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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Predicting hourly building energy usage  

SciTech Connect

This article presents the results of an evaluation to identify the most accurate method for making hourly energy use predictions. The prediction of energy usage by HVAC systems is important for the purposes of HVAC diagnostics, system control, parameter and system identification, optimization and energy management. Many new techniques are now being applied to the analysis problems involved with predicting the future behavior of HVAC systems and deducing properties of these systems. Similar problems arise in most observational disciplines, including physics, biology and economics.

Kreider, J.F. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering); Haberl, J.S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Title Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

3

Trends in Building Energy Usage in Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In late 1983, a cost containment program was initiated out of the governor's office directed at the major state agencies. The Energy Management Group at Texas A&M University provided technical expertise in obtaining agency energy usage and cost figures for the fiscal years 1981 to 1983. While there is considerable diversity from agency to agency, the trend is toward dramatically higher energy cost per square foot for virtually all agencies. This alarming trend can be partially explained by rising unit costs for gas and electricity and a lack of incentives for conservation efforts due to the method of utility budget allocations. A building standard signed into law in 1976 could have reduced energy consumption, but was never enforced. Beginning in fiscal year 1986, universities will be allowed to comingle utility money with capital operating money so that conservation can really pay off for them.

Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.; O'Neal, D. L.; Seshan, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns Speaker(s): Rich Brown Date: May 16, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Was explosive growth in electricity...

5

Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of heating and cooling equipment in semi-tropical climates presents some design considerations and limitations not so prevalent in temperate climates. In some cases, the heating season may be non-existent for all practical purposes. Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy requirements for commercial buildings. It is then suggested that this computer program would be valuable in determining the changes one could expect in annual energy usage by varying certain building design parameters. Secondly, a small office building actually constructed in Central Florida in which the author designed the Heating and Cooling HVAC system is described. Tradeoffs are presented showing the effects of changes in these building design parameters.

Worbs, H. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alphabetically Tools by Platform PC Mac UNIX Internet Tools by Country Related Links Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides...

7

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicted the actual electric usage throughout the summerincluding sub-metering the electric usage of lighting, plug,energy usage and predicting hourly building electric demand.

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

9

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Energy Usage Forecasts Quick and easy web-based tool that provides free 14-day ahead energy usage forecasts based on the degree day forecasts for 1,200 stations in the U.S. and Canada. The user enters the daily non-weather base load and the usage per degree day weather factor; the tool applies the degree day forecast and displays the total energy usage forecast. Helpful FAQs explain the process and describe various options for the calculation of the base load and weather factor. Historical degree day reports and 14-day ahead degree day forecasts are available from the same site. Keywords degree days, historical weather, mean daily temperature, load calculation, energy simulation Validation/Testing Degree day data provided by AccuWeather.com, updated daily at 0700.

10

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for building electric and gas usage Overall building energyGas Emissions (CO2) Building total steam consumption (therm/(ft 2 -yr)) and peak demand Metering data for building electric and steam usage

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Energy Usage Evaluation and Condition Monitoring for Electric Machines using Wireless Sensor Networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy usage evaluation and condition monitoring for electric machines are important in industry for overall energy savings. Traditionally these functions are realized only for large… (more)

Lu, Bin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Integrate Real-Time Weather with Thermostat Electrical Usage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Xiufeng Pang Weather and its dynamics are big drivers of energy usage. Integration of key weather variables - solar, wind, and temperature - into home energy management and demand...

13

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in...

14

DND: a model for forecasting electrical energy usage by water-resource subregion  

SciTech Connect

A forecast methodology was derived from principles of econometrics using exogenous variables, i.e., cost of electricity, consumer income, and price elasticity as indicators of growth for each consuming sector: residential, commercial, and industrial. The model was calibrated using forecast data submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) by the nine Regional Electric Reliability Councils. Estimates on electrical energy usage by specific water-resource subregion were obtained by normalizing forecasted total electrical energy usage by state into per capita usage. The usage factor and data on forecasted population were applied for each water resource subregion. The results derived using the model are self-consistent and in good agreement with DOE Energy Information Administration projections. The differences that exist are largely the result of assumptions regarding specific aggregations and assignment of regional-system reliability and load factors. 8 references, 2 figures, 13 tables.

Sonnichsen, J.C. Jr.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving… (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Annual fuel usage charts for oil-fired boilers. [Building space heating and hot water supplies  

SciTech Connect

On the basis of laboratory-determined boiler efficiency data, one may calculate the annual fuel usage (AFU) for any oil-fired boiler, serving a structure of a given design heat load, for any specified hourly weather pattern. Further, where data are available regarding the energy recapture rates of the strucutre due to direct gain solar energy (windows), lighting, cooking, electrical appliances, metabolic processes, etc., the annual fuel usage savings due to such (re) capture are straightforwardly determinable. Employing the Brookhaven National Laboratory annual fuel usage formulation, along with efficiency data determined in the BNL Boiler Laboratory, computer-drawn annual fuel usage charts can be generated for any selected boiler for a wide range of operating conditions. For two selected boilers operating in any one of the hour-by-hour weather patterns which characterize each of six cities over a wide range of firing rates, domestic hot water consumption rates, design heat loads, and energy (re) capture rates, annual fuel usages are determined and graphically presented. Figures 1 to 98, inclusive, relate to installations for which energy recapture rates are taken to be zero. Figures 97 to 130, inclusive, apply to a range of cases for which energy recapture rates are nonzero and determinable. In all cases, simple, direct and reliable annual fuel usage values can be determined by use of charts and methods such as those illustrated.

Berlad, A.L.; Yeh, Y.J.; Salzano, F.J.; Hoppe, R.J.; Batey, J.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Guidelines for Energy Cost Savings Resulting from Tracking and Monitoring Electrical nad Natural Gas Usage, Cost, and Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how improved energy information in schools and hospitals from tracking and monitoring electrical and natural gas usage, cost, and optional rate structures, can reduce energy costs. Recommendations, methods, and guidelines for monitoring and tracking of utilities are provided. These recommendations, methods, and guidelines are the result of on-site work for schools and hospitals . Recently completed energy usage survey and observations of several hospitals in Texas are included. Opportunities exist for schools, hospitals, and other buildings t o achieve significant dollar savings by good utility management. Understanding utility rate structures is essential for minimizing energy costs. The authors' data is for Texas schools and hospitals, but the principles presented apply to other geographic areas.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, M. C.; Estes, J. M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Learning policies for battery usage optimization in electric vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high cost, limited capacity, and long recharge time of batteries pose a number of obstacles for the widespread adoption of electric vehicles. Multi-battery systems that combine a standard battery with supercapacitors are currently one of the most ...

Stefano Ermon; Yexiang Xue; Carla Gomes; Bart Selman

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A large-scale study on predicting and contextualizing building energy usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a data-driven approach to modeling end user energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings. Our model is based upon a data set of monthly electricity and gas bills, collected by a utility ...

Kolter, Jeremy Z.

22

Electricity Use in California: Past Trends and Present Usage Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; thus, it includes loads served by self-generation. System peak load is measured at the power plant-use. We examine the growth in electricity demand between 1980 and 2000, as well as the composition in California in the 1990s did not grow explosively, nor was the amount of growth unanticipated. In both

23

Opt-E-Plus Software for Commercial Building Optimization; Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Commercial Building Optimization Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado...

24

build more efficient electrical grids, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research and development (R&D). The new action plan also places a greater emphasis on energy efficiency. Accomplishments to date under the CED include: (1) completing the final phase of the Weyburn-Midale Carbon Dioxide Monitoring and Storage Project, which focuses on best practices for the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2

25

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

26

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Title Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Publication Type...

27

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Title DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Publication Type Report...

28

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables? Title Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?...

29

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Building / tariffs electricity and gas loads for afeed-in tariff -ZNEB Storage and DR constraints -electricity

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

31

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determinants of residential electrical appliance usage in the Tri-State Region, 1960-1970: a regression study. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This study was undertaken to assess residential electricity usage, particularly electrical appliance use, in the residential sector of the New York Metropolitan area from 1960 to 1970. The attempts to choose and quantify the contribution of various determinants of electrical appliance usage using multiple regression analyses has been relatively successful. In addition, these results were compared with 1960 and 1970 data in an effort to establish a degree of consistency over time. The implications of the findings here point toward two complementary institutions for change: urban planning and public administration. The relationship between single family structures and high energy usage argue strongly for more dense communities, while price elasticities can be used by regulators to control electrical usage.

Stone, B.

1974-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (services to a building microgrid produces technology neutral

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desktop usage is also highly correlated with lighting loads.usage, as one might expect since most o?ce buildings do not adjust lighting

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building: An Economic Analysis Using DER-CAM Title Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building: An...

39

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metering technology makes it possible to differentiate electricity usage patterns of buildings on an hourly or sub-

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Usage of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Along the Corridors between the EV Project Major Cities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report explains how the EVSE are being used along the corridors between the EV Project cities. The EV Project consists of a nationwide collaboration between Idaho National Laboratory (INL), ECOtality North America, Nissan, General Motors, and more than 40 other city, regional and state governments, and electric utilities. The purpose of the EV Project is to demonstrate the deployment and use of approximately 14,000 Level II (208-240V) electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and 300 fast chargers in 16 major cities. This research investigates the usage of all currently installed EV Project commercial EVSE along major interstate corridors. ESRI ArcMap software products are utilized to create geographic EVSE data layers for analysis and visualization of commercial EVSE usage. This research locates the crucial interstate corridors lacking sufficient commercial EVSE and targets locations for future commercial EVSE placement. The results and methods introduced in this research will be used by INL for the duration of the EV Project.

Mindy Kirkpatrick

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage  

SciTech Connect

This analysis examines the relationship between energy demand and residential building attributes, demographic characteristics, and behavioral variables using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2005 microdata. This study investigates the applicability of the smooth backfitting estimator to statistical analysis of residential energy consumption via nonparametric regression. The methodology utilized in the study extends nonparametric additive regression via local linear smooth backfitting to categorical variables. The conventional methods used for analyzing residential energy consumption are econometric modeling and engineering simulations. This study suggests an econometric approach that can be utilized in combination with simulation results. A common weakness of previously used econometric models is a very high likelihood that any suggested parametric relationships will be misspecified. Nonparametric modeling does not have this drawback. Its flexibility allows for uncovering more complex relationships between energy use and the explanatory variables than can possibly be achieved by parametric models. Traditionally, building simulation models overestimated the effects of energy efficiency measures when compared to actual "as-built" observed savings. While focusing on technical efficiency, they do not account for behavioral or market effects. The magnitude of behavioral or market effects may have a substantial influence on the final energy savings resulting from implementation of various energy conservation measures and programs. Moreover, variability in behavioral aspects and user characteristics appears to have a significant impact on total energy consumption. Inaccurate estimates of energy consumption and potential savings also impact investment decisions. The existing modeling literature, whether it relies on parametric specifications or engineering simulation, does not accommodate inclusion of a behavioral component. This study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning units in residential buildings, and are using the central air-conditioning system in residential buildings. To determine the best air conditioning mode, a residential tower building with 22 layers was chosen for analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the central air-conditioning system and the residential multi-unit air-conditioning equipment system and the LiBr absorption chiller were compared based on calculating the first-cost and the annual cost (according to providing cooling 90 days annually). The predicted results show the economical feasibility of using the refrigerating units in air-conditioning systems in Beijing region, and point out the developing directions for the future.

Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Towards A Design Environment For Buildingintegrated Energy Systems: The Integration Of Electrical Power Flow Modelling With Building Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................................... xi Chapter 1 - Buildings Energy and Environment ..................................................................... 1 1.1 Energy Use within Buildings............................................................................................1 1.1.1 Environmental Implications.......................................................................................2 1.1.2 Economic Implications ..............................................................................................3 1.2 The Means of Reducing Energy Consumption..................................................................4 1.2.1 Energy End-Use Reduction........................................................................................4 1.2.2 Reducing High-Grade Energy Usage .........................................................................5 1.2.3 Electrical Energy Displa...

Nicolas James Kelly; Building Simulation; Nicolas James; Kelly B. Eng; M. Sc

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technologies Division Building / tariffs electricityOptions, Tariffs, and Building Analyzed Environmental Energyenergy management more effective stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally results will depend on the considered region and tariff

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Building a winning electric utility organization  

SciTech Connect

The key factor that will differentiate the winners and losers is the speed with which they build their skills and enhance their performance focus. Setting the {open_quote}right{close_quote} aspirations, then effectively managing the change process, will be critical for winning power companies. Historically, only certain dimensions of organizational performance have been critical to an electric utility`s financial success. As a result, utilities understandably focused on achieving high levels of customer satisfaction and reliability, excellent regulatory relationships, and safe and environmentally acceptable operations. However, as the power industry undergoes fundamental change, obtaining superior organizational performance will become much more crucial and difficult. Given the importance of meeting these organizational challenges head on, the authors believe CEOs can only address them by taking an important step back from day-to-day activities to define what high performance really means in the future competitive world and what steps should be taken to achieve their aspirations. To facilitate this rethink - which senior managers should view as a multiyear process - utilities need to do three things in an iterative way: (1) energize the transformation with the right performance aspirations. (2) Tailor a coherent change program to the company`s unique starting position. (3) Manage the change process to build a skill-based and performance-focused organization.

Farha, G.; Silverman, L. [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States); Keough, K. [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure Quality, Management, and Contract Incentives Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager...

47

Development of a commercial-sector data base and forecasting model for electricity usage and demand. Volume I. Preliminary model specification. [Description of subprograms BEHAV, DEMAND, ECON, ENER, and INGEN  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of twelve major technical reports under the Commission's contract with Hittman Associates. The contract will lead to the development of a data base on commercial space, and the development of a model to forecast electricity usage and demand. This report presents a preliminary specification of the model to be developed. The model being developed combines econometric and engineering approaches, and consists of five subprograms and an overall executing program. The first subprogram forecasts the stock of commercial space, based on employment data and other economic inputs. It also distinguishes among various types of commercial space, and breaks the commercial space into segments according to fuels for various end uses, such as heating, cooling, etc. The second subprogram uses detailed building-survey data to specify a typical, or characteristic building for each unique type of floorspace considered in the study. The third subprogram calculates monthly electricity usage for the typical buildings specified, using standard engineering techniques, and then scales up the electricity use for each building type according to the amount of space, of that type, in the entire building stock. The fourth subprogram performs a similar function, but produces hourly electricity demands, rather than monthly electricity usage. The fifth, and final subprogram adjusts the energy usage and demand values calculated to simulate the impact of certain economic conditions or policy measures. The report presents a flow chart for each subprogram, and a table of inputs and outputs required for each. The logic, structure, flow, and information transfer of each is described.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Measuring Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leading the effort to decipher MELs impacts on buildings Understanding and reducing the energy use of MELs is a significant problem. The buildings industry is working towards...

49

ElectricStorageinCaliforniasCommercialBuildings_cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it as EMS emulator and the building can use the mobile storage and stationary storage for tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected to the buildings for energy...

50

Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Office Buildings: Market Analysis for Electricity Service Providers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office buildings nationwide account for the greatest floor space and energy use of all commercial building types. To best serve and retain the loyalty of this important market, electric utilities need to understand the energy uses, priorities, and decision-making approaches of commercial building managers. This report assesses the office building energy market to provide a basic reference for utility program planners, marketing managers, and field representatives.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid June 7, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Nancy Sutley Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality Sally Jewell Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior Tom Vilsack Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture Editor's note: This article has been cross-posted from WhiteHouse.gov. As part of President Obama's initiative to make America a magnet for jobs by building a 21st century infrastructure, today he signed a Presidential Memorandum that will speed the modernization of the nation's electric grid. This will help make electricity more reliable, save consumers money

53

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

54

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cymap Electrical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for building loads and regulation compliance. Low-voltage wiring design from the transformer through to final circuits with LVHV discrimination capabilities. Can export small...

55

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

complexity of the DER interactions at buildings also show that a reduction in stationary battery costs increases the local PV adoption, but can also increase the fossil based...

56

File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial PV Systems NREL 2012.pdf...

57

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

58

Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 Federal Government Water Usage 5 Federal Government Water Usage March 2012 8.5.1 Federal Water Consumption Intensity and Costs (Millions of Gallons) Agency Total Source(s): 164,382.9 536,301.9 3,129,134.9 52.5 FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs FY 2007, Table 9, p. 26, Jan. 2010. HUD 21.8 139.1 1,432.0 15.2 RRB 5.5 19.5 346.9 15.9 SSA 125.0 617.1 9,262.0 13.5 Archives 107.9 552.9 4,062.0 26.6 State 169.0 762.2 4,476.7 37.8 EPA 168.1 1,196.0 3,723.3 45.2 Treasury 431.1 1,795.5 12,049.6 35.8 Commerce 352.1 1,571.2 13,627.9 25.8 TVA 733.0 2,248.2 27,969.8 26.2 DOT 464.1 3,002.8 25,722.1 18.0 DHS 1,522.8 12,442.9 45,556.7 33.4 Labor 1,029.0 4,816.3 20,335.8 50.6 NASA 2,036.5 5,085.8 38,896.2 52.4 HHS 1,799.7 11,814.7 31,338.4 57.4 GSA 2,651.2 18,104.9 176,414.5 15.0 USDA 2,150.9 4,876.0 57,480.9 37.4 USPS

60

Electric Forklift Conversion Transforms Building Products Manufacturer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last six years, market acceptance of electric lift trucks has steadily increased. Advances in motor drive, battery, and charger technology have dramatically improved equipment performance and utility, and therefore industry acceptance – even in demanding multi-shift operations. Roughly 64% of the total North American forklift market and more than 70% of the European Union lift truck market is now electric. For many applications, electric lift trucks offer equal or superior performance ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous orRetro...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning Title Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning Publication Type...

62

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote monitoring of temperature, electric usage and control of peak demand through a temperature-based duty-cycling algorithm developed specifically for the application. Installed costs and energy savings are discussed. A 16% energy-use reduction was confirmed through the first heating season of operation. The response of occupants and management to changes in temperature regime has been a critical aspect of system start-up and commissioning.

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Analysis of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency and load-managed electric cooling and water heating technologies often provide a better rate of return for commercial building owners, with lower capital outlay and lower technical risk than cogeneration. Commercially available equipment typical of these electric technologies include high-efficiency chillers, thermal energy storage, heat recovery chillers, heat recovery heat pumps, and heat pump water heaters.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

65

Annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. [Includes about 400 abstracts and glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from the Load Research Committee of Association of Edison Illuminating Companies (LRC/AEIC) reports and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts over references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

An annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report is a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end-use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis, and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from LRC/AEIC reports, and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts cover references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

Reznek, B.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

Belzer, David B.

2004-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration Distributed Energy Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consulting Services, LLC; Brett Oakleaf, Xcel Energy; Kenneth Wolf, Minnesota Public Utilities CommissionElectricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration Center Distributed Energy Publications 2005 for a single phase high frequency AC microgrid, S. Chakraborty, M.D. Weiss and M.G. Simoes, IEEE Transaction

69

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado requires a life cycle perspective. This paper compares greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from three renewable, and natural gas power plants is estimated for four time periods after construction. The assessment

Kammen, Daniel M.

70

Economics of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency electrical equipment often offers commercial building owners a higher rate of return than cogeneration, with much lower technical and financial risks. The rate of return for cogeneration systems proved much lower when using high-efficiency equipment rather than conventional equipment as the baseline in analyzing cogeneration economics.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Load Leveling Approach to Removing Appliance Features from Home Electricity Usage Profiles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the past twenty years, researchers have developed a class of algorithms that are capable of disaggregating a residential electric load into its set of… (more)

McLaughlin, Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Camp Discovery Helps Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on AddThis.com... Feb. 5, 2011 Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy

74

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM Title Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An...

75

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables? Michael, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement and partly by NEC Laboratories America Inc. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer

76

Present coal potential of Turkey and coal usage in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Total coal reserve (hard coal + lignite) in the world is 984 billion tons. While hard coal constitutes 52% of the total reserve, lignite constitutes 48% of it. Turkey has only 0.1% of world hard coal reserve and 1.5% of world lignite reserves. Turkey has 9th order in lignite reserve, 8th order in lignite production, and 12th order in total coal (hard coal and lignite) consumption. While hard coal production meets only 13% of its consumption, lignite production meets lignite consumption in Turkey. Sixty-five percent of produced hard coal and 78% of produced lignite are used for electricity generation. Lignites are generally used for electricity generation due to their low quality. As of 2003, total installed capacity of Turkey was 35,587 MW, 19% (6,774 MW) of which is produced from coal-based thermal power plants. Recently, use of natural gas in electricity generation has increased. While the share of coal in electricity generation was about 50% for 1986, it is replaced by natural gas today.

Yilmaz, A.O. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste handling building electrical system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

S.E. Salzman

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (°C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Connecting Your Solar Electric System to the Utility Grid: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of solar-powered homes connected to the local utility grid has increased dramatically. These''grid-connected'' buildings have solar electric panels or''modules'' that provide some or even most of their power, while still being connected to the local utility. This fact sheet provides information on connecting your solar electric system to the utility grid, including information on net metering.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation is: (1) global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (EV) modeling; (2) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (3) presentation summary - how does the number of EVs connected to the building change with different optimization goals (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (3) ongoing EV modeling for California: the California commercial end-use survey (CEUS) database, objective: 138 different typical building - EV connections and benefits; (4) detailed analysis for healthcare facility: optimal EV connection at a healthcare facility in southern California; and (5) conclusions. Conclusions are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions. Why? Stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff - final work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Mendes, Goncalo; Marnay, Chris; M& #233; gel, Olivier; Lai, Judy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A Study of the Electrical Energy Usage Patterns of a Texas Dairy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A one-year study was done on a modern dairy operation located in Hopkins County, Texas to determine the load patterns and total energy use of the major electrical loads in the dairy. It was found that the vacuum pumps for the milking machines consumed the most energy, followed by the water heater and milk coolers. Consumption for water heating and milk cooling was found to vary seasonally. Peak demands for the dairy occurred at 6 a.m. and 5 p.m. throughout the year during the morning and afternoon milkings. The morning peak occurred two hours prior to Texas Power & Light Company's winter peak hour, and the evening peak is coincident with TP&L's summer peak hour. It was estimated that a savings of approximately 33% on water heating kWh was attained through a waste heat recovery system connected to the milk coolers. The water heating load was found to have the highest load factor coincident with TP&L's summer peak of any of the loads monitored.

Schneider, K. C.; Pollard, K. W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Non-Intrusive Electric Load Monitoring in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased interest in optimal control, energy scorekeeping and fault detection for HVAC equipment in commercial buildings has focused attention on instrumentation required to obtain the desired data. In this paper we investigate what can be learned from measurements of electrical power at a single point, that of the electrical service for the entire HVAC system. This low-cost measurement has proved in field tests to be capable of detecting the power change when a piece of equipment turns on or off; detecting oscillating equipment power caused by poorly tuned controllers; and detecting suboptimal staging of multiple chillers. Detection of equipment start and stop transitions was strengthened by application of a nonlinear filter that determines the point of median power from a filtering window of user-selected width. A review of electric motor literature indicated that samples of electrical current taken at slightly faster than twice the 60 Hz fundamental can be used to detect several indicators of incipient motor failure. Tests were initiated to determine whether this technique can be applied to a number of motors on the same circuit.

Norford, L. K.; Mabey, N.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Usage Demographics 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Usage Demographics 2010 Academic Usage Usage by Discipline DOE & Other Lab Usage Usage by Institution Type Last edited: 2012-10-30 13:51:35...

88

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technologies Division Building / tariffs electricityOptions, Tariffs, and Building Analyzed Environmental Energyenergy management more effective stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally results will depend on the considered region and tariff

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Transmission and Grid Integration: Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Transmission and Grid Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM Ilan Momber, Toms Gmez, Giri Venkataramanan, Michael Stadler, Sebastian...

92

Thermal Systems Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Thermal Systems Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

BuildingPI: A future tool for building life cycle analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a reduction in energy usage. The Irish governmentassociated with building energy usage and is employedreduction in building energy usage. Energy simulation models

O'Donnell, James; Morrissey, Elmer; Keane, Marcus; Bazjanac, Vladimir

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageseasonal and annual electricity prices by region in c/kWh.based annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers. Here we use the electricity bill survey data fromcalculate a customer electricity bill requires two sets ofsame region. Monthly electricity bill data is available for

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Gonçalocommercial building microgrids *) Michael Stadler GonçaloSVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

99

Robotics and Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that the use of robots in an industrial plant will cut energy usage, because robots require no heat, light, or air conditioning in their work space. However, in analyzing industrial installations, we have found that, in practice, energy usage may either increase or decrease depending on the parameters of the particular facility. This paper describes our findings at the plants of various manufacturers. We performed on-site studies at plants operated by Chrysler Corporation in St. Louis (62 welding robots) and Franklin Manufacturing Company in St. Cloud, Minnesota (4 spray painting robots used in freezer manufacture), We also examined data on energy effects of robots from John Deere, caterpillar, and GM Guide Division. The effect of robots on electricity usage and other forms of energy usage are analyzed in this paper.

Hershey, R. L.; Fenton, S. E.; Letzt, A. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Brain usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage Name: A W Chen Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: For my science fair project I would like to know if every part of the brain is used all the...

102

Brain Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Name: Matt Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: what percentage of the brain does the average human use? Replies: This is a very difficult question to address. Your...

103

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

104

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings x) in nine climate zones x) hospitals, colleges,in nine different climate zones and three major utility

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Statistical Analysis and Interpretation of Building Characterization, Indoor Environmental Quality Monitoring and Energy Usage Data from Office Buildings and Classrooms in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent tasks had been performed (Stetzenbach 2008, Stetzenbach 2008b, Stetzenbach 2009) to measure a variety of parameters in normative buildings across the United States. For each of these tasks 10 buildings were selected as normative indoor environments. Task 1 focused on office buildings, Task 13 focused on public schools, and Task 0606 focused on high performance buildings. To perform this task it was necessary to restructure the database for the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) data and the Sound measurement as several issues were identified and resolved prior to and during the transfer of these data sets into SPSS. During overview discussions with the statistician utilized in this task it was determined that because the selection of indoor zones (1-6) was independently selected within each task; zones were not related by location across tasks. Therefore, no comparison would be valid across zones for the 30 buildings so the by location (zone) data were limited to three analysis sets of the buildings within each task. In addition, differences in collection procedures for lighting were used in Task 0606 as compared to Tasks 01 & 13 to improve sample collection. Therefore, these data sets could not be merged and compared so effects by-day data were run separately for Task 0606 and only Task 01 & 13 data were merged. Results of the statistical analysis of the IEQ parameters show statistically significant differences were found among days and zones for all tasks, although no differences were found by-day for Draft Rate data from Task 0606 (p>0.05). Thursday measurements of IEQ parameters were significantly different from Tuesday, and most Wednesday measures for all variables of Tasks 1 & 13. Data for all three days appeared to vary for Operative Temperature, whereas only Tuesday and Thursday differed for Draft Rate 1m. Although no Draft Rate measures within Task 0606 were found to significantly differ by-day, Temperature measurements for Tuesday and Thursday showed variation. Moreover, Wednesday measurements of Relative Humidity within Task 0606 varied significantly from either Tuesday or Thursday. The majority of differences in IEQ measurements by-zone were highly significant (pschool buildings S02, S04, and S05, respectively. Although all tasks demonstrated significant differences in sound measurements by zone, some of the buil

Linda Stetzenbach; Lauren Nemnich; Davor Novosel

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Analysis of electricity consumption profiles in public buildings with dimensionality reduction techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the daily electricity consumption profile of a building and its correlation with environmental factors makes it possible to examine and estimate its electricity demand. As an alternative to the traditional correlation analysis, a new ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Electricity consumption profiles, Energy efficiency, Information visualization

Antonio MoráN, Juan J. Fuertes, Miguel A. Prada, SerafíN Alonso, Pablo Barrientos, Ignacio DíAz, Manuel DomíNguez

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

108

Statistical Analysis and Interpretation of Building Characterization, Indoor Environmental Quality Monitoring and Energy Usage Data from Office Buildings and Classrooms in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Three independent tasks had been performed (Stetzenbach 2008, Stetzenbach 2008b, Stetzenbach 2009) to measure a variety of parameters in normative buildings across the United States. For each of these tasks 10 buildings were selected as normative indoor environments. Task 1 focused on office buildings, Task 13 focused on public schools, and Task 0606 focused on high performance buildings. To perform this task it was necessary to restructure the database for the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) data and the Sound measurement as several issues were identified and resolved prior to and during the transfer of these data sets into SPSS. During overview discussions with the statistician utilized in this task it was determined that because the selection of indoor zones (1-6) was independently selected within each task; zones were not related by location across tasks. Therefore, no comparison would be valid across zones for the 30 buildings so the by location (zone) data were limited to three analysis sets of the buildings within each task. In addition, differences in collection procedures for lighting were used in Task 0606 as compared to Tasks 01 & 13 to improve sample collection. Therefore, these data sets could not be merged and compared so effects by-day data were run separately for Task 0606 and only Task 01 & 13 data were merged. Results of the statistical analysis of the IEQ parameters show statistically significant differences were found among days and zones for all tasks, although no differences were found by-day for Draft Rate data from Task 0606 (p>0.05). Thursday measurements of IEQ parameters were significantly different from Tuesday, and most Wednesday measures for all variables of Tasks 1 & 13. Data for all three days appeared to vary for Operative Temperature, whereas only Tuesday and Thursday differed for Draft Rate 1m. Although no Draft Rate measures within Task 0606 were found to significantly differ by-day, Temperature measurements for Tuesday and Thursday showed variation. Moreover, Wednesday measurements of Relative Humidity within Task 0606 varied significantly from either Tuesday or Thursday. The majority of differences in IEQ measurements by-zone were highly significant (p<0.001), with the exception of Relative Humidity in some buildings. When all task data were combined (30 buildings) neither the airborne culturable fungi nor the airborne non-culturable spore data differed in the concentrations found at any indoor location in terms of day of collection. However, the concentrations of surface-associated fungi varied among the day of collection. Specifically, there was a lower concentration of mold on Tuesday than on Wednesday, for all tasks combined. As expected, variation was found in the concentrations of both airborne culturable fungi and airborne non-culturable fungal spores between indoor zones (1-6) and the outdoor zone (zone 0). No variation was found among the indoor zones of office buildings for Task 1 in the concentrations of airborne culturable fungi. However, airborne non-culturable spores did vary among zones in one building in Task 1 and variation was noted between zones in surface-associated fungi. Due to the lack of multiple lighting measurements for Tasks 13 and 0606, by-day comparisons were only performed for Task 1. No statistical differences were observed in lighting with respect to the day of collection. There was a wide range of variability by-zone among seven of the office buildings. Although few differences were found for the brightest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcBrtst) and the darkest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcDrkst) in Task 1, there was considerable variation for these variables in Task 13 and Task 0606 (p < 0.001). Other variables that differed by-zone in Task 13 include CombCCT and AmbCCT1 for S03, S07, and S08. Additionally, AmbChromX1, CombChromY, and CombChromX varied by-zone for school buildings S02, S04, and S05, respectively. Although all tasks demonstrated significant differences in sound measurements by zone, some of the buil

Linda Stetzenbach; Lauren Nemnich; Davor Novosel

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: All Buildings. 167: 481: 436: 88: 1,340: 24: 381: 69: 156: 418: 3,559: ... "Commercial ...

110

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Wholesale Market Edison Electric Institute, ElectricCo Southern California Edison Co State NC FL FL GA GA GA WVCode Company Name Boston Edison Co Central Vermont Pub Serv

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity prices developed for residential AC were criticized by a number of stakeholders, who argued that retail rates

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.2 E?ective Marginal Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Average

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

step 1: retrieve usage step 2: convert usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planet #12;step 2: convert usage data to ghg electricity conversion EPA eGRID database provides state by state data on: lbs CO2 / MWh lbs NOx / MWH eGRID Massachusetts ­ specific conversion factors only

Paulsson, Johan

115

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings across the country. As photovoltaic systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings, distributed among these five types. The buildings selected have average demands of 100 to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration. plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data.

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Aggregate energy usage statistics are insu?cientmonitoring of individual energy usages in real-time. . . . .Aggregated energy usage by appliance type normalized by

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables) improves the accuracy of regression models of electric load. 4) A piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence can be derived without the use of a change-point model (which would add complexity to the modeling algorithm) or assumptions about when structural changes occur (which could introduce inaccuracy). 5) A model that includes time-of-week and temperature dependence can be used for weather normalization and can determine whether the building is unusually temperature-sensitive, which can indicate problems with HVAC operation.

Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Monitoring of electrical end-use loads in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A California utility is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings selected have average demands of 100kW to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration, plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. PC-based software programs have been developed for reviewing and validating the end-sue load data and for generating reports.

Martinez, M. (Southern California Edison, CA (US)); Alereza, T.; Mort, D. (ADM Associates, Sacramento, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements of HVAC and lighting usage from the existingmeasurements of HVAC and lighting usage from the existingof HVAC, lighting, and plug usage from the existing building

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010,...

122

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings around the world. As photovoltaic (PV) technology continues to improve and costs drop, opportunities for PV will multiply. PV systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

124

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

125

Material impacts on operational energy usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decisions regarding materials and construction of a building are made all the time in the architectural process, but thought is not always given to how those choices may affect the buildings ultimate energy usage and the ...

Love, Andrea, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building has a peak electricity demand of 373 kW, and yearlyWinter (Nov. – Apr. ) )Electricity electricity demandelectricity demand (US$/kWh) (US$/kW) (US$/kWh) (US $/kW)

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation Jul 2010, Minneapolis MNis MN 1 Abstract--It is generally believed that plug-in electric vehicles

128

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Variability of Battery Wear in Light Duty Plug-In Electric Vehicles Subject to Ambient Temperature, Battery Size, and Consumer Usage: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Battery wear in plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) is a complex function of ambient temperature, battery size, and disparate usage. Simulations capturing varying ambient temperature profiles, battery sizes, and driving patterns are of great value to battery and vehicle manufacturers. A predictive battery wear model developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory captures the effects of multiple cycling and storage conditions in a representative lithium chemistry. The sensitivity of battery wear rates to ambient conditions, maximum allowable depth-of-discharge, and vehicle miles travelled is explored for two midsize vehicles: a battery electric vehicle (BEV) with a nominal range of 75 mi (121 km) and a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) with a nominal charge-depleting range of 40 mi (64 km). Driving distance distributions represent the variability of vehicle use, both vehicle-to-vehicle and day-to-day. Battery wear over an 8-year period was dominated by ambient conditions for the BEV with capacity fade ranging from 19% to 32% while the PHEV was most sensitive to maximum allowable depth-of-discharge with capacity fade ranging from 16% to 24%. The BEV and PHEV were comparable in terms of petroleum displacement potential after 8 years of service, due to the BEV?s limited utility for accomplishing long trips.

Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A. D.; Gonder, J.; Smith, K. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Development of a data base and forecasting model for commercial-sector electricity usage and demand. Volume VII. Detailed survey, sampling methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed toward obtaining two sets of primary data, from which econometric and engineering parameters for the model were to be derived. The first type will be collected in a mail survey of utility-company customers determined by an analysis of customer-account data. These data have been collected from Pacific Gas and Electric, Los Angeles Div. of Water and Power, San Diego Gas and Electric, and Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and have been analyzed and the survey customers selected. The second type will consist of detailed technical data on buildings in the SMSA's of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, and Sacramento. This report presents the final methodology for the selection of building samples, by type and location, for the detailed building data collection. Eleven tables present the results of the analysis. Within service areas and/or SMSA's, significant establishment classifications are illustrated with their energy characteristics. The allocation of the detailed survey-sample members is illustrated, according to establishment classifications and the 24 different building types. This specification is further detailed as to allocations within the SMUD service area and those to be taken from other areas. The methodology presented in this final report is being used to select sample members for the detailed survey.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Usage of Electronic Monograph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of Electronic Monograph. The following table shows the approximate usage of the monograph since April 1998. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

132

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings, including sub-metering the electric usage ofinternal loads without sub-metering. The winter data can becould be improved by sub-metering key HVAC equipment. Direct

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and gas load profiles based on the Californiamatches the building load profile, the shaving potentialclosely follow the load profile, and therefore, PV panels

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Exploring iPhone Usage: The Influence of Socioeconomic Differences on Smartphone Adoption, Usage and Usability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on device usage. Among our findings are that a large number of applications were uninstalled, lower SESExploring iPhone Usage: The Influence of Socioeconomic Differences on Smartphone Adoption, Usage. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 2 Dept. of Psychology, Rice University, Houston, TX {rahmati, chad

Zhong, Lin

137

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

138

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Regulations Resource Center About Building Energy Codes U.S. Energy Consumption by Sector (2011) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Annual, U.S. residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in significant cost savings in both the private and public sectors of the U.S. economy. Efficient buildings reduce power demand and have less of an environmental impact. The Purpose of Building Energy Codes Energy codes and standards set minimum efficiency requirements for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and emissions over

140

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

142

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

143

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Difference of Monthly Electric Usage between Initial Modelafter calibration. The electric usage was constant during7 Difference of Monthly Electric Usage between Calibrated

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Use characteristics and mode choice behavior of electric bike users in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by surveying electric bike usage in two large Chineseelectric bikes. Electric bike usage increases with age up tobicycle riders support electric bike usage of bike lanes.

Cherry, Christopher; Cervero, Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Economics of Green Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the site and source energy usage of each building, inIn contrast, source energy usage refers to the aggregate ofis obtained by aggregating energy usage for natural gas,

Eichholtz, Piet; Kok, Nils; Quigley, John M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase ____________________________ Week Ended (Sunday) _________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VEHICLE USAGE LOG Department ________________________________________ Vehicle Homebase of the owning Unit. Vehicle Homebase: Enter the City, Zip Code, Building, or other location designation. Week

Johnston, Daniel

147

Electricity-use Feedback in the Commercial Sector: Examining the Potential for Building Occupant Behavior Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedback technologies to encourage behavior change have been explored in the residential sector for the past three decades, but the savings potential of using feedback strategies in the commercial sector, which represents over one quarter of US electricity sales, has yet to be adequately explored. Although a number of building load control technologies that include some form of feedback provision have existed for some years, they generally target technical staff. The focus of this report is to understand...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electricifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy utilization log book for multi-tenant office building, Midwest, USA  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for an energy retrofit program at a 10-story office building. Energy and dollar savings effected are indicated. Included is an energy budget for 1979 prepared for the building management by Ohio Mechanical Corporation in December, 1978. The retrofit at the building included the installation of an outside air economizer, automatic control retrofit, closing of building openings with smoke dampers, balancing of air distribution, the installation of a new electric open drive centrifugal water chiller, and the installation of properly sized pump impellers. The replacement of the existing steam absorption water chillers with an electric chiller would normally (1) reduce steam usage, (2) increase electrical demand, and (3) increase total electrical kWh usage. A study of the data shows that steam usage in 1979 was reduced 72%, and total electrical usage was reduced 4.19%. These reductions in energy usage resulted in steam cost savings of $96,768.13 and electrical cost savings of $5,673.96. In 1979 total energy usage per square foot was reduced 107,211.55 Btu/ft/sup 2/ annually.

1980-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electricity rates. ERATES: A Computer Program for Calculating Time-of-Use, Block, and Demand Charges for Electricity Usage (Version 1.2). ...

151

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

Brookhaven Logo Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo Usage The Correct Usage of the BNL Logo - The following examples picture correct and incorrect use of the Laboratory logo. If you need assistance in using the logo, contact...

153

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject - Whole Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy A B C D E F G H I L M N O P R S T U Z Tool Applications Free Recently Updated AEPS System Planning electrical system, renewable energy system, planning and design software, modeling, simulation, energy usage, system performance, financial analysis, solar, wind, hydro, behavior characteristics, usage profiles, generation load storage calculations, on-grid, off-grid, residential, commercial, system sizing, utility rate plans, rate comparison, utility costs, energy savings Software has been updated. Archelios PRO Photovoltaic simulation, 3D design, economics results BlueSol PV system sizing, PV system simulation, grid-connected PV systems, electrical components, shading, economic analysis. COMFIE energy performance, design, retrofit, residential buildings, commercial buildings, passive solar Software has been updated.

154

Context: Usage and Effectiveness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Context: Usage and Effectiveness. US Navy Aircraft Halon 1301 Effectivity Analysis.. Tedeschi, M.; Leach, W.; 1995. ...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool provides actionable energy usage information to aid inin building HVAC system energy usage when using estimates offacility operation to track energy usage against performance

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

annual benchmarks for energy usage levels across propertythe actual and predicted energy usage of the building usingof the tenant’s actual energy usage. For this reason, modi?

Jaffee, Dwight M.; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data visualization, basically long-term and short-term time series plots serves as a preliminary quality check of the data available. A preliminary inspection of the data was performed, by viewing the channels to provide a clear identification of creep, missing data gaps, turned-off periods, and sudden big changes that suggest changes in the building operation or an addition to the building.

Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage intensity is shownResidential Building Site Energy Usage Intensity in ChinaGas Residen>al Building Energy Usage Intensity Comparison

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

163

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Pricesand Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

APS LOM Shop Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source APS LOM Shop Usage User Shop Access - Policies and Procedures User Shop Orientation User Shop...

165

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sub-metering the electric usage of lighting, plug, and HVACactual energy usage of the lighting and plug loads withoutin energy usage for the lighting, plug and miscellaneous

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

should minimize the total energy usage. Under the context ofreal-time energy usage can re- duce total electricity

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Co Ltd.”,Maharashtra state electricity distribution company recentlyCCE Electricity Price Exhaust Fan for Air Distribution (0.5

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in Electricity Demand Management – Lessons24 Table 4. Electricity Demand Projections, Energy and3. APP Base Case Electricity Demand Forecast –Residential

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand Forecasts–Final Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards to Projected Electricity Price in the ResidentialStandards to Marginal Electricity Price in the CommercialStandards to Projected Electricity Price in the Residential

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annexes Tables Table 1. Electricity Tariffs per Country andsuch as time-of-use electricity tariffs that create largeshows national average electricity tariffs per APP country.

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build- ings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,modeling,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120, p.

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy usage in super markets  

SciTech Connect

The supermarket industry used 450 billion Btu's of energy each day, enough to heat 2 million homes. But more important than the overall energy usage is what energy is costing the supermarket operator; in many cases energy costs exceed rent. This special research report is designed to help the supermarket management determine if their stores are excessive energy users and to provide valuable data for planning remodels and new stores. The report is presented in five sections. The first two sections, General Observations and Monthly Electrical Usage and Demand Power, can easily be used by all supermarket operators. The third and fourth sections contain more detailed statistics that will be valuable to industry people who want to analyze energy usage more thoroughly. The statistics in section 1-4 are reported for various geographic regions and store sizes. Section five is the sample distribution which provides an insight into what other stores are using for refrigeration, lighting, etc. The information in this report is average for a typical supermarket and should be used only as that when compared to a specific supermarket facility.

Gerke, E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

179

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: UtilityTrac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

savings measurement and verification Provides weather analysis reports with normalized energy usage Benchmark and compare similar buildings' usage and costs by square foot and A...

180

Using Dashboards to Improve Energy and Comfort in Federal Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature to boiler gas usage plotted in weekly averagesFigure A.7 above, the gas usage to heat the building goes up

Marini, Kyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Building for energy conservation. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

Contents include: why conserve energy; energy usage in building; energy losses in buildings; climatic effects and considerations; improving the efficiency of buildings; and alternate sources.

Merton, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Adaptive web usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web usage models and profiles capture significant interests and trends from past accesses. They are used to improve user experience, say through recommendation of pages, pre-fetching of pages, etc. While browsing behavior changes dynamically over time, ...

Bhushan Shankar Suryavanshi; Nematollaah Shiri; Sudhir P. Mudur

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exemplary Units Markup Language usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sample UnitsML tools and usage. ... Its usage is limited to demonstrating capabilities of plain XSLT processing with the data stored in UnitsML. ...

184

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalsince electric cooling loads can be offset by the absorptioncooling loads: utility purchases of electricity, on-site generation of electricity, absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in   Continuous or Retro?Commissioning  Phillip N.  Price, Conference on Building Commissioning: August 10-12, 2011Conference on Building Commissioning: August 10-12, 2011

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Quantifying Water Impacts of Buildings' Energy Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Irrigation-Livestock 83.3% Thermoelectric Power 3.4% Page 7. ... Hydro. Water consumed upstream may not make it through turbines downstream. ...

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Submetering of Building Energy and Water Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 22 4.1.4 Natural Gas and Steam Submetering . . . ... 2. DOE/EIA Annual Energy Outlook 2010, http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/aeo/demand.html. Page 15. ...

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Device for monitoring utility usage  

SciTech Connect

A device for monitoring utility usage for installation and use by homeowners and consumers with existing public utility meters having a disk that is mounted inside a transparent case and that rotates in response to electrical current usage, the device is described comprising: a disk rotation monitoring assembly for mounting on the exterior of the transparent case, said monitoring assembly comprising: (a) a sensor for sensing disk rotation speed and generating a signal in response thereto; and (b) means for mounting said sensor on the transparent case, said mounting means further comprising means for holding said sensor, means for attaching said holding means to the transparent case, and means for adjusting the position of said holding means to enable precise alignment of said sensor with the plane of the disk such that said sensor is in optical communication with the edge of said disk; one or more remote display terminals in electrical communication with said monitoring assembly, each of said one or more remote terminals comprising: (a) means for receiving said signal and processing said signal into utility consumption data; (b) an electronic memory for storing said data; (c) a visual display for displaying data in a reader-usable format about consumption; and (d) a display controller that enables selective displaying of any of said data on said visual display.

Green, R.G.

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Cost of an Electric Quad Used in the Buildings Sector ($2010 Billion) Residential Commercial Buildings Sector 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 11.82 11.82 11.82 11.94 11.68 11.82 10.59 10.83 10.70 11.41 11.58 11.48 11.68 11.33 11.51 11.49 10.77 11.15 11.71 11.67 11.69 11.72 11.52 11.63 10.57 9.76 10.19 10.55 9.73 10.16 11.16 10.35 10.78 10.68 9.90 10.31 10.42 9.48 9.97 10.16 9.20 9.70 10.57 9.73 10.17 10.48 9.62 10.07 9.54 8.46 9.01 9.24 8.11 8.68 9.92 8.97 9.47 9.85 8.78 9.33 9.16 8.44 8.81 9.32 8.58 8.96 9.15 8.16 8.66 9.46 8.64 9.05 10.27 9.34 9.82 10.24 9.27 9.76 9.28 8.48 8.89 9.56 8.77 9.18 11.92 10.52 11.25 11.83 10.40 11.14 10.61 9.76 10.19 10.86 9.60 10.25 11.90 10.08

191

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture for Localized Electrical Energy Reduction, Generation, and Sharing) [46] is the smart-grid

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfaces to Reduce PC Energy Usage. In Proceedings of46.2% of this primary energy usage[9]. Since buildings havecontributors to the total energy usage. Then, we can study

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Automotive materials usage trends  

SciTech Connect

The materials composition of US passenger cars is traced from 1960 and projected into 1990's. Sales-weighted average vehicle-weight trends are analyzed in terms of shifts in the large/small car mix, downsizing, and downweighting. The growth in the usage of lightweight materials: -high strength steels, cast/wrought aluminum, plastics and composites - are examined in detail. Usage trends in a host of other materials such as alloy steels, zinc, lead, copper, etc. are also discussed. An approximate quantitative analysis of changes in the usage of steel by the automotive industry worldwide show that about 10% of total decline in Western-World steel consumption is accounted for by the automotive industry. An assessment is presented for automotive industry use of critical materials such as chromium in alloy steels/cast irons and the platinum group metals in exhaust-gas catalysts. 10 references, 13 figures, 9 tables.

Gjostein, N.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-to commercial building microgrids,“ 2nd European Conference2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,t savings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters, i.e. , the electricity tariff structure. Due toenergy loads, 2 electricity and natural gas tariff structureelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed ($/day) Sources: PG&E commercial tariffs,

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (demand via utility purchases and burns natural gas to meet

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Restructuring by State in the US US States Restructuration Alabama Not Active Alaska Not Active Colorado

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers Ranges & ovens Pool heaters Direct heating equipmentOvens Standby Washing Machines Televisions Space Cooling Electric Water Heating

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

usage_household2001.pdf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Usage Indicators Tables Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-7a. Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

202

C:\MYDOCS\CBECS-FORM\CBECSFRM\ELECTRIC.WPD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A (8/12/97) A (8/12/97) Form Approval Electricity Usage OMB No: 1905-0145 Expires: July 31, 1998 Label IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CALL 1-800-927-0589 TOLL FREE AND ASK FOR THE SUPPLIER SURVEY SPECIALIST. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY FOR 1995 BUILDING ELECTRICITY USAGE FORM Consumption data are to be provided for the entire building identified on the label. A copy of the authorization form signed by the building owner/manager is included inside. Data may be submitted directly on the reporting form inside this folder, or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing or formatted diskette (if enclosed) , which provides the same information and is convenient for your company. Whatever format is used to submit data, answers to all questions on this form must be

203

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Impacts of Saving an Electric Quad (1) Utility Average-Sized Aggregate Number of Units Fuel Input Utility Unit (MW) to Provide the Fuel's Share Plant Fuel Type Shares (%) in 2010 of the Electric Quad (2) Coal 49% 36 Petroleum 1% 96 Natural Gas 19% 141 Nuclear 22% 3 Renewable (3) 10% 184 Total 100% 460 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2 for consumption and Table A8 for electricity supply. 245 17 85 1,026 22 1) This table displays the breakdown of electric power plants that could be eliminated by saving an electric quad, in exact proportion to the actual primary fuel shares for electricity produced nationwide in 2010. Use this table to estimate the avoided capacity implied by saving one

204

High-Intensity Discharge Industrial Lighting Design Strategies for the Minimization of Energy Usage and Life-Cycle Cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Worldwide, the electrical energy consumed by artificial lighting is second only to the amount consumed by electric machinery. Of the energy usage attributed to lighting… (more)

Flory IV, Isaac L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building technology; concretes; durability; effective medium theory; electrical conductivity; interfacial zone; mortar; percolation; fluid flow; sand ...

206

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

207

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build an open appliance power signature database, which willdevice in a database, such as its type of appliance, wherebased on appliance type and stores the results in a database

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plug-in electric vehicles as dispersed energy storage interactions with a smart office building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy resources (RESs) with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are being gradually accepted by society for their low carbon emission merits. However

Qian Dai; Shanxu Duan; Tao Cai; Changsong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Usage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Energy Usage How much do you spend per year compared to others? A state-by-state map of per capita energy expenditures. Subtopics Storage Consumption Transmission Smart Grid...

211

Memory Usage Considerations on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the memory requirement vvia internal checking in their codes or by some tools. Craypat could track heap usage. And IPM also tracks memory usage. Last edited: 2013-06-30 08:33:51...

212

Usage by Job Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage by Job Usage by Job Size Table Usage by Job Size Table page loading animation Usage Query Interface System All Hopper Edison Carver Planck Matgen Franklin Hopper 1 Magellan Dirac Bassi Jacquard Seaborg User Account (Repo) Execution Queue All Debug Interactive Premium Regular Short Regular Long Regular Small Regular Medium Regular Big Regular Extra Big Killable Low Transfer IO Task Special System Serial Big Memory Westmere === Inactive === Magellan Serial Magellan Short Magellan Small Magellan Medium Magellan Big Magellan Long Regular 1 Regular 1 Long Regular 16 Regular 32 Regular 48 Full Config Seaborg Serial Batch 16 Batch 32 Batch 64 Submit Queue all interactive debug premium regular low DOE Office all ASCR BER BES FES HEP NP Summary for jobs that completed after Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 @ 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59

213

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Energy Usage Information: Lessons from the Credit Reporting Industry. Speaker(s): Philip Henderson Date: October 4, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Janie Page There has been much discussion about the use of customer energy usage information to deliver value, such as with benchmarking tools that compare energy use in a building to a peer set, continuous commissioning services that diagnose faults in building systems, and tools that estimate expected savings from upgrades. A utility can use customer information to deliver these kinds of services to its customers directly, but most utilities today do not enable companies to obtain a customer's energy usage information in a systematic, automated way to deliver services to the customer, even if

214

General Electric Company design review manual, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is intended to serve as a guide to the Solar Energy Division of ERDA for preparing instructions for and evaluating the proposals resulting from the issuance of Program Opportunity Notices (PON's) for Commercial Buildings. The manual is meant to amplify Program Opportunity Notice DSE-75-2, with respect to site, building, and system selection and evaluation. The manual contains two major sections, one addressing the project concept and the other the design features. The project concept section provides for a description and evaluation of the site, the commercial building, the system application, the system predicted performance, and the long term economics of the application. The projects could be screened using the information from this section alone. Projects that remain acceptable can be further evaluated through design considerations as outlined in the second section. (WDM)

None

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Electricity, Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together diverse groups of experts...

216

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Intensity Comparison City The retail prototype building is an internal load dominated model in which lighting,

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some conclusions from this presentation are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions because stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - it's more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; and (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff. Final research work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Gomez, Tomaz; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Megel, Olivier; Mendes, Goncalo; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

New energy usage patterns in manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Long term energy demands of industrial societies will exceed energy production capabilities if present usage patterns remain unchanged. Thus the central core of the current energy dilemma involves the change from reliance on petroleum sources to the utilization of more plentiful energy resources. The two energy resources which are plentiful and the technology already exists for their development are coal and uranium. Several concepts of substituting electricity for oil and natural gas are presented.

Hauser, L.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Quantum Electrical Measurements Programs/Projects in PML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and manufacturers use NIST electrical standards and calibrations for all kinds of measurements from home electricity usage to electrocardiograms ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment; 3. a low storage and PV price run; 4. to assessFigure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Building a wireless mesh networked real-time electricity metering system in an MIT dormitory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A competitive, closed-loop information feedback system of wireless electricity meters was designed, tested, and implemented in seven MIT dormitory rooms. The meters utilized Allegro Hall Effect current sensors as well as ...

Oehlerking, Austin L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Resource Information and Forecasting Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers in the Resource Information and Forecasting group at NREL provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help characterize renewable energy resources and facilitate the integration of these clean energy sources into the electricity grid.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market Hourly Electricity Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature of electric service and usage, defining the hoursElectric. 12 The resulting evaluation report estimated elasticities and found measurable reductions in energy usage

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling, and industrial drive power represent large and growing end uses of electricity in Texas. Designing effective conservation programs requires cooperation among a variety of groups with varying perspectives.

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Woodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woodfuel usage in the commercial, industrial and electrical energy sectors of the Scottish market) to 30 of electrical energy generation, was paramount in the initial survey and remains so. Total woodfuel usageWoodfuel Usage Update 1 I Wood fuel use in Scotland 2010 I Hudson Consulting I October 2010

226

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased use of building energy simulation programs, calibration of simulated data to measured data has been recognized as an important factor in substantiating how well the model fits a real building. Model calibration to measured monthly utility data has been utilized for many years. Recently, efforts have reported calibrated models at the hourly level. Most of the previous methods have relied on very simple comparisons including bar charts, monthly percent difference time-series graphs, and x-y scatter plots. A few advanced methods have been proposed as well which include carpet plots and comparative 3-D time-series plots. Unfortunately, at hourly levels of calibration, many of the traditional graphical calibration techniques become overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box-whisker-mean plots to display long-term trends. In addition to the graphical calibration techniques, other methods are also used including indoor temperature calibration to improve thermostat schedules and architectural rendering as a means of verifying the building envelope dimensions and shading placement. Several statistical methods are also reviewed for their appropriateness including percent difference, mean bias error (MBE), and the coefficient of variation of the root mean squared error. Results are presented using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE-2. 1D building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce a MBE of-0.7% and a CV(RMSE) of 23. 1 % which compare favorably with the most accurate hourly neural network models.

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electrical Usage Characterization of Semiconductor Processing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the basic concepts in performing an energy and power audit of a semiconductor process tool. A protocol exists that fully describes these measurements and their use and applicability and it will be described. This protocol is currently being examined by SEMATECH for future publication. Example data will be presented showing the power, energy, and current load profiles of a typical tool.

Hinson, S. R.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject - Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Systems Lighting Systems A B C D E I K L M O Q R S T U V Tool Applications Free Recently Updated ADELINE daylighting, lighting, commercial buildings buildings Software has been updated. AEPS System Planning electrical system, renewable energy system, planning and design software, modeling, simulation, energy usage, system performance, financial analysis, solar, wind, hydro, behavior characteristics, usage profiles, generation load storage calculations, on-grid, off-grid, residential, commercial, system sizing, utility rate plans, rate comparison, utility costs, energy savings Software has been updated. AGI32 lighting, daylighting, rendering, roadway Software has been updated. BSim building simulation, energy, daylight, thermal and moisture analysis, indoor climate Software has been updated.

229

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage in the United States. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions over the life of buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP or the Program), supports the improvement of energy efficiency in buildings. BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the

230

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Clean Electrical Power, Capri, Italy, 9 - 10and regulatory issues in the electrical power sector.loads, other electrical power generation, electrical

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas and electricity sectors of fully displacing biomass usagegas and electricity sectors of fully displacing biomass usage

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improving energy usage  

SciTech Connect

The Phillips Petroleum Company's Borger Refinery and NGL Process Center Energy Conservation program has been one of surveying, making revisions and additions to, and redesign of processes and equipment to conserve energy. Special emphasis has been placed on minimizing energy usage in the design of new processes in the plants. In 1972 an average of 758,800 Btu's were used to process each barrel of fresh charge. Now 7.5 days of fresh charge are being saved to the plant each year. The energy-use reduction programs discussed were: (1) furnace and boiler excess-oxygen and combustibles control program; (2) installation of an Applied Automation, Inc., Fractionator Computer Control System named Optrol; and (3) the steam-trap program. 1 figure. (DP)

Haage, P.R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Food Sales Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings, though they comprised only 1 percent of commercial floorspace. Their total energy intensity was the third highest of all the building types, and their electricity...

234

HPSS Usage Examples at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examples Advanced Usage Examples Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Once you have set up your automatic HPSS authentication you can access HPSS within batch scripts. Read More ...

235

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Finnish and French plants under construction –, but rising fossil fuel and CO2 prices are reviving interest in nuclear power. A potential nuclear power renaissance in liberalised electricity markets will face a number of hurdles associated... with the CO2 price in Europe. The attractiveness of carbon free technologies such as nuclear plant for a power producer is reinforced by the additional cost placed on fossil fuel generation technologies by climate policies and CO2 emissions pricing...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

236

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

237

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

238

Residential hot water usage: A review of published metered studies. Topical report, August-December 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a review of residential hot water usage studies. The studies included were published and publicly available, they measured actual hot water usage or energy usage, and they had sufficient demographic information to determine the number of people per household. The available hot water usage data were normalized to a 135 F setpoint temperature to eliminate the variations in usage caused by different water heater thermostat settings. Typical hot water usage as a function of family size was determined from linear regression analyses of the normalized metered studies` data points. A national average hot water usage of 53 gallons per day was determined from the regression analyses and census data on average household size. The review of metered studies also shows that there is no discernible difference in hot water usage for households with either electric or gas water heaters.

Paul, D.D.; Ide, B.E.; Hartford, P.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The USDOE Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit: Preliminary Analysis of Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September of 1993 a 36,832 fixture lighting retrofit was completed at the United States Department of Energy Forrestal complex in Washington, D.C. This retrofit represents DOE's largest project to date that utilizes a Shared Energy Savings (SES) agreement as authorized under Public Law 99-272. As DOE's first major SES contract, it was important that every aspect of this project serve as the cornerstone of DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, including the careful measurement of the electricity and thermal energy savings.

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Vajda, E. J.; Shincovich, M.; D'Angelo III, L.; Harris, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of New and Stock Generating Capacities, by Plant Type Total Capital Costs Size Overnight Costs (2) of Typical New Plant New Plant Type (MW) (2010 $/kW) ($2010 million) Scrubbed Coal 1300 2809 3652 Integrated Coal-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 1200 3182 3818 IGCC w/Carbon Sequestration 520 5287 2749 Conv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 540 967 522 Adv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 400 991 396 Conv. Combustion Turbine 85 961 82 Adv. Combustion Turbine 210 658 138 Fuel Cell 10 6752 68 Advanced Nuclear 2236 5275 11795 Municipal Solid Waste 50 8237 412 Conventional Hydropower (3) 500 2221 1111 Wind 100 2409 241 Stock Plant Type 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Fossil Fuel Steam Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Nuclear Energy Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Plant use of electricity is included in heat rate calculations; however, transmission and distribution losses of the electric grid are excluded.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Electric Capacity Factors, by Year and Fuel Type (1) Conventional Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Solar/PV Wind Total 1990 59% 17% 23% 66% 45% 13% 18% 46% 1991 59% 18% 22% 70% 43% 17% 18% 46% 1992 59% 14% 22% 71% 38% 13% 18% 45% 1993 61% 16% 21% 70% 41% 16% 19% 46% 1994 61% 15% 22% 74% 38% 17% 23% 46% 1995 62% 11% 22% 77% 45% 17% 21% 47% 1996 65% 11% 19% 76% 52% 18% 22% 48% 1997 66% 13% 20% 72% 51% 17% 23% 48% 1998 67% 20% 23% 79% 47% 17% 20% 50% 1999 67% 20% 22% 85% 46% 15% 23% 51% 2000 70% 18% 22% 88% 40% 15% 27% 51% 2001 68% 20% 21% 89% 31% 16% 20% 48% 2002 69% 16% 18% 90% 38% 16% 27% 46% 2003 71% 21% 14% 88% 40% 15% 21% 44% 2004 71% 22% 16% 90% 39% 17% 25% 44% 2005 72% 22% 17% 89% 40% 15% 23% 45% 2006 71% 11% 19% 90% 42% 14% 27% 45% 2007 72% 12% 21% 92% 36% 14% 24% 45% 2008 71% 8% 20% 91% 37% 18% 26% 44% 2009 63% 7% 21% 90% 40% 16% 25% 42% 2010 (2) 65% 6% 23% 91% 37% 17% 29% 43% Note(s): Source(s) 1) EIA defines capacity factor to be "the ratio of the electrical energy produced by a generating unit for the period of time considered to the

242

The UCONABC usage control model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the family of UCONABC models for usage control (UCON), which integrate Authorizations (A), oBligations (B), and Conditions (C). We call these core models because they address the essence of UCON, leaving ... Keywords: access control, digital rights management, privacy, trust, usage control

Jaehong Park; Ravi Sandhu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Use of Computer Simulation to Reduce the Energy Consumption in a Tall Office Building in Dubai-UAE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are a major consumer of energy and thus have a significant impact on the environment. The use of artificial lights is a major contributor to the energy usage in a typical office building using electricity to run the lights and also increasing the cooling load due to its heat dissipation. Proper design for the maximization of natural light helps reduce the use of artificial lights and results in reduction in the buildings energy consumption. Computer simulation of the lighting and energy consumption in a typical tall office building in Dubai-UAE is used to optimize the effectiveness of natural lighting penetration and calculate the associated energy savings. Two alternative building designs are proposed and tested. The overall energy savings for the whole building reached 31.4 % for the proposed oval shaped design. This represents a significant reduction in the buildings electricity load and thus its impact on the environment.

Abu-Hijleh, B.; Abu-Dakka, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Definition: Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usage (Not Monetized) Usage (Not Monetized) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Oil Usage (Not Monetized) The functions that provide this benefit eliminate the need to send a line worker or crew to the switch or capacitor locations to operate them eliminate the need for truck rolls to perform diagnosis of equipment condition, and reduce truck rolls for meter reading and measurement purposes. This reduces the fuel consumed by a service vehicle or line truck. The use of plug-in electric vehicles can also lead to this benefit since the electrical energy used by plug-in electric vehicles displaces the equivalent amount of oil.[1] References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition

245

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

246

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onof using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridL ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins in the Contiguous United States (GW) Net Internal Capacity Capacity Demand (1) Resources (2) Margin (3) 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Note(s): Source(s): 778.5 980.3 20.6% 1) Net internal demand represents the system demand that is planned for by the electric power industry`s reliability authority and is equal to internal demand less direct control load management and interruptible demand. Direct control load management: Customer demand that can be interrupted at the time of the seasonal peak by direct control of the system operator by interrupting power supply to individual appliances or equipment on customer premises. This type of control usually reduces the demand of residential customers. Interruptible demand: Customer

249

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), “Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingto commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Ilanto commercial building microgrids 1 Michael Stadler a,b) ,

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

251

Editorial Style Guide: Word List and General Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI "Editorial Style Guide," together with the Company's "Graphic Standards Guide," provides information for building a strong corporate identity in EPRI publications. Providing lists of frequently used terms, EPRI software, and chemical elements, plus examples of word usage, the style guide can help authors both develop text efficiently and economically and brand EPRI as an integrated, global science and technology company.

1998-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

253

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2009 Peak Load and Capacity Margin, Summer and Winter by NERC Region (MW) NERC Region Capacity Margin Capacity Margin TRE 16.7% 19.1% FRCC 6.0% 2.0% MRO (U.S.) 24.6% 26.8% NPCC (U.S.) 29.1% 43.2% RFC 25.2% 33.3% SERC 24.6% 26.2% SPP 16.4% 34.6% WECC 19.4% 29.6% U.S. TOTAL 22.2% 28.5% Note(s): Source(s): 128,245 109,565 725,958 668,818 1) Summer Demand includes the months of June, July, August, and September. 2) Winter Demand includes December of the previous year and January-March of the current year. 3) Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at peak load as a percentage of net capacity resources. Net Capacity Resources: Utility- and IPP-owned generating capacity that is existing or in various stages of planning or construction, less inoperable capacity, plus planned capacity purchases from other resources, less planned

254

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

255

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

256

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

257

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar PV systems or virtually eliminating their electricity usage through dramatic changes in their energy-

Goldman, Charles A.; Eto, Joseph H.; Barbose, Galen L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

259

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Electric Conversion Factors and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Losses Average Utility Average Utility Growth Rate Delivery Efficiency (1, 2) Delivery Ratio (Btu/kWh) (2, 3) (2010-year) 1980 29.4% 1981 29.9% 1982 29.7% 1983 29.8% 1984 30.5% 1985 30.4% 1986 30.8% 1987 31.1% 1988 31.1% 1989 30.2% 1990 30.3% 1991 30.5% 1992 30.7% 1993 30.6% 1994 30.9% 1995 30.7% 1996 30.7% 1997 30.8% 1998 30.7% 1999 30.6% 2000 30.7% 2001 31.1% 2002 31.1% 2003 31.3% 2004 31.3% 2005 31.5% 2006 31.7% 2007 31.8% 2008 31.8% 2009 32.2% 2010 32.3% 2011 32.1% 2012 32.4% 2013 32.7% 2014 33.0% 2015 33.1% 2016 33.2% 2017 33.1% 2018 33.1% 2019 33.1% 2020 33.1% 2021 33.2% 2022 33.2% 2023 33.2% 2024 33.2% 2025 33.1% 2026 33.2% 2027 33.3% 2028 33.4% 10,218 0.2% 10,294 0.2% 10,266 0.2% 10,247 0.2% 10,277 0.2% 10,291 0.2% 10,281 0.2% 10,300 0.3% 10,301 0.3% 10,282 0.3% 10,292 0.4% 10,310 0.4% 10,305

260

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 56 Pagination 210 - 220 ISSN 0378-7788 Keywords Advanced Technology Demonstration, building design, Building heat transfer, cool roof, energy efficiency, Energy Performance of Buildings, energy savings, Energy Usage, energy use, Heat Island Abstract Reflective roofs can reduce demand for air conditioning and warming of the atmosphere. Roofs can also host photovoltaic (PV) modules that convert sunlight to electricity. In this study we assess the effects of installing a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof on an office building in Yuma, AZ. The system consists of thin film PV laminated to a white membrane, which lies above a layer of insulation. The solar absorptance of the roof decreased to 0.38 from 0.75 after installation of the BIPV, lowering summertime daily mean roof upper surface temperatures by about 5 °C. Summertime daily heat influx through the roof deck fell to ±0.1 kWh/m2from 0.3-1.0 kWh/m2. However, summertime daily heat flux from the ventilated attic into the conditioned space was minimally affected by the BIPV, suggesting that the roof was decoupled from the conditioned space. Daily PV energy production was about 25% of building electrical energy use in the summer. For this building the primary benefit of the BIPV appeared to be its capacity to generate electricity and not its ability to reduce heat flows into the building. Building energy simulations were used to estimate the cooling energy savings and heating energy penalties for more typical buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

262

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

263

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Electric Quad Average Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Average Utility Fuel Mix (Million Metric Tons) (1) Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Renewable Total 2010 0.83 10.14 46.45 0.00 0.30 57.72 2011 0.00 0.21 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 2012 0.00 0.65 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65 2013 0.00 0.16 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.16 2014 0.00 0.61 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.61 2015 0.00 1.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.04 2016 0.00 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 2017 0.00 0.58 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.58 2018 0.00 0.62 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.62 2019 0.00 0.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.70 2020 0.00 0.71 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.71 2021 0.00 0.76 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.76 2022 0.00 0.74 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.74 2023 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2024 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2025 0.00 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 2026 0.00 0.54 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.54 2027 0.00 0.63 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.63 2028 0.00 0.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.84 2029 0.00 1.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.05 2030 0.00 1.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.29 2031 0.00 1.46

264

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity. Sales, revenue and ... codes or demands or usage falling within specified limits by rate ... Monthly Electric Sales and Revenue Report with State ...

265

Office building performance - Software based energy calculation of office buildings and comparison with measured energy data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The usage of energy simulation tools is widespread in the construction field. Indeed, it is useful to predict the energy consumption of a new building,… (more)

Druhen, Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Predicting Energy Usage in a Supermarket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very little is known about the energy using systems in commercial and retail stores, which consume 24.8% of the energy used by all commercial buildings. This paper describes development of a change-point regression model for predicting the hourly and daily electrical use of a supermarket. Operational improvements already identified with the model can save the store over 4% of their electricity cost annually. Further analysis is expected to save the store additional energy costs.

Schrock, D. W.; Claridge, D. E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Compliance Toolkit | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operation and maintenance of the building-however important that might be to the overall energy usage of the building-is not considered in current national model energy codes and...

268

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

269

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

270

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forImpacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalDispatched Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles,” National

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Forecasting multi-appliance usage for smart home energy management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of forecasting the usage of multiple electrical appliances by domestic users, with the aim of providing suggestions about the best time to run appliances in order to reduce carbon emissions and save money (assuming time-of-use ...

Ngoc Cuong Truong, James McInerney, Long Tran-Thanh, Enrico Costanza, Sarvapali D. Ramchurn

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: IDEAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and virtually all with time-of-use metering). Input Data file, normally obtained from the electric utility company, which includes interval recordings of power usage. Program...

273

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 1512’s electricity bill on its current directof Building 1512’s electricity bill on its current directBuilding 1512’s electricity bill on its current direct

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in approximately 25% overall lower energy usage. Keywords: asynchronous circuits; NULL Convention Logic (NCL); NULLReducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction Combined with Supply Voltage Scaling Brett Sparkman and Scott C. Smith Department of Electrical Engineering, University

Smith, Scott C.

275

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.1u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Household Member and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

276

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CE3-6.2u. Electric Air-Conditioning Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Square Feet and Usage Indicators, 2001 Usage Indicators RSE Column Factor:

277

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer load profiles, energy tariff structures, and fuelenergy services in the building, the local economic environment, e.g. utility tariffs,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Chapman, “Using Microgrids as a Path Towards Smartof Commercial Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onsources and sinks, or microgrids. In prior research, many

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

OpenEI - Unit Cost Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at University of Texas at Austin http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode62

Provides annual energy usage for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The operation result of the demonstration of energy networks of electricity, heat, and hydrogen at an apartment building in 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell stacks, fuel processors, hydrogen storage devices, and large storage tanks for hot water, and the electricity and hot water from the fuel cells are shared via an internal electricity grid and a hot water pipe the system. Three small PEM fuel cells with hot water tanks have been installed, and the electricity and hot

282

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

283

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electriclower RH upper RH UPS Waste Heat Humid- ifier DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Residential energy usage comparison project: An overview  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overveiw of the residential energy usage comparison project, an integrated load and market research project sponsored by EPRI and the Southern California Edison Company. Traditional studies of the relative energy consumption of electric and gas household appliances have relied on laboratory analyses and computer simulations. This project was designed to study the appliance energy consumption patterns of actual households. Ninety-two households in Orange County, California, southeast of Los Angeles, served as the study sample. Half of the households received new electric space-conditioning, water-heating, cooking, and clothes-drying equipment; the other half received gas equipment. The electric space-conditioning and water-heating appliances were heat pump technologies. All of the appliances were metered to collect load-shape and energy consumption data. The households were also surveyed periodically to obtain information on their energy needs and their acceptance of the appliances. The metered energy consumption data provide an important benchmark for comparing the energy consumption and costs of alternative end-use technologies. The customer research results provide new insights into customer preferences for fuel and appliance types. 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Smith, B.A.; Uhlaner, R.T.; Cason, T.N. (Quantum Consulting, Inc., Berkeley, CA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Energy consumption and usage characteristics from field measurements of residential dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers  

SciTech Connect

The measured energy consumption and usage characteristics for household dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers for ten townhouses at Twin Rivers, N.J., are presented. Whenever the dishwashers and/or clothes washers were in use, the energy consumption, water consumption, frequency of usage, and water temperature were measured by a data acquisition system. The electrical energy of electric clothes dryers and the gas consumption of gas clothes dryers were measured, as well as their frequency and duration of use, and exhaust temperature. Typical household usage patterns of these major appliances are included.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with factors such as energy tariff and incentive policies.energy services requirements, usage patterns, tariffs, andelectricity tariff structure and the buildings’ energy load

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

289

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," ",,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Row"

290

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" 1. Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." " "," "," ",,,"Computer","Control of","Processes"," "," "," ",,,," ",," " " "," ","Computer Control","of Building-Wide","Environment(b)","or Major","Energy-Using","Equipment(c)","Waste","Heat","Recovery","Adjustable -","Speed","Motors","RSE"

291

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingAdvice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BuildingAdvice BuildingAdvice BuildingAdvice™ is a user-friendly, Web-based platform designed to assess building energy performance and identify and quantify energy savings opportunities. Target buildings are in the 5k-200k sq. ft. range, with scalability up to 1mm sq. ft. The platform combines 1) portable wireless sensor packages for capture of real-time building data, 2) automated entry of weather data, 3) manual entry of basic building information, and 4) proprietary EnGen™ energy modeling software. Output is a suite of comprehensive reports that benchmark against CBECS; provide key performance parameters including Energy Star rating, energy usage index, energy cost per square foot, and carbon emissions; provide ASHRAE Level II audits that quantify energy usage in four areas of

292

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

293

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collectors, an absorption chiller and both electrical and166 refrigeration tons) absorption chiller, 722 kW of solarcan be offset by the absorption chiller. For thermal loads,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal storage charging absoprtion cooling offsetsolar thermal collection, and thermally activated coolingkW) thermal storage storage charging non-cooling electric

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy… (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling offset storage natural gas combustion solar thermalnatural gas-fired genset, solar thermal collectors, an absorption chiller and both electrical and heat storage.

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Towards Sustainable Material Usage: Investigating Limits to ... secondary resources decreases energy consumption; this energy advantage ...

299

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Performance Compass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass Building Performance Compass logo Building Performance Compass analyzes commercial and multi-family building energy use patterns in a simple, easy-to-use Web-based interface. Using building details and energy data from the buildingÂ’s utility bills, it is unique in its ability to benchmark and compare all buildings, whether residential or commercial. Recent enhancements to Building Performance Compass include new multi-family support, the ability to track non-energy quantities such as water and waste, and features such as its fast-feedback report, which enables reporting energy savings as early as one month after work is completed. Building Performance Compass also provides extensive tracking of building data and usage, as well as the ability to upload and track

300

Resource and Fuels Usage Contacting the Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 577 24% Biomass 494 1190% Renewables 182 106% Nuclear 73 62% Coal 561 908 sectors · LDV is least carbon-intensive Total Energy (PJ) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 122 5% Biomass 891T activity) 9% line (218% PxT activity) In-State Emissions Total Energy (PJ) % of 1990 usage Natural gas 123

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

302

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Platform - Mac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mac Mac A B C D E G H I L O P Q R S T W ¡ Tool Applications Free Recently Updated ABACODE Residential code compliance, IECC Free software. Acuity Energy Platform energy efficiency software; customized business recommendation; commercial and industrial energy use comparisons Software has been updated. AEPS System Planning electrical system, renewable energy system, planning and design software, modeling, simulation, energy usage, system performance, financial analysis, solar, wind, hydro, behavior characteristics, usage profiles, generation load storage calculations, on-grid, off-grid, residential, commercial, system sizing, utility rate plans, rate comparison, utility costs, energy savings Software has been updated. ArchiWIZARD energy performance; 3-D graphics interface; solar and lighting simulation; real time updated results and changes; thermal calculation; building performance; heat balance; thermal regulation

304

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

305

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

307

Southern California: The Detroit of Electric Cars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by building a new electric-vehicle industry in Southerntime being, the electric vehicle industry electric-vehicleindustry into the electric-vehicle industry. • Inclusion of

Scott, Allen J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

309

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venkataramanan, 2006, Microgrids in the Evolving ElectricityN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Microgrids: An emerging paradigm forFrance, 4-9 June 2007 Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can use this additional battery capacity to lower its energy$80/year ($5 per kWh of battery capacity), which is paid byof stored electricity] EV battery capacity 16 kWh Maximum EV

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Information Handbook: Applications for Energy-Efficient Building Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the energy usage for each building from one benchmark periodbuilding use type? For example, ENERGY STAR can be used to benchmarkthe benchmark. In this example, Building A uses less energy

Granderson, Jessica

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Homepage | The Better Buildings Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Save the Date! May 7-9, 2014 For the first time, Better Buildings Challenge Partners, Better Buildings Alliance members, and Better Buildings Better Plants Partners will be coming together for the U.S. Department of Energy's annual Better Buildings Summit. Learn more about this distinguished conference. Real-time Energy Management: Improving Energy Efficiency Every 15 Minutes Organizations traditionally rely on monthly utility bills to track whole-building energy use and to benchmark against previous year's usage or other buildings. Tracking energy use at a more granular level can help isolate usage issues and correct them more quickly. Register here. Take the Food Service Energy and Water Survey Complete the survey to help develop an ENERGY STAR 1-100 score for

314

NEWTON: Blood Group Systems Usage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blood Group Systems Usage Blood Group Systems Usage Name: Kishori Status: student Grade: n/a Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Summer 2013 Question: What is the difference between MN blood group system and ABO bloodgroup system? Although, we nowadays prefer ABO blood groups why do we use MN blood groups in the forensic department? Replies: Humans actually have multiple blood antigens on the surface of our blood cells. Wikipedia says that there are over 50 different blood group antigens. ABO and Rh are just the most dominant. Rh actually has 3 alleles called C, D and E. So one could be CCddee, for example, but clinically, when referring to Rh, only the D antigen is considered. So MN is another system that is also present. The reason it would be considered in forensics is due to population genetics considerations. Certain combinations are found in different percentages depending on what ancestry a person is a part of. Humans evolved in isolation from each other and until relatively recently, were separated due to difficult travel/migration. But even though we can move around the planet easily now, we still carry the history of our ancestry in our DNA. M and N are codominant, like the ABO system.

315

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Usage Forecasts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Listed Alphabetically Tools by Platform Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India...

316

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

317

Residential building energy analysis : development and uncertainty assessment of a simplified model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective design of energy-efficient buildings requires attention to energy issues during the preliminary stages of design. To aid in the early consideration of a building's future energy usage, a simplified building energy ...

Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

319

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9 Lighting electric power comparison between real-for the building total electric power agree well with eachanalysis of the electric power indicated that different

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Modeling Long-Term Search Engine Usage Ryen W. White, Ashish Kapoor, and Susan T. Dumais  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosensor design accurately senses daylight availability, cutting electric light usage 40­60 percent or morePhotosensors and associated control systems can dim or raise fluorescent lighting systems to decrease or increase the electrical lighting used as the amount of daylight changes during the day. However

Dumais, Susan

322

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium Figure 1. Schematic of the EnergyHotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium Table 3. Estimated PG&E Commercial EnergyHotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium typical for Californian utilities, the electricity tariff has time-of-use (TOU) pricing for both energy

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sound level prediction, noise level AEPS System Planning electrical system, renewable energy system, planning and design software, modeling, simulation, energy usage, system...

324

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

325

Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31000 kWh yr -1 and annual gas usage is 0.0732 × 7200 = 527= 26700 kWh yr -1 and annual gas usage is 0.081 × 7200 = 580electricity usage (kWh yr -1 ), 2) annual gas energy use (

Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EART 265 Lecture Notes: Energy Energy Usage US per capita energy usage is 10 kW. This represents 1 of 2 kW. Euro- pean countries tend to use less energy per capita by a factor of 2. China's per capita/4 of the worldwide energy usage, and with 1/20th of the world population gives a global average power consumption

Nimmo, Francis

327

Memory Usage Considerations on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Considerations Memory Usage Considerations on Hopper Most Hopper compute nodes have 32 GB of physical memory, but, not all that memory is available to user programs. Compute Node Linux (the kernel), the Lustre file system software, and message passing library buffers all consume memory, as does loading the executable into memory. Thus the precise memory available to an application varies. Approximately 31 GB of memory can be allocated from within an MPI program using all 24 cores per node, i.e., 1.29 GB per MPI task on average. If an application uses 12 MPI tasks per node, then each MPI task could use about 2.58 GB of memory. You may see an error message such as "OOM killer terminated this process." "OOM" means Out of Memory and it means that your code has exhausted the

328

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

329

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity Reliability Title Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity...

330

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

Recent accomplishments in buildings energy research by the diverse groups in the Energy Efficient Buildings Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are summarized. We review technological progress in the areas of ventilation and indoor air quality, buildings energy performance, computer modeling, windows, and artificial lighting. The need for actual consumption data to track accurately the improving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressed by the Buildings Energy Data (BED) Group at LBL. We summarize results to date from our Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) studies, which include time trends in the energy consumption of new commercial and new residential buildings, the measured savings being attained by both commercial and residential retrofits, and the cost-effectiveness of buildings energy conservation measures. We also examine recent comparisons of predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present the case for building energy use labels.

Wall, L.W.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

332

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

333

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Use Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity in 1999. Office and mercantile buildings used the most total electricity. Both of these building types used electricity as their predominant energy source. Figure showing total electricity consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Electricity Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most electricity per building. Figure showing electricity consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

334

A framework for simulation-based real-time whole building performance assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the building total electric power, is shown in Figure 9. Theon building total electric power and fuel consumption, suchi.e. the separate electric power measurements for lighting,

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption 8.4 WaterSense 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter includes data on water use in commercial and residential buildings and the energy needed to supply that water. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In 2005, water use in the buildings sector was estimated at 39.6 billion gallons per day, which is nearly 10% of total water use in the United States. From 1985 to 2005, water use in the residential sector closely tracked population growth, while water use in the commercial sector grew almost twice as fast.

337

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCĂ“N, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

338

Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Usage analysis and the web of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The workshop on Usage Analysis and the Web of Data (USEWOD2011) was the first workshop in the field to investigate combinations of usage data with semantics and the Web of Data. Questions the workshop aims to address are for example: How can semantics ...

Bettina Berendt; Laura Hollink; Vera Hollink; Markus Luczak-Rösch; Knud Möller; David Vallet

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Detecting and analyzing insecure component usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software is commonly built from reusable components that provide desired functionalities. Although component reuse significantly improves software productivity, insecure component usage can lead to security vulnerabilities in client applications. ... Keywords: differential testing, insecure component usage, testing and analysis of real-world software

Taeho Kwon; Zhendong Su

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

344

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

345

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

346

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

347

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

348

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

349

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Residential Energy Usage Comparison: Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The load shapes of major residential electric and gas appliances were compared in an integrated load and market research project in southern California. The energy consumption data provide a benchmark for comparing the costs of alternative technologies; the market research data relate customer attitudes with appliance load shapes.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Measuring and Understanding the Energy Use Signatures of a Bank Building  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory measured and analyzed the energy end-use patterns in a bank building located in the north-eastern United States. This work was performed in collaboration with PNC Financial Service Group under the US DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships Program. This paper presents the metering study and the results of the metered data analysis. It provides a benchmark for the energy use of different bank-related equipments. The paper also reveals the importance of metering in fully understanding building loads and indentifying opportunities for energy efficiency improvements that will have impacts across PNC’s portfolio of buildings and were crucial to reducing receptacle loads in the design of a net-zero bank branches. PNNL worked with PNC to meter a 4,000 ft2 bank branch in the state of Pennsylvania. 71 electrical circuits were monitored and 25 stand-alone watt-hour meters were installed at the bank. These meters monitored the consumption of all interior and exterior lighting, receptacle loads, service water heating, and the HVAC rooftop unit at a 5-minute sampling interval from November 2009 to November 2010. A total of over 8 million data records were generated, which were then analyzed to produce the end-use patterns, daily usage profiles, rooftop unit usage cycles, and inputs for calibrating the energy model of the building.

Xie, YuLong; Liu, Bing; Athalye, Rahul A.; Baechler, Michael C.; Sullivan, Greg

2012-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

353

Baseline information development for energy smart schools -- applied research, field testing and technology integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and natural gas usage, and sum of these basedaggregated electricity and/or gas usages for the buildinggas, other fuels), building areas served, equipment types and usage

Xu, Tengfang; Piette, Mary Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transmission grid extensions during the build-up of a fully renewable pan-European electricity supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatio-temporal generation patterns for wind and solar photovoltaic power in Europe are used to investigate the future rise in transmission needs with an increasing penetration of these variable renewable energy sources (VRES) on the pan-European electricity system. VRES growth predictions according to the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU countries are used and extrapolated logistically up to a fully VRES-supplied power system. We find that keeping today's international net transfer capacities (NTCs) fixed over the next forty years reduces the final need for backup energy by 13% when compared to the situation with no NTCs. An overall doubling of today's NTCs will lead to a 26% reduction, and an overall quadrupling to a 33% reduction. The remaining need for backup energy is due to correlations in the generation patterns, and cannot be further reduced by transmission. The main investments in transmission lines are due during the ramp-up of VRES from 15% (as planned for 2020) to 80%. Add...

Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hour hour Fig. 8. Office Building Jul Electricity Use y Fig.9. Office Building Jul Electricity Load Provision with CHPEnergy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment,

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Visual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lighting design knowledge is beneficial. Users More than 5000. Audience Architects, electrical and civil engineers, lighting designers, design-build contractors, electrical...

357

Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPL Electric Utilities Corporation Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) provides...

358

General Guidance on Data Usage and Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Guidance on Data Usage and Management General Guidance on Data Usage and Management Summary Data Usage Credit Data Management and Documentation: Introduction Our philosophy Data management Record measured values Zero versus missing value Metadata Data documentation Define variables Specify units Provide citations For additional information Summary Ensure long-term preservation of, and full and open access to, high-quality data sets Give proper credit to the researchers providing the data Provide thorough, yet simple, documentation: how the data were produced, what they mean Generate ASCII data and documentation files; they ensure readibility by virtually all users Define variable names and units Point to, or provide, important publications that further document the data Data usage CDIAC fully supports the July 1991 Policy Statements on Data Management for

359

ERP Usage in Practice: An Empirical Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the results of an exploratory study of Fortune 1000 firms and their enterprise resource planning ERP usage, as well as benefits and changes they have realized from ERP. The study empirically examines ERP in these organizations to ...

Mary C. Jones; Randall Young

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Microsoft Word - Epoxy Usage Form.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Form Rev. 41111 Monthly Epoxy Usage Form (Weight in Grams) Date Initials CTD 101K Stycast Catalyst Epon Resin Epicure Part A Part B Part C 2850 24LV 815828 3140...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May-4 June, 2005 electricity (and demand) charges and a lowdisproportionately to summer electricity demand peaks in hotreduce building peak electricity demands in California using

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on DistributedCombined Heat and Power, Electricity Tariffs, Demand Charge,California electricity tariffs for large buildings typically

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage Policy ... CNST NanoFab Facility User Computer Security and Usage Policy ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

arXiv.org help - arXiv usage statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by major subject areas through January 2013 Access and download statistics: Today's usage for arXiv.org (not including mirrors) Institutional Usage Statistics: 2009, 2010,...

365

EMCS and time-series energy data analysis in a large government office building  

SciTech Connect

Energy Management Control System (EMCS) data are an underutilized source of information on the performance of commercial buildings. Newer EMCS's have the ability and storage capacity to trend large amounts of data and perform preliminary analyses; however, these features often receive little or no use, as operators are generally not trained in data management, visualization, and analysis. Whole-building hourly electric-utility data are another readily available and underutilized source of information. This paper outlines the use of EMCS and utility data to evaluate the performance of the Ronald V. Dellums Federal Building in Oakland, California, a large office building operated by the Federal General Services Administration (GSA). The project began as an exploratory effort at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to examine the procedures operators were using to obtain information and operate their buildings. Trending capabilities were available, but in limited use by the operators. LBNL worked with the building operators to use EMCS to trend one-minute data for over one-hundred points. Hourly electricity-use data were also used to understand usage patterns and peak demand. The paper describes LBNL's key findings in the following areas: Characterization of cooling plant operations; Characterization of economizer performance; Analysis of annual energy use and peak demand operations; Techniques, strengths, and shortcomings of EMCS data analysis; Future plans at the building for web-based remote monitoring and diagnostics. These findings have helped GSA develop strategies for peak demand reduction in this and other GSA buildings. Such activities are of great interest in California and elsewhere, where electricity reliability and demand are currently problematic. Overall, though the building's energy use is fairly low, significant energy savings are available by improving the existing EMCS control strategies.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Friedman, Hannah

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

367

The Power to Change: Sustainable Electricity Usage in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Light Bulb Exchange program: replaces inefficient incandescent bulbs with integrated compact fluorescent Lighting Project - The UHC (University Housing Council) and the CCSC (Columbia College Student Council bulbs Watt and Woodbridge residence halls Bulbs - 15X longer, save $38,000 in energy cost and 446

Colorado at Boulder, University of

368

RECS Electricity Usage Form_v2 (25418 - Activated, Traditional...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Period Enter the End Date for each billing period MMDDYY Enter the Amount used in kWh XXXX kWh were: AActual EEstimated RRead by Customer (select one) A E R 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

369

Household Electricity Usage Form - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration . U.S. Department of Energy . Washington, DC 20585 . Form EIA-457E ...

370

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

371

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Dc Living Walls Posted by: Dc 15 Nov 2013 - 13:26 Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more... Tags: ancient building system, architect, biomimicry, building technology, cooling, cu, daylight, design problem, energy use, engineer, fred andreas, geothermal, green building, heat transfer, heating, living walls, metabolic adjustment, net zero, pre-electricity, Renewable Energy, Solar, university of colorado, utility grid, Wind

372

Boulder Laboratories Building 1 Renovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fresh air for modern laboratory work, electrical ... of Building 1 at the NIST Boulder laboratories. ... conservation of water, energy, and construction ...

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

373

Buildings Technology Research and Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is to require that electrical distribution panels be ... energy use of their devices is generally ... with whole building automation systems • Benchmarking ...

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

375

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas from PG&E. The electricity tariff has Time-Of-Use (TOU)month) Source: SCE TOU electricity tariff and SoCal naturalthe almost flat electricity tariff ($/kWh) and the seasonal

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kandler Smith, NREL EDV Battery Robust Design - 1 Design of Electric Drive Vehicle Batteries for Long Life and Low Cost Robustness to Geographic and Consumer-Usage Variation...

378

Recommending energy tariffs and load shifting based on smart household usage profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a system and study of personalized energy-related recommendation. AgentSwitch utilizes electricity usage data collected from users' households over a period of time to realize a range of smart energy-related recommendations on energy tariffs, ... Keywords: demand response, energy tariffs, load shifting, personalization, recommender systems, smart grid

Joel E. Fischer; Sarvapali D. Ramchurn; Michael Osborne; Oliver Parson; Trung Dong Huynh; Muddasser Alam; Nadia Pantidi; Stuart Moran; Khaled Bachour; Steve Reece; Enrico Costanza; Tom Rodden; Nicholas R. Jennings

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE USAGE OF ANTENNAS IN MIMO AND MISO INTERFERENCE CHANNELS Mariam Kaynia , Andrea J. Goldsmith. of Science and Technology Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford Mobile and small), we derive upper and lower bounds to both our per- formance metrics. Moreover, the particular

Gesbert, David

380

UDP: Usage-based Dynamic Pricing with Privacy Preservation for Smart Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UDP: Usage-based Dynamic Pricing with Privacy Preservation for Smart Grid Xiaohui Liang, Student for smart grid in a community environment, which enables the electricity price to correspond-preserving manner. Index Terms--Smart grid; dynamic price; privacy preserva- tion; community-specific I

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effect of Usage Conditions on Household Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezer Energy Consumption. Effect of Usage Conditions ...

383

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

384

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

385

How Usage is Charged at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

usage usage is charged How usage is charged MPP Charging (Computational Systems) When a job runs on a NERSC MPP system, such as Hopper, charges accrue against one of the user's repository allocations. The unit of accounting for these charges is the "MPP Hour". A parallel job is charged for exclusive use of each multi-core node allocated to the job. The MPP charge for such a job is calculated as the product of: the job's elapsed wall-clock time in hours, the number of nodes allocated to the job (regardless of the number actually used), the number of cores available on each allocated node, a machine charge factor (MCF) based on typical performance of the machine relative to Hopper (MCF=1.0), and a queue charge factor (QCF). Queue priority scheduling gives users

386

Automobile usage patterns. Highlight report. Volume XIV  

SciTech Connect

A report is given as part of a series of studies dealing with general public behavior and attitudes towards energy conservation. Specifically, this study concentrates on automobile usage patterns. The study is based on 1,007 telephone interviews and includes topics such as car usage affected by lifestyle, car usage patterns, planned trips as compared with routine or spontaneous trips, times per week trip is usually made, analysis of trips, the extent to which shopping trips are done by phone instead of by car, willingness to cut out trips, factors deterring car use, and a summary which concludes that the primary way that people could cut down automobile use without eliminating leisure time use would be in more careful planning of trip for shopping and errands. Another important finding in this study is lack of sensitivity to gasoline prices. (GRA)

Rappeport, M.; Labaw, P.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

CloudMonitor: Profiling Power Usage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Cloud Computing platforms the addition of hardware monitoring devices to gather power usage data can be impractical or uneconomical due to the large number of machines to be metered. CloudMonitor, a monitoring tool that can generate power models for software-based power estimation, can provide insights to the energy costs of deployments without additional hardware. Accurate power usage data leads to the possibility of Cloud providers creating a separate tariff for power and therefore incentivizing software developers to create energy-efficient applications.

Smith, James William; Ward, Jonathan Stuart; Sommerville, Ian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Reducing the Energy Usage of Office Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate how component-based middleware can reduce the energy usage of closed-source applications. We rst describe how the Puppeteer system exploits well-dened interfaces exported by applications to modify their behavior. We then present a detailed study of the energy usage of Microsoft's PowerPoint application and show that adaptive policies can reduce energy expenditure by 49% in some instances. In addition, we use the results of the study to provide general advice to developers of applications and middleware that will enable them to create more energy-ecient software. 1

Jason Flinn; Eyal De Lara; M. Satyanarayanan; Dan S. Wallach; Willy Zwaenepoel; Willy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

390

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analysed.

Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jonathan; Marnay, Chris; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; Megel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Application of the Software as a Service Model to the Control of Complex Building Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to create broad access to its optimization software, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the University of California at Davis (UC Davis) and OSISoft, has recently developed a Software as a Service (SaaS) Model for reducing energy costs, cutting peak power demand, and reducing carbon emissions for multipurpose buildings. UC Davis currently collects and stores energy usage data from buildings on its campus. Researchers at LBNL sought to demonstrate that a SaaS application architecture could be built on top of this data system to optimize the scheduling of electricity and heat delivery in the building. The SaaS interface, known as WebOpt, consists of two major parts: a) the investment& planning and b) the operations module, which builds on the investment& planning module. The operational scheduling and load shifting optimization models within the operations module use data from load prediction and electrical grid emissions models to create an optimal operating schedule for the next week, reducing peak electricity consumption while maintaining quality of energy services. LBNL's application also provides facility managers with suggested energy infrastructure investments for achieving their energy cost and emission goals based on historical data collected with OSISoft's system. This paper describes these models as well as the SaaS architecture employed by LBNL researchers to provide asset scheduling services to UC Davis. The peak demand, emissions, and cost implications of the asset operation schedule and investments suggested by this optimization model are analyzed.

Stadler, Michael; Donadee, Jon; Marnay, Chris; Lai, Judy; Mendes, Goncalo; Appen, Jan von; M& #233; gel, Oliver; Bhattacharya, Prajesh; DeForest, Nicholas; Lai, Judy

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

392

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

393

Customer Response to Day-ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

394

Energy efficient practices, products and programs for buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy conservation protects the environment and saves money. The United States have achieved outstanding results so far in energy conservation and efficiency since the oil crises in the 1970`s. Yet there are enormous opportunities available in the building industry to further reduce energy usage with the technologies that are available today. This report discusses the different building related energy conservation strategies that can be implemented, examines some of the energy efficient building products, equipment and appliances that are currently available for home and commercial use, and provides operation and maintenance tips. One of the most promising energy efficient practice and product is the photovoltaic technology, which is discussed in chapter 3. Not only is solar energy a sustainable resource and environmentally friendly, it could generate excess energy to feed back into the electric grid system and result in no energy charges for the owner other than the initial installation cost. Finally, this report will examine the EPA Energy Star Buildings and Green Lights program and the Energy Star labeled products intended to encourage the growth and use of energy efficient technologies and practices.

Barton, J.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

396

Collaborative Systems for Building Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of new generation of PLC's and WinCC software in creating collaborative systems for managing, controlling and supervising building electric equipment. These systems assure all the requirements of a building and offer to the ... Keywords: Building Automation System, PLC, WinCC, Redundancy, HVAC, HAS, SCADA, HMI

Ioan Valentin Sita

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Identifying diverse usage behaviors of smartphone apps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smartphone users are increasingly shifting to using apps as "gateways" to Internet services rather than traditional web browsers. App marketplaces for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone platforms have made it attractive for developers to deploy apps and ... Keywords: app usage behavior, smartphone apps

Qiang Xu; Jeffrey Erman; Alexandre Gerber; Zhuoqing Mao; Jeffrey Pang; Shobha Venkataraman

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , “Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings”, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a time of use tariff for electrical energy. The CA dataThe ConEd tariffs, with flat electrical energy charges, andenergy from their local utilities at published tariffs. The

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mandatory Electric Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electricity over IP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mostly Pointless Lamp Switching (MPLampS) is an architecture for carrying electricity over IP (with an MPLS control plane). According to our marketing department, MPLampS has the potential to dramatically lower the price, ease the distribution and usage, ...

B. Rajagopalan

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

403

building | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 50% (2 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 25% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 25% (1 vote) Total votes: 4 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

404

University of Minnesota (NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections University of Minnesota (NorthernSTAR Building...

405

The Building Research Council at the University of Illinois ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections The Building Research Council at the University of Illinois is...

406

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAP, iSBEM, EPCs, Psychrometrics. CYPE-Building Services building services, single model, energy simulation, sizing, HVAC, plumbing, sewage, electricity, solar, analysis of...

407

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Buildings consume approximately 40% of the energy, and nearly 70% of the electricity used in the United States. Building surfaces are well suited to renewable energy ...

408

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Country -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tool Applications Free Recently Updated CYPE-Building Services building services, single model, energy simulation, sizing, HVAC, plumbing, sewage, electricity, solar, analysis of...

409

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

410

Supercomputer assisted generation of machine learning agents for the calibration of building energy models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus ... Keywords: big data, building energy modeling, calibration, machine learning, parametric ensemble, supercomputer

Jibonananda Sanyal; Joshua New; Richard Edwards

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Visibility Driven BVH Build Up Algorithm for Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heuristics. Moreover, it is also possible to lower the construction time and memory usage by subdividing only's website. For any questions on other usage of the document than scholarly purposes you are obliged University, Botanick´a 554/68a, 602 00 Brno, Czech Republic bFaculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech

Havran, Vlastimil

412

Homepage | The Better Buildings Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Alliance Sectors Public Private Commercial Real Estate & Hospitality Healthcare Higher Education Retail, Food Service & Grocery Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management Information Systems Public Sector Teams Energy Savings Performance Contracts Strategic Energy Planning Finance Strategies Data Management Approaches Market Solutions Teams Appraisals & Valuation Data Access Financing Leasing & Split Incentive Workforce Development Events 2014 Better Buildings Summit Better Buildings Webinar Series Efficiency Forum Past Webinars

413

Energy usage of rotating biological contractor facilities  

SciTech Connect

A recent US Environmental Protection Agency field study investigated the energy requirements for rotating biological contactor (RBC) units. The energy measurements for mechanically driven units varied considerably, but the overall average of 2.03 kW/shaft was very close to current manufacturer estimates. The power factor of most of the mechanically driven units was very low, and most installations could benefit from power factor correction. The energy requirements of air driven units also were highly variable and must be evaluated on an individual plant basis. The results of this study provide factual data on energy usage of RBC units, as well as a basis for developing design and operational considerations to reduce energy usage and maximize operational flexibility and plant performance. 9 references, 7 tables.

Gilbert, W.G.; Wheeler, J.F.; MacGregor, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data Green Button Helps More Consumers Click with Their Energy Usage Data September 12, 2013 - 2:41pm Addthis At the White House...

415

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Regulations Regarding Usage from the

416

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

417

Energy Usage Data Standard for US Smart Grid Passes Key ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Usage Data Standard for US Smart Grid Passes Key Advisory Panel Vote. From NIST Tech Beat: March 1, 2011. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

419

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

420

EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Previous reports Previous reports Distributed Generation in Buildings - AEO2005 Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models - July 2002 Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Release date: August 29, 2013 Distributed and dispersed generation technologies generate electricity near the particular load they are intended to serve, such as a residential home or commercial building. EIA defines distributed generation (DG) as being connected to the electrical grid and intended to directly offset retail sales, and dispersed generation as being off-grid and often used for remote applications where grid-connected electricity is cost-prohibitive. Dispersed generation in the buildings sector is not currently gathered by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy for County Government Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Santa Clara County Executive's Office In February 2006, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a Green Building Policy for all county-owned or leased buildings. The standards were revised again in September 2009. All new buildings over 5,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver

422

Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Place Wilmington, DE Website http://www.prweb.com/releases/ References Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release[1] BMI Website[2] DuPont Website[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) is a company located in Wilmington, DE. References ↑ "Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release" ↑ "BMI Website"

423

American Electric Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Vehicles Inc Place Palmer Lake, Colorado Zip 80133 Sector Vehicles Product American Electric Vehicles (AEV) builds...

424

Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve...

425

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

426

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

427

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

429

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

How Households Use Different Types of Vehicles: A Structural Driver Allocation and Usage Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

types Mini cars have approximately average usage. SubcompactCompact cars have greater than average usage only if theycar is driven morethan otherwise expected. The . -elationships between usage

Golob, Thomas F.; Kim, Seyoung; Ren, Weiping

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily Laboratories America Inc. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

433

Application of solar technologies in buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the buildings energy research carried out at SERI is to provide the buildings industry with technological innovations in materials, components, and systems that enable them to reduce the usage and cost of energy. The scope of research includes eight technology areas, including advanced windows, storage material composites, advanced insulation, desiccant cooling, air management, building performance monitoring, building design guidelines, and active water heating. This paper outlines the benefits, the results to date, and the current research activities associated with these eight technology options. 16 refs., 6 figs.

Flowers, L.T.; Groff, G.C. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Marquardt Switches, Inc., Cazenovia, NY (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

435

Development of the Duke University Building Energy Analysis Method (DUBEAM) and generation of plots for North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The study is directed toward developing a method of estimating energy savings which will be both accurate and easy to apply. Estimating the energy savings from feasible energy conserving opportunities requires a determination of the energy usage by various components of the existing building, and the projected energy usage by the building after the proposed energy conserving modifications. (TFD)

Sud, I.; Wiggins, R.W. Jr.; Chaddock, J.B.; Butler, T.D.

1979-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

437

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

438

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

439

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

440

Affording Gas and Electricity: Self Disconnection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity, but this seems to be because gas prepayers have lower average income than electricity prepayersAffording Gas and Electricity: Self Disconnection and Rationing by Prepayment and Low Income Credit interview schedule................................... liv #12;2 Fuel Usage and Consumption Patterns of Low

Feigon, Brooke

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generally face retail electricity rates that are fixed formarginal electricity production and the fixed retail rateselectricity charge for usage rising by three times the customer’s summer part-peak energy rate

Han, Junqiao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. ... More Tables on New Hampshire's Electricity Profile: Formats;

443

buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

444

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff,and building energy loads Solar radiation profiles for PVload profile, city’s solar radiation data, electricity and

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Intelligent Buildings Series, Volume 1: Large Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities seek the means to manage supply and demand of electricity, they increasingly look to the demand-side for opportunities. Commercial and institutional buildings represent substantial electrical loads that account for approximately 30% of all electric power consumed in the United States. Given the right circumstances, these energy consumers can act as demand-side resources by reducing their electrical demand in response to conditions on the supply-side. While demand response applications in com...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Controlling electrical costs with energy management  

SciTech Connect

Energy Management Systems have been proven to be extremely effective in reducing electrical energy costs. This particular system is also capable of monitoring natural gas usage and even regulating that usage with the control of valves. Controlling electrical energy usage must be a cooperative effort between the plant where the system is to be installed and the manufacturer of the Energy Management Controller. The latter can be assisted by being advised of which loads are able to be shed and how shedding those loads affect production.

Collins, W.M.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Simple strategies for minimization of cooling water usage in binary power plants  

SciTech Connect

The geothermal resources which could be used for the production of electrical power in the United States are located for the most part in the semi-arid western regions of the country. The availability of ground or surface water in the quantity or quality desired for a conventional wet'' heat rejections system represents a barrier to the development of these resources with the binary cycle technology. This paper investigates some simple strategies to minimize the cooling water usage of binary power plants. The cooling water usage is reduced by increasing the thermal efficiency of the plant. Three methods of accomplishing this are considered here: increasing the average source temperature, by increasing the geofluid outlet temperature; decreasing pinch points on the heat rejection heat exchangers, increasing their size; and using internal recuperation within the cycle. In addition to the impact on water usage, the impact on cost-of-electricity is determined. The paper shows that some of these strategies can reduce the cooling water requirements 20 to 30% over that for a plant similar to the Heber Binary Plant, with a net reduction in the cost-of-electricity of about 15%. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

450

An assessment of worldwide supercomputer usage  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a comparative study of advanced supercomputing usage in Japan and the United States as of Spring 1994. It is based on the findings of a group of US scientists whose careers have centered on programming, evaluating, and designing high-performance supercomputers for over ten years. The report is a follow-on to an assessment of supercomputing technology in Europe and Japan that was published in 1993. Whereas the previous study focused on supercomputer manufacturing capabilities, the primary focus of the current work was to compare where and how supercomputers are used. Research for this report was conducted through both literature studies and field research in Japan.

Wasserman, H.J.; Simmons, M.L.; Hayes, A.H.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

452

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

453

Whole Building Design Approach | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Approach Design Approach Whole Building Design Approach October 16, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis Picture of a Spanish-style building with xeriscape, including palm trees. Camp Pendleton's temporary lodging facility was constructed from 20% recycled materials and will be 100% recyclable upon its distant demolition. The four-story South Mesa Lodge also received one of the U.S. Green Building Council's highest energy efficiency ratings, saving more than 30% percent of water, lighting, and overall utility usage. As defined by the Whole Building Design Guide, the goal of whole building design is to create a successful high-performance building by applying an integrated design and team approach to the project during the planning and programming phases. Whole building design has proven to help:

454

Battery management system for Li-Ion batteries in hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Battery Management System (BMS) is the component responsible for the effcient and safe usage of a Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) battery pack. Its main… (more)

Marangoni, Giacomo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Optimal Planning and Operation of Smart Grids with Electric Vehicle Interconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or cooling loads via absorption cooling. The outputs of DER-for hot water usage and absorption cooling, thereby allowingutilization and absorption cooling reduces the electricity

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adoption Model distributed generation building energycosts of the DG (distributed generation) equipment, alongcapability: DG (distributed generation, electricity only);

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capitalcost.htm). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage foret al. 1996, 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Goldstein, L. etet al. 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003 and at the Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

459

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Oklahoma Department of Central Services In June 2008, the governor of Oklahoma signed [http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/2007-08bills/HB/hb3394_enr.rtf HB 3394] requiring the state to develop a high-performance building certification program for state construction and renovation projects. The standard, which

460

City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing a requirement for all new occupied city buildings larger than 5,000 square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ă?nay, Devrim

462

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: â—Ź total nearly 4.9 million buildings â—Ź comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace â—Ź consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) â—Ź

463

Nanogrids, Power Distribution, and Building Networks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanogrids, Power Distribution, and Building Networks Speaker(s): Bruce Nordman Date: February 24, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Electricity consumption and information...

464

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DAYSIM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free RADIANCE-based daylighting analysis software to predict the annual daylight availability and electric lighting use in arbitrary buildings for manual and automated lighting...

465

Building Envelope and HVAC FOA Selection Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cold climate commercial heat pump system. The system will reduce annual electricity use for commercial building space heating in cold climates by at least 25 percent....

466

Dow Building Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

467

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cepenergy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis of the Energy Matrix (Electricity, Water, Fuel), and CO2 emissions in buildings. Energy Problems, Saving and Optimizing. Tool of Management for Energy leakage. Culture and...

468

Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Butadiene 1:3 is separated from other C4-hydrocarbons by extractive distillation in a sieve plate tower. Prior to the development work to be described, the pressure in the extraction tower was controlled at a fixed value. The tower pressure-boilup control loop did not behave satisfactorily in the presence of non-condensables which entered with the feed. The capacity of the flooded reflux drum condenser for the tower was limiting production during summer months. The tower pressure control loop was put on manual. The pressure was allowed to drop to its lowest attainable value for the existing conditions of boilup and condenser cooling capability. This manner of operation is known as floating pressure control. By taking advantage of the higher relative volatility at the lower tower pressure, energy usage was reduced and there was an increase in production capacity. The tower operation at a lower temperature reduced tower and reboiler fouling. Substantial savings have resulted from these improvements. The annual energy consumption has been reduced by 25% and maximum productive capacity is higher by 15%. The rate of tower and reboiler fouling has not been fully quantified but is greatly reduced. A more stable tower operation has also contributed to higher productivity and reduced energy usage. Venting of non-condensables does not affect tower stability and the operators have adapted well to the new control strategy.

Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Pricing Experiments for a Computer-Telephony-Service Usage Allocation Jimmy S. Shih, Randy H. Katz, Anthony D. Joseph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pricing Experiments for a Computer-Telephony-Service Usage Allocation Jimmy S. Shih, Randy H. Katz, Anthony D. Joseph Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of California to entice users to talk less, talk at another time, or use a lower quality connection. With our token scheme

Joseph, Anthony D.

470

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Energy Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer logo. Provides quick economic analysis for commercial and industrial buildings. Building Energy Analyzer (BEA) estimates annual and monthly loads and costs associated with air-conditioning, heating, on-site power generation, thermal storage, and heat recovery systems for a given building and location. The user can compare the performance of standard and high efficiency electric chillers, variable speed electric chillers, absorption chillers, engine chillers, thermal storage, on-site generators, heat recovery, or desiccant systems. The user can also prepare side-by-side economic comparisons of different energy options and equipment life cycle cost analysis. The BEA is a system screening tool. It is a tool that is

471

High Performance Homes That Use 50% Less Energy Than the DOE Building America Benchmark Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes lessons learned from designing, building, and monitoring five affordable, energy-efficient test houses in a single development in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) service area. This work was done through a collaboration of Habitat for Humanity Loudon County, the US Department of Energy (DOE), TVA, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The houses were designed by a team led by ORNL and were constructed by Habitat's volunteers in Lenoir City, Tennessee. ZEH5, a two-story house and the last of the five test houses to be built, provided an excellent model for conducting research on affordable high-performance houses. The impressively low energy bills for this house have generated considerable interest from builders and homeowners around the country who wanted a similar home design that could be adapted to different climates. Because a design developed without the project constraints of ZEH5 would have more appeal for the mass market, plans for two houses were developed from ZEH5: a one-story design (ZEH6) and a two-story design (ZEH7). This report focuses on ZEH6, identical to ZEH5 except that the geothermal heat pump is replaced with a SEER 16 air source unit (like that used in ZEH4). The report also contains plans for the ZEH6 house. ZEH5 and ZEH6 both use 50% less energy than the DOE Building America protocol for energyefficient buildings. ZEH5 is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2632 ft2 house with a home energy rating system (HERS) index of 43, which qualifies it for federal energy-efficiency incentives (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, and a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100). This report is intended to help builders and homeowners build similar high-performance houses. Detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 are compared with the Building America Benchmark building, and detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data gleaned from 94 sensors installed in ZEH5 to monitor electric sub-metered usage, temperature and relative humidity, hot water usage, and heat pump operation for 1 year are presented. This information should be particularly useful to those considering structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roofing; foundation geothermal heat pumps for space heating and cooling; solar water heaters; and roof-mounted, grid-tied photovoltaic systems. The document includes plans for ZEH6 (adapted from ZEH5), a one-story, high-performance house, as well as projections of how the design might perform in five major metropolitan areas across the TVA service territory. The HERS ratings for this all-electric house vary from 36 (Memphis, Tennessee) to 46 (Bristol, Tennessee).

Christian, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Building load control and optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on load control by improving the operations in existing building HVAC ...

Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Space heating systems in the Northwest: energy usage and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect

The question of energy usage and cost of providing space heat in the Northwest is discussed. Though space heating needs represents only 18% of the U.S.'s total energy consumption, it nevertheless appears to offer the greatest potential for conservation and near term applications of alternate energy sources. Efficiency and economic feasibility factors are considered in providing for space heating demands. These criteria are presented to establish energy usage, cost effectiveness and beneficial conservation practices for space heating of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. Four Northwestern cities have been chosen whose wide range of climate conditions are used to formulate the seasonal fuel and capital cost and hence the annual heating cost covering a broad spectrum of heating applications, both the traditional methods, the newer alternate forms of energy, and various methods to achieve more efficient utilization of all types.

Keller, J.G.; Kunze, J.F.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Usage of Friction-damped Braced Frames for Seismic Vibration Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents the results of experimental work that examines the functionality of friction-damped braced frames during seismic events. The simplicity and efficacy of this friction device as a means of passive vibration control suggest that it may have notable implications in the field of structural engineering. Little scholarship has been devoted to this issue in recent years, and further research to advance our understanding of its possible implementations is necessary. To measure the functionality of this type of frame, this study first examines and compares virtual models of a building modeling the effect of friction damping versus that same building without such damping. It then corroborates these findings by presenting the results of physical experimentation on a scale model of the building, both with and without damping. The validation of the virtual models by the physical model provides credence to the usage of friction-damped braced frames as a seismic energy dissipating system.

Fink, Brynnan 1992-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Reading Comprehension - Charges and Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charges and Electricity Atoms, the basic building blocks of matter, are made of three basic components: protons, neutrons and electrons. The protons and neutrons cluster together...

477

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

478

NREL: Buildings Research - Commercial Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Research Staff Commercial Buildings Research Staff Members of the Commercial Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as computer science, physics, and chemistry. Brian Ball Kyle Benne Eric Bonnema Larry Brackney Alberta Carpenter Michael Deru Ian Doebber Kristin Field Katherine Fleming David Goldwasser Luigi Gentile Polese Brent Griffith Rob Guglielmetti Elaine Hale Bob Hendron Lesley Herrmann Adam Hirsch Eric Kozubal Feitau Kung Rois Langner Matt Leach Nicholas Long Daniel Macumber James Page Andrew Parker Shanti Pless Jennifer Scheib Marjorie Schott Michael Sheppy Greg Stark Justin Stein Daniel Studer Alex Swindler Paul Torcellini Evan Weaver Photo of Brian Ball Brian Ball, Ph.D., Senior Engineer brian.ball@nrel.gov

479

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q","Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,32.3,8,3.3,5.8,14.1,1.1

480

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity usage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

482

" Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" 2 Number of Establishments by Usage of General Energy-Saving Technologies, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Usage within General Energy-Saving Technologies;" " Unit: Establishment Counts." ,,,"Computer Control of Building Wide Evironment(c)",,,"Computer Control of Processes or Major Energy-Using Equipment(d)",,,"Waste Heat Recovery",,,"Adjustable - Speed Motors",,,"Oxy - Fuel Firing",,,," " "NAICS" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(e)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

483

"Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,65,54.3,3.3,1.5,1.6,4.4 "1.",28.6,17.9,14,0.9,0.6,0.7,1.7

484

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.4,1,0.4,0.6,1.2,"Q" "2 Times A Day",24.6,8.6,2.3,1,1.6,3.5,0.2

485

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

486

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

487

Identification of Market Requirements of Smart Buildings Technologies for High Rise Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the findings on the identification of market requirements of smart buildings technologies for high rise office buildings in Saudi Arabia including: levels of importance of smart building technologies for office buildings, current practices of utilizing hi-tech smart building technologies in office buildings, required additional features of smart building technologies for office buildings, challenges for integrating smart building technologies for office buildings, major benefits of hi-tech smart buildings technologies for office buildings, and priorities of smart building technologies based on current usage. The paper also reports on key parameters of the comparison of smart office building technologies between Saudi Arabia and developed countries which are based on the survey results for the former and literature review for the latter. This comparison provides in a nutshell a conclusion of the complete survey analysis conducted in this research and at the same time provides an indication on the utilization level of smart office buildings in Saudi Arabia compared to the current practices in developed countries.

Reffat, R. M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

490

Cleaning optimization for reduced chemical usage  

SciTech Connect

The use of dilute SC-1 (NH40H:H202:H20) chemistry cleaning processes for particle removal from silicon surfaces has been investigated. Dilute chemistries can be highly effective, especially when high- frequency acoustic energy (megasonics) is applied. The high particle removal efficacy of the dilute chemistry processes presumably arises due to increased double layer effects caused by reduced ionic strength. Dilute chemistry SC- I solutions exhibit somewhat reduced efficacy for removal of certain light organics; however, when dilute SC-1 is used along with other pre-gate cleaning steps (e.g. HF, SC-2, and piranha), then the overall cleaning sequence is quite effective. In addition to providing robust cleaning processes, dilute chemistries also result in significantly lower chemical and rinse water usage. Waste water treatment requirements are also lessened when dilute chemistry cleaning solutions are employed.

Resnick, P.J.; Simonson, G.C.; Matlock, C.A.; Kelly, M.J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations...

492

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

493

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

494

Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the...

495

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY - Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

POWER PLANT WATER USAGE AND LOSS STUDY August 2005 Revised May 2007 Prepared for: The United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE Gasification...

496

Child Care Availability and Usage Among Welfare Recipients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Child Care Availability and Usage Among Welfare Recipients 1the impact that the availability of nearby licensed care hasemployment and that the availability of nearby licensed care

Houston, Douglas; Ong, Paul M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

NANOFAB TOOL USAGE RATES Effective 1/1/13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Application specific training beyond general tool usage will require additional training time and should be discussed with process engineer prior to ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

498

Electrical energy consideration and payment in an Australian University  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses an attempt to obtain a formula to calculate the energy consumption for each faculty of a university from the faculty statistics or, at least, to calculate a change of energy allowance based on changing faculty statistics. Topics considered include the university plant, factors contributing to electrical energy usage (base load component, personnel component, laboratory-workshop component), the faculty energy usage equation, establishing the values of the formula constants, estimating energy usage, and faculty energy savings.

Bonwick, W.J.; Cappadona, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

500

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) Building Management System The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into distributed intelligent-automated demand response (DIADR) building management systems. Project Description This project aims to develop a DIADR building management system with intelligent optimization and control algorithms for demand management, taking into account a multitude of factors affecting cost including: Comfort Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) Lighting Other building systems Climate Usage and occupancy patterns. The key challenge is to provide the demand response the ability to address more and more complex building systems that include a variety of loads,