415 373 407 476 389 Total 350 472 421 463 536 437 Clear 36% 49% 43% 44% 38% 33% Tinted 40% 24% 17% 15% 11% 10% Reflective 7% 8% 6% 4% 3% 3% Low-e 17% 19% 34% 37% 48% 54% Total 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Note(s): Source(s): (2) 1) Includes double- and

  3. Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effec guid-window repair.jpg This Top Innovation describes research by Building Science Corporation to determine that whole-house energy savings of up to 10% can be achieved ...

  4. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  5. Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Bahman Habibzadeh, U.S. Department of Energy ...

  6. Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extensive information was presented on assessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks. It ...

  7. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1979-12-07

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  8. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnes, Paul R.; Shapira, Hanna B.

    1981-01-01

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  9. Highly Insulating R-5 Windows Volume Purchase - How Utilities Can Participate Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    This fact sheet describes DOE’s Windows Volume Purchase, the benefits of highly insulated R-5 windows and low-e storm windows, and the important role that utilities can play in expanding the market for these highly insulated windows.

  10. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Windows and Building Envelope » Windows and Building Envelope Facilities Windows and Building Envelope Facilities LBNL's Advanced Windows Testbed 1 of 2 LBNL's Advanced Windows Testbed This outdoor test facility contains three, thermally-isolated chambers that have been instrumented to measure thermal, daylighting, and occupant impacts of advanced window technologies. In this setup, LBNL staff are evaluating a heat recovery/ ventilation unit (left), a

  11. Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Bahman Habibzadeh, U.S. Department of Energy View the Presentation PDF icon Windows and Building Envelope Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Window and Envelope Technologies Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Windows and Envelope Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer

  12. Research and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development Roadmap: Windows and Building Envelope Cover of windows and envelope report, depicting a house, storefront, and multiple office windows. This Building Technologies Office (BTO) Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap identifies priority windows and building envelope R&D areas of interest. Cost and performance targets are identified for each key R&D area. The roadmap describes the

  13. State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames - Research and Market Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Arasteh, Dariush; Kohler, Christian

    2007-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a market and research review related to state-of-the-art highly insulating window frames. The market review focuses on window frames that satisfy the Passivhaus requirements (window U-value less or equal to 0.8 W/m{sup 2}K ), while other examples are also given in order to show the variety of materials and solutions that may be used for constructing window frames with a low thermal transmittance (U-value). The market search shows that several combinations of materials are used in order to obtain window frames with a low U-value. The most common insulating material seems to be Polyurethane (PUR), which is used together with most of the common structural materials such as wood, aluminum, and PVC. The frame research review also shows examples of window frames developed in order to increase the energy efficiency of the frames and the glazings which the frames are to be used together with. The authors find that two main tracks are used in searching for better solutions. The first one is to minimize the heat losses through the frame itself. The result is that conductive materials are replaced by highly thermal insulating materials and air cavities. The other option is to reduce the window frame area to a minimum, which is done by focusing on the net energy gain by the entire window (frame, spacer and glazing). Literature shows that a window with a higher U-value may give a net energy gain to a building that is higher than a window with a smaller U-value. The net energy gain is calculated by subtracting the transmission losses through the window from the solar energy passing through the windows. The net energy gain depends on frame versus glazing area, solar factor, solar irradiance, calculation period and U-value. The frame research review also discusses heat transfer modeling issues related to window frames. Thermal performance increasing measures, surface modeling, and frame cavity modeling are among the topics discussed. The review shows that the current knowledge gives the basis for improving the calculation procedures in the calculation standards. At the same time it is room for improvement within some areas, e.g. to fully understand the natural convection effects inside irregular vertical frame cavities (jambs) and ventilated frame cavities.

  14. Thermal insulation for Buildings. September 1982-September 1988 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 244 citations, 92 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  15. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows and Building Envelope Facilities Windows and Building Envelope Facilities Addthis LBNL's Advanced Windows Testbed 1 of 2 LBNL's Advanced Windows Testbed This outdoor test facility contains three, thermally-isolated chambers that have been instrumented to measure thermal, daylighting, and occupant impacts of advanced window technologies. In this setup, LBNL staff are evaluating a heat recovery/ ventilation unit (left), a switchable electrochromic window (middle), and a

  16. High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a window air conditioning unit in place in a window frame. Window air conditioners are inexpensive, portable, and can be installed by home occupants, making them a good solution for spot cooling and for installing air conditioning into homes that lack ductwork. However, window air conditioners have low

  17. Pennsylvania: Window Technology First of Its Kind for Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Opti Ultra Thermal Window series introduces new high-performing windows to the commercial building industry and unlocks the potential to save energy in more of America's commercial building space.

  18. Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guides- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building America team Building Science Corporation guides contractors through several options for repairing or replacing old windows to improve air sealing and thermal performance.

  19. Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Rating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Marchesi Redouane Begag; Je Kyun Lee; Danny Ou; Jong Ho Sonn; George Gould; Wendell Rhine

    2004-10-15

    During the performance of contract DE-FC26-00-NT40998, entitled ''Affordable Window Insulation with R-10/inch Value'', research was conducted at Aspen Aerogels, Inc. to develop new transparent aerogel materials suitable for window insulation applications. The project requirements were to develop a formulation or multiple formulations that have high transparency (85-90%) in the visible region, are hydrophobic (will not opacify with exposure to water vapor or liquid), and have at least 2% resiliency (interpreted as recoverable 2% strain and better than 5% strain to failure in compression). Results from an unrelated project showed that silica aerogels covalently bonded to organic polymers exhibit excellent mechanical properties. At the outset of this project, we believed that such a route is the best to improve mechanical properties. We have applied Design of Experiment (DOE) techniques to optimize formulations including both silica aerogels and organically modified silica aerogels (''Ormosils''). We used these DOE results to optimize formulations around the local/global optimization points. This report documents that we succeeded in developing a number of formulations that meet all of the stated criteria. We successfully developed formulations utilizing a two-step approach where the first step involves acid catalyzed hydrolysis and the second step involves base catalyzed condensation to make the gels. The gels were dried using supercritical CO{sub 2} and we were able to make 1 foot x 1 foot x 0.5 inch panels that met the criteria established.

  20. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - Berkeley, CA Partner: Pella Windows - Pella, IA

  1. Thermal insulation for buildings. September 1982-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for September 1982-May 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used for the thermal insulation of buildings. Consumer acceptance of materials and weatherproofing options are included. Insulation in new and retrofitted buildings is discussed. Residential buildings, earth sheltered structures, greenhouses, and animal houses are among the structures studied. Infrared thermal sensing of heat loss, insulation placement, multilayer partition walls, and insulating windows are briefly considered. (This updated bibliography contains 299 citations, 55 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  2. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Collaborate with industry partners to improve ... value of energy efficiency Codes and Standards * Establish ... cost premium compared to standard IGU: Windows: <8ft 2 ...

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Basement Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

  4. Windows and Building Envelope Sub-Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    market entry & acceptance of window & building envelope product installation Improve testing & modeling capabilities, including window design tools to enable market adoption Technology pathways & research reports Improve performance & cost of near-term technologies & reduce manufacturing costs Documented low cost infiltration measurement methods Competitively funded projects to model attachments in window software tools Government, standards & industry orgs. & EE

  5. A generalized window energy rating system for typical office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Cheng; Chen, Tingyao; Yang, Hongxing; Chung, Tse-ming

    2010-07-15

    Detailed computer simulation programs require lengthy inputs, and cannot directly provide an insight to relationship between the window energy performance and the key window design parameters. Hence, several window energy rating systems (WERS) for residential houses and small buildings have been developed in different countries. Many studies showed that utilization of daylight through elaborate design and operation of windows leads to significant energy savings in both cooling and lighting in office buildings. However, the current WERSs do not consider daylighting effect, while most of daylighting analyses do not take into account the influence of convective and infiltration heat gains. Therefore, a generalized WERS for typical office buildings has been presented, which takes all primary influence factors into account. The model includes embodied and operation energy uses and savings by a window to fully reflect interactions among the influence parameters. Reference locations selected for artificial lighting and glare control in the current common simulation practice may cause uncompromised conflicts, which could result in over- or under-estimated energy performance. Widely used computer programs, DOE2 and ADELINE, for hourly daylighting and cooling simulations have their own weaknesses, which may result in unrealistic or inaccurate results. An approach is also presented for taking the advantages of the both programs and avoiding their weaknesses. The model and approach have been applied to a typical office building of Hong Kong as an example to demonstrate how a WERS in a particular location can be established and how well the model can work. The energy effect of window properties, window-to-wall ratio (WWR), building orientation and lighting control strategies have been analyzed, and can be indicated by the localized WERS. An application example also demonstrates that the algebraic WERS derived from simulation results can be easily used for the optimal design of windows in buildings similar to the typical buildings. (author)

  6. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Insulated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New Paltz, New York | Department of Energy Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New Paltz, New York Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New Paltz, New York In this study, the U.S. Department of Energy's team Building America Partner-ship for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) worked with Kinsley Construction Company to evaluate the real-world performance of insulated

  7. Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a framed basement wall with insulation in between the studs. Efficient and durable construction practices for basements are critical because basements can account for 10% to 30% of a home's total heat loss and provide significant risk of moisture problems due to extensive cold surfaces at the walls and slab. For this Top Innovation award,

  8. Drafty Windows: Is it Better to Insulate or Replace Them?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I’ve lived in my condominium for several years, and though it naturally stays cooler in the summer (with all west-facing windows) I struggle to keep it warm in the winter without taking out a loan to pay utilities

  9. Application issues for large-area electrochromic windows incommercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    Projections of performance from small-area devices to large-area windows and enterprise marketing have created high expectations for electrochromic glazings. As a result, this paper seeks to precipitate an objective dialog between material scientists and building-application scientists to determine whether actual large-area electrochromic devices will result in significant performance benefits and what material improvements are needed, if any, to make electrochromics more practical for commercial building applications. Few in-situ tests have been conducted with large-area electrochromic windows applied in buildings. This study presents monitored results from a full-scale field test of large-area electrochromic windows to illustrate how this technology will perform in commercial buildings. The visible transmittance (Tv) of the installed electrochromic ranged from 0.11 to 0.38. The data are limited to the winter period for a south-east-facing window. The effect of actual device performance on lighting energy use, direct sun control, discomfort glare, and interior illumination is discussed. No mechanical system loads were monitored. These data demonstrate the use of electrochromics in a moderate climate and focus on the most restrictive visual task: computer use in offices. Through this small demonstration, we were able to determine that electrochromic windows can indeed provide unmitigated transparent views and a level of dynamic illumination control never before seen in architectural glazing materials. Daily lighting energy use was 6-24 percent less compared to the 11 percent-glazing, with improved interior brightness levels. Daily lighting energy use was 3 percent less to 13 percent more compared to the 38 percent-glazing, with improved window brightness control. The electrochromic window may not be able to fulfill both energy-efficiency and visual comfort objectives when low winter direct sun is present, particularly for computer tasks using cathode-ray tube (CRT) displays. However, window and architectural design as well as electrochromic control options are suggested as methods to broaden the applicability of electrochromics for commercial buildings. Without further modification, its applicability is expected to be limited during cold winter periods due to its slow switching speed.

  10. NON-INTRUSIVE SENSOR FOR GAS FILL VERIFICATION OF INSULATED GLASS WINDOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Freedman; Paul L. Kebabian; Richard R. Romano; James Woodroffe

    2003-10-01

    A sensor capable of measuring the amount of oxygen (an unwanted component that is only present because of improper filling or seal failure) within an argon-filled insulated glass window has been designed, built and successfully tested. It operates by using the optical absorption of oxygen in the atmospheric A-band centered at 762 nm. Light emitted by an argon-filled surface glow discharge lamp is Zeeman-tuned on and off an oxygen absorption line using an AC-modulated electromagnet. In the presence of oxygen, the change in the measured intensity of the lamp, obtained using standard demodulation techniques, is proportional to the oxygen column density. Measurements using an industry-standard insulated glass window indicate that the sensor can measure the amount of oxygen in a nominally argon-filled IG window (with a window gap of 10 mm) with a precision of 0.50% oxygen using a 16 second integration time. This level of precision is well within the limits required by the IG window manufacturing industry for proper monitoring of newly manufactured window units.

  11. Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Field and lab studies by Building America teams BSC, PHI, and Northern STAR characterize the thermal, air, and vapor resistance properties of rigid foam insulation and describe best practices for their use on walls, roofs, and foundations.

  12. Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The OptiQ™ Ultra Thermal Window series introduces new high-performing windows to the commercial building industry and unlocks the potential to save energy in more of America’s commercial building space.

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guide

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guide TOP INNOVATOR: BSC Old single-glazed windows have such low thermal resistance that their effect on the overall thermal resistance of the walls can be staggering. Building America recommends several ways to improve the performance of existing windows at varying price points. Owners of older homes who want to improve their homes' efficiency often conclude that window replacement is a necessary first step. They are right that windows can be a

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Residential Prime Window Sales, by Glass Type (Million Units) 1980 8.6 34% 0.0 0% 16.6 66% 25.2 100% 1990 4.9 14% 12.0 34% 18.7 53% 35.6 100% 1993 2.8 14% 17.2 84% 0.4 2% 20.4 100% 1995 5.5 12% 37.8 85% 1.3 3% 44.5 100% 1999 4.8 8% 55.2 89% 2.0 3% 62.0 100% 2001 3.9 7% 50.9 90% 1.5 3% 56.3 100% 2003 4.7 7% 55.9 89% 2.2 4% 62.8 100% 2005 4.2 6% 63.8 91% 2.5 3% 70.5 100% 2007 2.7 5% 55.0 93% 1.4 2% 59.1 100% 2009 1.6 4% 36.2 93% 1.2 3% 38.9 100% Note(s): 1) IG = insulated glazing. Source(s):

  15. Building America Expert Meeting: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Windows Options for New and Existing Homes Building America Expert Meeting: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley

  16. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, & Repair Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    In this Top Innovation profile, Building Science Corporation guides contractors through several options for repairing or replacing old windows to improve air sealing and thermal performance.

  17. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retrofits | Department of Energy Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement, on Sept. 9, 2014. Thomas Culp, Birch Point Consulting, LLC, discussed the development of low-e storm windows and examples of success

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Industry Use Shares of Mineral Fiber (Glass/Wool) Insulation (1) 1997 1999 2001 2003 2004 2005 Insulating Buildings (2) Industrial, Equipment, and Appliance Insulation Unknown Total Note(s): 1) Based on value of shipments. 2) Including industrial. Source(s): DOC, Annual Survey of Manufacturers: Value of Product Shipments 2005, Nov. 2006, Table 1, p. 54 for 2003-2005; and DOC, 2001 Annual Survey of Manufacturers: Value of Product Shipments, Dec. 2002, p. 65 for 1997-2001. 100% 100% 100% 100%

  19. Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-12-23

    Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Nonresidential Window Sales, by Type and Census Region (Million Square Feet of Vision Area) (1) Northeast Midwest South West Total Type 1995 2009 1995 2009 1995 2009 1995 2009 1995 2009 New Construction Commercial Windows (2) 4 15 16 22 21 58 13 25 54 120 Curtain Wall 3 10 6 16 16 41 8 18 33 84 Store Front 7 10 11 16 14 41 11 18 43 85 Total (3) 14 36 33 53 51 140 32 60 130 289 Remodeling/Replacement Commercial Windows (2) 18 12 25 17 46 45 27 19 116 93 Curtain Wall 4 2 6 3 8 7 10 3 28 15 Store

  1. Windows and Building Envelope Sub-Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & tools that reduce the amount of energy lost through building enclosures; contribute to ... products & systems that can reduce energy lost through building enclosures Manufacturers ...

  2. Building America Expert Meeting: Windows Options for New and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. ...

  3. Promising Technology: R-5 Window Replacements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A significant amount of the energy used to heat and cool commercial buildings is lost through inefficient windows. Incorporating windows into a building that are resistant to heat transfer can significantly reduce the amount of energy that is lost through windows. R-values are an indication of how resistant a window is to heat transfer, and a larger R-value indicates a more insulating window. An R-5 window represents an efficient window, and has a larger R-value than what is required to qualify for ENERGY STAR.

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Excavationless: Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project describes an innovative, minimally invasive building foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home that uses hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 2005 Residential Prime Window Stock (Million Households) Double Pane Census Division New England 5.3 Middle Atlantic 15.0 East North Central 17.3 West North Central 7.7 South Atlantic 21.3 East South Central 6.8 West South Central 12.1 Mountain 7.3 Pacific 16.4 United States 109.2 Selected States New York 7.0 Florida 6.7 Texas 7.6 California 12.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Respondents were shown pictures of different types of window glass and were asked "Which picture best describes the type

  6. Highly Insulating Windows for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reliability in Fenestration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, David

    2010-11-30

    EverSealed Windows, Inc. (ESW) agreed in early 2006, prior to the contract award, to add three additional deliverables to the Project (new Milestones 30, 31 and 32), and have the results of these three deliverables form the basis of the go/no-go decision for proceeding from BP1 to BP2. ESW completed all three milestones and the DOE agreed in November 2006 to continue the Project. ESW subsequently initiated work on BP2 and its two milestones. These were to (1) Assemble and test glass-to-metal bonded coupons to test the strength of ESW's glass-to-metal bonds (ESW's Test Vehicle 1 or TV1), and (2) to assemble and test the hermeticity of glass and metal packages (ESW's Test Vehicle 2 or TV2). ESW completed both milestones of BP2 in late 2010, demonstrating that its bonds were both strong enough and hermetic enough that vacuum insulating glass units could be assembled and survive a 40+ year service life in any climate in North America. Based on the accomplishments in BP-1, the DOE held a go/no-go meeting in Washington, DC in mid-November 2006 and moved the Project into Budget Period 2 (BP-2). During this go/no-go meeting, the DOE expressed a concern that ESW did not have a back-up plan or process should ESW be unable to make its diffusion bonding process more than adequate for the necessary bond strength and hermeticity of the seal. ESW suggested and volunteered to investigate using a glass frit (i.e., solder glass) as a back-up to its diffusion bonding of glass to oxidized metal.

  7. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices TOP INNOVATOR: BSC, PHI, NorthernSTAR Field studies by Building America's research teams show the most effective ways to take advantage of the thermal, air, and vapor resistance properties of rigid foam insulation on walls, roofs, and foundations. Building America has been advocating the use of rigid foam sheathing insulation for years as a means to improve the home's thermal envelope by increasing R-value while minimizing thermal bridging in wood-framed

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Residential Storm Window and Door Shipments, by Frame Type (Million Units) Type 1990 2000 2005 2008 1990 2000 2005 2008 1990 2000 2005 2008 Aluminum 10 8 7 N/A 2 4 4 3 12 12 11 N/A Wood 0 0 0 N/A 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A Other (1) 1 2 2 N/A 0 1 2 1 1 4 4 N/A Total (2) 11 11 9 N/A 2 6 6 4 13 16 15 N/A Note(s): Windows Doors Total 1) Other includes metal over wood/foam core or vinyl, etc. 2) Due to rounding, sums may not add up to totals. Source(s): AAMA/NWWDA, Industry Statistical Review and Forecast

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Insulating Glass Historical Penetration, by Sector (Percent of New Sales) (1) Sector 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2009 Residential 73% 86% 89% 92% 94% 95% Nonresidential 63% 80% 84% 86% 88% 89% Note(s): 1) Usage is a good indication of sales. Includes double- and triple-pane sealed units. Source(s): Ducker Research, Industry Statistical Review and Forecast 1992-1993 for 1985; AAMA/Ducker Research, Industry Statistical Review and Forecast 1993 for 1990; AAMA/WDMA, 2000 AAMA/WDMA Industry

  10. Building America Solution Center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    design and construction topics, including air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality, and much more. Explore the Building America Solution Center. ...

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Residential Prime Window Sales, by Frame Type (Million Units) (1) New Construction 1990 1995 2000 2005 2007 2009 Remodeling/Replacement 1990 1995 2000 2005 2007 2009 Total Construction 1990 1995 2000 2005 2007 2009 Note(s): Source(s): AAMA, Industry Statistical Review and Forecast 1992, 1993 for Note 2; AAMA/NWWDA, Industry Statistical Review and Forecast 1996, 1997, Table 6, p. 6 for 1990; AAMA/WDMA, 2000 AAMA/WDMA Industry Statistical Review and Forecast, Feb. 2001, p. 6 for 1995; 2003

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.2 Windows

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Typical Thermal Performance of Residential Windows, by Type Single-Glazed Clear Single-Glazed with Bronze Tint Double-Glazed Clear Double-Glazed with grey/Bronze Tint Double-Glazed with High Performance Tint Double-Glazed with High-Solar Gain Low-e Glass, Argon/Krypton Gas Double-Glazed with Moderate-Solar Gain Low-e Glass, Argon/Krypton Gas Double-Glazed with Low-Solar Gain Low-e (1) Glass, Argon/Krypton Gas Triple-Glazed (2) with High-Solar Gain Low-e Glass, Argon/Krypton Gas (3)

  13. Solar Energy Windows and Smart IR Switchable Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarny, James; Kornish, Brian

    2011-09-30

    The three building envelope functions with the largest impact on the energy usage are illumination, energy flux and energy production. In general, these three functions are addressed separately in the building design. A step change toward a zero-energy building can be achieved with a glazing system that combines these three functions and their control into a single unit. In particular, significant value could be realized if illumination into the building is dynamically controlled such that it occurs during periods of low load on the grid (e.g., morning) to augment illumination supplied by interior lights and then to have that same light diverted to PV energy production and the thermal energy rejected during periods of high load on the grid. The objective of this project is to investigate the feasibility of a glazing unit design that integrates these three key functions (illumination and energy flux control, and power production) into a single module.

  14. Examination of the technical potential of near-infrared switching thermochromic windows for commercial building applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Lee, Eleanor S.; Clavero, Cesar

    2013-12-01

    Current thermochromic windows modulate solar transmission primarily within the visible range, resulting in reduced space-conditioning energy use but also reduced daylight, thereby increasing lighting energy use compared to conventional static, near-infrared selective, low-emittance windows. To better understand the energy savings potential of improved thermochromic devices, a hypothetical near-infrared switching thermochromic glazing was defined based on guidelines provided by the material science community. EnergyPlus simulations were conducted on a prototypical large office building and a detailed analysis was performed showing the progression from switching characteristics to net window heat flow and perimeter zone loads and then to perimeter zone heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) and lighting energy use for a mixed hot/cold climate and a hot, humid climate in the US. When a relatively high daylight transmission is maintained when switched (Tsol = 0.10-0.50, Tvis = 0.30-0.60) and if coupled with a low-e inboard glazing layer (e = 0.04), the hypothetical thermochromic window with a low critical switching temperature range (14-20°C) achieved reductions in total site annual energy use of 14.0-21.1 kWh/m2-floor-yr or 12-14%2 for moderate- to large-area windows (WWR≄0.30) in Chicago and 9.8-18.6 kWh/m2-floor-yr or 10-17%3 for WWR≄0.45 in Houston compared to an unshaded spectrally-selective, low-e window (window E1) in south-, east-, and west-facing perimeter zones. If this hypothetical thermochromic window can be offered at costs that are competitive to conventional low-e windows and meet aesthetic requirements defined by the building industry and end users, then the technology is likely to be a viable energy-efficiency option for internal load dominated commercial buildings.

  15. A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S; Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

  16. Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector October 19, 2011 - 1:10pm Addthis An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as

  17. Window Spacers and Edge Seals in Insulating Glass Units: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINTEF Building and Infrastructure; Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Bergh, Sofie Van Den; Hart, Robert; Jelle, Bjrn Petter; Gustavsen, Arild

    2013-01-31

    Insulating glass (IG) units typically consist of multiple glass panes that are sealed and held together structurally along their perimeters. This report describes a study of edge seals in IG units. First, we summarize the components, requirements, and desired properties of edge construction in IG units, based on a survey of the available literature. Second, we review commercially available window edge seals and describe their properties, to provide an easily accessible reference for research and commercial purposes. Finally, based on the literature survey and review of current commercial edge seal systems, we identify research opportunities for future edge seal improvements and solutions.

  18. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

  19. A protocol for lifetime energy and environmental impact assessment of building insulation materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S. Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre O.

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist, which provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different building insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines. - Highlights: • We proposed a protocol to evaluate the environmental impacts of insulation materials. • The protocol considers all life cycle stages of an insulation material. • Both the direct environmental impacts and the indirect impacts are defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided operational energy’ is defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided environmental impact’ is defined.

  20. List of Building Insulation Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windows Biomass Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Water Heat Wind Yes Ameren Illinois (Electric) -...

  1. Technology Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Trade-Friendly Retrofit Insulated Panels for Existing Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For this project with the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Home Innovation Research Labs, the retrofit insulated panels relied on an enhanced expanded polystyrene (EPS) for thermal...

  2. Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. T

  3. A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with CO2 | Department of Energy A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend Materials with CO2 A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend Materials with CO2 ISTN extruded polystyrene (XPS) board produced in factory demonstration ISTN extruded polystyrene (XPS) board produced in factory demonstration Lead Performer: Industrial Science & Technology Network - Lancaster, PA DOE Funding: $400,000 Cost Share: $80,000 Project Term: 1/1/2014 -

  4. Installing Windows with Foam Sheathing on a Wood-Frame Wall: January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-05-01

    In most wall assemblies, connection details around windows have been the source of problems with water penetration into the building. This report describes how to install a window into a wall with insulating sheathing as an integrated drainage plane.

  5. Income Tax Deduction for the Installation of Building Insulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A residential taxpayer is entitled to an Indiana income tax deduction on the materials and labor used to install insulation in a taxpayer’s principal place of residence in Indiana. 

  6. Building America Case Study: Innovative Retrofit Foundation Insulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The strategy relies on a three-step process: 1. Fill open concrete block cores entirely with a Class II vapor-retarding solid insulating fll such as closed-cell spray polyurethane ...

  7. Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development: A Roadmap for Emerging Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This Building Technologies Office (BTO) Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap identifies priority windows and building envelope R&D areas of interest. Cost and performance targets are identified for each key R&D area. The roadmap describes the technical and market challenges to be overcome, R&D activities and milestones, key stakeholders, and potential energy savings that could result if cost and performance targets are met. Methods for improving technology performance and specific strategies for reducing installed costs and mitigating any other market barriers, which would increase the likelihood of mass-market technology adoption, are identified. This roadmap is a useful resource for public and private decision makers evaluating and pursuing high-impact R&D focused on advancing next-generation energy efficient windows and building envelope technologies.

  8. Building America Case Study: Exterior Insulation Pre- and Post...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The control house, Test House 3, meets criteria from the HPwES pro- gram, including dense-pack walls and window upgrades. IBACOS worked with GHA to retrofit three houses, including ...

  9. Role of Highly Insulating Windows in Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Residential Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "What emerging innovations are the key to future homes?"

  10. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project by Building Science Corporation focuses on the field implementation of taped board insulation as the drainage plane in both new and retrofit residential applications.

  11. Assessment of the Potential to Achieve very Low Energy Use in Public Buildings in China with Advanced Window and Shading Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor; Pang, Xiufeng; McNeil, Andrew; Hoffmann, Sabine; Thanachareonkit, Anothai; Li, Zhengrong; Ding, Yong

    2015-05-29

    As rapid growth in the construction industry continues to occur in China, the increased demand for a higher standard living is driving significant growth in energy use and demand across the country. Building codes and standards have been implemented to head off this trend, tightening prescriptive requirements for fenestration component measures using methods similar to the U.S. model energy code American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1. The objective of this study is to (a) provide an overview of applicable code requirements and current efforts within China to enable characterization and comparison of window and shading products, and (b) quantify the load reduction and energy savings potential of several key advanced window and shading systems, given the divergent views on how space conditioning requirements will be met in the future. System-level heating and cooling loads and energy use performance were evaluated for a code-compliant large office building using the EnergyPlus building energy simulation program. Commercially-available, highly-insulating, low-emittance windows were found to produce 24%–66% lower perimeter zone HVAC electricity use compared to the mandated energy-efficiency standard in force (GB 50189-2005) in cold climates like Beijing. Low-e windows with operable exterior shading produced up to 30%–80% reductions in perimeter zone HVAC electricity use in Beijing and 18%–38% reductions in Shanghai compared to the standard. The economic context of China is unique since the cost of labor and materials for the building industry is so low. Broad deployment of these commercially available technologies with the proper supporting infrastructure for design, specification, and verification in the field would enable significant reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.

  12. Assessment of the Potential to Achieve very Low Energy Use in Public Buildings in China with Advanced Window and Shading Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Eleanor; Pang, Xiufeng; McNeil, Andrew; Hoffmann, Sabine; Thanachareonkit, Anothai; Li, Zhengrong; Ding, Yong

    2015-05-29

    As rapid growth in the construction industry continues to occur in China, the increased demand for a higher standard living is driving significant growth in energy use and demand across the country. Building codes and standards have been implemented to head off this trend, tightening prescriptive requirements for fenestration component measures using methods similar to the U.S. model energy code American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1. The objective of this study is to (a) provide an overview of applicable code requirements and current efforts within China to enable characterization and comparison of window and shading products,more » and (b) quantify the load reduction and energy savings potential of several key advanced window and shading systems, given the divergent views on how space conditioning requirements will be met in the future. System-level heating and cooling loads and energy use performance were evaluated for a code-compliant large office building using the EnergyPlus building energy simulation program. Commercially-available, highly-insulating, low-emittance windows were found to produce 24%–66% lower perimeter zone HVAC electricity use compared to the mandated energy-efficiency standard in force (GB 50189-2005) in cold climates like Beijing. Low-e windows with operable exterior shading produced up to 30%–80% reductions in perimeter zone HVAC electricity use in Beijing and 18%–38% reductions in Shanghai compared to the standard. The economic context of China is unique since the cost of labor and materials for the building industry is so low. Broad deployment of these commercially available technologies with the proper supporting infrastructure for design, specification, and verification in the field would enable significant reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the near term.« less

  13. A New Generation of Building Insulation by Foaming Polymer Blend...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing advanced material composites with pore morphology control and CO2 foaming to ... the building materials market with an industrial andor venture-capital partner from ...

  14. An analysis of different insulation strategies for earth-sheltered buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forowicz, T.Z. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Dept. of Architecture; [Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Fundamental Technological Research; [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of the energy performance of various insulation configurations for earth-sheltered buildings. It discusses the effectiveness of each insulation configuration in reducing the heating and cooling load. The long-term unsteady thermal processes between the building and the surrounding soil are considered. The mathematical model of the problem consists of a heat conduction equation with appropriate boundary and initial conditions. The variations in outside air temperature are driven by a harmonic function. The set of algebraic equations obtained by balancing the elementary heat flows into control elements is solved by an explicit scheme. The simulation program enables a two-dimensional thermal analysis in two cross sections for an underground building of any size situated at any depth. It predicts the heat flow between the building and the surrounding soil and through the ground`s surface. Internal building surface and soil temperatures are also calculated.

  15. Building America Case Study: Exterior Insulation Pre- and Post...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOEGO-102015-4607 *June 2015 BUILDING AMERICA CASE STUDY: WHOLE-HOUSE SOLUTIONS FOR EXISTING HOMES Project Cost and Projected Annual Utility Cost Savings* Test House 1: * Project ...

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 U.S. Insulation Demand, by Type (Million Pounds) (1) Insulation Type 1992 2001 2006 (1) Fiberglass 2,938 55% 3,760 54% 4,085 53% Foamed Plastic 1,223 23% 1,775 25% 1,955 26% Cellulose 485 9% 665 9% 730 10% Mineral Wool 402 8% 445 6% 480 6% Other 309 6% 370 5% 395 5% Total 5,357 100% 7,015 100% 7,645 100% Note(s): 1) Projected. Source(s): National Insulation Association, www.insulation.org, Aug. 2006.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Case Study, The Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio (Education) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Footprint: 3 Classrooms (1) 1 Conference Room 1 Adminstration Office Auditorium, 100 seats 6 Small Offices Atrium Wastewater Treatment Facility Shell Windows Material: Green Tint Triple Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Grey Tint Double Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Fenestration(square feet) Window Wall (2) window/wall l Atrium, Triple Pane (3)

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Thermal Performance of Insulation Fiberglass (2) Perlite/Vermiculite Batts (3) Loose-Fill 2.1 - 3.7 Loose-Fill Foam Boards Spray-Applied Expanded Polystyrene 3.9 - 4.4 Rock Wool (2) Polyisocyanurate/Polyurethane 5.6 - 7.0 Loose-Fill Phenolic 4.4 - 8.2 Cellulose Reflective Insulation 2 - 17 Loose-Fill Vacuum Powder Insulation 25 - 30 Spray-Applied Vacuum Insulation Panel 20 - 100 Note(s): Source(s): 3.1 - 3.7 2.9 - 3.5 1) Hr-SF-F/Btu-in. Does not include the effects of aging and settling. 2)

  19. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes a low-cost, low-tech attic insulation technique developed by the ARIES Building America team with help from Southern Energy Homes and Johns Manville. Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production and transportation constraints. The simplicity of this dense-pack solution to increasing attic insulation R-value promises real hope for widespread industry adoption.

  20. Vacuum Insulation for Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... as quickly as possible 4 Approach * Use basic processes and materials to form smooth ... Capsules Deposited using Dip Coating, demonstrating virtually no visual degradation. ...

  1. EERE Success Story-Energy Efficient Windows to Reach Market Quicker with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Tool | Department of Energy Energy Efficient Windows to Reach Market Quicker with New Tool EERE Success Story-Energy Efficient Windows to Reach Market Quicker with New Tool March 31, 2016 - 11:36am Addthis PPG Industriesñ€™ online tool, Construct, allows users to quickly build a virtual Insulated Glass Unit (IGU) and calculate its thermal and optical properties. Image credit: PPG Industries. PPG Industries' online tool, Construct, allows users to quickly build a virtual Insulated

  2. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Insulation A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 2012 May 2012 * PNNL-20972 BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 17. R BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES Energy Renovations Volume 17: Insulation A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael C. Baechler, Project Manager K. T. Adams, M. G. Hefty, and T. L. Gilbride and Oak

  3. Carpe Diem: Install Insulated Roman Shades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As I mentioned in yesterday's blog, I had insulated window quilts installed on most of my home's windows.

  4. Effectiveness of duct sealing and duct insulation in multi-family buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karins, N.H.; Tuluca, A.; Modera, M.

    1997-07-01

    This research investigated the cost-effectiveness of sealing and insulating the accessible portions of duct systems exposed to unconditioned areas in multifamily housing. Airflow and temperature measurements were performed in 25 apartments served by 10 systems a 9 multi-family properties. The measurements were performed before and after each retrofit, and included apartment airflow (supply and return), duct system temperatures, system fan flow and duct leakage area. The costs for each retrofit were recorded. The data were analyzed and used to develop a prototypical multifamily house. This prototype was used in energy simulations (DOE-2.1E) and air infiltration simulations (COMIS 2.1). The simulations were performed for two climates: New York City and Albany. In each climate, one simulation was performed assuming the basement was tight, and another assuming the basement was leaky. Simulation results and average retrofit costs were used to calculate cost-effectiveness. The results of the analysis indicate that sealing leaks of the accessible ductwork is cost-effective under all conditions simulated (simple payback was between 3 and 4 years). Insulating the accessible ductwork, however, is only cost-effective for buildings with leaky basement, in both climates (simple paybacks were less than 5 years). The simple payback period for insulating the ducts in buildings with tight basements was greater than 10 years, the threshold of cost-effectiveness for this research. 13 refs., 5 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Building America Case Study: Excavationless Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NorthernSTAR

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  6. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window Types Window Types A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto A wood-frame window with insulated window glazing. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/chandlerphoto Windows come in a number of different frame and glazing types. By combining an energy-efficient frame choice with a glazing type tailored to your climate and application, you can customize each of your home's windows. Types of Window Frames Improving the thermal resistance

  7. Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows! | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows Spring Home Maintenance: Windows, Windows, Windows April 26, 2013 - 11:42am Addthis Caulking is an easy way to reduce air ...

  8. Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stansbury, E.E. , Knoxville, TN )

    1991-10-01

    An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

  9. Growth window and effect of substrate symmetry in hybrid molecular beam epitaxy of a Mott insulating rare earth titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moetakef, Pouya; Zhang, Jack Y.; Raghavan, Santosh; Kajdos, Adam P.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-07-15

    The conditions for the growth of stoichiometric GdTiO{sub 3} thin films by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated. It is shown that relatively high growth temperatures (>750 Degree-Sign C) are required to obtain an MBE growth window in which only the stoichiometric film grows for a range of cation flux ratios. This growth window narrows with increasing film thickness. It is also shown that single-domain films are obtained by the growth on a symmetry-matched substrate. The influence of lattice mismatch strain on the electrical and magnetic characteristics of the GdTiO{sub 3} thin film is investigated.

  10. A procedure for analyzing energy and global warming impacts of foam insulation in U.S. commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1998-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop a procedure for evaluating the energy and global warming impacts of alternative insulation technologies for US commercial building applications. The analysis is focused on the sum of the direct contribution of greenhouse gas emissions from a system and the indirect contribution of the carbon dioxide emission resulting from the energy required to operate the system over its expected lifetime. In this paper, parametric analysis was used to calculate building related CO{sub 2} emission in two US locations. A retail mail building has been used as a model building for this analysis. For the analyzed building, minimal R-values of insulation are estimated using ASHRAE 90.1 requirements.

  11. Preliminary Assessment of the Energy-Saving Potential of Electrochromic Windows in Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    Electrochromic windows provide variable tinting that can help control glare and solar heat gain. We used BEopt software to evaluate their performance in prototypical energy models of a single-family home.

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This Top Innovation profile explains how comprehensive performance testing by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory led to simple, affordable methods that homeowners could employ for increasing the energy efficiency of window air conditioners.

  13. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Until recently, energy-efficient window retrofit options have largely been limited to repair or replacement; leaving the homeowner to decide between affordability and deeper energy savings.  A new...

  14. Building America Case Study:Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board Ontario, Canada PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Climate-Exposed Long- Term Testing of Mineral Fiber Insulation Board Under Cladding Attachment Load Location: Ontario, Canada Partners: Building Science Laboratories, buildingsciencelabs.com Building Science Corporation, buildingscience.com Building Component: Above-grade frame wall Application: Both new construction and retrofit; wood-framed buildings Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable

  15. Pushing the Envelope: A Case Study of Building the First Manufactured Home Using Structural Insulated Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Hadley, Donald L.; Sparkman, Ronald; Lubliner, Michael

    2002-06-01

    This paper for the ACEEE Summer Study describes construction of the first manufactured home ever produced from structural insulated panels. The home was built in July 2000 by Champion Enterprises at its Silverton, Oregon, plant. The house was completed on the assembly line in 9 days including a 300-mile road test. The paper examines the design and approval process leading to the project, the manufacturing process and its adjustment to SIPs, and the transportation and energy performance of the house after it was built. PNNL coordinated this project and conducted long-term monitoring on the house. The WSU Energy Program conducted building diagnostics testing once the house was occupied. PNNL’s and WSU’s involvement was funded by the U.S. DOE Building America Program. The Oregon Office of Energy conducted blower door and duct blaster tests. The completed home was estimated to reduce energy consumption by 50% and to have twice the structural strength required by HUD code for manufactured homes. The demonstration proved that the manufactured home production line could support SIPs production simultaneously with traditional construction and without major modifications, the line work in parallel with SIPs and traditional materials. The project revealed severl possibilities for further improving cost and time savings with SIPs construction, that might translate into increased capacity.

  16. Window shopping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, D.

    1990-03-01

    The author addresses the energy efficiency of windows and describes changes and new products available in this consumer information article. Experiments currently being done by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Bonneville Power Authority and the Washington State Energy Office show that some of these superwindows collect more energy from the sun than they let escape from inside the home. One type of window in current production is the low-E (low-emissivity) and the IGUs (insulated glass units). Low-E techniques include glazing of the glass with various materials including polyester and metallic coatings. Other measures include filling the airspace in double pane windows with argon, aerogel or by creating a vacuum in the airspace. Another factor the author considers is ultraviolet light protection.

  17. Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 2014 Top Innovation describes a dense-pack solution to increasing attic insulation R-value for manufactured homes.

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Case Study, The Solaire, New York, New York (Apartments/Multi-Family) Building Design Floor Area: 357,000 SF Units: 293 Maximum Occupancy: 700 Floors: 27 Site Size: 0.38 Acres Typical Occupancy(1): 578 Black-Water Treatment Facility (2) Shell Windows Material: Double Glazed, Low-e, Thermal Breaks with Insulated Spacers Operable Windows Fixed Windows Visual Transminttance 0.68 0.68 Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.35 0.35 U-Factor 0.47 0.41 Wall/Roof Material R-Value Exterior Walls: Insulated

  19. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of Larry Kinney, Synergistic Building Technologies. An energy upgrade on this...

  20. Building America Case Study: Retrofit Measure for Embedded Wood Members in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls, Lawrence, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-10-01

    ?There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw have known solutions. But wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content and relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100 percent RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated vs. non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15 percent) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  1. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: John Wesley...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to build two net-zero energy homes with foam-sheathed masonry walls, low-E windows 2.9 ACH50 air sealing, transfer grilles, ducts in insulated attic, PV, and solar water heating. ...

  2. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    which saves money. Structural Insulated Panels Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated insulated structural elements for use in building walls, ceilings, floors,...

  3. Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DCCurcija@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Window Attachments 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 Planned end date: 9/30/2018 Key Milestones: 1. CGDB Releases (2); 3/31; 9/30/2015 2. Validated simulation methods for priority window attachments; 9/30/2015 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $1,100k Total future DOE $: $2,100k [estimated] Key Partners: Project Goal: Develop validated simulation models and procedures for

  4. Building America Case Study: Excavationless Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Excavationless: Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes Minneapolis, Minnesota PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study Location: Minneapolis, MN Partners: Cocoon, cocoon-solutions.com Urban Homeworks, urbanhomeworks.org/ BASF, basf.us American Environmental, LLC NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Building Component: Foundation insulation Application: Retrofit; single-family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zones: All

  5. Window Daylighting Demo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Scenario comparisons - Rapid analysis of faade options ... WINDOW 6) Strong positive response from early adopters ... and Collaborators Website team: Univ of Minnesota Building ...

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile – Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    In this Top Innovation profile, field and lab studies by BSC, PHI, and NorthernSTAR characterize the thermal, air, and vapor resistance properties of rigid foam insulation and describe best practices for their use on walls, roofs, and foundations.

  7. Building America Update - June 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2013 Building America Update - June 2013 Here you can link to the June 2013 edition of the Building America Update, which features articles on: Articles from Green Building Advisor magazine; "What's Wrong With This Picture?" for crawlspace, insulation, and window installation DOE Challenge Home news, events, and trainings New features in Building America Solution Center New publications PDF icon building_america_update_june2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Building

  8. Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing PROJECT aPPliCaTiON Construction: Existing homes with unvented cathedralized roofs. Type: Residential Climate Zones: All TEam mEmbERs Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com BASF www.basf.com Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com Honeywell http://honeywell.com Icynene www.icynene.com COdE COmPliaNCE 2012 International Code Council, International Residential Code Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over

  9. High Performance Window Attachments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Performance Window Attachments D. Charlie Curcija Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory dccurcija@lbl.gov 510-495-2602 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Impact of Project: * Motivate manufacturers to make improvements in Window systems U-Factors, SHGC and daylighting utilization * Increase awareness of benefits from energy efficient window attachments Problem Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but

  10. Establishment of a Rating Program for Pre- and Post-Fabricated Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Shah, B.; Bloyd, Cary N.

    2011-08-01

    This document was prepared to support the Smart Buildings-Material Testing and Rating Centres (SB-2) activity of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Energy Smart Communities Initiative (ESCI). The ESCI was put forward by APEC Leaders at the 2010 meeting in Japan. APEC is the premier forum for facilitating economic growth, cooperation, trade and investment in the Asia-Pacific region. This document addresses the testing and certification of building products and equipment to support building energy codes, focusing specifically on energy-efficient factory-built windows. It sets forth a proposed structure for an APEC economy to establish a testing, rating, certification, and labeling program for efficient factory-built windows. In the context of this document, efficient windows would be windows made with insulating glass (IG) and an efficient frame assembly. The minimum efficiency metric (or thermal performance) for these windows is not quantified in this document and would generally be established by a governmental agency.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Case Study, The Visitor Center at Zion National Park, Utah (Service/Retail/Office) Building Design Vistors Center (1): 8,800 SF Comfort Station (2): 2,756 SF Fee Station: 170 SF Shell Windows Type U-Factor SHGC (3) South/East Glass Double Pane Insulating Glass, Low-e, Aluminum Frames, Thermally Broken 0.44 0.44 North/West Glass Double Pane Insulating Glass, Heat Mirror, Aluminum Frames, Thermally Broken 0.37 0.37 Window/Wall Ratio: 28% Wall/Roof Materials Effective R-Value Trombe Walls:

  12. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-e Storms:  The Next “Big Thing” in Window RetrofitsOfficial Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014)

  13. Building America Case Study: Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01

    This guide provides information and recommendations to the following groups: Insulation contractors, General contractors, Builders, Home remodelers, Mechanical contractors, and Homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done. The order of work completed during home construction and retrofit improvements is important. Health and safety issues must be addressed first and are more important than durability issues. And durability issues are more important than saving energy. Not all techniques can apply to all houses. Special conditions will require special action. Some builders or homeowners will wish to do more than the important but basic retrofit strategies outlined by this guide. The following are best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and home builders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant items were discussed with the group which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane: 4. Horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible 5. Where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials 6. Frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation Section 5 of this measure guideline contains the detailed construction procedure for the three recommended methods to effectively seal the joints in exterior insulating sheathing to create a simple, long term, and durable drainage plane.

  14. Development of a Process to Build Polyimide Insulated Magnets For Operation at 350C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zatz, Irving J.

    2013-07-09

    An extensive R&D program has been conducted that has confirmed the feasibility of designing and fabricating copper alloy magnets that can successfully operate at temperatures as high as 350C. The process, originally developed for the possibility of manufacturing in-vessel resonant magnetic field perturbation (RMP) coils for JET, has been optimized for insulated magnet (and, potentially, other high temperature component) applications. One of the benefits of high temperature operation is that active cooling may no longer be required, greatly simplifying magnet/component design. These elevated temperatures are beyond the safe operating limits of conventional OFHC copper and the epoxies that bond and insulate the turns of typical magnets. This would necessitate the use an alternative copper alloy conductor such as C18150 (CuCrZr). Coil manufacture with polyimide is very similar to conventional epoxy bonded coils. Conductors would be dry wound then impregnated with polyimide of low enough viscosity to permit saturation, then cured; similar to the vacuum pressure impregnation process used for conventional epoxy bonded coils. Representative polyimide insulated coils were mechanically tested at both room temperature and 350C. Mechanical tests included turn-to-turn shear bond strength and overall polyimide adhesion strength, as well as the flexural strength of a 48-turn polyimide-bonded coil bundle. This paper will detail the results of the testing program on coil samples. These results demonstrate mechanical properties as good, or better than epoxy bonded magnets, even at 350C.

  15. Building America Technlogy Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade – Madison Residence (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This basement insulation project included a dimple map conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat installation.

  16. Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Building Science...

  17. Homeowner's Guide to Window Air Conditioner Installation for Efficiency and Comfort (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This fact sheet offers a step-by-step guide to proper installation of window air conditioning units, in order to improve efficiency and comfort for homeowners.

  18. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Choose high-performance windows that have at least two panes of glass and a low-e coating. Choose a low U-factor for better insulation in colder climates; the U-factor is the...

  19. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  20. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  1. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  2. Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings March 6, 2014...

  3. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K; Biswas, Kaushik; Song, Bo; Zhang, Sisi

    2012-08-01

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and fire safety. A related issue is the degree to which new standards are adopted and enforced. In the U.S., standards are developed using a consensus process, and local government agencies are free to implement these standards or to ignore them. For example, some U.S. states are still using 2003 versions of the building efficiency standards. There is also a great variation in the degree to which the locally adopted standards are enforced in different U.S. cities and states. With a more central process in China, these issues are different, but possible impacts of variable enforcement efficacy may also exist. Therefore, current building codes in China will be compared to the current state of building fire-safety and energy-efficiency codes in the U.S. and areas for possible improvements in both countries will be explored. In particular, the focus of the applications in China will be on green buildings. The terminology of 'green buildings' has different meanings to different audiences. The U.S. research is interested in both new, green buildings, and on retrofitting existing inefficient buildings. An initial effort will be made to clarify the scope of the pertinent wall insulation systems for these applications.

  4. Air Sealing Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-14

    This information sheet addresses windows and may also be applied to doors and other pre-assembled elements installed in building enclosures that also perform an air barrier function.

  5. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of ...

  6. Performance of a multifunctional PV/T hybrid solar window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidsson, Henrik; Perers, Bengt; Karlsson, Bjoern

    2010-03-15

    A building-integrated multifunctional PV/T solar window has been developed and evaluated. It is constructed of PV cells laminated on solar absorbers placed in a window behind the glazing. To reduce the cost of the solar electricity, tiltable reflectors have been introduced in the construction to focus radiation onto the solar cells. The reflectors render the possibility of controlling the amount of radiation transmitted into the building. The insulated reflectors also reduce the thermal losses through the window. A model for simulation of the electric and hot water production was developed. The model can perform yearly energy simulations where different features such as shading of the cells or effects of the glazing can be included or excluded. The simulation can be run with the reflectors in an active, up right, position or in a passive, horizontal, position. The simulation program was calibrated against measurements on a prototype solar window placed in Lund in the south of Sweden and against a solar window built into a single family house, Solgaarden, in Aelvkarleoe in the central part of Sweden. The results from the simulation shows that the solar window annually produces about 35% more electric energy per unit cell area compared to a vertical flat PV module. (author)

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments ...

  8. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  9. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Exterior Insulation Pre- and Post-Retrofit, Syracuse, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, Inc., was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) to research exterior wall insulation solutions for enclosure upgrades. This case study describes the deep energy retrofit of three test homes in the Syracuse, New York area and represent these enclosure strategies: rigid foam insulation; spray foam insulation, and a control house that follows Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) guidelines.

  10. External Insulation of Masonry Walls and Wood Framed Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.

    2013-01-01

    The use of exterior insulation on a building is an accepted and effective means to increase the overall thermal resistance of the assembly that also has other advantages of improved water management and often increased air tightness of building assemblies. For thin layers of insulation (1” to 1 œ”), the cladding can typically be attached directly through the insulation back to the structure. For thicker insulation layers, furring strips have been added as a cladding attachment location. This approach has been used in the past on numerous Building America test homes and communities (both new and retrofit applications), and has been proven to be an effective and durable means to provide cladding attachment. However, the lack of engineering data has been a problem for many designers, contractors, and code officials. This research project developed baseline engineering analysis to support the installation of thick layers of exterior insulation on existing masonry and frame walls. Furthermore, water management details necessary to integrate windows, doors, decks, balconies and roofs were created to provide guidance on the integration of exterior insulation strategies with other enclosure elements.

  11. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.2 Windows 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment 5.4 Water Heaters 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems 5.6 Lighting 5.7 Appliances 5.8 Active Solar Systems 5.9 On-Site Power 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the

  13. Experimental study of thermal resistance values (R-values) of low-density mineral-fiber building insulation batts commercially available in 1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tye, R.P.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    This study was initiated in June 1977 to obtain and evaluate full-thickness thermal performance data on mineral fiber, i.e., fiberglass and rock wool, batt-type insulations. The study aimed to obtain full-thickness thermal performance data and to assess other properties of mineral fiber building insulations. The physical property measurements discussed in this report provide a measure of the range of values for density, thickness, and R-value based on a sampling of low-density mineral-fiber building insulation batts purchased in the marketplace in 1977. The experimental data were used to establish mean R-values at nominal (label) thickness of R-11 and R-19 fiberglass batts and R-11 rock wool batts. The full-thickness and sliced testing techniques provided a set of R-values on the purchased samples that were converted to R-values at label thickness by using a particular correlation of apparent thermal conductivity and density. The full thickness results indicate surprisingly large percentages below labeled R-value for these four types of mineral fiber insulation. A statistical analysis of these data based on the assumption of normally distributed properties is included. This yielded estimates of similar magnitude for the population from which the samples were purchased. An urgency for continued sampling and further testing of mineral fiber insulations by many laboratories was identified. The differences between results obtained with the sliced technique and results obtained with full-thickness testing must be thoroughly understood and documented so that adjustment factors for the thickness effect can be accurately established. (LCL)

  14. Windows technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

  15. Building America Best Practices Series. Volume 17 - Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Adams, K. T.; Hefty, M. G.; Gilbride, T. L.; Love, Pat M.

    2012-05-01

    This guide will help contractors and homeowners identify ways to make their homes more comfortable, more energy efficient, and healthier to live in. It also identifies the steps to take, with the help of a qualified home performance contractor, to increase their home’s insulation, ensure healthy levels of ventilation, and prevent moisture problems. Contractors can use this document to explain the value of these insulation measures to their customers. The references in this document provide further explanation of insulation techniques and technologies.

  16. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, Ken

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago—a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area, in which high heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability, and uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies are uncomfortable for residents. In this project, the Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by DOE to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  17. Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing: New York, New York (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Building America Case Study Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing New York, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing Location: New York, NY Partners: Manufactured and modular home building companies The Levy Partnership, Inc., www.levypartnership.com SBRA, www.research-alliance.org AFM Corp., www.afmcorporation.com BASF, www.basf.com Dow Corp., www.dow.com Johns Manville, www.jm.com Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com CertainTeed,

  18. Building America Technlogy Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade- Minneapolis Residence (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This interior foundation project employed several techniques to improve performance and mitigate moisture issues: dimple mat; spray polyurethane foam insulation; moisture and thermal management systems for the floor; and paperless gypsum board and steel framing.

  19. ARPA-E Announces $30 Million in Funding for Window Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to retrofit existing single-pane windows. "At ARPA-E, we invest in technology ... materials to insulate existing windows in cases where window replacement isn't feasible." ...

  20. CAVE WINDOW

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  1. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Window_Attachments-Webinar-Oct_28_2015...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Energy Savings from Window Attachments: Please Mind the Gap Moderator: ... an economist with PNNL and team lead of Building America's Window Attachments Program. Ms. ...

  3. R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material R25 Polyisocyanurate Composite Insulation Material Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: -- NanoPore Inc. - Albuquerque, NM; -- Firestone Building Products Company - Indianapolis, IN DOE Funding:

  4. Physical properties of residential insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Research to evaluate properties, test methods and operating environments for thermal insulations used in residences is an important part of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Insulating Materials (BTESIM) program sponsored by the US DOE. Three projects were carried out under the Insulating Materials part of BTESIM. The areas discussed are: (1) the thermal performance of mineral fiber insulating batts, (2) the design density for loose-fill insulations, and (3) the operatio of recesses light fixtures covered by loose-fill cellulosic insulation.

  5. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  6. Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach, Wyandotte, Michigan (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Affordable Cold Climate Infill Housing with Hybrid Insulation Approach Wyandotte, Michigan PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New home Type: Single-family, affordable Builder: City of Wyandotte with various local homebuilders www.wyandotte.net Size: 1,150 to 1,500 ft 2 Price Range: $113,000-$138,000 Date completed: 2012 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA HERS index: * 2009 IECC = 102 * Case study house 1,475 ft 2 * With renewables = NA * Without renewables = 75 Projected annual energy cost

  7. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. ...

  8. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ... SEP program, including associated standards, protocols, and application may be used ...

  9. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft Ś 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tintź technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of power consumption by ALCWs allows for on-board power electronics for automatic matching of transmission through windows to varying climate conditions without drawing the power from the power grid. ALCWs are capable of transmitting more sunlight in winters to assist in heating and less sunlight in summers to minimize overheating. As such, they can change the window from being a source of energy loss to a source of energy gain. In addition, the scalable AMI’s roll-to-roll process, proved by making 1ft Ś 1ftALCW prototype panels, allows for cost-effective production of large-scale window panels along with capability to change easily their color and shape. In addition to architectural glazing in houses and commercial buildings, ALCWs can be used in other applications where control of sunlight is needed, such as green houses, used by commercial produce growers and botanical gardens, cars, aircrafts, etc.

  10. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  11. Why build below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlings, R.

    1982-01-01

    Building homes underground is a rapidly growing concept. From less than 200 in 1977 to about 6000 homes at present, this trend is discussed in detail. Although dirt is a poor insulator, its temperature moderating properties offer advantages. The need for insulating an underground house is discussed as well as the advantages of this type of home: (1) security advantages (fewer entrances); (2) storm resistance; (3) protection against fire; (4) lower maintenance costs; (5) space for lawn and garden is greater; and (6) these homes are quieter. The three principle types of underground homes are discussed in detail and illustrated with drawings and floor plans. These are: (1) the elevational type (most popular) with all doors and windows on one wall with other walls and roof completely covered; (2) penetrational homes with windows and doors on more than one side; and (3) the atrium home which is built around an open courtyard or atrium. Problems associated with earth-sheltered homes (underground water, structural strength requirements, building codes, indoor air pollution, costs, and financing) are discussed and suggestions are made for cutting costs. 4 references. (MJJ)

  12. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Durable Interior Foundation Insulation Retrofits for Cold Climates, Cloquet, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thermal and moisture problems in existing basements create a unique challenge as the exterior face of the wall is not easily or inexpensively accessible. This approach by the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team addresses thermal and moisture management from the interior face of the wall without disturbing the exterior soil and landscaping. It is effective at reducing energy loss through the wall principally during the heating season.

  13. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the frame and divider elements and corresponding edge-of-glass areas (based on generic correlations); The total solar and visible transmittance and reflectances of the glazing system. Color properties, i.e. L*, a*, and b* color coordinates, dominant wavelength, and purity for transmitted and reflected (outdoor) solar radiation; The damage-weighted transmittance of the glazing system between 0.3 an 0.38 microns; The angular dependence of the solar and visible transmittances, solar and visible reflectances, solar absorptance, and solar heat gain coefficient of the glazing system; The percent relative humidity of the inside and outside air for which condensation will occur on the interior and exterior glazing surfaces respectively; The center-of-glass temperature distribution.« less

  14. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the frame and divider elements and corresponding edge-of-glass areas (based on generic correlations); The total solar and visible transmittance and reflectances of the glazing system. Color properties, i.e. L*, a*, and b* color coordinates, dominant wavelength, and purity for transmitted and reflected (outdoor) solar radiation; The damage-weighted transmittance of the glazing system between 0.3 an 0.38 microns; The angular dependence of the solar and visible transmittances, solar and visible reflectances, solar absorptance, and solar heat gain coefficient of the glazing system; The percent relative humidity of the inside and outside air for which condensation will occur on the interior and exterior glazing surfaces respectively; The center-of-glass temperature distribution.

  15. Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Conventional storm window improves efficiency with additional air-sealing and an insulating "dead air space." Low-e coating further improves overall performance by increasing the ...

  16. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Development,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts | Department of Energy Rural Development, Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Rural Development, Inc., Greenfield, Massachusetts Case study of Rural Development Inc. who worked with Building America research partner CARB to design affordable HERS-8 homes (60 w/o PV), with double-stud walls heavy insulation, low-load sealed-combustion gas space heaters, triple-pane windows, solar water heating, and PV. PDF icon

  17. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Evaluation of a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifamily Retrofit | Department of Energy a Multifamily Retrofit Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit A 37-unit apartment complex underwent multiple energy retrofit measures, including attic and wall insulation, low-e windows, and energy-efficient appliances, to comply with the Boulder SmartRegs Ordinance. PDF icon Evaluation of a Multifamily Retrofit in Climate Zone 5 - Boulder, Colorado More Documents & Publications Building

  18. Wall Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-01

    This fact sheet provides information on advanced wall framing, including insulating walls, airtight construction, and moisture control.

  19. Issue 5: Optimizing High Levels of Insulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

  20. How Much Insulation is Too Much?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

  1. Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech18_alvine_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems Window Daylighting Demo

  2. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  3. Measure Guideline. Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and to be a practical resource for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  4. Building America Update - March 6, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Innovation Spotlight: Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, and Repair Guides Photo of a man hanging a storm window onto an existing window of a house. Researchers at Building ...

  5. Advances in window technology: 1973-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arasteh, D.

    1994-12-31

    Until the 1970s, the thermal performance of windows and other fenestration technologies was rarely of interest to manufacturers, designers, and scientists. Since then, however, a significant research and industry effort has focused on better understanding window thermal and optical behavior, how windows influence building energy patterns, and on the development of advanced products. This chapter explains how fenestration technologies can make a positive impact on building energy flows, what physical phenomena govern window heat and light transfer, what new products have been developed, and what new products are currently the subject of international research efforts. 44 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial ...

  7. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  8. Energy Savings from Window Attachments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Window Attachments October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory October 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road, MS 90R3111 Berkeley, CA 94720 Authors: D. Charlie Curcija Mehry Yazdanian Christian Kohler

  9. EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: Window Technology First of Its...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows play a significant role in a building's energy use; in 2010, 2.55 quads of energy were lost through windows-the equivalent of more than 20 billion gallons of gasoline. In ...

  10. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  11. Slab Insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to insulate slab-on-grade floors and control moisture, air leakage, termites, and radon.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  13. Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services Use the following links to get product information and locate professional services for windows, doors, and skylights. Product Information Awnings in Residential Buildings: The Impact on Energy Use and Peak Demand University of Minnesota Center for Sustainable Building Research Independently Tested and Certified Energy Performance ENERGY STARÂź

  14. Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon cq1_foundation_insulation_huelman.pdf More Documents & Publications Critical Question #1: How Do We Retrofit the Tough Buildings? Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Exploratory Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:

  15. Predicting window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.

    1995-07-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining window U-factors, there has been little work to date on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is, perhaps, of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a preliminary step to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and inferior indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building materials, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products, as part of its mandate from the Department of Energy. A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing, to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This article outlines the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products, and describes the status of the development of these methods. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products. Much of the technical discussion in this article can be found in ASHRAE Transactions.

  16. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech22_tenent_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications NREL senior scientist, Robert Tenent, Ph.D., with equipment for low cost processing (deposition) of window coatings materials. Dynamic Windows Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material CX-003799:

  17. High Performance Window Attachments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Window Attachments High Performance Window Attachments Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech20_curcija_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Fenestration Software Tools Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems OpenStudio - 2013 Peer Review

  18. Building America Update - February 8, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The user-friendly interface delivers a variety of resources for key construction topics such as air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality and much ...

  19. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  20. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, A.; Baker, R.; Prahl, D.

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using 'L' clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and 'picture framing' the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  1. Spray Foam Exterior Insulation with Stand-Off Furring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herk, Anatasia; Baker, Richard; Prahl, Duncan

    2014-03-01

    IBACOS, in collaboration with GreenHomes America, was contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to research exterior wall insulation solutions. This research investigated cost-effective deep energy retrofit (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 50/50 split between material and labor. The strategies included exterior wall insulation plus energy upgrades as needed in the attic, mechanical and ventilation systems, and basement band joist, walls, and floors. The work can be integrated with other home improvements such as siding or window replacement. This strategy minimizes physical connections to existing wall studs, encapsulates existing siding materials (including lead paint) with spray foam, and creates a vented rain screen assembly to promote drying. GreenHomes America applied construction details created by IBACOS to a test home. 2x4 framing members were attached to the wall at band joists and top plates using "L" clips, with spray foam insulating the wall after framing was installed. Windows were installed simultaneously with the framing, including extension jambs. The use of clips in specific areas provided the best strength potential, and "picture framing" the spray foam held the 2x4s in place. Short-term testing was performed at this house, with monitoring equipment installed for long-term testing. Testing measurements will be provided in a later report, as well as utility impact (before and after), costs (labor and materials), construction time, standard specifications, and analysis for the exterior wall insulation strategy.

  2. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base ...

  3. Window Daylighting Demo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Daylighting Demo Window Daylighting Demo Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon commlbldgs20_selkowitz_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Facades, Daylighting, and Complex Fenestration Systems High Performance Window Attachments Figure 1: Measurement of performance of ceiling tiles made of new phase change materials in test bed, in naturally ventilated and forced ventilation modes. Source: LBNL. CBERD:

  4. Insulator-to-Metal Transition of Vanadium Dioxide | U.S. DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as smart windows and ultrafast field effect transistors, exhibits an insulator to ... vanadium dioxide driven by large phonon entropy," Nature 515, 535-539, 2014. DOI: ...

  5. Window Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2000-04-01

    The Window Industry Technology Roadmap looks at the trends in window design and installation in 2000 and projects trends for the future.

  6. Buried and Encapsulated Ducts- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Top Innovation profile highlights Building America research into insulating ductwork that is in unconditioned attics.

  7. Building Insulation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

  8. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storm Windows Storm Windows An energy upgrade on this daycare center included interior storm windows because most of the windows are on the north elevation. | Photo courtesy of ...

  9. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and maybe more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads.

  10. Window and Envelope Technologies Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Window and Envelope Technologies activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO ...

  11. Windows and Envelope Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Windows and Envelope Subprogram. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer ...

  12. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation Insulation Where to Insulate Where to Insulate Learn where to insulate in a home to save money and improve comfort. Read more Insulation Insulation Get the facts about how insulation works. Read more Moisture Control Moisture Control Learn how to control moisture in your home to improve the effectiveness of your insulation and air sealing strategies. Read more You can reduce your home's heating and cooling costs through proper insulation and air sealing techniques. These techniques

  13. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ​A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  14. EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Save Energy for Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: New Series of Windows Has Potential to Save Energy for Commercial Buildings March 6, 2014 - 4:10pm Addthis The project is being administered by BTO's Emerging Technologies Program. It is the first R-5 window series for the commercial buildings sector that also surpasses the highly-efficient requirements for R-5 windows. The

  15. Feasibility of SF6 Gas-Insulated Transformers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feasibility of SF 6 Gas-Insulated Transformers Brandon Bouwman, P.E. Electrical Engineer, Generation Equipment Section Hydroelectric Design Center 14 June 2012 BUILDING STRONG Âź PORTLAND DISTRICT 2 Outline  Transformer Background & Basics  Oil-filled transformers  Oil-filled transformer concerns  Gas-insulated transformers (GIT)  Gas-insulated transformer benefits  Gas-insulated transformer concerns  Risks and Unknowns  Questions? BUILDING STRONG Âź PORTLAND DISTRICT

  16. Solar optical materials for innovative window design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M.

    1982-08-01

    New and innovative optical materials and coatings can greatly improve the efficiency of window energy systems. These potential materials and coatings increase energy efficiency by reducing radiative losses in the infrared, or reducing visible reflection losses or controlling overheating due to solar gain. Current progress in heat mirror coatings for glass and polymeric substrates is presented. Highly doped semiconducting oxides and metal/dielectric interference coatings are reviewed. Physical and optical properties are outlined for antireflection films and transparent aerogel insulation media. The potential for optical switching films as window elements includes discussions of electrochromic, photochromic and other physical switching processes.

  17. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments | Department of Energy Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments This webinar discussed how window attachments and coverings, such as storm windows and cellular shades, can be a cost-effective means of reducing energy use in residential buildings. This webinar reviewed some of the latest research in this area,

  18. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior SEPTEMBER 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: D&R International, Ltd. September 2013 Prepared for: Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared By: D&R International, Ltd. 1300 Spring Street, Suite 500 Silver Spring, MD 20910

  19. Windows and Envelope Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Windows and Envelope Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Windows and Envelope Subprogram Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Karma Sawyer, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Windows and Envelope Subprogram. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. PDF icon 2016 BTO Peer Review Presentation-Windows and

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass (WWR) 20-40% Window U-Factor 0.33-0.56 SHGC 0.31-0.49 Wall R-Value 7.6-15.2 Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-30 Wall Material Mass (HC > 7 Btu/ft^2) Lighting Average Power Density (Watts/SF) 0.9 System and Plant System and Plant Packaged Single-Zone Packaged Single-Zone w/ Economizer Cooling Capacity > 54 kBtu Heating Plant: Gas Furnace 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant: Air conditioner

  1. Analysis of the Chinese Market for Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Shi, Qing

    2014-03-20

    China will account for about half of the new construction globally in the coming decade. Its floorspace doubled from 1996 to 2011, and Chinese rural buildings alone have as much floorspace as all of U.S. residential buildings. Building energy consumption has also grown, increasing by over 40% since 1990. To curb building energy demand, the Chinese government has launched a series of policies and programs. Combined, this growth in buildings and renovations, along with the policies to promote green buildings, are creating a large market for energy efficiency products and services. This report assesses the impact of China’s policies on building energy efficiency and on the market for energy efficiency in the future. The first chapter of this report introduces the trends in China, drawing on both historical analysis, and detailed modeling of the drivers behind changes in floorspace and building energy demand such as economic and population growth, urbanization, policy. The analysis describes the trends by region, building type and energy service. The second chapter discusses China’s policies to promote green buildings. China began developing building energy codes in the 1980s. Over time, the central government has increased the stringency of the code requirements and the extent of enforcement. The codes are mandatory in all new buildings and major renovations in China’s cities, and they have been a driving force behind the expansion of China’s markets for insulation, efficient windows, and other green building materials. China also has several other important policies to encourage efficient buildings, including the Three-Star Rating System (somewhat akin to LEED), financial incentives tied to efficiency, appliance standards, a phasing out of incandescent bulbs and promotion of efficient lighting, and several policies to encourage retrofits in existing buildings. In the third chapter, we take “deep dives” into the trends affecting key building components. This chapter examines insulation in walls and roofs; efficient windows and doors; heating, air conditioning and controls; and lighting. These markets have seen significant growth because of the strength of the construction sector but also the specific policies that require and promote efficient building components. At the same time, as requirements have become more stringent, there has been fierce competition, and quality has at time suffered, which in turn has created additional challenges. Next we examine existing buildings in chapter four. China has many Soviet-style, inefficient buildings built before stringent requirements for efficiency were more widely enforced. As a result, there are several specific market opportunities related to retrofits. These fall into two or three categories. First, China now has a code for retrofitting residential buildings in the north. Local governments have targets of the number of buildings they must retrofit each year, and they help finance the changes. The requirements focus on insulation, windows, and heat distribution. Second, the Chinese government recently decided to increase the scale of its retrofits of government and state-owned buildings. It hopes to achieve large scale changes through energy service contracts, which creates an opportunity for energy service companies. Third, there is also a small but growing trend to apply energy service contracts to large commercial and residential buildings. This report assesses the impacts of China’s policies on building energy efficiency. By examining the existing literature and interviewing stakeholders from the public, academic, and private sectors, the report seeks to offer an in-depth insights of the opportunities and barriers for major market segments related to building energy efficiency. The report also discusses trends in building energy use, policies promoting building energy efficiency, and energy performance contracting for public building retrofits.

  2. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption. ...

  3. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New Paltz, New York Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate, New ...

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Retrofit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Member in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Retrofit Measures for Embedded Wood Member in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls In ...

  5. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: ...

  6. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation devised an experiment to build and instrument unvented test roofs using air-permeable insulation (dense-pack ...

  7. Retrofit of a Multifamily Mass Masonry Building in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

    2013-08-01

    Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

  8. Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attics - Building America Top Innovation Unvented, Conditioned Attics - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows an attic that is conditioned (insulated) and showing ...

  9. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Windows Windows can be one of your home's most attractive features. Windows provide views, daylighting, ventilation, and heat from the sun in the winter. Unfortunately, they can...

  10. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, Louise F.; Mosiman, Garrett E.

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  11. Evaluating Fenestration Products for Zero-Energy Buildings: Issuesfor Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arasteh, Dariush; Curcija, Charlie; Huang, Joe; Huizenga,Charlie; Kohler, Christian

    2006-07-25

    Computer modeling to determine fenestration product energy properties (U-factor, SHGC, VT) has emerged as the most cost-effective and accurate means to quantify them. Fenestration product simulation tools have been effective in increasing the use of low-e coatings and gas fills in insulating glass and in the widespread use of insulating frame designs and materials. However, for more efficient fenestration products (low heat loss products, dynamic products, products with non-specular optical characteristics, light re-directing products) to achieve widespread use, fenestration modeling software needs to be improved. This paper addresses the following questions: (1) Are the current properties (U, SHGC, VT) calculated sufficient to compare and distinguish between windows suitable for Zero Energy Buildings and conventional window products? If not, what data on the thermal and optical performance, on comfort, and on peak demand of windows is needed. (2) Are the algorithms in the tools sufficient to model the thermal and optical processes? Are specific heat transfer and optical effects not accounted for? Is the existing level of accuracy enough to distinguish between products designed for Zero Energy Buildings? Is the current input data adequate?

  12. BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Joe Lstiburek, Building Science Corp. View the Presentation PDF icon BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles Building

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: John Wesley Miller,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tucson, Arizona | Department of Energy John Wesley Miller, Tucson, Arizona Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: John Wesley Miller, Tucson, Arizona Case study of John Wesley Miller Companies, who worked with the NAHBRC to build two net-zero energy homes with foam-sheathed masonry walls, low-E windows 2.9 ACH50 air sealing, transfer grilles, ducts in insulated attic, PV, and solar water heating. PDF icon John Wesley Miller Companies: Armory Park Del Sol - Tucson, AZ More

  14. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments | Department of Energy Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments October 27, 2015 Speakers Katherine Cort, Research Economist, Pacific Northwest National

  15. NREL Electrochromic Window Research Wins Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Winners of the CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in Energy Efficiency, Dr. Satyen Deb at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that a small electrical charge can change the opacity of tungsten oxide from clear to tinted. He, Dr. Dane Gillaspie, and their fellow scientists at NREL then applied this knowledge to develop and transfer the technologies required to construct an electrochromic window, which can switch between clear and heavily tinted states. Electrochromic windows allow natural light in while adding tint to reduce summer heat and glare, and going clear to allow sunlight through in the winter. Broad adaptation of these windows could reduce US total energy use by four percent and reduce building cooling loads by 20%, much of this during expensive peak hours. Windows based on these discoveries are now being installed worldwide.

  16. NREL Electrochromic Window Research Wins Award

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Winners of the CO-LABS Governor's Award for High-Impact Research in Energy Efficiency, Dr. Satyen Deb at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) discovered that a small electrical charge can change the opacity of tungsten oxide from clear to tinted. He, Dr. Dane Gillaspie, and their fellow scientists at NREL then applied this knowledge to develop and transfer the technologies required to construct an electrochromic window, which can switch between clear and heavily tinted states. Electrochromic windows allow natural light in while adding tint to reduce summer heat and glare, and going clear to allow sunlight through in the winter. Broad adaptation of these windows could reduce US total energy use by four percent and reduce building cooling loads by 20%, much of this during expensive peak hours. Windows based on these discoveries are now being installed worldwide.

  17. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  18. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  19. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Retrofit Foundation Insulation Strategies, Minneapolis, Minnesota | Department of Energy Innovative Retrofit Foundation Insulation Strategies, Minneapolis, Minnesota Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Innovative Retrofit Foundation Insulation Strategies, Minneapolis, Minnesota In this project, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership evaluated a retrofit insulation strategy for foundations that is designed for use with open-core concrete block

  20. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation | Department of Energy Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction - August 13, 2014 - Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Rigid Insulation This presentation, Cladding Attachment Over Thick Rigid Exterior Insulation, was delivered at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure

  1. Plasma window characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Gleizer, S.; Gurovich, V.; Kronhaus, I.; Hershcovitch, A.; Nozar, P.; Taliani, C.

    2007-03-01

    Parameters of an arc Ar plasma discharge used as a plasma window with a discharge current of {approx}50 A and a voltage of {approx}58 V are presented. It is shown that this arc discharge allows one to decrease the pressure at the low pressure end of the plasma window almost 380 times using relatively low pumping at the low pressure end of the plasma window. Calculations of the plasma parameters and their spatial distribution using a simple wall-stabilized arc model showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimentally obtained data. It is shown that a significant decrease in gas flow through the plasma window occurs due to the increase in plasma viscosity. An improvement of the plasma window ignition and some of its design aspects are described as well.

  2. EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: Window Technology First of Its Kind for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy Window Technology First of Its Kind for Commercial Buildings EERE Success Story-Pennsylvania: Window Technology First of Its Kind for Commercial Buildings November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Windows play a significant role in a building's energy use; in 2010, 2.55 quads of energy were lost through windows-the equivalent of more than 20 billion gallons of gasoline. In support of DOE's goal to reduce energy consumption in buildings by 50% by 2030,

  3. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Weatherize » Insulation Insulation Spray foam insulation fills the nooks and crannies in the walls of this energy-efficient Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Spray foam insulation fills the nooks and crannies in the walls of this energy-efficient Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Foam core structural insulated panels are built in a factory, shipped to the jobsite, and assembled. | Photo courtesy of Michael Baechler. Foam core structural insulated panels are built in a

  4. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  5. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  6. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlassź products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026Ś1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  7. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conditioners | Department of Energy Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado. PDF icon testing_residential_ariconditioners_booten_winkler.pdf More Documents & Publications Key Issues High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners -

  8. Window and Envelope Technologies Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Envelope Technologies Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Window and Envelope Technologies Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Karma Sawyer, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Window and Envelope Technologies activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation PDF icon Window and

  9. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a...

  10. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Home: Retrofitting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Insight Homes, Seaford, Delaware Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Innovative Retrofit Foundation Insulation Strategies, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  12. Highly insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Test Facility (FTF) High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filter Test Facility (FTF) DOE-STD-3020-2015 Specification for HEPA Filters Used by DOE Contractors The purpose of this standard is to establish specifications and quality assurance (QA) requirements for the procurement, packaging, shipping and storage of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. DOE-STD-3025-2007 Quality Assurance Inspection and Testing of HEPA

  13. Thermal and Optical Properties of Low-E Storm Windows and Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Widder, Sarah H.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2015-07-17

    Installing low-emissivity (low-E) storm windows and panels over existing windows has been identified as a cost-effective new approach for improving the energy efficiency of existing buildings where window replacement is impractical or too expensive. As such, it is desirable to characterize the key energy performance properties of low-E storm windows and panels when installed over different types of existing primary windows. this paper presents the representative U-factors, solar heat gain coefficients (SGHCs) and visible transmittance properties of the combined assemblies of various storm windows and panel types installed over different primary windows.

  14. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  15. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  16. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  17. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  18. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air conditioners filter RefrigeratorsFreezers (10) Apply RefrigeratorsFreezers filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (9) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (12) Apply Dishwasher filter Other EE (12) Apply Other EE filter Windows (11) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (10) Apply Building Insulation filter Chillers (10)...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (10) Apply Solar Photovoltaics filter Solar Water Heat (10) Apply Solar Water Heat filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (9) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Manufacturing Equipment (10) Apply Processing and Manufacturing Equipment filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (8) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    air filter Building Insulation (11) Apply Building Insulation filter Windows (11) Apply Windows filter Food Service Equipment (10) Apply Food Service Equipment filter Geothermal...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Government filter Filter by savings category: Lighting (10) Apply Lighting filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (8) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Filter by savings category: Building Insulation (105) Apply Building Insulation filter Windows (102) Apply Windows filter Air conditioners (85) Apply Air conditioners filter...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    filter Heat Pumps (10) Apply Heat Pumps filter Motor VFDs (10) Apply Motor VFDs filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (9) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Direct-Use filter Solar Photovoltaics (10) Apply Solar Photovoltaics filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (9) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chillers filter Furnaces (10) Apply Furnaces filter Hydrogen (10) Apply Hydrogen filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Building Insulation (9) Apply Building Insulation filter...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Insulation (7) Apply Building Insulation filter Solar Water Heat (7) Apply Solar Water Heat filter Windows (7) Apply Windows filter Biomass (6) Apply Biomass filter...

  10. Building America Case Study: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1 -Story Homes in ... Partnership Building Component: Roofattic air sealing and insulation Application: ...

  11. Retrofit of a MultiFamily Mass Masonry Building in New England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

    2013-08-01

    Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) has partnered with Building Science Corporation to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing brick building (a former convent) into condominiums. The research performed for this project provides information regarding advanced retrofit packages for multi-family masonry buildings in Cold climates. In particular, this project demonstrates safe, durable, and cost-effective solutions that will potentially benefit millions of multi-family brick buildings throughout the East Coast and Midwest (Cold climates). The retrofit packages provide insight on the opportunities for and constraints on retrofitting multifamily buildings with ambitious energy performance goals but a limited budget. The condominium conversion project will contribute to several areas of research on enclosures, space conditioning, and water heating. Enclosure items include insulation of mass masonry building on the interior, airtightness of these types of retrofits, multi-unit building compartmentalization, window selection, and roof insulation strategies. Mechanical system items include combined hydronic and space heating systems with hydronic distribution in small (low load) units, and ventilation system retrofits for multifamily buildings.

  12. Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar Slides from the Building America webinar on November 30, 2011. PDF icon webinar_hybrid_insulation_20111130.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America Expert Meeting: Foundations Research Results Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies Building America Technology Solutions for

  13. Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Photo of an unvented and insulated ...

  14. Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Initial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Initial and Long-Term Cladding Over Exterior Insulation This research conducted by Building Science Corporation evaluated ...

  15. Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Building Science Corporation (BSC) held an expert meeting on Cladding Attachment Over Exterior ...

  16. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Urbane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study of Urbane Homes who worked with Building America research partner NAHBRC to build HERS-57 homes with rigid foam insulated slabs and foundation walls, advanced framed ...

  17. 5 Reasons to Download the New Building America Solutions App...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ducts, insulation, HVAC and over 150 specific measures for constructing high-performance, energy-efficient buildings. 4. With the Building America Solutions app, registered users...

  18. Next Generation Building Envelope Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Envelope Materials Next Generation Building Envelope Materials Addthis 1 of 3 Vacuum insulation panels (left); Modified atmosphere panels (right) Image: Oak Ridge National...

  19. Technology Solutions Case Study: Retrofit Measures for Embedded Wood Members in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Ueno

    2015-10-01

    In this project, the Building Science Corporation team studied a historic brick building in Lawrence, Massachusetts, which is being renovated into 10 condominium units and adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings.

  20. Measure Guideline: Energy-Efficient Window Performance and Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2012-11-01

    This document provides guidelines for the selection of energy-efficient windows in new and existing residential construction in all US climate zones. It includes information on window products, their attributes and performance. It provides cost/benefit information on window energy savings as well as information on non-energy benefits such as thermal comfort and reduced HVAC demands. The document also provides information on energy impacts of design decisions such as window orientation, total glazing area and shading devices and conditions. Information on resources for proper window installation is included as well. This document is for builders, homeowners, designers and anyone making decisions about selecting energy efficient window. It is intended to complement other Building America information and efforts.

  1. Determining window solar heat gain coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, S.J.; Wonderen, S.J. van . Solar Calorimetry Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    The solar heat gain characteristics of fenestration systems impact daytime building energy performance, occupant comfort and utility load demands. A measure of the fraction of available solar energy entering a building interior per unit window area is defined as the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). Together with a window's thermal transmittance (U-value), the SHGC is used to compare fenestration products, and it allows for the calculation of energy rating number and annual energy performance. The need to measure and compared advances in window technology has led to the development of experimental and analytical methods for the determination of SHGC performance. Several test facilities currently or previously capable of performing SHGC measurements exist worldwide. Results experimentally determined using these facilities have provided design data for handbook tables, and have been instrumental in the development and validation of predictive analytical methods and computer simulation tools. However, these facilities have operated without a standard test procedure for SHGC performance. Consequently, recent efforts have been focused on developing consensus test procedures for the evaluation of window energy performance.

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-03-01

    Exterior insulating sheathing for high performance building enclosures is an important strategy for meeting energy efficiency requirements in many climates and can position an existing building to perform at the level of best-in-class new construction. Insulation board is also important in high performance building retrofit situations where minimal disruption at the interior is typically desired.

  3. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits

  4. 5 Steps to Making Your Windows More Energy Efficient | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steps to Making Your Windows More Energy Efficient 5 Steps to Making Your Windows More Energy Efficient December 13, 2013 - 4:06pm Addthis Keep your hard-earned dollars from flying out the window by following the <a href="http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/publications/pdfs/building_america/measure_guide_wood_windows.pdf">latest guidelines for window repair, rehabilitation and replacement</a>. | Photo courtesy of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical

  5. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  6. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  7. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cladding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) In this project, researchers from Building Science Corporation investigated issues to better understand the mechanics behind the addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings to increase

  8. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Moisture

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet) In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Retrofit Measures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Embedded Wood Member in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls | Department of Energy Existing Homes: Retrofit Measures for Embedded Wood Member in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Retrofit Measures for Embedded Wood Member in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls In this project, the Building Science Corporation team studied a historic brick building in Lawrence, Massachusetts, which is being renovated into 10 condominium units and adding insulation to

  10. Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings 1 of 3 PPG developed and commercialized the InterceptÂź Spacer System that revolutionized the manufacture of double-pane insulated glazing units (IGUs) 25 years ago. Over 125 PPG-licensed InterceptÂź Spacer System lines are in operation in the US. Currently in use in more than 600 million residential windows, the InterceptÂź Spacer System is the top-selling product of its kind in North America. Image:

  11. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top Innovation Image of a man insulating the ceiling of a home. Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures ...

  12. Building Envelope Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MA
    Photo Courtesy of Fraunhofer CSE, Photo Credit: Trent Bell Development of a Bio-Based, Inexpensive, Noncorrosive, Nonflammable Phenolic Foam for Building Insulation ...

  13. Insulating polymer concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schorr, H. Peter; Fontana, Jack J.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    A lightweight insulating polymer concrete formed from a lightweight closed cell aggregate and a water resistance polymeric binder.

  14. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Curcija, Charlie; Kohler, Christian

    2008-09-11

    While window frames typically represent 20-30% of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows that incorporate very low-conductance glazing. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. Based on a literature review and an evaluation of current methods of modeling heat transfer through window frames, we conclude that current procedures specified in ISO standards are not sufficiently adequate for accurately evaluating heat transfer through the low-conductance frames. We conclude that the near-term priorities for improving the modeling of heat transfer through low-conductance frames are: (1) Add 2D view-factor radiation to standard modeling and examine the current practice of averaging surface emissivity based on area weighting and the process of making an equivalent rectangular frame cavity. (2) Asses 3D radiation effects in frame cavities and develop recommendation for inclusion into the design fenestration tools. (3) Assess existing correlations for convection in vertical cavities using CFD. (4) Study 2D and 3D natural convection heat transfer in frame cavities for cavities that are proven to be deficient from item 3 above. Recommend improved correlations or full CFD modeling into ISO standards and design fenestration tools, if appropriate. (5) Study 3D hardware short-circuits and propose methods to ensure that these effects are incorporated into ratings. (6) Study the heat transfer effects of ventilated frame cavities and propose updated correlations.

  15. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further decreasing the amount of unconditioned air that enters the office building. The HVAC system has an Energy Efficiency Rating 29% greater than required. No CFC based refrigerants were used in the HVAC system, thus reducing the emission of compounds that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. In addition, interior light fixtures employ the latest energy-efficient lamp and ballast technology. Interior lighting throughout the building is operated by sensors that will automatically turn off lights inside a room when the room is unoccupied. The electrical traction elevators use less energy than typical elevators, and they are made of 95% recycled material. Further, locally manufactured products were used throughout, minimizing the amount of energy required to construct this building. The primary objective was to construct a 30,000 square foot medical office building on the Jackson Park Hospital campus that would comply with newly adopted City of Chicago green building codes focusing on protecting the environment and conserving energy and resources. The energy saving systems demonstrate a state of the-art whole-building approach to energy efficient design and construction. The energy efficiency and green aspects of the building contribute to the community by emphasizing the environmental and economic benefits of conserving resources. The building highlights the integration of Chicago's new green building codes into a poor, inner city neighborhood project and it is designed to attract medical providers and physicians to a medically underserved area.

  16. Residential Windows and Window Coverings: A Detailed View of the Installed Base and User Behavior

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Includes information about the installed base of residential windows and window coverings, and the operation of window coverings by households.

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Insulation, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heater Jackson Energy Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Established in...

  18. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Apply sun-control or other reflective films on south-facing windows to reduce solar heat gain. Long-Term Savings Tip Installing high-performance windows will improve your home's ...

  19. Capture sunlight with your window

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture sunlight with your window Capture sunlight with your window A luminescent solar concentrator is an emerging sunlight harvesting technology that has the potential to disrupt the way we think about energy. August 24, 2015 The luminescent solar concentrator could turn any window into a daytime power source. The luminescent solar concentrator could turn any window into a daytime power source. Contact Los Alamos National Laboratory Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email

  20. Dynamic Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamic Windows Dynamic Windows NREL senior scientist, Robert Tenent, Ph.D., with equipment for low cost processing (deposition) of window coatings materials. NREL senior scientist, Robert Tenent, Ph.D., with equipment for low cost processing (deposition) of window coatings materials. Lead Performer: National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Golden, CO Partners: -- Sage Electrochromics - Faribault, MN -- e-Chromic Technologies, Inc. - Boulder, CO -- Colorado School of Mines - Golden, CO -- Stanford

  1. Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech28_hess_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications WICF Certification, Compliance and Enforcement webinar New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards Concerns in Energy Innovations Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12.

  2. Airflow Resistance of Loose-Fill Mineral Fiber Insulations in Retrofit Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, C. J.; Fox, M. J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-02-01

    This report expands on Building America Report 1109 by applying the experimental apparatus and test method to dense-pack retrofit applications using mineral fiber insulation materials. Three (3) fiber glass insulation materials and one (1) stone wool insulation material were tested, and the results compared to the cellulose results from the previous study.

  3. Airflow Resistance of Loose-Fill Mineral Fiber Insulations in Retrofit Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, C. J.; Fox, M. J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-02-01

    This report expands on Building America Report 1109 by applying the experimental apparatus and test method to dense-pack retrofit applications using mineral fiber insulation materials. Three fiber glass insulation materials and one stone wool insulation material were tested, and the results compared to the cellulose results from the previous study.

  4. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    storm windows, caulking and weatherstripping, and using window treatments or coverings. ... Window treatments or coverings can reduce heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the ...

  5. Building America Update - March 6, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, 2014 Building America Update - March 6, 2014 March 6, 2014 - 4:07pm Addthis Top Innovation Spotlight: Window Replacement, Rehabilitation, and Repair Guides Photo of a man hanging a storm window onto an existing window of a house. Researchers at Building Science Corporation, a Building America team, estimate that whole-house energy savings of up to 10% can be achieved through repair and rehabilitation of windows, potentially improving the energy efficiency of more than 5 million U.S. homes

  6. Numerical prediction of window condensation potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    Although a substantial amount of effort has been expended to develop numerical methods for determining windows U-factors (EE 1983; Goss and Curcija 1994; Standaert 1985; CSA 1993a; NFRC 1991), there has been little work to data on using numerical methods to predict condensation potential. It is perhaps of direct interest to most ASHRAE members to determine heat loss and solar gains through windows as a precursor to sizing heating and cooling equipment, but condensation has long been recognized as an extremely important issue for consumers (and, consequently, for window manufacturers). Moreover, building scientists recognize the link between condensation and increased energy consumption (due to latent loads), reduced occupant comfort and indoor air quality (from the presence of bacteria and mold), and structural damage (where accumulated condensation is absorbed by the building material, thus reducing their structural stability). The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) is developing a rating method for condensation potential in fenestration products as part of its mandate from the US Department of Energy (DOE). A rating method would benefit from the use of simulation as a supplement to physical condensation resistance testing to reduce the cost and time required for implementation and increase the flexibility of the rating method. This paper outlines one of the necessary components in the application of numerical methods for evaluating condensation in fenestration products. The theoretical approach and its practical application are discussed, as well as some comparisons between numerical prediction and physical test results for a sample of products.

  7. Building America Expert Meeting: Interior Insulation Retrofit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    It was found that conflicting understanding exists, such as general assessment approaches, assessments of masonry material properties, and the inclusion of air spaces between ...

  8. Low heat transfer, high strength window materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berlad, Abraham L.; Salzano, Francis J.; Batey, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A multi-pane window with improved insulating qualities; comprising a plurality of transparent or translucent panes held in an essentially parallel, spaced-apart relationship by a frame. Between at least one pair of panes is a convection defeating means comprising an array of parallel slats or cells so designed as to prevent convection currents from developing in the space between the two panes. The convection defeating structures may have reflective surfaces so as to improve the collection and transmittance of the incident radiant energy. These same means may be used to control (increase or decrease) the transmittance of solar energy as well as to decouple the radiative transfer between the interior surfaces of the transparent panes.

  9. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Wednesday, 26 January 2011 00:00 Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual

  10. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  11. Windows on the axion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the THETA vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10/sup /minus/12/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup 6/ eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producing detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10/sup /minus/6/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup /minus/3/ eV and 1 eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 5 eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve ''heavenly axions,'' are being planned or are underway. 58 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AeroSysNNC_3-25.pdf AeroSysNNC_3-25.pdf PDF icon AeroSysNNC_3-25.pdf More Documents & Publications AeroSys: Noncompliance Determination (2010-SE-0302) AeroSys: Test Notice (2009) AeroSys: Order (2010-CE-01/0201 and 2010-SE-0302)

    Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Develop an efficient insulation

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (10) Apply Chillers filter Equipment Insulation (10) Apply Equipment Insulation filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building (9) Apply...

  14. Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation | Department of Energy Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Building America Expert Meeting: Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation Building Science Corporation (BSC) held an expert meeting on Cladding Attachment Over Exterior Insulation on Saturday, July 28, 2012 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, Massachusetts. Featured speakers included Jay Crandell of ARES Consulting, Peter Baker of BSC, Gary Parsons of DOW Chemical Company, Vladimir Kochkin of the

  15. Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Initial and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-Term Cladding Over Exterior Insulation | Department of Energy Existing Homes: Initial and Long-Term Cladding Over Exterior Insulation Building America Technology Solutions for Existing Homes: Initial and Long-Term Cladding Over Exterior Insulation This research conducted by Building Science Corporation evaluated the system mechanics and long-term performance of the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure to provide a convenient cladding

  16. Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Webinar | Department of Energy Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar Building America Webinar: Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar This webinar, presented by research team Building Science Corporation, discussed insulating foundations and controlling water leakage as a critical measure for reducing heating load in homes in cold climates. File webinar_hybrid_insulation_20111130.wmv More Documents & Publications Building

  17. Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Pederson, Bjorn O. (Chelmsford, MA)

    1984-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

  18. Thermal properties and use of cellulosic insulation produced from recycled paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1996-10-01

    Information regarding the use of building insulation made from recycled paper is summarized. Results of previous experimental studies to determine thermal conductivities, settled density, and flammability are outlined, and calculation methods for thermal resistivity are presented in detail. Other performance factors affecting installed insulation are discussed. Industry data and information on the production, use, and economics of cellulosic insulation for residential and commercial buildings are provided. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. This report outlines the extensive information that was presented on assessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks.

  20. Expert Meeting Report. Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011, at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. This report outlines the extensive information that was presented on assessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks.

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    This case study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Building Science Corporation is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, Florida; zone 2A), insulated with air-permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass).

  2. Contributing to Net Zero Building: High Energy Efficient EIFS Wall Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbary, Lawrence D.; Perkins, Laura L.; Serino, Roland; Preston, Bill; Kosny, Jan

    2014-01-29

    The team led by Dow Corning collaborated to increase the thermal performance of exterior insulation and finishing systems (EIFS) to reach R-40 performance meeting the needs for high efficiency insulated walls. Additionally, the project helped remove barriers to using EIFS on retrofit commercial buildings desiring high insulated walls. The three wall systems developed within the scope of this project provide the thermal performance of R-24 to R-40 by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an expanded polystyrene (EPS) encapsulated vacuum insulated sandwich element (VISE). The VISE was incorporated into an EIFS as pre-engineered insulation boards. The VISE is installed using typical EIFS details and network of trained installers. These three wall systems were tested and engineered to be fully code compliant as an EIFS and meet all of the International Building Code structural, durability and fire test requirements for a code compliant exterior wall cladding system. This system is being commercialized under the trade name Dryvit¼ Outsulation¼ HE system. Full details, specifications, and application guidelines have been developed for the system. The system has been modeled both thermally and hygrothermally to predict condensation potential. Based on weather models for Baltimore, MD; Boston, MA; Miami, FL; Minneapolis, MN; Phoenix, AZ; and Seattle, WA; condensation and water build up in the wall system is not a concern. Finally, the team conducted a field trial of the system on a building at the former Brunswick Naval Air Station which is being redeveloped by the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority (Brunswick, Maine). The field trial provided a retrofit R-30 wall onto a wood frame construction, slab on grade, 1800 ft2 building, that was monitored over the course of a year. Simultaneous with the façade retrofit, the building’s windows were upgraded at no charge to this program. The retrofit building used 49% less natural gas during the winter of 2012 compared to previous winters. This project achieved its goal of developing a system that is constructible, offers protection to the VIPs, and meets all performance targets established for the project.

  3. Building America Case Study: Performance of a Hot-Dry Climate Whole House Retrofit, Stockton, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ARBI

    2014-09-01

    The Stockton house retrofit is a two-story tudor style single family deep retrofit in the hot-dry climate of Stockton, CA. The home is representative of a deep retrofit option of the scaled home energy upgrade packages offered to targeted neighborhoods under the pilot Large-Scale Retrofit Program (LSRP) administered by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI). Deep retrofit packages expand on the standard package by adding HVAC, water heater and window upgrades to the ducting, attic and floor insulation, domestic hot water insulation, envelope sealing, lighting and ventilation upgrades. Site energy savings with the deep retrofit were 23% compared to the pre-retrofit case, and 15% higher than the savings estimated for the standard retrofit package. Energy savings were largely a result of the water heater upgrade, and a combination of the envelope sealing, insulation and HVAC upgrade. The HVAC system was of higher efficiency than the building code standard. Overall the financed retrofit would have been more cost effective had a less expensive HVAC system been selected and barriers to wall insulation remedied. The homeowner experienced improved comfort throughout the monitored period and was satisfied with the resulting utility bill savings.

  4. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Insulation Materials Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Cellulose, a fiber insulation material with a high recycled content, is blown into a home attic. | Photo courtesy of Cellulose Insulation Manufacturers Association. Blown-in fiberglass insulation thoroughly fills the stud cavities in this home. | Photo courtesy of Bob Hendron, NREL. Blown-in fiberglass

  5. Window Types | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tints Heat-absorbing window glazing contains special tints that change the color of the glass. Tinted glass absorbs a large fraction of the incoming solar radiation...

  6. Tips: Windows | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    attractive features. Windows provide views, daylighting, ventilation, and heat from the sun in the winter. Unfortunately, they can also account for 10% to 25% of your heating bill...

  7. Expert Meeting Report. Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyck, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011, at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

  8. Expert Meeting Report: Windows Options for New and Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojczyk, C.; Carmody, J.; Haglund, K.

    2013-05-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership held an Expert Meeting on Windows Options for New and Existing Homes on November 14, 2011 at the Nolte Building on the campus of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. Featured speakers included John Carmody and Pat Huelman of the University of Minnesota, Charlie Curcija of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Jim Larson of Cardinal Glass Industries, Peter Yost of Building Green, Peter Baker of Building Science Corporation, and Theresa Weston of Du Pont Innovations. Audience participation was actively encouraged during each presentation to uncover need and promote dialog among researchers and industry professionals.

  9. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as rigid boards and duct insulation. Manufacturers now produce medium- and high-density fiberglass batt insulation products that have slightly higher R-values than the...

  10. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes: Case Study: Build

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    San Antonio Green, San Antonio, Texas | Department of Energy Homes: Case Study: Build San Antonio Green, San Antonio, Texas Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes: Case Study: Build San Antonio Green, San Antonio, Texas PNNL, FSEC, and CalcsPlus provided technical assistance to Build San Antonio Green on three deep energy retrofits. For this gut rehab they replaced the old roof with a steeper roof and replaced drywall while adding insulation, new HVAC, sealed ducts, transfer

  11. A Design Guide for Early-Market Electrochromic Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Clear, Robert D.; DiBartolomeo, Dennis L.; Klems, Joseph H.; Fernandes, Luis L.; Ward, GregJ.; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Yazdanian, Mehry

    2006-05-01

    Switchable variable-tint electrochromic (EC) windows preserve view out while modulating transmitted light, glare, and solar heat gains. Consumers will require objective information on the risks and benefits of this emerging technology as it enters the market in 2006. This guide provides such information and data derived from a wide variety of simulations, laboratory tests, and a 2.5-year field test of prototype large-area EC windows evaluated under outdoor sun and sky conditions. This design guide is provided to architects, engineers, building owners, and others interested in electrochromic windows. The design guide provides basic information about what is an electrochromic window, what it looks like, how fast does it switch, and what current product offerings are. The guide also provides information on performance benefits if more mature product offerings were available.

  12. Method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    A method of fabricating a microelectronic device package with an integral window for providing optical access through an aperture in the package. The package is made of a multilayered insulating material, e.g., a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) or high-temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC). The window is inserted in-between personalized layers of ceramic green tape during stackup and registration. Then, during baking and firing, the integral window is simultaneously bonded to the sintered ceramic layers of the densified package. Next, the microelectronic device is flip-chip bonded to cofired thick-film metallized traces on the package, where the light-sensitive side is optically accessible through the window. Finally, a cover lid is attached to the opposite side of the package. The result is a compact, low-profile package, flip-chip bonded, hermetically-sealed package having an integral window.

  13. Dielectric insulating polyolefin compounds and conductor products insulated therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Jr., Burton T.; Prober, Maurice; Kiersztyn, Stanley E.

    1979-01-01

    Polyolefin compounds containing nitrile polysiloxane fluid which have improved electrical properties, and electrical conductors insulated therewith.

  14. INTEGRATED ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW-WALL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Arney, Ph.D.

    2002-12-31

    The building industry faces the challenge of reducing energy use while simultaneously improving construction methods and marketability. This paper describes the first phase of a project to address these concerns by designing an Integrated Window Wall System (IWWS) that can be commercialized. This work builds on previous research conducted during the 1990's by Lawrence Berkeley national Laboratories (LBNL). During this phase, the objective was to identify appropriate technologies, problems and issues and develop a number of design concepts. Four design concepts were developed into prototypes and preliminary energy analyses were conducted Three of these concepts (the foam wall, steel wall, and stiffened plate designs) showed particular potential for meeting the project objectives and will be continued into a second phase where one or two of the systems will be brought closer to commercialization.

  15. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles | Department of Energy Homes Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles This case study by the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Building Science Corporation is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a

  16. Insulation fact sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Case Study, The Thermal Test Facility, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (Office/Laboratory) Building Design Floor Area: 10,000 SF Floors(1): 2 Aspect Ratio: 1.75 Offices Laboratories Conference Room Mechanical Level Shell Windows Material U-factor SHGC(2) Viewing Windows: Double Pane, Grey Tint, Low-e 0.42 0.44 Clerestory Windows: Double Pane, Clear, Low-e 0.45 0.65 Window Area(SF) North 38 South(3) 1,134 East 56 West 56 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value North Wall

  18. Experimental and Numerical Examination of the Thermal Transmittance of High Performance Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen Ph.D., Arild; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Arasteh P.E., Dariush; Uvslokk, Sivert; Talev, Goce; Petter Jelle Ph.D., Bjorn

    2010-06-17

    While window frames typically represent 20-30percent of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. The Passivhaus Institute in Germany states that windows (glazing and frames, combined) should have U-values not exceeding 0.80 W/(m??K). This has created a niche market for highly insulating frames, with frame U-values typically around 0.7-1.0 W/(m2 cdot K). The U-values reported are often based on numerical simulations according to international simulation standards. It is prudent to check the accuracy of these calculation standards, especially for high performance products before more manufacturers begin to use them to improve other product offerings. In this paper the thermal transmittance of five highly insulating window frames (three wooden frames, one aluminum frame and one PVC frame), found from numerical simulations and experiments, are compared. Hot box calorimeter results are compared with numerical simulations according to ISO 10077-2 and ISO 15099. In addition CFD simulations have been carried out, in order to use the most accurate tool available to investigate the convection and radiation effects inside the frame cavities. Our results show that available tools commonly used to evaluate window performance, based on ISO standards, give good overall agreement, but specific areas need improvement.

  19. Energy performance analysis of prototype electrochromic windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.; Rubin, M.; Selkowitz, S.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of three newly developed prototype electrochromic devices. The DOE-2.1 E energy simulation program was used to analyze the annual cooling, lighting, and total electric energy use and peak demand as a function of window type and size. The authors simulated a prototypical commercial office building module located in the cooling-dominated locations of Phoenix, AZ and Miami, FL. Heating energy use was also studied in the heating-dominated location of Madison, WI. Daylight illuminance was used to control electrochromic state-switching. Two types of window systems were analyzed; i.e., the outer pane electrochromic glazing was combined with either a conventional low-E or a spectrally selective inner pane. The properties of the electrochromic glazings are based on measured data of new prototypes developed as part of a cooperative DOE-industry program. The results show the largest difference in annual electric energy performance between the different window types occurs in Phoenix and is about 6.5 kWh/m{sup 2} floor area (0.60 kWh/ft{sup 2}) which can represent a cost of about $.52/m{sup 2} ($.05/ft{sup 2}) using electricity costing $.08/kWh. In heating-dominated locations, the electrochromic should be maintained in its bleached state during the heating season to take advantage of beneficial solar heat gain which would reduce the amount of required heating. This also means that the electrochromic window with the largest solar heat gain coefficient is best.

  20. 3 Innovations That Are Transforming America's Home Building Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 3 Innovations That Are Transforming America's Home Building Industry 3 Innovations That Are Transforming America's Home Building Industry December 12, 2013 - 3:07pm Addthis A worker caulks the exterior of a home window. Advanced window framing techniques can help homeowners save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Center A worker caulks the exterior of a home window. Advanced window framing techniques can help homeowners save

  1. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Cloquet, Minnesota Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Durable Interior Foundation Insulation Retrofits for Cold Climates, Cloquet, Minnesota Thermal ...

  2. Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    sealing and insulating exterior walls and attic and installing new, efficient appliances. ... Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Deep Energy Retrofit ...

  3. Building America Case Study: Retrofit Measure for Embedded Wood...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Existing Homes Building America Case Study Retrofit Measures for Embedded Wood Members in Insulated Mass Masonry Walls Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: The...

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior ...

  5. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this project, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership evaluated a retrofit insulation strategy for foundations that is designed for use with open-core concrete block ...

  6. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped ...

  7. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Monitoring of ... when compared with high-R approaches using exterior insulating sheathing. ...

  8. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Board - Ontario, Canada Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board - Ontario, Canada This case study ...

  9. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    understand the mechanics behind the addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings to increase the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. ...

  10. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Valles

    2010-01-08

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  11. Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fills the nooks and crannies in the walls of this energy-efficient Florida home. | Photo courtesy of FSECIBACOS. Spray foam insulation fills the nooks and crannies in the...

  12. Insulator for laser housing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  13. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  14. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  15. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  16. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  17. Vacuum foil insulation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, John P.; Sabolcik, Rudolph E.; Svedberg, Robert C.

    1976-11-16

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly.

  18. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconducting Topological Insulators Print Three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs), discovered experimentally in 2007-2009 by a Princeton-ALS collaboration, are a promising platform for developing the next generation of electronics. Electrons within one nanometer of a TI's surface move at high speeds in a "light-like" fashion. The quantum interactions that generate these electronic states cause individual electrons to be spin polarized even at room temperature and to strongly

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats, Building Insulation, Windows, Motors, Motor VFDs, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Agricultural Equipment, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building,...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pumps, Building Insulation, Windows, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building PEPCO- Commissioning and Operations Incentive Programs Pepco's Enhanced Commissioning Program offers...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dehumidifiers, Lighting, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, Building Insulation, Windows, Motors, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building,...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Siding, Roofs, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Agricultural Equipment, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Custom...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Siding, Roofs, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Agricultural Equipment, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Other...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Controls, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Other EE, Hydroelectric (Small), Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment...

  5. Aerogel: a transparent insulator for solar applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.J.; Russo, R.E.; Tewari, P.H.; Lofftus, K.D.

    1985-06-01

    Aerogel is a transparent, low density, insulating material suitable for a variety of solar applications. Significant energy savings can be realized by using aerogel for a window glazing material. Other possible applications include solar collector covers, transparent insulating jackets for direct gain passive solar devices, and situations that require both transparency and good insulation. Because silica aerogel has a low density (2 to 10% solid), it has a thermal conductivity as low as 0.014 W/m/sup 0/K without evacuation, and if evacuated, lower than 0.006 W/m/sup 0/K. It provides a clear view with only slight coloring due to its weak and nearly isotropic scattering of light. This paper describes significant progress made in the past year at our laboratory in the development of aerogel. We have improved the transparency, developed new preparation methods using less toxic materials, and initiated successful experiments in drying alcogels at near ambient temperature. Optical transmission, light scattering, and electron microscopy data show that CO/sub 2/ supercritical drying of alcogels produces aerogels similar in quality to those produced by high temperature supercritical drying. These advances make the commercial production of aerogel much more feasible.

  6. X-Windows Acceleration via NX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Windows Acceleration via NX X-Windows Acceleration via NX May 12, 2011 by Francesca Verdier NX is a computer program that handles remote X-Windows connections. It can greatly...

  7. Window-closing safety system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only and inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window.

  8. Window-closing safety system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only an inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window. 5 figs.

  9. Energy Efficient Window Treatments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficient Window Treatments Energy Efficient Window Treatments The awnings on this home shade the windows and generate electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jhorrocks The awnings on this home shade the windows and generate electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jhorrocks You can choose window treatments or coverings not only for decoration but also for saving energy. Some carefully selected window treatments can reduce heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the

  10. A window on urban sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stigt, Rien van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Spit, Tejo J.M.

    2013-09-15

    Sustainable urban development requires the integration of environmental interests in urban planning. Although various methods of environmental assessment have been developed, plan outcomes are often disappointing due to the complex nature of decision-making in urban planning, which takes place in multiple arenas within multiple policy networks involving diverse stakeholders. We argue that the concept of ‘decision windows’ can structure this seemingly chaotic chain of interrelated decisions. First, explicitly considering the dynamics of the decision-making process, we further conceptualized decision windows as moments in an intricate web of substantively connected deliberative processes where issues are reframed within a decision-making arena, and interests may be linked within and across arenas. Adopting this perspective in two case studies, we then explored how decision windows arise, which factors determine their effectiveness and how their occurrence can be influenced so as to arrive at more sustainable solutions. We conclude that the integration of environmental interests in urban planning is highly dependent on the ability of the professionals involved to recognize and manipulate decision windows. Finally, we explore how decision windows may be opened. -- Highlights: ‱ Decision-making about sustainable urban development occurs in networks. ‱ The concept of ‘decision windows’ was further elaborated. ‱ Decision windows help understand how environmental interests enter decision-making. ‱ Decision windows can, to some extent, be influenced.

  11. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in your home involves design, selection, and installation. Design Before selecting new windows for your home, determine what types of windows will work best and where to...

  12. Do You Have Windows That Need Replacing?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Do you have windows that need replacing, too? Do you have any plans to replace them with newer, more efficient windows?

  13. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. You are accessing a document ...

  14. Window taper functions for subaperture processing. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Window taper functions for subaperture processing. It is well known that the spectrum ...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Air conditioners, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Insulation Small Business Energy Loan...

  16. Black Mountain Insulation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain Insulation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Mountain Insulation Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product: UK-based manufacturer of sheeps wool insulation which...

  17. EERE Success Story-Energy-Efficient Smart Windows are Lowering Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs | Department of Energy Energy-Efficient Smart Windows are Lowering Energy Costs EERE Success Story-Energy-Efficient Smart Windows are Lowering Energy Costs September 9, 2015 - 12:11pm Addthis Low-E windows ñ€“ featuring an energy-saving technology developed at Berkeley National Laboratoryñ€“ are now found in 80% of homes and 50% of buildings in the United States. Low-E windows - featuring an energy-saving technology developed at Berkeley National Laboratory- are now found in 80%

  18. Building America Case Study: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    The External Thermal and Moisture Management System (ETMMS), typically seen in deep energy retrofits, is a valuable approach for the roof-only portions of existing homes, particularly the 1 1/2-story home. It is effective in reducing energy loss through the building envelope, improving building durability, reducing ice dams, and providing opportunities to improve occupant comfort and health.

  19. Building America Case Study: Balancing Hydronic Systems in Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned * Unit temperature in a multifamily hydronic building can vary by as much as 61F, particularly if windows are open or tenants use intermittent supplemen- tal ...

  20. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  1. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  2. Measure Guideline. Incorporating Thick Layers of Exterior Rigid Insulation on Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, Joseph; Baker, Peter

    2015-04-09

    This measure guideline, written by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America team Building Science Corporation, provides information about the design and construction of wall assemblies that use layers of rigid exterior insulation thicker than 1-Âœ in. and that require a secondary cladding attachment location exterior to the insulation. The guideline is separated into several distinct sections that cover: (1) fundamental building science principles relating to the use of exterior insulation on wall assemblies; (2) design principles for tailoring this use to the specific project goals and requirements; and (3) construction detailing to increase understanding about implementing the various design elements.

  3. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1.What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2.Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3.What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  4. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, P.; Eng, P.; Lepage, R.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of both wood framed walls as well as mass masonry wall assemblies. For thick layers of exterior insulation (levels greater than 1.5 inches), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location (Straube and Smegal 2009, Pettit 2009, Joyce 2009, Ueno 2010). The research presented in this report is intended to help develop a better understanding of the system mechanics involved and the potential for environmental exposure induced movement between the furring strip and the framing. BSC sought to address the following research questions: 1. What are the relative roles of the mechanisms and the magnitudes of the force that influence the vertical displacement resistance of the system? 2. Can the capacity at a specified deflection be reliably calculated using mechanics based equations? 3. What are the impacts of environmental exposure on the vertical displacement of furring strips attached directly through insulation back to a wood structure?

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (10) Apply Building Insulation filter Compressed air (10) Apply Compressed air filter Windows (10) Apply Windows filter Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building (8) Apply...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Photovoltaics filter Wind (All) (12) Apply Wind (All) filter Windows (11) Apply Windows filter Boilers (10) Apply Boilers filter Building Insulation (10) Apply Building...

  7. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Imagine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study of Imagine Homes, who worked with the Building America research partner IBACOS to build HERS-52 homes with spray foam-insulated attics and central fan-integrated supply ...

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2012: High-R Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research on high-R-value walls showing the difference between rated and whole wall R values and the need for vented cladding to reduce condensation potential with some insulation types.

  9. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Tindall...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study of Tindall Homes who worked with Building America research team IBACOS to build 20 HERS-58 homes with R-49 mixed attic insulation, poly-iso foam in advanced framed ...

  10. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cladding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board - Ontario, Canada | Department of Energy Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board - Ontario, Canada Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board - Ontario, Canada This case study describes a high performance enclosure retrofit package that uses mineral fiber insulation board and describes retrofit assembly and details for wood frame roof and walls and for

  11. High Power Coax Window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, M. L.; Dudas, A.; Sah, R.; Elliott, T. S.; Rimmer, R. A.; Stirbet, M. S.

    2010-05-23

    A su­per­con­duct­ing RF (SRF) power cou­pler ca­pa­ble of han­dling 500 kW CW RF power is re­quired for pre­sent and fu­ture stor­age rings and linacs. There are over 35 cou­pler de­signs for SRF cav­i­ties rang­ing in fre­quen­cy from 325 to 1500 MHz. Cou­pler win­dows vary from cylin­ders to cones to disks, and RF power cou­plers are lim­it­ed by the abil­i­ty of ce­ram­ic win­dows to with­stand the stress­es due to heat­ing and me­chan­i­cal flex­ure. We pro­pose a novel ro­bust co-ax­i­al SRF cou­pler de­sign which uses com­pressed win­dow tech­nol­o­gy. This tech­nol­o­gy will allow the use of high­ly ther­mal­ly con­duc­tive ma­te­ri­als for cryo­genic win­dows. Using com­pressed win­dow tech­niques on disk co-ax­i­al win­dows will make sig­nif­i­cant im­prove­ments in the power han­dling of SRF cou­plers. We pre­sent the bench test re­sults of two win­dow as­sem­blies back to back, as well as in­di­vid­u­al win­dow VSWR in EIA3.125 coax. A vac­u­um test as­sem­bly was made and the win­dows baked out at 155C. The pro­cess­es used to build win­dows is scal­able to larg­er di­am­e­ter coax and to high­er power lev­els.

  12. Building Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Building Science This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question How do we first do no harm with high-r enclosures?Ž PDF icon issue1_highr_enclosures.pdf More Documents & Publications Issue #1: How Do We First Do No Harm with High-R Enclosures? ZERH Webinar: Getting Enclosures Right in Zero Energy Ready Homes Basement Insulation Systems - Building America Top Innovation

  13. Tips: Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for recommendations. Be careful how close you place insulation next to a recessed light fixture-unless it is insulation contact (IC) rated-to avoid a fire hazard. See the...

  14. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet) Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet) This case study describes Building Science Corporation's research into spray polyurethane foams in residential roofs, performing hygrothermal

  15. Building America Update - February 6, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 6, 2014 Building America Update - February 6, 2014 February 6, 2014 - 3:11pm Addthis Top Innovation Spotlight: Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices For years, Building America research teams have advocated using the thermal, air, and vapor properties of rigid foam sheathing insulation to improve walls, This photos shows a rigid exterior insulation installed on the roof of a house. roofs, and foundations of homes. In 2013, these research efforts earned a Top Innovation award,

  16. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  17. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  18. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  19. Building Performance Database Analysis Tools | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rating year. Building Systems: Data can be filtered by a ... glass type, air flow control, wall insulation R-value, ... Regression: Fits a multiple linear regression model to the ...

  20. Windows, Doors, and Skylights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows, Doors, and Skylights Windows, Doors, and Skylights Choose energy efficient windows to reduce energy bills and improve the comfort of your home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Choose energy efficient windows to reduce energy bills and improve the comfort of your home. | Photo courtesy of FSEC/IBACOS. Windows, doors, and skylights-also known as fenestration-are significant components in a home's envelope. Ensuring they are as energy efficient as possible can save energy; reduce heating,

  1. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-Efficient Windows Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Windows provide our homes with light, warmth, and ventilation, but they can also negatively impact a home's energy efficiency. You can reduce energy

  2. WINDOW 4. 0: Program description. A PC program for analyzing the thermal performance of fenestration products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Windows and Daylighting Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating total window thermal performance indices (e.g. U-values, solar heat gain coefficients, shading coefficients, and visible transmittances). WINDOW 4.0 provides a versatile heat transfer analysis method consistent with the rating procedure developed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC). The program can be used to design and develop new products, to rate and compare performance characteristics of all types of window products, to assist educators in teaching heat transfer through windows, and to help public officials in developing building energy codes. WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision to WINDOW 3.1 and we strongly urge all users to read this manual before using the program. Users who need professional assistance with the WINDOW 4.0 program or other window performance simulation issues are encouraged to contact one or more of the NFRC-accredited Simulation Laboratories. A list of these accredited simulation professionals is available from the NFRC.

  3. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon bldgcodes03_guttman_040213.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Building America System Research

  4. A first-generation prototype dynamic residential window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Arasteh, Dariush

    2004-10-26

    We present the concept for a ''smart'' highly efficient dynamic window that maximizes solar heat gain during the heating season and minimizes solar heat gain during the cooling season in residential buildings. We describe a prototype dynamic window that relies on an internal shade, which deploys automatically in response to solar radiation and temperature. This prototype was built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from commercially available ''off-the-shelf'' components. It is a stand-alone, standard-size product, so it can be easily installed in place of standard window products. Our design shows promise for near-term commercialization. Improving thermal performance of this prototype by incorporating commercially available highly efficient glazing technologies could result in the first window that could be suitable for use in zero-energy homes. The unit's predictable deployment of shading could help capture energy savings that are not possible with manual shading. Installation of dynamically shaded windows in the field will allow researchers to better quantify the energy effects of shades, which could lead to increased efficiency in the sizing of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment for residences.

  5. X-ray Induced Quasiparticles: New Window on Unconventional

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Superconductivity | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) X-ray Induced Quasiparticles: New Window on Unconventional Superconductivity Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594

  6. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  9. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  10. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  11. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  12. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, L.W.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1982-12-01

    Recent accomplishments in buildings energy research by the diverse groups in the Energy Efficient Buildings Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are summarized. We review technological progress in the areas of ventilation and indoor air quality, buildings energy performance, computer modeling, windows, and artificial lighting. The need for actual consumption data to track accurately the improving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressed by the Buildings Energy Data (BED) Group at LBL. We summarize results to date from our Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) studies, which include time trends in the energy consumption of new commercial and new residential buildings, the measured savings being attained by both commercial and residential retrofits, and the cost-effectiveness of buildings energy conservation measures. We also examine recent comparisons of predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present the case for building energy use labels.

  13. Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhi, Hassan; Sharples, Stephen

    2013-01-15

    On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

  14. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  15. Stanek Windows | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buildings, Efficiency Product: Consulting; Installation; Maintenance and repair;Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution;Trainining and education Phone Number:...

  16. Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development: Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Guillermo Garcia Heliotrope Technologies, Inc. Ashok Gidwani Booz Allen Hamilton David Hawn Dedicated Roof and Hydro-Solutions, LLC Jason Holt Heliotrope Technologies, Inc. Patrick ...

  17. Windows come to the workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upton, M.

    1984-04-11

    Those making major buying decisions about software packages face a difficult process. The author looks at specific features, including windows and integrated packages. Everyone aspiring to be anyone in the packaged software business is touting an integrated system. Integrated software means a lot of things to a lot of people, but three hierarchical levels seem to stand out: the data integration level, the command structure level, and the modeless (or seamless) level.

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Excavationless: Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. This project describes an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home that uses hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  19. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  20. Rolling, Rolling, Rolling: Roller Window Shades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There's a lot of talk these days about installing new energy-efficient windows. Thanks to a Federal tax credit of up to $1,500, window advertisements, both print and radio and TV broadcasting, are aplenty.

  1. Building America Case Study: Advanced Extended Plate and Beam Wall System in a Cold-Climate House, Mount Joy, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the design and evaluation of a innovative wall system. This highly insulated (high-R) light-frame wall system for use above grade in residential buildings is referred to as Extended Plate & Beam (EP&B). The EP&B design is the first of its kind to be featured in a new construction test house (NCTH) for the DOE Building America program. The EP&B wall design integrates standard building methods and common building products to construct a high-R wall that minimizes transition risks and costs to builders. The EP&B design combines optimized framing with integrated rigid foam sheathing to increase the wall system's R-value and reduce thermal bridging. The foam sheathing is installed between the wall studs and structural wood sheathing. The exterior wood sheathing is attached directly to a framing extension formed by extended top and bottom plates. The exterior wood sheathing can dry to the exterior and provides bracing, a clear drainage plane and flashing surface for window and door openings, and a nailing surface for siding attachment. With support of the DOE Building America program, Home Innovation Research Labs partnered with Lancaster County Career and Technology Center (LCCTC) to build a NCTH in Lancaster, PA to demonstrate the EP&B wall design in a cold climate (IECC climate zone 5A). The results of the study confirmed the benefits of the systems and the viability of its integration into the house construction process.

  2. Making Smart Windows Smarter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Windows Smarter Making Smart Windows Smarter April 5, 2011 - 2:00pm Addthis "Smart Windows" seen at light and dark settings. | Photo Courtesy of SAGE Electrochromics, Inc., by Susan Fleck Photography "Smart Windows" seen at light and dark settings. | Photo Courtesy of SAGE Electrochromics, Inc., by Susan Fleck Photography Roland Risser Roland Risser Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Power (Acting) What does this project do? Pleotint, LLC has developed a

  3. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  4. Energy Department Announces Six Projects to Develop Energy-Saving Windows, Roofs, and Heating and Cooling Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department announces a $9 million investment in leading-edge building envelope technologies, including high-efficiency, high-performance windows, roofs and heating and cooling equipment.

  5. Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  7. Insulation Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Insulation and Energy Efficiency Information: Home Energy: The Magazine of Residential Energy Conservation Addthis Related Articles In existing homes, cellulose (here) or other...

  8. Thermal insulations using vacuum panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Burke, Melissa S.

    1991-07-16

    Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

  9. Building America Update - July 10, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10, 2014 Building America Update - July 10, 2014 July 10, 2014 - 2:05pm Addthis Building Science Corporation worked with Transformations, Inc., on a subdivision of super-insulated homes that earned HERS scores of 35 before adding solar PV. Building Science Corporation worked with Transformations, Inc., on a subdivision of super-insulated homes that earned HERS scores of 35 before adding solar PV. Top Innovation Spotlight: Zero Energy Ready Single-Family Homes Deadline for Feedback for Crafting

  10. Building America Webinar: May 21, 2014 - | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Building America Webinar: May 21, 2014 - This presentation, delivered at the webinar, High Performance Building Enclosures: Part I, Existing Homes, on May 21, 2014, provides strategies for retrofitting exterior foundation insulation without an excavator. PDF icon BA_Webinar_tomschirber_5-21-14.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Excavationless: Exterior-Side Foundation Insulation for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet) Excavationless

  11. Evaluation of control strategies for different smart window combinations using computer simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonsson, Andreas; Roos, Arne

    2010-01-15

    Several studies have shown that the use of switchable windows could lower the energy consumption of buildings. Since the main function of windows is to provide daylight and visual contact with the external world, high visible transmittance is needed. From an energy perspective it is always best to have the windows in their low-transparent state whenever there are cooling needs, but this is generally not preferable from a daylight and visual contact point of view. Therefore a control system, which can be based on user presence, is needed in connection with switchable windows. In this study the heating and cooling needs of the building, using different control mechanisms were evaluated. This was done for different locations and for different combinations of switchable windows, using electrochromic glazing in combination with either low-e or solar control glazing. Four control mechanisms were investigated; one that only optimizes the window to lower the need for heating and cooling, one that assumes that the office is in use during the daytime, one based on user presence and one limiting the perpendicular component of the incident solar irradiation to avoid glare and too strong daylight. The control mechanisms were compared using computer simulations. A simplified approach based on the balance temperature concept was used instead of performing complete building simulations. The results show that an occupancy-based control system is clearly beneficial and also that the best way to combine the panes in the switchable window differs depending on the balance temperature of the building and on the climate. It is also shown that it can be beneficial to have different window combinations for different orientations. (author)

  12. Novel Thermal Break with Simplified Manufacturing for R7 Commercial Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Novel Thermal Break with Simplified Manufacturing for R7 Commercial Windows Novel Thermal Break with Simplified Manufacturing for R7 Commercial Windows Lead Performer: Alcoa - Pittsburgh, PA DOE Funding: $1,123,838 Cost Share: $280,960 Project Term: October 2014 - September 2016 Funding Opportunity: Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers and Incubator Technologies (BENEFIT) - 2014 (DE-FOA-0001027) Project Objective Alcoa proposes to develop a novel sandwich-type foam

  13. Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet), Building America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DOEGO-102013-4267 * December 2013 BUILDING AMERICA CASE STUDY: TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR NEW AND EXISTING HOMES RESEARCH DETAILS Advanced frame wall with exterior insulation Hybrid ...

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: CDC Realty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research partner Building Science Corporation to design HERS-54 homes with ducts in insulated attics, solar water heating, tight air sealing, and rigid foam exterior sheathing. ...

  15. Recent development in green buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, V.C.

    1996-12-31

    Because of the environmental concerns about some materials used in buildings, particularly chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) fluids used as the blowing agent for insulation materials and as refrigerants used in the air conditioning systems have led to a search for environmentally safe alternatives. For insulation materials, new non-CFC blowing agents are still under development. However, the old insulation materials in the buildings will stay because they do not pose any further environmental damage. It is a different story for refrigerants used in air conditioning systems. This study reports that the change-over from CFC to non-CFC refrigerants in the existing and future air conditioning equipment could be a chance not only to take care of the environmental concerns, but to save energy as well. Alternative air conditioning technologies, such as the desiccant dehumidification and absorption systems, and the potential of some natural substances, such as carbon dioxide, as the future refrigerants are also discussed.

  16. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming; Kuzay, Tuncer M.

    1995-01-01

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  17. Building technologies program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

  18. NREL Improves Window Heat Transfer Calculations (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of algorithm discrepancies helps to promote market confidence in EnergyPlus and DOE-2. Heat loss through windows represents a significant amount of the overall energy use in homes. To address discrepancies in building simulation software-and market barriers impeding building energy use analysis-researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) identified and resolved window-related energy predictions of EnergyPlus and DOE-2, thereby improving the accuracy of both simulation

  19. Window, Door, and Skylight Products and Services | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Doors, and Skylights ENERGY STAR Learn how to save energy by sealing your home and choosing ENERGY STAR windows, doors, and skylights. Window Selection Tool Efficient Windows...

  20. Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions for Dynamic Window Material Low-Cost Solutions for Dynamic Window Material ... More Documents & Publications Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows ...

  1. Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights Energy Performance Ratings for Windows, Doors, and Skylights Before you shop for energy-efficient windows, doors, and ...

  2. Tips for Daylighting with Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Alastair; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    These guidelines provide an integrated approach to the cost-effective design of perimeter zones in new commercial buildings and existing building retrofits. They function as a quick reference for building designers, through a set of easy steps and rules-of-thumb, emphasizing “how-to” practical details. References are given to more detailed sources of information, should the reader wish to go further. The design method used in this document emphasizes that building decisions should be made within the context of the whole building as a single functioning system rather than as an assembly of distinct parts. This integrated design approach looks at the ramifications of each individual system decision on the whole building. For example, the decision on glazing selection will have an effect on lighting, mechanical systems, and interior design. Therefore, the entire design team should participate and influence this glazing decision—which typically rests with the architect alone. The benefit of an integrated design approach is a greater chance of success towards long-term comfort and sustained energy savings in the building.

  3. Purged window apparatus utilizing heated purge gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballard, Evan O.

    1984-01-01

    A purged window apparatus utilizing tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows, and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube. Use of this apparatus prevents backstreaming of gases under investigation which are flowing past the mouth of the mounting tube which would otherwise deposit on the windows. Lengthy spectroscopic investigations and analyses can thereby be performed without the necessity of interrupting the procedures in order to clean or replace contaminated windows.

  4. Rigid thin windows for vacuum applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Glenn Allyn; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Myers, Booth Richard; Chen, Hao-Lin; Wakalopulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A thin window that stands off atmospheric pressure is fabricated using photolithographic and wet chemical etching techniques and comprises at least two layers: an etch stop layer and a protective barrier layer. The window structure also comprises a series of support ribs running the width of the window. The windows are typically made of boron-doped silicon and silicon nitride and are useful in instruments such as electron beam guns and x-ray detectors. In an electron beam gun, the window does not impede the electrons and has demonstrated outstanding gun performance and survivability during the gun tube manufacturing process.

  5. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  6. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  7. Superconducting Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a building-sized particle accelerator. The connection between TI electrons and the physics of special relativity may at first seem like a mere mathematical oddity, but in...

  8. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  9. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  10. Flipping Photoelectron Spins in Topological Insulators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The interior bulk of a topological insulator is an insulator, but electrons (grey spheres) move swiftly on the surface as if through a metal. They are spin polarized,...

  11. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator ...

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  13. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  14. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Uribe, Francisco A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  15. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  16. Berkeley Lab Scientists Developing Paint-on Coating for Energy Efficient Windows

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It’s estimated that 10 percent of all the energy used in buildings in the U.S. can be attributed to window performance, costing building owners about $50 billion annually, yet the high cost of replacing windows or retrofitting them with an energy efficient coating is a major deterrent. U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers are seeking to address this problem with creative chemistry—a polymer heat-reflective coating that can be painted on at one-tenth the cost.

  17. An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

    2005-08-01

    This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data is presented in support of project and model assumptions. Finally, current and suggested testing protocol and procedure for future model validation and IG physical testing are discussed.

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clothes Washers, Dishwasher, RefrigeratorsFreezers, Building Insulation, Windows OTEC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC)...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors Adams Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Loan Program Supplemental loan money is...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Insulation, Windows, Roofs, Other EE, Wind (Small), Geothermal Direct-Use Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Insulation, Windows, Other EE, LED Lighting, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programmable Thermostats, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors Midstate Electric Cooperative- Residential Conservation Rebates Midstate Electric Cooperative offers its...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Siding, Roofs Entergy Mississippi- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Entergy Solutions for Business Program provides technical...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings Category: Clothes Washers, Dishwasher, RefrigeratorsFreezers, Ceiling Fan, Lighting, Air conditioners, Programmable Thermostats, Building Insulation, Windows,...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    are available for customers who... Eligibility: Residential Savings Category: Geothermal Heat Pumps, Heat Pumps, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Comprehensive Measures...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Roofs, CustomOthers pending approval, Geothermal Direct-Use, Other Distributed Generation Technologies California Enterprise...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building Insulation, Windows, CustomOthers pending approval, Other EE, Tankless Water Heater Energy Conservation Improvements Property Tax Exemption Qualifying...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CaulkingWeather-stripping, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Other EE Jackson Energy Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Established in...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Siding, Roofs, Agricultural Equipment, Other EE, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), Reflective Roofs, LED Lighting, Commercial...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Processing and Manufacturing Equipment, Other EE, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small), LED Lighting...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to their properties while... Eligibility: Residential Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar Photovoltaics, Solar Pool Heating, Building Insulation, Windows, Roofs,...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors Energy Optimization (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Program Energy Optimization Eligibility:...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boilers, Programmable Thermostats, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows Redding Electric- Residential and Commercial Energy...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Income Residential Savings Category: Clothes Washers, RefrigeratorsFreezers, Water Heaters, Heat Pumps, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Comprehensive Measures...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Category: Biomass, Water Heaters, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, Building Insulation, Windows, Roofs, Other EE Community Energy Education Management...

  17. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors Montgomery County- Residential Energy Conservation Property Tax Credit Note: As originally...

  18. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting ControlsSensors, Chillers, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, Compressed air, Programmable Thermostats, Building Insulation, Windows, Roofs, Motor VFDs, Agricultural...

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CaulkingWeather-stripping, Building Insulation, Windows, Insulation, LED Lighting OTEC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC)...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation, Windows, Doors, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Insulation Santee Cooper- Residential Energy Efficiency Existing Homes Rebate Program Santee Cooper provides...

  1. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Insulation, Water Heaters, Furnaces, Boilers, Programmable Thermostats, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Other EE Efficient...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Insulation, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heater Emerald PUD- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Emerald People's Utility District...

  3. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insulation, Water Heaters, Lighting, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, CustomOthers pending approval, Other EE Energy Conservation...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Heaters, Lighting, Chillers, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, Heat recovery, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Insulation CaliforniaFIRST...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Dishwasher, RefrigeratorsFreezers, Equipment Insulation, Water Heaters, Lighting, Heat Pumps, Air conditioners, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Custom...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Insulation, LED Lighting, Tankless Water Heater CPS Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CPS Energy offers a...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Doors, Other EE Arlington County- Green Building Incentive Program The Green Building Density Incentive program allows the...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermostats, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Windows, Other EE, Tankless Water Heater City of Plano- Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings Return on...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Daylighting, Building Insulation, Windows, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Wind (Small), Hydroelectric (Small) Energy Conservation in State Buildings In 1992 the state...

  10. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners | Department of Energy Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners This guide will help contractors and homeowners identify ways to make their homes more comfortable, more energy efficient, and healthier to live in. It also identifies

  11. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Research and Development 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for research and development, including residential and commercial integration, lighting, HVAC and water heating, envelope, windows, and analysis tools.

  12. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  13. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  14. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  15. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal bridging, better condensation resistance, reduced thermal stress on the structure, as well as other commonly associated improvements such as increased airtightness and improved water management. For thick layers of exterior insulation (more than 1.5 in.), the use of wood furring strips attached through the insulation back to the structure has been used by many contractors and designers as a means to provide a convenient cladding attachment location. Although the approach has proven effective, there is significant resistance to its widespread implementation due to a lack of research and understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of the vertical displacement resistance capacity. In addition, the long-term in-service performance of the system has been questioned due to potential creep effects of the assembly under the sustained dead load of the cladding and effects of varying environmental conditions. In addition, the current International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) do not have a provision that specifically allows this assembly.

  16. WINDOW 4.0: Program description. A PC program for analyzing the thermal performance of fenestration products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    WINDOW 4.0 is a publicly available IBM PC compatible computer program developed by the Windows and Daylighting Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for calculating total window thermal performance indices (e.g. U-values, solar heat gain coefficients, shading coefficients, and visible transmittances). WINDOW 4.0 provides a versatile heat transfer analysis method consistent with the rating procedure developed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC). The program can be used to design and develop new products, to rate and compare performance characteristics of all types of window products, to assist educators in teaching heat transfer through windows, and to help public officials in developing building energy codes. WINDOW 4.0 is a major revision to WINDOW 3.1 and we strongly urge all users to read this manual before using the program. Users who need professional assistance with the WINDOW 4.0 program or other window performance simulation issues are encouraged to contact one or more of the NFRC-accredited Simulation Laboratories. A list of these accredited simulation professionals is available from the NFRC.

  17. Windows, Doors, & Skylights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Windows, Doors, & Skylights Windows, Doors, & Skylights Installing storm windows keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer while also lowering your energy bills by up to $350 a year. <a href="/node/797126" target="_blank">Start saving today by following a step-by-step guide in our new DIY Savings Project</a>. Installing storm windows keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer while also lowering your energy bills by up to $350

  18. Energy-Efficient Windows | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and lighting to this sunny kitchen. | Photo courtesy of Emily Minton-Redfield for Jim Logan Architects. Energy-efficient windows provide space heating and lighting to this...

  19. Transparency: it's not just for windows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparency: it's not just for windows Los Alamos National Laboratory's database of environmental monitoring data is now directly viewable by the public. March 20, 2012...

  20. Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dynamically Responsive Infrared Window Coatings Addthis 1 of 5 An oxygen plasma etcher is ... Kyle Alvine checks on the progress of the plasma etch. Image: Pacific Northwest National ...