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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Title DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries Publication Type Report...

2

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

3

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global economy has grown rapidly over the past decade with a commensurate growth in the demand for electricity services that has increased a country's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Increasing need of reliable and affordable electricity supply is a challenge which is before every Asia Pacific Partnership (APP) country. Collaboration between APP members has been extremely fruitful in identifying potential efficiency upgrades and implementing clean technology in the supply side of the power sector as well established the beginnings of collaboration. However, significantly more effort needs to be focused on demand side potential in each country. Demand side management or DSM in this case is a policy measure that promotes energy efficiency as an alternative to increasing electricity supply. It uses financial or other incentives to slow demand growth on condition that the incremental cost needed is less than the cost of increasing supply. Such DSM measures provide an alternative to building power supply capacity The type of financial incentives comprise of rebates (subsidies), tax exemptions, reduced interest loans, etc. Other approaches include the utilization of a cap and trade scheme to foster energy efficiency projects by creating a market where savings are valued. Under this scheme, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of electricity are capped and electricity retailers are required to meet the target partially or entirely through energy efficiency activities. Implementation of DSM projects is very much in the early stages in several of the APP countries or localized to a regional part of the country. The purpose of this project is to review the different types of DSM programs experienced by APP countries and to estimate the overall future potential for cost-effective demand-side efficiency improvements in buildings sectors in the 7 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savings potential is estimated to be 1.7 thousand TWh or 21percent of the 2030 projected base case electricity demand. Electricity savings potential ranges from a high of 38percent in India to a low of 9percent in Korea for the two sectors. Lighting, fans, and TV sets and lighting and refrigeration are the largest contributors to residential and commercial electricity savings respectively. This work presents a first estimates of the savings potential of DSM programs in APP countries. While the resulting estimates are based on detailed end-use data, it is worth keeping in mind that more work is needed to overcome limitation in data at this time of the project.

McNeil, MIchael; Letschert, Virginie; Shen, Bo; Sathaye, Jayant; de la Ru du Can, Stephane

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

owned integrated hydro electricity utilities prevail,s Loading Order for Electricity Resources”, Staff Report,International Developments in Electricity Demand Management

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards to Projected Electricity Price in the ResidentialStandards to Marginal Electricity Price in the CommercialStandards to Projected Electricity Price in the Residential

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annexes Tables Table 1. Electricity Tariffs per Country andsuch as time-of-use electricity tariffs that create largeshows national average electricity tariffs per APP country.

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Co Ltd.”,Maharashtra state electricity distribution company recentlyCCE Electricity Price Exhaust Fan for Air Distribution (0.5

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developments in Electricity Demand Management – Lessons24 Table 4. Electricity Demand Projections, Energy and3. APP Base Case Electricity Demand Forecast –Residential

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Restructuring by State in the US US States Restructuration Alabama Not Active Alaska Not Active Colorado

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers Ranges & ovens Pool heaters Direct heating equipmentOvens Standby Washing Machines Televisions Space Cooling Electric Water Heating

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Price impacts of electric-utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As competition in the electricity industry increases, utilities (and others) worry more about the upward pressure on electricity prices that demand-side management (DSM) programs often impose. Because of these concerns, several utilities have recently reduced the scope of their DSM programs or focused these programs more on customer service and peak-demand reductions and less on improving energy efficiency. This study uses the Oak Ridge Financial Model (ORFIN) to calculate the rate impacts of DSM. The authors use ORFIN to examine the two factors that contribute to DSM`s upward pressure on prices: the cost of the programs themselves and the loss of revenue associated with fixed-cost recovery. This second factor reflects the reduction in revenues caused by the DSM-induced energy and demand savings that exceed the reduction in utility costs. This analysis examines DSM price impacts as functions of the following factors: the DSM program itself (cost, conservation load factor, geographic focus on deferral of transmission and distribution investments, and mix across customer classes); the utility`s cost and pricing structures (factors at least partly under the utility`s control, such as retail tariffs, fixed vs variable operating costs, and capital costs not related to kW or kWh growth); and external economic and regulatory factors (the level and temporal pattern of avoided energy and capacity costs; ratebasing vs expensing of DSM-program costs; shareholder incentives for DSM programs; load growth; and the rates for income, property, and revenue taxes).

Hirst, E.; Hadley, S.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Electric-utility DSM programs: Terminology and reporting formats  

SciTech Connect

The number, scope, effects, and costs of electric-utility demand-site management programs are growing rapidly in the United States. Utilities, their regulators, and energy policy makers need reliable information on the costs of, participation in, and energy and load effects of these programs to make informed decisions. In particular, information is needed on the ability of these programs to cost-effectively provide energy and capacity resources that are alternatives to power plants. This handbook addresses the need for additional and better information in two ways. First, it discusses the key concepts associated with DSM-program types, participation, energy and load effects, and costs. Second, the handbook offers definitions and a sample reporting form for utility DSM programs. The primary purpose in developing these definitions and this form is to encourage consistency in the collection and reporting of data on DSM programs. To ensure that the discussions, reporting formats, and definitions will be useful and used, development of this handbook was managed by a committee, with membership from electric utilities, state regulatory commissions, and the US Department of Energy. Also, this data-collection form was pretested by seven people from six utilities, who completed the form for nine DSM programs.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Sabo, C. (Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Washington, DC (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Building Retrofit and DSM Study in Jiangsu | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NRDC will coordinate Chinese and foreign experts and pay for the project. Demand-Side Management (DSM) refers to utility policies or incentives for customers (residential,...

14

Electric Utility Industrial DSM and M&V Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydros demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Power Smart Partners Program (PSP) is the premier demand-side management program for BC Hydros large commercial and industrial non-transmission class customers. It is a direct energy acquisition program that is based on a partnering approach with BC Hydros business customers. A customer that commits to being a Power Smart Partner gains access to financial support and assistance with the identification and implementation of electricity savings projects. A direct financial incentive is provided to lower customers funding requirements and to improve the payback and/or investment criteria for energy efficiency projects. Projects are evaluated against established criteria set forth by BC Hydro. Projects which prove to be the most cost-effective on a $/kWh basis receive funds. For transmission-voltage customers, BC Hydro has recently implemented a new tariff designed to encourage energy reduction. The new tariff is an inclining block tariff and is known as the Stepped Rate. The customers consumption is compared against their Customer Baseline Load (CBL). The first 90% of the customers consumption is billed at a Tier 1 rate. The remaining consumption is billed at a Tier 2 rate, approximately two times the Tier 1 rate. There are mechanisms in place to adjust the customers CBL to account for activities such as customer-funded demand-side-management projects and customer plant expansion projects. This paper will discuss BC Hydros M&V program in terms of the process, operations and M&V results to date for the PSP. In addition, the paper will discuss the new Stepped Rate tariff intricacies in terms of CBL setting, CBL adjustments and transmission customer Impact Study guideline requirements.

Lau, K. P. K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Electric-utility DSM-program costs and effects, 1991 to 2001  

SciTech Connect

For the past three years (1989, 1990, and 1991), all US electric utilities that sell more than 120 GWh/year have been required to report to the Energy Information Administration data on their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These data provide a rich and uniquely comprehensive picture of electric-utility DSM programs in the United States. Altogether, 890 utilities (of about 3250 in the United States) ran DSM programs in 1991; of these, 439 sold more than 120 GWh and reported details on their DSM programs. These 439 utilities represent more than 80% of total US electricity sales and revenues. Altogether, these utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on DSM programs in 1991, equal to 1.0% of total utility revenues that year. In return for these (and prior-year) expenditures, utility DSM programs cut potential peak demand by 26,700 MW (4.8% of the national total) and cut annual electricity use by 23,300 GWh (0.9% of the national total). These 1991 numbers represent substantial increases over the 1989 and 1990 numbers on utility DSM programs. Specifically, utility DSM expenditures doubled, energy savings increased by almost 50%, and demand reductions increased by one-third between 1989 and 1991. Utilities differed enormously in their DSM-program expenditures and effects. Almost 12% of the reporting utilities spent more than 2% of total revenues on DSM programs in 1991, while almost 60% spent less than 0.5% of revenues on DSM. Utility estimates of future DSM-program expenditures and benefits show continuing growth. By the year 2001, US utilities expect to spend 1.2% of revenues on DSM and to cut demand by 8.8% and annual sales by 2.7%. Here, too, expectations vary by region. Utilities in the West and Northwest plan to spend more than 2% of revenues on DSM that year, while utilities in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Southwest, Central, and North Central regions plan to spend less than 1% of revenues on DSM.

Hirst, E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Building Retrofit and DSM Study in Jiangsu | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization Natural Resources Defense Council Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis, Pathways analysis, Policiesdeployment...

17

Electric-utility DSM programs: 1990 data and forecasts to 2000  

SciTech Connect

In April 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data on 1989 and 1990 electric-utility demand-site management (DMS) programs. These data represent a census of US utility DSM programs, with reports of utility expenditures, energy savings, and load reductions caused by these programs. In addition, EIA published utility estimates of the costs and effects of these programs from 1991 to 2000. These data provide the first comprehensive picture of what utilities are spending and accomplishing by utility, state, and region. This report presents, summarizes, and interprets the 1990 data and the utility forecasts of their DSM-program expenditures and impacts to the year 2000. Only utilities with annual sales greater than 120 GWh were required to report data on their DSM programs to EIA. Of the 1194 such utilities, 363 reported having a DSM program that year. These 363 electric utilities spent $1.2 billion on their DSM programs in 1990, up from $0.9 billion in 1989. Estimates of energy savings (17,100 GWh in 1990 and 14,800 GWh in 1989) and potential reductions in peak demand (24,400 MW in 1990 and about 19,400 MW in 1989) also showed substantial increases. Overall, utility DSM expenditures accounted for 0.7% of total US electric revenues, while the reductions in energy and demand accounted for 0.6% and 4.9% of their respective 1990 national totals. The investor-owned utilities accounted for 70 to 90% of the totals for DSM costs, energy savings, and demand reductions. The public utilities reported larger percentage reductions in peak demand and energy smaller percentage DSM expenditures. These averages hide tremendous variations across utilities. Utility forecasts of DSM expenditures and effects show substantial growth in both absolute and relative terms.

Hirst, E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DSM pocket guidebook  

SciTech Connect

It has been estimated that if electricity were used more efficiently with commercially available end-use technologies, 24%--44% of the nation's current demand for electricity could be eliminated. Almost all major electric utilities in the west are investigated such demand-side management (DSM) opportunities. In some service territories, for example, improved efficiency could soon produce as much power as that from new coal-fired plants and produce it at a lower cost. Even utilities that currently have excess capacity are finding that DSM offers an opportunity to build efficient end-use stock to help them meet their future load shape objectives. Utility DSM programs typically consist of several measures designed to modify the utility's load shape (for example, innovative rate structures, direct utility control of loads, promotion of energy-efficient technologies, and customer education). The coordinated implementation of such measures requires planning, analysis of options, engineering, marketing, monitoring, and other coordination activities. This guidebook addresses one facet of an overall DSM program: selection of end-use technologies within the electrical utilities. This guidebook is intended to be a quick reference source both for utility field representatives in their customer interactions and for utility planners in the early stages of developing a DSM program. Finally, this guidebook is directed primarily at small municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives within the Western Area Power Administration (Western) service area.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity? This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a ``base`` that is typical of US utilities; a ``surplus`` utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a ``deficit`` utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

The effects of utility DSM programs on electricity costs and prices  

SciTech Connect

More and more US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. Should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. This study uses a dynamic model to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios. In these cases, fossil-fuel prices, load growth, the amount of excess capacity the utility has in 1990, planned retirements of power plants, the financial treatment of DSM programs, and the costs of energy- efficient programs vary. These analyses are conducted for three utilities: a base'' that is typical of US utilities; a surplus'' utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit'' utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. 28 refs.

Hirst, E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DSM strikes again. [Demand-side management of gas and electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses and explains demand-side management (DSM) of the gas and electric utility companies. It contrasts the advantages that electric utilities offering economic incentives (with any cost passed on to rate payers) to increase demand while such offerings are rarely available from the gas utilities. It then discusses the cause and cost of pollution from conventional electrical facilities compared to gas-operated equipment and facilities. The paper goes on to discuss fuel switching and other incentives to get individuals and facilities to switch to natural gas.

Katz, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Opt-E-Plus Software for Commercial Building Optimization; Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Commercial Building Optimization Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado...

24

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Title Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response Publication Type...

25

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables? Title Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?...

26

build more efficient electrical grids, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research build more efficient electrical grids, and advance clean energy research and development (R&D). The new action plan also places a greater emphasis on energy efficiency. Accomplishments to date under the CED include: (1) completing the final phase of the Weyburn-Midale Carbon Dioxide Monitoring and Storage Project, which focuses on best practices for the safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2

27

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Electrical System performs the function of receiving, distributing, transforming, monitoring, and controlling AC and DC power to all waste handling building electrical loads. The system distributes normal electrical power to support all loads that are within the Waste Handling Building (WHB). The system also generates and distributes emergency power to support designated emergency loads within the WHB within specified time limits. The system provides the capability to transfer between normal and emergency power. The system provides emergency power via independent and physically separated distribution feeds from the normal supply. The designated emergency electrical equipment will be designed to operate during and after design basis events (DBEs). The system also provides lighting, grounding, and lightning protection for the Waste Handling Building. The system is located in the Waste Handling Building System. The system consists of a diesel generator, power distribution cables, transformers, switch gear, motor controllers, power panel boards, lighting panel boards, lighting equipment, lightning protection equipment, control cabling, and grounding system. Emergency power is generated with a diesel generator located in a QL-2 structure and connected to the QL-2 bus. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System distributes and controls primary power to acceptable industry standards, and with a dependability compatible with waste handling building reliability objectives for non-safety electrical loads. It also generates and distributes emergency power to the designated emergency loads. The Waste Handling Building Electrical System receives power from the Site Electrical Power System. The primary material handling power interfaces include the Carrier/Cask Handling System, Canister Transfer System, Assembly Transfer System, Waste Package Remediation System, and Disposal Container Handling Systems. The system interfaces with the MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System for supervisory monitoring and control signals. The system interfaces with all facility support loads such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, office, fire protection, monitoring and control, safeguards and security, and communications subsystems.

S.C. Khamamkar

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

28

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Division Building / tariffs electricity and gas loads for afeed-in tariff -ZNEB Storage and DR constraints -electricity

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (services to a building microgrid produces technology neutral

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building: An Economic Analysis Using DER-CAM Title Plug in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a small office Building: An...

36

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on retail sales of energy-saving light bulbs. A total of 210sales ban from November 2009. From this date 2009, all light bulbs

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030 . 257 APP countries through the year 2030. Overall, the savingsbe 1.7 thousand TWh or 21% of the 2030 projected base case

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

government agency directed to implement energy efficiency policy,government to develop national standards for 13 residential household appliances in 1978 under the National Energy Policy

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conference on Standby Power, 22 nd and 3 rdperformance, - the e-standby program which is a voluntaryconsumption while in standby. Furthermore, the Ministry of

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state level, different energy efficiency programs involve financial incentives.incentives for the utility to implement energy efficiency programs. About 18 states

McNeil, MIchael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technologies Division Building / tariffs electricityOptions, Tariffs, and Building Analyzed Environmental Energyenergy management more effective stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally results will depend on the considered region and tariff

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Electricity Consumption: The Role of Structure Quality, Management, and Contract Incentives Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager...

43

Building a winning electric utility organization  

SciTech Connect

The key factor that will differentiate the winners and losers is the speed with which they build their skills and enhance their performance focus. Setting the {open_quote}right{close_quote} aspirations, then effectively managing the change process, will be critical for winning power companies. Historically, only certain dimensions of organizational performance have been critical to an electric utility`s financial success. As a result, utilities understandably focused on achieving high levels of customer satisfaction and reliability, excellent regulatory relationships, and safe and environmentally acceptable operations. However, as the power industry undergoes fundamental change, obtaining superior organizational performance will become much more crucial and difficult. Given the importance of meeting these organizational challenges head on, the authors believe CEOs can only address them by taking an important step back from day-to-day activities to define what high performance really means in the future competitive world and what steps should be taken to achieve their aspirations. To facilitate this rethink - which senior managers should view as a multiyear process - utilities need to do three things in an iterative way: (1) energize the transformation with the right performance aspirations. (2) Tailor a coherent change program to the company`s unique starting position. (3) Manage the change process to build a skill-based and performance-focused organization.

Farha, G.; Silverman, L. [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Washington, DC (United States); Keough, K. [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measuring Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leading the effort to decipher MELs impacts on buildings Understanding and reducing the energy use of MELs is a significant problem. The buildings industry is working towards...

45

ElectricStorageinCaliforniasCommercialBuildings_cover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it as EMS emulator and the building can use the mobile storage and stationary storage for tariff-driven demand response. By using EVs connected to the buildings for energy...

46

Office Buildings: Market Analysis for Electricity Service Providers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office buildings nationwide account for the greatest floor space and energy use of all commercial building types. To best serve and retain the loyalty of this important market, electric utilities need to understand the energy uses, priorities, and decision-making approaches of commercial building managers. This report assesses the office building energy market to provide a basic reference for utility program planners, marketing managers, and field representatives.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid Building a 21st Century Electric Grid June 7, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Photo courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Nancy Sutley Chair, White House Council on Environmental Quality Sally Jewell Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior Tom Vilsack Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture Editor's note: This article has been cross-posted from WhiteHouse.gov. As part of President Obama's initiative to make America a magnet for jobs by building a 21st century infrastructure, today he signed a Presidential Memorandum that will speed the modernization of the nation's electric grid. This will help make electricity more reliable, save consumers money

49

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cymap Electrical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for building loads and regulation compliance. Low-voltage wiring design from the transformer through to final circuits with LVHV discrimination capabilities. Can export small...

50

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

complexity of the DER interactions at buildings also show that a reduction in stationary battery costs increases the local PV adoption, but can also increase the fossil based...

51

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact:...

52

File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial PV Systems NREL 2012.pdf...

53

Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous orRetro...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning Title Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning Publication Type...

55

Electric Forklift Conversion Transforms Building Products Manufacturer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last six years, market acceptance of electric lift trucks has steadily increased. Advances in motor drive, battery, and charger technology have dramatically improved equipment performance and utility, and therefore industry acceptance even in demanding multi-shift operations. Roughly 64% of the total North American forklift market and more than 70% of the European Union lift truck market is now electric. For many applications, electric lift trucks offer equal or superior performance ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analysis of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency and load-managed electric cooling and water heating technologies often provide a better rate of return for commercial building owners, with lower capital outlay and lower technical risk than cogeneration. Commercially available equipment typical of these electric technologies include high-efficiency chillers, thermal energy storage, heat recovery chillers, heat recovery heat pumps, and heat pump water heaters.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Energy Efficiency Indicators for High Electric-Load Buildings Speaker(s): Bernard Aebischer Date: February 6, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indictor for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed. Prerequisites in order to be able to use these indicators in energy efficiency programmes are discussed. The opportunity of an internationally coordinated research activity is also presented. Since 1999, Dr. Bernard Aebischer has served as a senior scientist at CEPE (Centre for Energy Policy and Economics) of the Swiss Federal Institutes of

58

The DSM debate  

SciTech Connect

As efficiency and conservation measures gain favor in energy resource planning, the independent power producers industry considers a host of issues related to demand side management (DSM) implementation. An increasing number of state regulators consider DSM preferable to new generation, both on economic and environmental grounds.

Hocker, C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration Distributed Energy Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consulting Services, LLC; Brett Oakleaf, Xcel Energy; Kenneth Wolf, Minnesota Public Utilities CommissionElectricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration Center Distributed Energy Publications 2005 for a single phase high frequency AC microgrid, S. Chakraborty, M.D. Weiss and M.G. Simoes, IEEE Transaction

60

Economics of Electric Alternatives to Cogeneration in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency electrical equipment often offers commercial building owners a higher rate of return than cogeneration, with much lower technical and financial risks. The rate of return for cogeneration systems proved much lower when using high-efficiency equipment rather than conventional equipment as the baseline in analyzing cogeneration economics.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

Erin Boedecker

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

62

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Building and Operating Electric Power Plants in the Upper Colorado requires a life cycle perspective. This paper compares greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from three renewable, and natural gas power plants is estimated for four time periods after construction. The assessment

Kammen, Daniel M.

63

Summary of California DSM impact evaluation studies  

SciTech Connect

Over the past several years, four of the largest investor-owned California utilities have completed more than 50 evaluation studies designed to measure the energy and demand impacts of their demand-side management (DSM) programs. These four are: Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E), Southern California Edison (SCE), Southern California Gas (SoCalGas), and San diego Gas and Electric (SDG and E). These studies covered residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural DSM programs and provided a wealth of information on program impacts. The objective of this report is to summarize the results of these DSM evaluation studies in order to describe what DSM has achieved in California, to assess how well these achievements were forecast, and to compare the effectiveness of different types of DSM programs. This report documents the sizable investment made by the California utilities in their 1990--92 DSM programs. Between 1990 and 1992, the four utilities spent $772 million on energy-efficiency/conservation programs. This report also summarizes the realization rates estimated by the 50+ evaluation studies. Realization rates are defined as ex-post net savings estimates divided by ex-ante net savings estimates. Realization rates are summarized for 158 programs and program segments.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Camp Discovery Helps Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy on AddThis.com... Feb. 5, 2011 Camp Discovery Helps Kids Build an Electric Dune Buggy

65

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM Title Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An...

66

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables? Michael, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement and partly by NEC Laboratories America Inc. Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer

67

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 System Architecture 3.1 Building as a2.1 Energy Flows in Buildings . . . . . . . . 2.1.1 Electric2.3.2 Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Building Energy

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR WASTE HANDLING BUILDING ELECTRICAL SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) waste handling building electrical system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P, ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

S.E. Salzman

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Proceedings: International Workshop on Innovative DSM [Demand Side Management] Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand-side management (DSM) is becoming more important in the utility environment characterized by increasing competition and major uncertainties in demand and supply. EPRI and CIGRE, a leading international organization for the electric power industry, cosponsored this workshop to discuss strategies for designing and implementing DSM programs.

None

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Connecting Your Solar Electric System to the Utility Grid: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the number of solar-powered homes connected to the local utility grid has increased dramatically. These''grid-connected'' buildings have solar electric panels or''modules'' that provide some or even most of their power, while still being connected to the local utility. This fact sheet provides information on connecting your solar electric system to the utility grid, including information on net metering.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outline of this presentation is: (1) global concept of microgrid and electric vehicle (EV) modeling; (2) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (3) presentation summary - how does the number of EVs connected to the building change with different optimization goals (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (3) ongoing EV modeling for California: the California commercial end-use survey (CEUS) database, objective: 138 different typical building - EV connections and benefits; (4) detailed analysis for healthcare facility: optimal EV connection at a healthcare facility in southern California; and (5) conclusions. Conclusions are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions. Why? Stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff - final work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Mendes, Goncalo; Marnay, Chris; M& #233; gel, Olivier; Lai, Judy

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Positioning the electric utility to build information infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

In two particular respects (briefly investigated in this study from a lawyer`s perspective), electric utilities appear uniquely well-positioned to contribute to the National Information Infrastructure (NII). First of all, utilities have legal powers derived from their charters and operating authorities, confirmed in their rights-of-way, to carry out activities and functions necessary for delivering electric service. These activities and functions include building telecommunications facilities and undertaking information services that have become essential to managing electricity demand and supply. The economic value of the efficiencies made possible by telecommunications and information could be substantial. How great remains to be established, but by many estimates electric utility applications could fund a significant share of the capital costs of building the NII. Though utilities` legal powers to pursue such efficiencies through telecommunications and information appear beyond dispute, it is likely that the effort to do so will produce substantial excess capacity. Who will benefit from this excess capacity is a potentially contentious political question that demands early resolution. Will this windfall go to the utility, the customer, or no one (because of political paralysis), or will there be some equitable and practical split? A second aspect of inquiry here points to another contemporary issue of very great societal importance that could very well become the platform on which the first question can be resolved fortuitously-how to achieve universal telecommunications service. In the effort to fashion the NII that will now continue, ways and means to maximize the unique potential contribution of electric utilities to meeting important social and economic needs--in particular, universal service--merit priority attention.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Non-Intrusive Electric Load Monitoring in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased interest in optimal control, energy scorekeeping and fault detection for HVAC equipment in commercial buildings has focused attention on instrumentation required to obtain the desired data. In this paper we investigate what can be learned from measurements of electrical power at a single point, that of the electrical service for the entire HVAC system. This low-cost measurement has proved in field tests to be capable of detecting the power change when a piece of equipment turns on or off; detecting oscillating equipment power caused by poorly tuned controllers; and detecting suboptimal staging of multiple chillers. Detection of equipment start and stop transitions was strengthened by application of a nonlinear filter that determines the point of median power from a filtering window of user-selected width. A review of electric motor literature indicated that samples of electrical current taken at slightly faster than twice the 60 Hz fundamental can be used to detect several indicators of incipient motor failure. Tests were initiated to determine whether this technique can be applied to a number of motors on the same circuit.

Norford, L. K.; Mabey, N.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Deliveryfor meeting building electricity and heat requirementswas funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Technologies Division Building / tariffs electricityOptions, Tariffs, and Building Analyzed Environmental Energyenergy management more effective stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally results will depend on the considered region and tariff

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Transmission and Grid Integration: Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Transmission and Grid Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM Ilan Momber, Toms Gmez, Giri Venkataramanan, Michael Stadler, Sebastian...

79

Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

Not Available

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal Systems Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Thermal Systems Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Gonalocommercial building microgrids *) Michael Stadler GonaloSVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageaverage seasonal and annual electricity prices by region inbased annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Averageseasonal and annual electricity prices by region in c/kWh.based annual average electricity price vs. annual energy

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers. Here we use the electricity bill survey data fromcalculate a customer electricity bill requires two sets ofsame region. Monthly electricity bill data is available for

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

PCBs may spell trouble for utility DSM  

SciTech Connect

Utilities that promote lighting retrofit programs as part of a demand-side management (DSM) program any run into trouble disposing of lighting system ballasts. That's because ballast made before 1979 used polychlorinated biphenyls-better know as PCBs-as dielectric fluids in their capacitors. Because PCBs were found to be toxic, federal regulations banned their use in manufacturing after 1979. With the typical life of a lighting system ballast ranging between 10 to 25 years, many PCB-containing ballasts are ready for replacement. What's more, the growth of electric utility DSM programs over the past decade has accelerated the replacement of ballasts containing PCBs. The result is that large quantities of such ballasts are being discarded at a rate greater than if disposal were the result of ballast burnout of failure alone. Federal regulations banning PCB production also require the cleanup and disposal of existing PCB materials. The process of removing existing low-efficiency ballasts as part of DSM program is complicated by a variety of special handling, labeling, transportation, and disposal requirements and options. Of course, these complications and their associated costs affect the economics of DSM lighting retrofit programs.

Manwell, S.; Epstein, G.

1993-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

87

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand side management (DSM) activities in the electric power industry. The report presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a ...

89

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings x) in nine climate zones x) hospitals, colleges,in nine different climate zones and three major utility

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

91

Application of DSM evaluation studies to utility forecasting and planning  

SciTech Connect

Utilities and their customers have made substantial investments in utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. These DSM programs also represent a substantial electricity resource. DSM program performance has been studied more systematically in recent years than over any previous period. DSM program evaluations are traditionally targeted to meet the program manager`s need for information on program costs and performance and, more recently, to verify savings to regulators for incentive awards and lost revenue recovery. Yet evaluations may also be used to produce results relevant to utility forecasting and planning. Applying evaluation results is especially important for utilities with substantial current and future commitments to acquiring demand-side resources. This report discusses the application of evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The report has three objectives. First, we identify what demand forecasters, DSM forecasters, and resource planners want to learn from evaluations. Second, we identify and describe the major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results and illustrate many of these issues through a specific evaluation application exercise. Finally, we suggest approaches for addressing these major problems. The report summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The report also includes results from case studies of Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Southern California Edison Company, utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts. Finally, we draw on a specific application exercise in which we used a set of impact evaluations to revise a utility DSM forecast.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of electricity consumption profiles in public buildings with dimensionality reduction techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the daily electricity consumption profile of a building and its correlation with environmental factors makes it possible to examine and estimate its electricity demand. As an alternative to the traditional correlation analysis, a new ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Electricity consumption profiles, Energy efficiency, Information visualization

Antonio MorN, Juan J. Fuertes, Miguel A. Prada, SerafN Alonso, Pablo Barrientos, Ignacio DAz, Manuel DomNguez

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

DSM Load Growth Through Electrotechnology Application Assistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper will discuss how a new "win-win" approach is emerging that improves both customer competitiveness and utility energy sales as both DSM and the utility's relationship with its customers mature. While most DSM resources have been invested in conservation efforts, the efficient load building aspects must no longer be ignored. As DSM "returns to its roots," electrotechnology applications assistance programs are beginning to provide measured results that are a key part of utility efforts to manage demand. Several innovative electrotechnology application programs exist but most share a combination of the following key attributes: 1) Immediate results-oriented electrotechnology applications assistance and implementation is provided to key customers, 2) Market research is conducted on a broad category of customers to determine appropriate electrotechnology applications and assistance, 3) An advertising and promotional campaign development/ implementation plan is created, 4) Technology transfer training is provided for customers and utility staff, and 5) An assessment is made for the development of a regional technology application center.

Merchant, D. G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Building The last mile'  

SciTech Connect

Utilities may want to leverage the multibillion-dollar investment cable television is about to make. Virtually every utility has corporate objectives to focus more on the customer and change the way the customer is viewed. Utility supply strategy has been shifting away from building large, expensive power plants to making smaller investments with flexible options that can be adjusted to suit future conditions. This strategy is requisite to helping utilities keep and build their share of the market. One result is that utilities and regulators have adopted the concept of demand-side management (DSM) with enthusiasm. What's more, the last 10 years have brought new utility initiatives to explore customer value-oriented pricing structures that recognize the varying cost of production. These DSM opportunities and pricing initiatives require utilities to communicate with customers and help them manage their electricity use. New DSM programs that rely on communications technology include: (1) Providing real-time price signals for electricity-and eventually gas and water; (2) Implementing a direct- or shared-load control program for peak clipping or valley filling by interacting with properly equipped smart appliances; (3) Providing beyond-the-meter value-added services for residential customers, such as weather monitoring, video communications, home comfort automation, appliance monitoring and diagnostics, and energy efficiency tips; and (4) Obtaining detailed data on customers' electricity use patterns to develop new DSM programs. One action by the utility industry will determine whether this strategic vision is achieved: the establishment of a two-way, user-friendly, voice, data, and video communication path to the customer from the utility.

Gupta, P.C.; Bringenberg, J.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: All Buildings. 167: 481: 436: 88: 1,340: 24: 381: 69: 156: 418: 3,559: ... "Commercial ...

96

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present methods for analyzing commercial and industrial facility 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building managers to better understand their facility's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to ask the right questions to discover opportunities for demand response, energy efficiency, electricity waste elimination, and peak load management. We primarily focus on demand response. Methods discussed include graphical representations of electric load data, a regression-based electricity load model that uses a time-of-week indicator variable and a piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence, and the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads and demand response behavior. In the future, these methods could be translated into easy-to-use tools for building managers.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings across the country. As photovoltaic systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Wholesale Market Edison Electric Institute, ElectricCo Southern California Edison Co State NC FL FL GA GA GA WVCode Company Name Boston Edison Co Central Vermont Pub Serv

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Monitoring of Electrical End-Use Loads in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern California Edison is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings, distributed among these five types. The buildings selected have average demands of 100 to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration. plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. For example, the Load Profile Viewer is a PC-based software program for reviewing and validating the end-use load data.

Martinez, M.; Alereza, T.; Mort, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.2 E?ective Marginal Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Demand Prices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Calculation of Electricity Prices 4.1 Average

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tariff-based analysis of commercial building electricity prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity prices developed for residential AC were criticized by a number of stakeholders, who argued that retail rates

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Rosenquist, Greg J.; Van Buskirk, Robert D.; McMahon, James E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

International DSM and DSM program evaluation: An INDEEP assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the current level of demand-side management (DSM) occurring in selected European countries and reviews the availability of information on DSM programs and program evaluation. Next, thirteen European DSM programs are compared by examining such factors as: motivations for program implementation, marketing methods, participation rates, total energy savings, and program costs. The transfer of DSM program results and experiences found in these case studies is also discussed, as well as the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of these programs. This paper represents a preliminary assessment of the state of DSM and DSM program evaluation in Europe. The findings from this work also represent the first steps in a joint international effort to compile and analyze the measured results of energy efficiency programs in a consistent and comprehensive fashion. The authors find that these programs represent cost-effective resources: the cost of energy saved by the programs ranged from a low of 0.0005 ECUs/kWh (0.01 {cents}/kWh) to a high of 0.077 ECUs/kWh (9.7 {cents}/kWh), with an average cost of 0.027 ECUs/kWh (3.3 {cents}/kWh). Weighted by energy savings, the average cost of energy saved by the programs was 0.014 ECUs/kWh (1.8 {cents}/kWh).

Vine, E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables) improves the accuracy of regression models of electric load. 4) A piecewise linear and continuous outdoor air temperature dependence can be derived without the use of a change-point model (which would add complexity to the modeling algorithm) or assumptions about when structural changes occur (which could introduce inaccuracy). 5) A model that includes time-of-week and temperature dependence can be used for weather normalization and can determine whether the building is unusually temperature-sensitive, which can indicate problems with HVAC operation.

Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Monitoring of electrical end-use loads in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A California utility is currently conducting a program to collect end-use metered data from commercial buildings in its service area. The data will provide actual measurements of end-use loads and will be used in research and in designing energy management programs oriented toward end-use applications. The focus of the program is on five major types of commercial buildings: offices, grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, and warehouses. End-use metering equipment is installed at about 50 buildings selected have average demands of 100kW to 300 kW. The metered end-uses vary among building types and include HVAC, lighting, refrigeration, plug loads, and cooking. Procedures have been custom-designed to facilitate collection and validation of the end-use load data. PC-based software programs have been developed for reviewing and validating the end-sue load data and for generating reports.

Martinez, M. (Southern California Edison, CA (US)); Alereza, T.; Mort, D. (ADM Associates, Sacramento, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Price and cost impacts of utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. In particular, should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity Most of the debates about the appropriate economic tests to use in assessing utility programs do not address the magnitude of the impacts. As a result, questions remain about the relationships among utility DSM programs and acquisition of supply resources and the effects of these choices on electricity prices and costs. This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. A dynamic model is used to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios for three utilities: a base that is typical of US utilities; a surplus utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. Model results show that DSM programs generally reduce electricity costs and increase electricity prices. However, the percentage reduction in costs is usually greater than the percentage increase in prices. On the other hand, most of the cost benefits of DSM programs can be obtained without raising electricity prices.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar electric buildings: An overview of today`s applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure presents a broad look at photovoltaic-powered buildings. It includes residential and commercial systems, both stand-alone and connected to utility power, that are located in urban, near-urban, and rural settings around the world. As photovoltaic (PV) technology continues to improve and costs drop, opportunities for PV will multiply. PV systems for buildings, such as those shown here, represent one of the strongest near-term markets.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

108

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle Kids at Camp Discovery Bond Over Building Electric Vehicle August 13, 2010 - 11:30am Addthis Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Campers at Camp Discovery put the finishing touches on a newly assembled electric vehicle they built to learn more about EV technology while sharing their experiences with battling cancer. | Photo courtesy of Craig Egan Joshua DeLung Each year, about 150 kids gather during the summer at Camp Discovery in Kerrville, Texas, to learn new things and have fun. But this isn't an ordinary summer camp - the attendees, ages seven to 16, all have been

109

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building has a peak electricity demand of 373 kW, and yearlyWinter (Nov. Apr. ) )Electricity electricity demandelectricity demand (US$/kWh) (US$/kW) (US$/kWh) (US $/kW)

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010,...

111

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation Jul 2010, Minneapolis MNis MN 1 Abstract--It is generally believed that plug-in electric vehicles

112

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Re DSM: Here comes demand-side marketing  

SciTech Connect

Demand-side management (DSM) programs where utilities pay large rebates for energy efficient equipment are being declared dead. The popular view of DSM in the past was to encourage conservation of energy with significant rebates, credits and other incentives offered by electric and also natural gas utilities. After years of increase in utility DSM expenditures, the first decline took place last year of about 6% for the electric industry. Although still spending more than $2 billion in 1994, utilities have continued this year to reduce the number of DSM programs. For some utilities there has been a dramatic abandonment of energy efficiency incentive programs. Where programs remain, utilities are placing increased emphasis on the most cost-effective ones which are usually directed toward commercial and industrial facilities. At the same time utilities have been transforming their programs from demand-side management to demand-side marketing. The objectives have shifted to retaining existing customers, developing new accounts, and increasing profitable sales. Incentives are justified in this new cost-driven competitive environment when they result in decreased rates for all customers. Whereas, in the past, DSM program participants were the primary beneficiaries with reduced bills, in the new marketing environment all customers can benefit from reduced bills.

Barrett, L.B. [Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Innovative Control of Electric Heat in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the application of web-based wireless technology for control of electric heating in a large multifamily housing complex. The control system architecture and components are described. A web-based application enables remote monitoring of temperature, electric usage and control of peak demand through a temperature-based duty-cycling algorithm developed specifically for the application. Installed costs and energy savings are discussed. A 16% energy-use reduction was confirmed through the first heating season of operation. The response of occupants and management to changes in temperature regime has been a critical aspect of system start-up and commissioning.

Lempereur, D.; Bobker, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Energy and economic efficiency alternatives for electric lighting in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates current efficient alternatives for replacing or supplementing electric lighting systems in commercial buildings. Criteria for establishing the economic attractiveness of various lighting alternatives are defined and the effect of future changes in building lighting on utility capacity. The report focuses on the energy savings potential, economic efficiency, and energy demand reduction of three categories of lighting alternatives: (1) use of a renewable resource (daylighting) to replace or supplement electric lighting; (2) use of task/ambient lighting in lieu of overhead task lighting; and (3) equipment changes to improve lighting energy efficiency. The results indicate that all three categories offer opportunities to reduce lighting energy use in commercial buildings. Further, reducing lighting energy causes a reduction in cooling energy use and cooling capacity while increasing heating energy use. It does not typically increase heating capacity because the use of lighting in the building does not offset the need for peak heating at night.

Robbins, C.L.; Hunter K.C.; Carlisle, N.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Advancing Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the research the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting to achieve net-zero energy buildings (NZEBs). It also includes key definitions of NZEBs and inforamtion about an NZEB database that captures information about projects around the world.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and gas load profiles based on the Californiamatches the building load profile, the shaving potentialclosely follow the load profile, and therefore, PV panels

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

119

The role of DSM in a competitive market  

SciTech Connect

The author appreciates the opportunity to participate in this NARUC conference and to offer some thoughts on the implications for demand side management (DSM) resulting from increased competition in the electricity and gas businesses. The dominant theme of almost every professional conference in both gas and electricity is that the markets are becoming increasingly competitive and furthermore that increased competition benefits customers and affords opportunities to providers of energy services. However, only part of the effects of increased competition occur through utility DSM programs. A competitive marketplace for electricity and gas would indeed have an effect on utility conservation programs and on utility customers. The following are some of the implications of a competitive market. My presentation is an explanation and defense of these five propositions. (1) Economic efficiency will be enhanced - which increases the level of economic well being of customers and increases the productivity of the U. S. economy. (2) Energy efficiency will decrease, which may also increase our level of economic well-being and economic productivity. (3) Some DSM conservation programs will end, because they fail to pass the market test of competition. Those DSM programs that contribute to the efficient use of energy resources will prosper under competition. (4) The economic well-being of lower and middle income customers will be enhanced, first, by abolishing the DSM based subsidies to high income customers and second by pricing separately the reliability of electric services. (5) Policy goals will have to be justified on their merits - which is the worst fear of some, but the best outcome as viewed by others.

Sutherland, R.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Abstract--We present new approaches for building yearly and seasonal models for 5-minute ahead electricity load  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity load forecasting. They are evaluated using two full years of Australian electricity load data. We first analyze the cyclic nature of the electricity load and show that the autocorrelation function to building a single yearly model. I. INTRODUCTION PREDICTING the future electricity demand, also called

Koprinska, Irena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

122

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electricity-use Feedback in the Commercial Sector: Examining the Potential for Building Occupant Behavior Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedback technologies to encourage behavior change have been explored in the residential sector for the past three decades, but the savings potential of using feedback strategies in the commercial sector, which represents over one quarter of US electricity sales, has yet to be adequately explored. Although a number of building load control technologies that include some form of feedback provision have existed for some years, they generally target technical staff. The focus of this report is to understand...

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility's gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this non-traditional'' market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs  

SciTech Connect

Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

Hirst, E.; Reed, J. [eds.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Title Review of Self-direct Demand Side Management (DSM) Programs Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2012 Authors Borgeson, Merrian Keywords demand side resources: policy, electricity markets, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, self direct programs, technical assistance Full Text LBNL recently provided technical assistance funded by DOE to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio to inform their decision-making about changes to their existing self-direct program for commercial and industrial customers. Self-direct programs are usually targeted at large industrial customers with specialized needs or strong in-house energy engineering capacity. These programs are found in at least 24 states, and there is significant variety in how these programs are structured - with important implications for the additionality and reliability of the energy savings that result. LBNL reviewed existing programs and compared key elements of self-direct program design. For additional questions about this work, please contact Merrian Borgeson.

127

Evaluating the DSM Potential for Industrial Electrotechnologies and Management Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to help balance load requirements and generating capacity, Houston Lighting & Power Company (HL&P) contracted with SRI International (SRI) to identify existing and emerging electrotechnologies and management practices (technologies) for possible inclusion in an industrial demand side management (DSM) program. This paper outlines the procedures used to evaluate technologies that may impact oil refining, pulp & paper production, and 26 major chemical processes of industrial customers within HL&P's service area. Each technology was reviewed with regard to its electricity requirements and applicability to various industries. In addition, each technology's basic principles, existing industrial applications, possible new applications, product or process limitations, and representative economics were investigated. Where applicable, concerns other than economic attractiveness such as environmental issues, worker safety, and product quality were identified. Additional information was also obtained from preliminary efforts to project the commercial penetration of each of these technologies. Factors affecting commercial penetration include the existing level of market penetration, fuel prices, electricity prices, capital investment requirements, perceived risk, and internal hurdles rates for investment. In order to fully determine which of these technologies should be included in an industrial DSM program, various HL&P industrial customers were interviewed with regard to their knowledge and/or acceptance levels of selected electrotechnologies and management practices. This enabled HL&P to better understand the specific needs of industrial customers within their service area. This survey data, along with the information provided by SRI and other sources, formed the basis for initial selection of technologies to include in an industrial DSM program. The value of encouraging HL&P's industrial customers to use any of these technologies will be compared to DSM programs for other customer classes, as well as more traditional generating resource options, before the final selection of electrotechnologies and management practices is made.

Harrell, P. J.; Pavone, A.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

129

Data Visualization for Quality-Check Purposes of Monitored Electricity Consumption in All Office Buildings in the ESL Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report comprises an effort to visualize the monitored electricity consumption in all office buildings (not including the office buildings comprising other functions as classrooms and laboratories, for instance) in the ESL database. This data visualization, basically long-term and short-term time series plots serves as a preliminary quality check of the data available. A preliminary inspection of the data was performed, by viewing the channels to provide a clear identification of creep, missing data gaps, turned-off periods, and sudden big changes that suggest changes in the building operation or an addition to the building.

Sreshthaputra, A.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Strategy for Designing DSM Program after the Restructuring in Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To maintain supply adequacy and mitigate price volatility in electricity market, the necessity for obtaining demandside resource is increasing and obtaining demand-side resource is set as a priority of electricity policy. For this purpose, we introduce a new DSM mechanism and program development strategies based on customer response and electricity industry efficiency. Especially we introduced DLC(Direct Load Control) technology via two-way communication scheme for large customer. This DLC program targets interruptible load that covers large customer in commercial and industrial sector. This program can retain demand reserve that does not interrupt process in plant or business along with real-time monitoring load condition of end-use and interrupt load by pre-determined procedures, if necessary. This analysis shows that electricity boiler, pump, blower, HVAC can save energy during some time. In addition, developing system to monitor end-use load and interconnecting it with MOS(Market Operation System) should be established as infrastructure in DSM.

Rhee, C.; Lee, K.; Jo, I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MEMORANDUM TO: SPSC DSM WORK GROUP PARTICIPANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPSCs 20-year High DSM/DG study case is intended to be based on a load forecast that reflects significantly higher energy efficiency levels than in the reference case. LBNL and Itron have developed a preliminary SPSC High DSM load forecast using Itrons statistically adjusted enduse (SAE) load forecasting framework, which allows the specification of end use efficiency levels for 30 individual residential and commercial end-use categories. The stock efficiency levels selected for the High DSM/DG case are intended to represent the highest efficiency levels that are commercially available today. Accompanying this memorandum are two Excel workbooks containing the residential and commercial stock efficiency assumptions proposed for the High DSM case. We are seeking feedback from SPSC DSM Work Group participants on whether the stock efficiency assumptions in those workbooks are appropriate (i.e., reflective of the highest efficiency levels commercially available today). Please focus your attention, in particular, on the information contained in Columns F and H in each of the state-labeled worksheets, which identify the proposed average stock efficiency levels for the High DSM case and the corresponding energy savings relative to

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Actual vs anticipated savings from DSM programs: An assessment of the California experience  

SciTech Connect

Since the late 1980`s, utilities in California have used demand-side management (DSM) extensively to achieve a variety of corporate and public policy goals. This commitment to ene efficiency was encouraged by the establishment of financial incentives for the utilities to acquire demand-side resources. With restructuring of electric and gas markets underway in California, including recent cutbacks by the California utilities in their DSM program efforts, it is timely to review retrospectively the accomplishments of California`s DSM investments. This paper summarizes the results of 50 evaluation studies that assess California DSM programs operating between 1990 and 1992. On average, the programs delivered 112% of the energy savings that were planned, and the typical program realized approximately 86% of the energy savings it was expected to deliver. Thus, the California DSM programs outperformed DSM programs from the 1980s, in terms of more accurately forecasting energy impacts. Among the 50 impact studies, lower realization rates are associated with residential-sector programs, relatively high ex-ante estimates of savings, and significant levels of free ridership.

Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Mihlmester, P.E. [Aspen Systems Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

Belzer, David B.

2004-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs. [Demand-Side Management (DSM)  

SciTech Connect

Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility's portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to triangulate'' an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

Hirst, E.; Reed, J. (eds.); Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Towards A Design Environment For Buildingintegrated Energy Systems: The Integration Of Electrical Power Flow Modelling With Building Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................................... xi Chapter 1 - Buildings Energy and Environment ..................................................................... 1 1.1 Energy Use within Buildings............................................................................................1 1.1.1 Environmental Implications.......................................................................................2 1.1.2 Economic Implications ..............................................................................................3 1.2 The Means of Reducing Energy Consumption..................................................................4 1.2.1 Energy End-Use Reduction........................................................................................4 1.2.2 Reducing High-Grade Energy Usage .........................................................................5 1.2.3 Electrical Energy Displa...

Nicolas James Kelly; Building Simulation; Nicolas James; Kelly B. Eng; M. Sc

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Pricesand Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Utility DSM Programs from 1989 through 1998: Continuation or cross roads?  

SciTech Connect

Over the past five years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has been collecting data annually from U.S. electric utilities on their demand-side management (DSM) programs, both current and projected. The latest data cover activities for 1993 and projections for 1994 and 1998. In 1993, 991 utilities operated DSM programs. That year, they spent $2.8 billion, a 13% increase over 1992 expenditures. These and earlier DSM programs saved 44,000 GWh of energy and reduced potential peak demand by 40,000 MW, 30% and 22% increases over the 1992 values, respectively. While some people predict the demise of electric-utility DSM programs, the data do not paint so bleak a picture. In most parts of the country, DSM programs grew in 1993 and utilities (as of Spring 1994) projected continued growth through 1998. Expenditures grew from 1.3% of revenues in 1992 to 1.5% in 1993, and are expected to grow 2.5% per year faster than inflation, which is equivalent to revenue growth. Thus, DSM spending is expected to stay constant at 1.5% of revenues through 1998. Because of the cumulative effect of DSM programs, energy savings are expected to grow from 1.2% of sales in 1992 to 1.6% in 1993 and 3.0% in 1998. Potential-peak reductions are expected to increase from 5.9% of peak demand in 1992 to 6.8% in 1993 and 8.9% in 1998. However, the growth in spending is not as rapid as the 8% annual real growth projected a year earlier. Actual expenditures in 1993 were 6.5% lower than projected early that year. Energy savings, on the other hand, were the same as projected earlier. Potential peak reductions were actually 9% higher than previously projected.

Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build- ings, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,modeling, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120, p.

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that growth in electricity demand in developed countriesof displacement of electricity demand by heat- activatedmeets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Jonathan Koomey* andData to Improve Electricity Demand ForecastsFinal Report.further research. Electricity demand varies constantly. At

Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Investigation and Analysis of Energy Consumption and Cost of Electric Air Conditioning Systems in Civil Buildings in Changsha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigated 40 typical air conditioned buildings in Changsha in 2005, including 15 hotel buildings, 6 commercial buildings, 5 office buildings, 6 hospital buildings and 8 synthesis buildings. On this basis we analyze the relation between types of cold and heat sources and the HVAC area of the buildings. Meanwhile the economical and feasible types of cold and heat sources are pointed out, i.e., oil boilers and gas boilers for heat source, and centrifugal and screw water chillers for cold source based on the electric refrigeration. Among the heat sources, the prospect of gas boilers is better. In addition, the air source heat pump depends heavily on whether some crucial issues such as frost can be solved during its application. The water-source heat pump will likely be applied. Based on the analysis of energy consumption and energy bills, we determine the feasible measures for energy conservation including the aspects of design, operation and management. Among them, special attention should be paid to energy metering and running time of air conditioning systems in civil buildings in Changsha.

Xie, D.; Chen, J.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, Q.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

BRENNAN --DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRENNAN -- DSM UNDER COMPETITION: 1 Demand-Side Management Programs Under Retail Electricity · An automotive analogy Not marketing of fuel-efficient cars Not exactly CAFE standards or EPA mileage stickers More like getting a check from oil companies if one buys a high mileage car · Conservation

California at Berkeley. University of

147

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% | 9.03 1990 | 65.0% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 9.26 1991 | 65.6% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 9.42 1992 | 64.6% 35.2% 0.2% 100% | 9.43 1993 | 65.7% 34.1% 0.2% 100% | 9.76 1994 | 65.5% 34.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.01 1995 | 66.2% 33.6% 0.2% 100% | 10.28 1996 | 66.5% 33.3% 0.2% 100% | 10.58 1997 | 66.8% 33.0% 0.2% 100% | 10.73 1998 | 67.6% 32.2% 0.2% 100% | 11.14 1999 | 67.9% 32.0% 0.2% 100% | 11.30 2000 | 68.7% 31.1% 0.2% 100% | 11.67 2001 | 70.5% 29.4% 0.2% 100% |

148

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today's state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Research opportunities to improve DSM impact estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was commissioned by the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) as part of its research mission to advance the energy efficiency and productivity of all end-use sectors in California. Our specific goal in this effort has been to identify viable research and development (R&D) opportunities that can improve capabilities to determine the energy-use and demand reductions achieved through demand-side management (DSM) programs and measures. We surveyed numerous practitioners in California and elsewhere to identify the major obstacles to effective impact evaluation, drawing on their collective experience. As a separate effort, we have also profiled the status of regulatory practices in leading states with respect to DSM impact evaluation. We have synthesized this information, adding our own perspective and experience to those of our survey-respondent colleagues, to characterize today`s state of the art in impact-evaluation practices. This scoping study takes a comprehensive look at the problems and issues involved in DSM impact estimates at the customer-facility or site level. The major portion of our study investigates three broad topic areas of interest to CIEE: Data analysis issues, field-monitoring issues, issues in evaluating DSM measures. Across these three topic areas, we have identified 22 potential R&D opportunities, to which we have assigned priority levels. These R&D opportunities are listed by topic area and priority.

Misuriello, H.; Hopkins, M.E.F. [Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Designing Industrial DSM Programs that Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many reasons why industrial customers do not implement all cost-effective efficiency measures on their own. Utility demand side management (DSM) programs can help overcome some of these barriers. DSM programs provide an opportunity for utilities to reduce the cost of providing energy services while helping customers to reduce their energy bills and thereby increase profit margins and competitiveness. A review of utility experience with industrial DSM programs shows that some types of programs work much better than other types. Successful efforts include both custom and prescriptive components that show an understanding of the customers perspective, use marketing that is personal and user-friendly, provide flexibility, and include financial incentives. Among the less successful programs are programs that do not address customer needs, including information-only, loan, and shared savings programs. A number of other program approaches are largely untested and merit further experimentation. Based on these findings, we recommend that utilities and industrial customers work together to design DSM programs that serve the needs of industrial customers.

Nadel, S. M.; Jordan, J. A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ContinuousorRetro?Commissioning PhillipN. Price,Conference on Building Commissioning: August 10-12, 2011Conference on Building Commissioning: August 10-12, 2011

Price, Phillip N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1997 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

153

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalsince electric cooling loads can be offset by the absorptioncooling loads: utility purchases of electricity, on-site generation of electricity, absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Cost of an Electric Quad Used in the Buildings Sector ($2010 Billion) Residential Commercial Buildings Sector 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 11.82 11.82 11.82 11.94 11.68 11.82 10.59 10.83 10.70 11.41 11.58 11.48 11.68 11.33 11.51 11.49 10.77 11.15 11.71 11.67 11.69 11.72 11.52 11.63 10.57 9.76 10.19 10.55 9.73 10.16 11.16 10.35 10.78 10.68 9.90 10.31 10.42 9.48 9.97 10.16 9.20 9.70 10.57 9.73 10.17 10.48 9.62 10.07 9.54 8.46 9.01 9.24 8.11 8.68 9.92 8.97 9.47 9.85 8.78 9.33 9.16 8.44 8.81 9.32 8.58 8.96 9.15 8.16 8.66 9.46 8.64 9.05 10.27 9.34 9.82 10.24 9.27 9.76 9.28 8.48 8.89 9.56 8.77 9.18 11.92 10.52 11.25 11.83 10.40 11.14 10.61 9.76 10.19 10.86 9.60 10.25 11.90 10.08

156

Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toaDSMbasedenergymanagementsystemfor realtimeSupervisory and Energy Management System of largeSimes, An Energy Management System for Building

Birman, Kenneth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture for Localized Electrical Energy Reduction, Generation, and Sharing) [46] is the smart-grid

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Applying DSM evaluation results to utility planning  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a study to assess the application of DSM evaluation results to utility forecasting and planning. The paper has three objectives: (1) identify forecasting and planning applications of evaluation studies, (2) identify major obstacles and problems associated with applying evaluation results to forecasting and planning, and (3) suggest approaches to address the major problems. The paper summarizes results from interviews with utilities, regulators, and consultants to determine how the utility industry currently applies evaluation results in forecasting and planning. The paper also includes results from a detailed case study of Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) and Southern California Edison Company (SCE), two utilities with large DSM programs and active evaluation efforts.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-to commercial building microgrids, 2nd European Conference2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management,

Stadler, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings, IEEEsuccessful deployment of microgrids will depend heavily on

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Desktop usage is also highly correlated with lighting loads.usage, as one might expect since most o?ce buildings do not adjust lighting

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modeling, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,t savings, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building technology; concretes; durability; effective medium theory; electrical conductivity; interfacial zone; mortar; percolation; fluid flow; sand ...

164

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters, i.e. , the electricity tariff structure. Due toenergy loads, 2 electricity and natural gas tariff structureelectricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed ($/day) Sources: PG&E commercial tariffs,

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (electricity ($/kWh) demand ($/kW) Natural Gas $/kWh fixed (demand via utility purchases and burns natural gas to meet

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Impacts of Saving an Electric Quad (1) Utility Average-Sized Aggregate Number of Units Fuel Input Utility Unit (MW) to Provide the Fuel's Share Plant Fuel Type Shares (%) in 2010 of the Electric Quad (2) Coal 49% 36 Petroleum 1% 96 Natural Gas 19% 141 Nuclear 22% 3 Renewable (3) 10% 184 Total 100% 460 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A2 for consumption and Table A8 for electricity supply. 245 17 85 1,026 22 1) This table displays the breakdown of electric power plants that could be eliminated by saving an electric quad, in exact proportion to the actual primary fuel shares for electricity produced nationwide in 2010. Use this table to estimate the avoided capacity implied by saving one

167

Low-income DSM Programs: Methodological approach to determining the cost-effectiveness of coordinated partnerships  

SciTech Connect

As governments at all levels become increasingly budget-conscious, expenditures on low-income, demand-side management (DSM) programs are being evaluated more on the basis of efficiency at the expense of equity considerations. Budgetary pressures have also caused government agencies to emphasize resource leveraging and coordination with electric and gas utilities as a means of sharing the expenses of low-income programs. The increased involvement of electric and gas utilities in coordinated low-income DSM programs, in turn, has resulted in greater emphasis on estimating program cost-effectiveness. The objective of this study is to develop a methodological approach to estimate the cost- effectiveness of coordinated low-income DSM programs, given the special features that distinguish these programs from other utility-operated DSM programs. The general approach used in this study was to (1) select six coordinated low-income DSM programs from among those currently operating across the United States, (2) examine the main features of these programs, and (3) determine the conceptual and pragmatic problems associated with estimating their cost-effectiveness. Three types of coordination between government and utility cosponsors were identified. At one extreme, local agencies operate {open_quotes}parallel{close_quotes} programs, each of which is fully funded by a single sponsor (e.g., one funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the other by a utility). At the other extreme are highly {open_quotes}coupled{close_quotes} programs that capitalize on the unique capabilities and resources offered by each cosponsor. In these programs, agencies employ a combination of utility and government funds to deliver weatherization services as part of an integrated effort. In between are {open_quotes}supplemental{close_quotes} programs that utilize resources to supplement the agency`s government-funded weatherization, with no changes to the operation of that program.

Brown, M.A.; Hill, L.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build an open appliance power signature database, which willdevice in a database, such as its type of appliance, wherebased on appliance type and stores the results in a database

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Building America System Research Plan for Reduction of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This research plan describes the overall scope of system research that is needed to reduce miscellaneous electrical loads (MEL) in future net zero energy homes.

Barley, C. D.; Haley, C.; Anderson, R.; Pratsch, L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Plug-in electric vehicles as dispersed energy storage interactions with a smart office building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy resources (RESs) with plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are being gradually accepted by society for their low carbon emission merits. However

Qian Dai; Shanxu Duan; Tao Cai; Changsong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Utility DSM: off the coasts and into the heartland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility demand-side management efforts began on the coasts but have recently spread to the ''heartland.'' The authors review efforts to develop DSM programs and policies in states that are now ramping up programs, identifying key practices that are often linked with progress in states that are new to DSM and discussing the implications for the 18 states that currently lack significant DSM programs. (author)

Nadel, Steven; Gold, Rachel

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

General Electric Company design review manual, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is intended to serve as a guide to the Solar Energy Division of ERDA for preparing instructions for and evaluating the proposals resulting from the issuance of Program Opportunity Notices (PON's) for Commercial Buildings. The manual is meant to amplify Program Opportunity Notice DSE-75-2, with respect to site, building, and system selection and evaluation. The manual contains two major sections, one addressing the project concept and the other the design features. The project concept section provides for a description and evaluation of the site, the commercial building, the system application, the system predicted performance, and the long term economics of the application. The projects could be screened using the information from this section alone. Projects that remain acceptable can be further evaluated through design considerations as outlined in the second section. (WDM)

None

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in...

175

Smart buildings with electric vehicle interconnection as buffer for local renewables?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some conclusions from this presentation are: (1) EV Charging/discharging pattern mainly depends on the objective of the building (cost versus CO{sub 2}); (2) performed optimization runs show that stationary batteries are more attractive than mobile storage when putting more focus on CO{sub 2} emissions because stationary storage is available 24 hours a day for energy management - it's more effective; (3) stationary storage will be charged by PV, mobile only marginally; and (4) results will depend on the considered region and tariff. Final research work will show the results for 138 different buildings in nine different climate zones and three major utility service territories.

Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; DeForest, Nicholas; Donadee, Jon; Gomez, Tomaz; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Megel, Olivier; Mendes, Goncalo; Siddiqui, Afzal

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Electricity, Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together diverse groups of experts...

177

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric Utility Demand-Side Management 1999 Executive Summary Background Demand-side management (DSM) programs consist of the planning, implementing, and monitoring ...

178

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Guidebook for Farmstead Demand-Side Management (DSM) program design. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

The acceptance and growth of Demand-Side Management (DSM) continues to increase in the US. According to latest estimates, total expenditures on electric utility DSM programs now exceed $1.2 billion annually, with these investments ranging from 1 to 5 percent of a utility`s gross revenues. In addition, due to increasing environmental concerns and the high cost of new capacity, these expenditure levels are expected to increase. While the vast majority of these DSM programs are directed at the more traditional residential, commercial and industrial market sectors, significant opportunities still exist. One market segment that has not been the focus of attention but a critical sector from an economic development perspective for marry utilities -- is the agricultural and farmstead market. Although the total number of farms in the United States decreased by approximately 5 percent between 1985 and 1989, the land dedicated to farming still accounts for over 995 million acres. Furthermore, the total value of farm output in the United States has been steadily increasing since 1986. The limited penetration of energy efficiency measures in farmsteads provides an excellent opportunity for utilities to expand their DSM programming efforts to capture this ``non-traditional`` market segment, and at the same time assist farms in increasing their efficiency and competitiveness. In marry states, and, in particular New York State, agriculture plays a major economic role. The importance of farms not only from a utility perspective but also from a state and federal perspective cannot be overstated. As such, utilities are in a unique position to facilitate farmstead DSM technology investments in an effort to benefit the farmer (and his profitability), the utility, the state and the country. This guidebook is designed to provide the framework for agricultural demand planning, including market assessment, technology assessment, market penetration analysis and program design.

Rose, M.; Camera, R.K.

1992-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased use of building energy simulation programs, calibration of simulated data to measured data has been recognized as an important factor in substantiating how well the model fits a real building. Model calibration to measured monthly utility data has been utilized for many years. Recently, efforts have reported calibrated models at the hourly level. Most of the previous methods have relied on very simple comparisons including bar charts, monthly percent difference time-series graphs, and x-y scatter plots. A few advanced methods have been proposed as well which include carpet plots and comparative 3-D time-series plots. Unfortunately, at hourly levels of calibration, many of the traditional graphical calibration techniques become overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box-whisker-mean plots to display long-term trends. In addition to the graphical calibration techniques, other methods are also used including indoor temperature calibration to improve thermostat schedules and architectural rendering as a means of verifying the building envelope dimensions and shading placement. Several statistical methods are also reviewed for their appropriateness including percent difference, mean bias error (MBE), and the coefficient of variation of the root mean squared error. Results are presented using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE-2. 1D building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce a MBE of-0.7% and a CV(RMSE) of 23. 1 % which compare favorably with the most accurate hourly neural network models.

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment; 3. a low storage and PV price run; 4. to assessFigure 5. Low Storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Heat6. Low storage and PV Price (run 3) Diurnal Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Building a wireless mesh networked real-time electricity metering system in an MIT dormitory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A competitive, closed-loop information feedback system of wireless electricity meters was designed, tested, and implemented in seven MIT dormitory rooms. The meters utilized Allegro Hall Effect current sensors as well as ...

Oehlerking, Austin L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Resource Information and Forecasting Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers in the Resource Information and Forecasting group at NREL provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help characterize renewable energy resources and facilitate the integration of these clean energy sources into the electricity grid.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling, and industrial drive power represent large and growing end uses of electricity in Texas. Designing effective conservation programs requires cooperation among a variety of groups with varying perspectives.

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Food Sales Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

buildings, though they comprised only 1 percent of commercial floorspace. Their total energy intensity was the third highest of all the building types, and their electricity...

186

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Clean Electrical Power, Capri, Italy, 9 - 10and regulatory issues in the electrical power sector.loads, other electrical power generation, electrical

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

188

US electric utility demand-side management, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in US at the national, regional, and utility levels. Objective is provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions, and costs attributable to DSM.

NONE

1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Financing arrangements and industrial organisation for new nuclear build in electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Finnish and French plants under construction , but rising fossil fuel and CO2 prices are reviving interest in nuclear power. A potential nuclear power renaissance in liberalised electricity markets will face a number of hurdles associated... with the CO2 price in Europe. The attractiveness of carbon free technologies such as nuclear plant for a power producer is reinforced by the additional cost placed on fossil fuel generation technologies by climate policies and CO2 emissions pricing...

Finon, Dominique; Roques, Fabien A

190

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81 Municipal Solid Waste 50 1 1 1 1 1 Wood and Other Biomass 50 5 5 5 5 6 Solar Thermal 100 9 9 9 9 9 Solar Photovoltaic 150 11 11 13 23 52 Wind 100 123 124 153 182 262 Total 277 372 538 760 1,041 Distributed Generation 148 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Cumulative additions after Dec. 31, 2010. 2) Based on current stock average capacity. 3) Combustion turbine/diesel data used.

191

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

192

The USDOE Forrestal Building Lighting Retrofit: Preliminary Analysis of Electricity Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September of 1993 a 36,832 fixture lighting retrofit was completed at the United States Department of Energy Forrestal complex in Washington, D.C. This retrofit represents DOE's largest project to date that utilizes a Shared Energy Savings (SES) agreement as authorized under Public Law 99-272. As DOE's first major SES contract, it was important that every aspect of this project serve as the cornerstone of DOE's Federal Relighting Initiative, including the careful measurement of the electricity and thermal energy savings.

Haberl, J. S.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Vajda, E. J.; Shincovich, M.; D'Angelo III, L.; Harris, L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of New and Stock Generating Capacities, by Plant Type Total Capital Costs Size Overnight Costs (2) of Typical New Plant New Plant Type (MW) (2010 $/kW) ($2010 million) Scrubbed Coal 1300 2809 3652 Integrated Coal-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) 1200 3182 3818 IGCC w/Carbon Sequestration 520 5287 2749 Conv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 540 967 522 Adv. Gas/Oil Combined Cycle 400 991 396 Conv. Combustion Turbine 85 961 82 Adv. Combustion Turbine 210 658 138 Fuel Cell 10 6752 68 Advanced Nuclear 2236 5275 11795 Municipal Solid Waste 50 8237 412 Conventional Hydropower (3) 500 2221 1111 Wind 100 2409 241 Stock Plant Type 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Fossil Fuel Steam Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Nuclear Energy Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Plant use of electricity is included in heat rate calculations; however, transmission and distribution losses of the electric grid are excluded.

194

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Electric Capacity Factors, by Year and Fuel Type (1) Conventional Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Solar/PV Wind Total 1990 59% 17% 23% 66% 45% 13% 18% 46% 1991 59% 18% 22% 70% 43% 17% 18% 46% 1992 59% 14% 22% 71% 38% 13% 18% 45% 1993 61% 16% 21% 70% 41% 16% 19% 46% 1994 61% 15% 22% 74% 38% 17% 23% 46% 1995 62% 11% 22% 77% 45% 17% 21% 47% 1996 65% 11% 19% 76% 52% 18% 22% 48% 1997 66% 13% 20% 72% 51% 17% 23% 48% 1998 67% 20% 23% 79% 47% 17% 20% 50% 1999 67% 20% 22% 85% 46% 15% 23% 51% 2000 70% 18% 22% 88% 40% 15% 27% 51% 2001 68% 20% 21% 89% 31% 16% 20% 48% 2002 69% 16% 18% 90% 38% 16% 27% 46% 2003 71% 21% 14% 88% 40% 15% 21% 44% 2004 71% 22% 16% 90% 39% 17% 25% 44% 2005 72% 22% 17% 89% 40% 15% 23% 45% 2006 71% 11% 19% 90% 42% 14% 27% 45% 2007 72% 12% 21% 92% 36% 14% 24% 45% 2008 71% 8% 20% 91% 37% 18% 26% 44% 2009 63% 7% 21% 90% 40% 16% 25% 42% 2010 (2) 65% 6% 23% 91% 37% 17% 29% 43% Note(s): Source(s) 1) EIA defines capacity factor to be "the ratio of the electrical energy produced by a generating unit for the period of time considered to the

195

DSM as an economic development strategy  

SciTech Connect

Models capable of reflecting price adjustments and capital flows can estimate the longer-term impacts of energy choices on the net gain and distribution of employment. But without a common basis in the types of models used, research on the employment effects of energy efficiency cannot be integrated in a way that is useful. A sluggish economic recovery, lagging consumer confidence and concerns about the U.S.`s international competitiveness have pushed the jobs issue to the forefront of almost all economic policies. Energy efficiency and demand-side management (DSM) advocates are actively raising the issue in energy policy and regulatory forums around the country. Recent policy level discussions within the Department of Energy have strengthened this momentum. At the heart of the DOE work is an emphasis on the use of `Quality Metrics` to guide the development of its programs and budgets. Employment and income benefits are part of this new calculus. Several new studies have elevated this issue to new levels of policy consideration. Even municipal utilities have begun to explore this issue, with the release of a software package called the OPTIONS model. But with all this activity a good deal of confusion remains about how to understand the job creation process. To help clear some of the confusion, this article explains the basic tools used to measure employment gains or losses. It also reviews some of the basic lessons learned in the application of these tools.

Laitner, S.; Goodman, I.; Krier, B.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

N. et al. , (2007), Microgrids, An Overview of Ongoingto commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Ilanto commercial building microgrids 1 Michael Stadler a,b) ,

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins in the Contiguous United States (GW) Net Internal Capacity Capacity Demand (1) Resources (2) Margin (3) 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Note(s): Source(s): 778.5 980.3 20.6% 1) Net internal demand represents the system demand that is planned for by the electric power industry`s reliability authority and is equal to internal demand less direct control load management and interruptible demand. Direct control load management: Customer demand that can be interrupted at the time of the seasonal peak by direct control of the system operator by interrupting power supply to individual appliances or equipment on customer premises. This type of control usually reduces the demand of residential customers. Interruptible demand: Customer

198

DSM-Communities in the World-Wide Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed shared memory is an interesting alternative to message-based construction of distributed systems. We contemplate extending the applicability of our current implementation of a DSM operating system from the locally connected PC cluster to ...

Peter Schulthess; Oliver Schirpf; Michael Schttner; Moritz Wende

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onof using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Benefits of Electric Vehicles Integration onusing plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs for gridL ABORATORY Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

202

Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project, July 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Review of Independent Review of Electrical System Configuration Management and Design Change Control at the Savannah River Site, Waste Solidification Building Project July 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Scope .........................................................................................................................................1 3.0 Background ...............................................................................................................................2

203

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014 22.2 2015 22.2 2016 22.2 2017 22.2 2018 22.2 2019 22.2 2020 22.2 2021 22.2 2022 22.2 2023 22.2 2024 22.2 2025 22.2 2026 22.2 2027 22.2 2028 22.2 2029 22.2 285.6 87.9 211.3 161.19 114.7 882.9 285.6 87.9 205.3 159.30 114.7 875.0 285.6 88.6 201.8 159.01 114.7 871.8 285.6 88.9 199.6 158.22 114.7 869.2 285.6 89.0 194.5 154.88 114.7 860.8 285.6 89.0 191.9 153.01 113.9 855.6 285.6 89.0 189.2 150.00 113.2

204

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2009 Peak Load and Capacity Margin, Summer and Winter by NERC Region (MW) NERC Region Capacity Margin Capacity Margin TRE 16.7% 19.1% FRCC 6.0% 2.0% MRO (U.S.) 24.6% 26.8% NPCC (U.S.) 29.1% 43.2% RFC 25.2% 33.3% SERC 24.6% 26.2% SPP 16.4% 34.6% WECC 19.4% 29.6% U.S. TOTAL 22.2% 28.5% Note(s): Source(s): 128,245 109,565 725,958 668,818 1) Summer Demand includes the months of June, July, August, and September. 2) Winter Demand includes December of the previous year and January-March of the current year. 3) Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at peak load as a percentage of net capacity resources. Net Capacity Resources: Utility- and IPP-owned generating capacity that is existing or in various stages of planning or construction, less inoperable capacity, plus planned capacity purchases from other resources, less planned

205

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998 318 42 360 154 1999 315 44 359 155 2000 271 45 316 165 2001 214 39 253 170 2002 260 44 304 194 2003 272 45 317 196 2004 265 49 314 184 2005 267 53 320 180 2006 286 62 349 165 2007 246 71 317 177 2008 253 94 347 167 2009 272 113 384 159 2010 289 100 390 165 2011 296 172 468 159 2012 296 148 444 161 2013 297 172 469 158 2014 297 186 483 161 2015 297 197 494 160 2016 297 207 504 160 2017 297 212 510 161 2018 298 224 522 161 2019 298 230 528 161 2020 298 246 544 161 2021

206

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for building electric and gas usage Overall building energyGas Emissions (CO2) Building total steam consumption (therm/(ft 2 -yr)) and peak demand Metering data for building electric and steam usage

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1989 73.6 2.6 1.7 1.1 0.2 N.A. 1.5 1990 73.3 2.7 2.1 1.2 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1991 75.4 2.6 2.5 1.3 0.3 N.A. 1.9 1992 74.2 2.9 2.5 1.4 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1993 76.8 2.9 2.6 1.5 0.3 N.A. 1.8 1994 76.9 3.0 2.7 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1995 77.4 3.0 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1996 75.3 2.9 2.9 1.7 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1997 78.3 2.9 2.9 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.6 1998 78.0 2.9 3.0 1.8 0.3 N.A. 1.7 1999 78.3 2.8 3.0 1.8 0.4 N.A. 2.3 2000 78.2 2.8 3.3 1.7 0.4 N.A. 2.4 2001 77.9 2.2

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Electric Conversion Factors and Transmission and Distribution (T&D) Losses Average Utility Average Utility Growth Rate Delivery Efficiency (1, 2) Delivery Ratio (Btu/kWh) (2, 3) (2010-year) 1980 29.4% 1981 29.9% 1982 29.7% 1983 29.8% 1984 30.5% 1985 30.4% 1986 30.8% 1987 31.1% 1988 31.1% 1989 30.2% 1990 30.3% 1991 30.5% 1992 30.7% 1993 30.6% 1994 30.9% 1995 30.7% 1996 30.7% 1997 30.8% 1998 30.7% 1999 30.6% 2000 30.7% 2001 31.1% 2002 31.1% 2003 31.3% 2004 31.3% 2005 31.5% 2006 31.7% 2007 31.8% 2008 31.8% 2009 32.2% 2010 32.3% 2011 32.1% 2012 32.4% 2013 32.7% 2014 33.0% 2015 33.1% 2016 33.2% 2017 33.1% 2018 33.1% 2019 33.1% 2020 33.1% 2021 33.2% 2022 33.2% 2023 33.2% 2024 33.2% 2025 33.1% 2026 33.2% 2027 33.3% 2028 33.4% 10,218 0.2% 10,294 0.2% 10,266 0.2% 10,247 0.2% 10,277 0.2% 10,291 0.2% 10,281 0.2% 10,300 0.3% 10,301 0.3% 10,282 0.3% 10,292 0.4% 10,310 0.4% 10,305

209

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88 1990 3.01 0.51 3.52 6.10 (1) 30.51 1991 2.98 0.56 3.54 6.42 (1) 30.87 1992 2.59 0.60 3.19 6.48 (1) 30.74 1993 2.86 0.62 3.48 6.41 (1) 31.86 1994 2.62 0.63 3.26 6.69 (1) 32.41 1995 3.15 0.60 3.75 7.08 (1) 33.50 1996 3.53 0.63 4.15 7.09 (1) 34.50 1997 3.58 0.64 4.22 6.60 (1) 34.90 1998 3.24 0.63 3.87 7.07 (1) 36.24 1999 3.22 0.66 3.87 7.61 (1) 36.99 2000 2.77 0.66 3.43 7.86 (1) 38.08 2001 2.21 0.55 2.76 8.03 (1) 37.25

210

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5% 12.1% 16.8% (1) 100% 1987 10.9% 4.7% 56.5% 9.7% 0.5% 10.2% 17.8% (1) 100% 1988 9.5% 5.6% 56.5% 8.2% 0.4% 8.6% 19.9% (1) 100% 1989 10.5% 5.7% 54.2% 9.4% 1.4% 10.8% 18.8% (1) 100% 1990 10.7% 4.2% 53.4% 9.9% 1.7% 11.6% 20.0% (1) 100% 1991 11.0% 3.9% 52.8% 9.7% 1.8% 11.5% 20.9% (1) 100% 1992 11.5% 3.2% 53.7% 8.4% 2.0% 10.4% 21.1% (1) 100% 1993 11.1% 3.5% 54.2% 9.0% 2.0% 11.0% 20.2% (1) 100% 1994 12.4% 3.3% 53.5%

211

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Electric Quad Average Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Average Utility Fuel Mix (Million Metric Tons) (1) Petroleum Natural Gas Coal Nuclear Renewable Total 2010 0.83 10.14 46.45 0.00 0.30 57.72 2011 0.00 0.21 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.21 2012 0.00 0.65 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65 2013 0.00 0.16 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.16 2014 0.00 0.61 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.61 2015 0.00 1.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.04 2016 0.00 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 2017 0.00 0.58 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.58 2018 0.00 0.62 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.62 2019 0.00 0.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.70 2020 0.00 0.71 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.71 2021 0.00 0.76 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.76 2022 0.00 0.74 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.74 2023 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2024 0.00 0.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.60 2025 0.00 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 2026 0.00 0.54 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.54 2027 0.00 0.63 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.63 2028 0.00 0.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.84 2029 0.00 1.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.05 2030 0.00 1.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.29 2031 0.00 1.46

212

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

213

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 1512s electricity bill on its current directof Building 1512s electricity bill on its current directBuilding 1512s electricity bill on its current direct

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DSM shareholder incentives: Current designs and economic theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews recent DSM shareholder incentive designs and performance at 10 US utilities identifies opportunities for regulators to improve the design of DSM shareholder incentive mechanisms to increase the procurement of cost-effective DSM resources. We develop six recommendations: (1) apply shared-savings incentives to DSM resource programs; (2) use markup incentives for individual programs only when net benefits are difficult to measure, but are known to be positive; (3) set expected incentive payments based on covering a utility`s {open_quotes}hidden costs,{close_quotes} which include some transitional management and risk-adjusted opportunity costs; (4) use higher marginal incentives rates than are currently found in practice, but limit total incentive payments by adding a fixed charge; (5) mitigate risks to regulators and utilities by lowering marginal incentive rates at high and low performance levels; and (6) use an aggregate incentive mechanism for all DSM resource programs, with limited exceptions (e.g., information programs where markups are more appropriate).

Stoft, S.; Eto, J.; Kito, S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of using plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery packs forImpacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalDispatched Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, National

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Demand-Side Management (DSM) Opportunities as Real-Options Speaker(s): Osman Sezgen Date: August 1, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare As some end-users of energy and aggregators are choosing to be exposed to real-time prices and energy price volatility, they are coming across new DSM opportunities that would not be feasible under typical utility rate structures. Effective evaluation of such opportunities requires a good understanding of the wholesale energy markets and the use of models based on recent financial techniques for option pricing. The speaker will give examples of such modeling approaches based on his experience in the retail-energy industry. Specific examples will include evaluation of distributed generation, load curtailment, dual-fuel cooling, and energy

217

Louisville Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reset: 250 - 550 Thermal Storage: 100kW offset Energy Audit: Free Louisville Gas and Electric (LGE) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly...

218

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

219

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing energy demand can be beneficial for both the energy consumer and the energy supplier. By reducing energy use, the consumer reduces operating costs and improves production efficiency and competitiveness. Similarly, the supplier may reduce the need for costly capacity expansion and wholesale power purchasing, especially if energy reductions occur during peak loading conditions. Energy reductions may also lessen global climate change and reduce many other consequences of fossil-fuel energy use. The following research highlights a methodology to characterize energy use and optimize a DSM program for different types of commercial buildings. Utilizing publicly available records, such as utility billing data and property tax records, the diverse commercial building market was characterized. The commercial building types were matched to relevant submarkets of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). These sources were combined to prioritize building type submarket energy use intensity (kWh/sf/yr), load factor and many other energy use characteristics for each market segment. From this information, lower tier performers in each NAICS submarket can be identified and appropriate DSM alternatives selected specific to each.

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer load profiles, energy tariff structures, and fuelenergy services in the building, the local economic environment, e.g. utility tariffs,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Interactions with a Small Office Building: An Economic Analysis using DER-CAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and P. Chapman, Using Microgrids as a Path Towards Smartof Commercial Building Microgrids, IEEE Transactions onsources and sinks, or microgrids. In prior research, many

Momber, Ilan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

223

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The operation result of the demonstration of energy networks of electricity, heat, and hydrogen at an apartment building in 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cell stacks, fuel processors, hydrogen storage devices, and large storage tanks for hot water, and the electricity and hot water from the fuel cells are shared via an internal electricity grid and a hot water pipe the system. Three small PEM fuel cells with hot water tanks have been installed, and the electricity and hot

225

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1995  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternative Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. The report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it relates to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management``, presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electric Efficiency Standard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Efficiency Standard Electric Efficiency Standard Electric Efficiency Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Indiana Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission In December 2009, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission's (IURC) ordered utilities to establish demand-side management (DSM) electric savings goals leading to 2.0% reduction of electricity sales by the year 2019. Utilities under IURC jurisdiction must file three-year DSM plans, beginning in July of 2010, which indicate progress and plans for reaching

228

Innovative and Progressive Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electric energy has been a concern of energy users in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors for several decades, and has increased in significance since the 1973 energy shortages. During this time, it has also become increasing difficult for electric utilities to install new generating capacity due to public concerns about nuclear energy and environmental issues. In many areas of the country, utilities now find themselves capacity short during their peak periods, and have concerns about providing a reliable supply of electricity. These utilities have initiated programs which encourage their customers to conserve electric energy, and shift or lower use during the utility's peak periods. In other areas of the country there are utilities which have more than adequate electric supplies. These utilities have developed programs which ensure that costs of electricity are such that existing customers are maintained. Programs which address demand issues of an energy utility are referred to as Demand-Side Management (DSM) and are extremely rigorous in scope. Electric utilities have pursued many different DSM policies and strategies during the past decade. These programs have addressed various technologies and have included rebates for efficient lighting, electric motors and packaged air conditioning systems. More recently, however, many utilities have implemented very innovative programs, which indicates an increased commitment towards demand planning, and requires a substantial financial investment in new equipment and engineering services. Some programs have addressed such areas as thermal storage and industrial processes, and others have included comprehensive facility energy studies where greater than fifty percent of the cost of energy retrofits may be covered by the utility. Progressive pricing strategies have included real-time pricing and aggressive curtailable rates for commercial and industrial buildings. Further, new standards are being established by electric utilities which promote energy efficient new construct ion. All of these programs can have considerable impacts on both the customer's and utility's energy use patterns and load shapes. This paper will discuss a number of more significant and innovative DSM programs, and will explain the potential load and energy impacts.

Epstein, G. J.; Fuller, W. H.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ORION: An Adaptive Home-based Software DSM School of Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORION: An Adaptive Home-based Software DSM M.C. Ng School of Computing National University. Orion implements home-based consistency model, which is a recent development in the DSM field that has schemes for home-based DSM systems: home migration and dynamic adaptation between write

Wong, Weng Fai

230

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal storage charging absoprtion cooling offsetsolar thermal collection, and thermally activated coolingkW) thermal storage storage charging non-cooling electric

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Demand Response-Enabled Model Predictive HVAC Load Control in Buildings using Real-Time Electricity Pricing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy (more)

Avci, Mesut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collectors, an absorption chiller and both electrical and166 refrigeration tons) absorption chiller, 722 kW of solarcan be offset by the absorption chiller. For thermal loads,

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh Universitys approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling offset storage natural gas combustion solar thermalnatural gas-fired genset, solar thermal collectors, an absorption chiller and both electrical and heat storage.

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

236

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

237

Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months when buildings' electricity demand is also high dueoptimize buildings' electricity demand according to hourlymonths when buildings' electricity demand is also high due

Kim, Joyce Jihyun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Rincon, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to consent to a proposal by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow public access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) reactor building located near Rincon, Puerto Rico for use as a museum. PREPA, the owner of the BONUS facility, has determined that the historical significance of this facility, as one of only two reactors of this design ever constructed in the world, warrants preservation in a museum, and that this museum would provide economic benefits to the local community through increased tourism. Therefore, PREPA is proposing development of the BONUS facility as a museum.

N /A

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

240

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1334E-2009 1334E-2009 Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States Michael Stadler, Chris Marnay, Afzal Siddiqui, Judy Lai, Brian Coffey, and Hirohisa Aki Environmental Energy Technologies Division Revised March 2009 http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this paper was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct

242

Southern California: The Detroit of Electric Cars?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by building a new electric-vehicle industry in Southerntime being, the electric vehicle industry electric-vehicleindustry into the electric-vehicle industry. Inclusion of

Scott, Allen J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

244

Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for meeting building electricity and heat requirements efficiently and with appropriate energy quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venkataramanan, 2006, Microgrids in the Evolving ElectricityN ATIONAL L ABORATORY Microgrids: An emerging paradigm forFrance, 4-9 June 2007 Microgrids: An emerging paradigm for

Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can use this additional battery capacity to lower its energy$80/year ($5 per kWh of battery capacity), which is paid byof stored electricity] EV battery capacity 16 kWh Maximum EV

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technology data characterizing space conditioning in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the US, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of space conditioning end uses in terms of specific technologies is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and heating and cooling plants is very large. Second, the properties of the building envelope are an integral part of a building`s HVAC energy consumption characteristics. Third, the characteristics of commercial buildings vary greatly by building type. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. This report describes the process by which the authors collected space-conditioning technology data and then mapped it into the COMMEND 4.0 input format. The data are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Franconi, E.M.; Koomey, J.G.; Greenberg, S.E.; Afzal, A.; Shown, L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

248

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9 Lighting electric power comparison between real-for the building total electric power agree well with eachanalysis of the electric power indicated that different

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

High DSM Scenario Request for the 2011 TEPPC Transmission Expansion Plan (and Treatment of DSM in Reference Case/Other Scenarios) Recommendation of the State/Provincial Steering Committee DSM Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the November 6, 2009 meeting of the State-Provincial Steering Committee (SPSC), the SPSC agreed that it would submit a high DSM scenario to TEPPC and requested that the DSM Working Group prepare the request, for review and approval by the SPSC. This document outlines the approach recommended by the DSM Work Group for developing a high DSM scenario, to be modeled in the 2011 TEPPC 10-Year Transmission Expansion Plan. 1 In addition, the DSM Working Group has developed recommendations for the treatment of DSM in the reference case and two scenarios (Carbon Reduction and Breakthrough Technology) proposed by the Scenario Working Group. Table 1 sets for the recommended approach for these items, for energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), combined heat and power (CHP) and distribution system efficiency upgrades. These recommendations have been informed by the technical assistance of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the non-state officials participating in the DSM Working Group, as well as the state official/commissioner members of the Group.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Final issue of this report. - 1996 - Presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand side management (DSM) activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1996  

SciTech Connect

The US Electric Utility Demand-Side Management report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management (DSM) activities in the US at the national, regional, and utility levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decision makers, government policy makers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding DSM as it related to the US electric power industry. The first chapter, ``Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Management,`` presents a general discussion of DSM, its history, current issues, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent chapters present discussions and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. 9 figs., 24 tabs.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side Managment 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Savings as a Percentage of Retail Sales by U.S. Electric Utilities with DSM Energy Savings Programs and Sales to Ultimate Consumers by Class of Ownership, 1996

253

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity Reliability Title Demand-Responsive and Efficient Building Systems as a Resource for Electricity...

254

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

255

Demand-side management of China`s electric power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of China`s strategies for electricity demand-side management (DSM) by the year 2000. It discusses electricity shortages, potential for electricity conservation, and measures to cope with the problems. It concludes that the country should speed up the reform of electricity pricing, make executable laws, and invest capital in demand-side management.

Yang, M. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand). School of Environment, Resources and Development

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Building Energy Technologies NREL's New Energy-Efficient "RSF" Building Buildings provide shelter for nearly everything we do-we work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, homes and commercial buildings use nearly three quarters of the electricity in the United States. Opportunities abound for reducing the huge amount of energy consumed by buildings, but discovering those opportunities requires compiling substantial amounts of data and information. The Buildings Energy Technologies gateway is your single source of freely accessible information on energy usage in the building industry as well as tools to improve

258

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium Figure 1. Schematic of the EnergyHotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium Table 3. Estimated PG&E Commercial EnergyHotel & Congress Centre, Brussels, Belgium typical for Californian utilities, the electricity tariff has time-of-use (TOU) pricing for both energy

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dynamic system monitoring (DSM) for HVDC modulation control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a part of an EPRI-sponsored development on advanced power modulation control system for HVDC lines, dynamic system monitors (DSM) were installed at the dc terminals of the Square Butte system. The monitors were used to validate the computer models used for the controller design and will be used to validate the performance of the controllers after installation. The paper describes the use of Prony analysis and Fourier techniques to analyze system disturbances and to validate the computer models. As described in the paper, excellent results have been achieved at least for parts of the system for some well defined disturbances.

Grund, C.E. (Power Systems Engineering Dept., Schenectady, NY (United States). Power Systems Engineering Dept.); Sweezy, G. (Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)); Balser, S.J. (Power Technology, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)); Nilsson, S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A framework for simulation-based real-time whole building performance assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the building total electric power, is shown in Figure 9. Theon building total electric power and fuel consumption, suchi.e. the separate electric power measurements for lighting,

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

262

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

263

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

264

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

265

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

266

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

267

Demand-side-management: DSM must create a future as a profit center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities prepare for more direct competition, demand-side management (DSM) must also become competitive to survive. DSM has traditionally been a loss leader for utilities - good public relations but expensive. In the coming years, DSM must turn that around and become a source of revenue to continue to flourish. DSm must become a profit center, contributing not only to a positive public image for the utility and appeasing government mandates, but assisting in keeping the utility on the black side of the ledger books. This article examines Central Vermont Public Service`s SmartEnergy subsidiary and it`s GreenPlugs program.

Chambers, A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

IRP and the electricity industry of the future: Workshop results  

SciTech Connect

During the next several years, the U.S. electricity industry is likely to change dramatically. Instead of an industry dominated by vertically integrated companies that are regulated primarily by state public utility commissions, we may see an industry with many more participants and less regulation. These new participants may include independent power producers, entities that dispatch and control power plants on a real-time basis, entities that build and maintain transmission networks, entities that build and maintain distribution systems and also sell electricity and related to services to some retail customers, and a variety of other organizations that sell electricity and other services to retail customers. Because markets are intended to be the primary determinant of success, the role of state and federal regulators might be less than it has been in the past. During the past decade, utilities and state regulators have developed new ways to meet customer energy-service needs, called integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP provides substantial societal benefits through the consideration and acquisition of a broad array of resources, including renewables and demand-side management (DSM) programs as well as traditional power plants-, explicit consideration of the environmental effects of electricity production and transmission; public participation in utility planning; and attention to the uncertainties associated with different resources, future demands for electricity, and other factors. IRP might evolve in different ways as the electricity industry is restructured (Table S-I). To explore these issues, we ran a Workshop on IRP and the Electricity Industry of the Future in July 1994. This report presents the wisdom and experience of the 30 workshop participants. To focus discussions, we created three scenarios to represent a few of the many ways that the electricity industry might develop.

Tonn, B.; Hirst, E.; Bauer, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Use Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion kilowatthours (kWh) of electricity in 1999. Office and mercantile buildings used the most total electricity. Both of these building types used electricity as their predominant energy source. Figure showing total electricity consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Electricity Consumption per Building by Building Type Inpatient health care buildings used by far the most electricity per building. Figure showing electricity consumption per building by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800.

270

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

271

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

272

Environmental Assessment for Authorizing the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) to allow Public Access to the Boiling Nuclear Superheat (BONUS) Reactor Building, Ricon, Puerto Rico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 i DOE/EA-1394 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR AUTHORIZING THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA) TO ALLOW PUBLIC ACCESS TO THE BOILING NUCLEAR SUPERHEAT (BONUS) REACTOR BUILDING, RINCÓN, PUERTO RICO January 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office Oak Ridge, Tennessee DOE/EA-1394: Public Access to the BONUS Facility January 2003 ii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES V LIST OF TABLES V ACRONYMS VI UNIT ABBREVIATIONS VII SUMMARY VIII 1. INTRODUCTION 10 1.1 Purpose and Need for Action 10 1.2 Operational and Decommissioning History 15 1.3 Summary of Radiological Conditions at the BONUS Facility 19 2. DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 25

273

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab has for several years been developing methods for selection of optimal microgrid systems, especially for commercial building applications, and applying these methods in the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York, (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage, and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of power quality and reliability (PQR) to the capabilities of DER-CAM. All of these objectives have been pursued via analysis of the attractiveness of a Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid consisting of multiple nameplate 100 kW Tecogen Premium Power Modules (CM-100). This unit consists of an asynchronous inverter-based variable speed internal combustion engine genset with combined heat and power (CHP) and power surge capability. The essence of CERTS Microgrid technology is that smarts added to the on-board power electronics of any microgrid device enables stable and safe islanded operation without the need for complex fast supervisory controls. This approach allows plug and play development of a microgrid that can potentially provide high PQR with a minimum of specialized site-specific engineering. A notable feature of the CM-100 is its time-limited surge rating of 125 kW, and DER-CAM capability to model this feature was also a necessary model enhancement.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

An Analysis of the DER Adoption Climate in Japan Using Optimization Results for Prototype Buildings with U.S. Comparisons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hour hour Fig. 8. Office Building Jul Electricity Use y Fig.9. Office Building Jul Electricity Load Provision with CHPEnergy Systems (IES) for Buildings: A Market Assessment,

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Adaptive Schemes for Home-based DSM Systems School of Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Schemes for Home-based DSM Systems M.C. Ng School of Computing National University Home-based consistency model, a variant of lazy release consistency model (LRC), is a recent, we present 2 adaptive schemes for home-based DSM systems: home migration and dynamic adaptation

Wong, Weng Fai

276

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Visual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lighting design knowledge is beneficial. Users More than 5000. Audience Architects, electrical and civil engineers, lighting designers, design-build contractors, electrical...

277

Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPL Electric Utilities Corporation Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) provides...

278

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Building Technologies | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Equipment Building Technologies Deployment System/Building Integration Climate & Environment Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Buildings SHARE Building Technologies Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings and resulting carbon emissions is essential to achieving a sustainable clean energy future. To address the enormous challenge, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on helping develop new building technologies, whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations in all of these areas.

280

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Dc Living Walls Posted by: Dc 15 Nov 2013 - 13:26 Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more... Tags: ancient building system, architect, biomimicry, building technology, cooling, cu, daylight, design problem, energy use, engineer, fred andreas, geothermal, green building, heat transfer, heating, living walls, metabolic adjustment, net zero, pre-electricity, Renewable Energy, Solar, university of colorado, utility grid, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

282

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on DistributedCombined Heat and Power, Electricity Tariffs, Demand Charge,California electricity tariffs for large buildings typically

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May-4 June, 2005 electricity (and demand) charges and a lowdisproportionately to summer electricity demand peaks in hotreduce building peak electricity demands in California using

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transmission grid extensions during the build-up of a fully renewable pan-European electricity supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatio-temporal generation patterns for wind and solar photovoltaic power in Europe are used to investigate the future rise in transmission needs with an increasing penetration of these variable renewable energy sources (VRES) on the pan-European electricity system. VRES growth predictions according to the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU countries are used and extrapolated logistically up to a fully VRES-supplied power system. We find that keeping today's international net transfer capacities (NTCs) fixed over the next forty years reduces the final need for backup energy by 13% when compared to the situation with no NTCs. An overall doubling of today's NTCs will lead to a 26% reduction, and an overall quadrupling to a 33% reduction. The remaining need for backup energy is due to correlations in the generation patterns, and cannot be further reduced by transmission. The main investments in transmission lines are due during the ramp-up of VRES from 15% (as planned for 2020) to 80%. Add...

Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Building Extraction Using Lidar Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate 3D surface models in urban areas are essential for a variety of applications, such as visualization, GIS, and mobile communications. Since manual surface reconstruction is very costly and time consuming, the development of automated algorithms is of great importance. On the other hand LIDAR data is a relatively new technology for obtaining Digital Surface Models (DSM) of the earths surface. It is a fast method for sampling the earths surface with a high density and high point accuracy. In this paper a new approach for building extraction from LIDAR data is presented. The approach utilizes the geometric properties of urban buildings for the reconstruction of the building wire-frames from the LIDAR data. We start by finding the candidate building points that are used to populate a plane parameter space. After filling the plane parameter space, we find the planes that can represent the building roof surfaces. Roof regions are then extracted and the plane parameters are refined using a robust estimation technique and the geometric constraint between adjacent roof facets. The region boundaries are extracted and used to form the building wire-frames. The algorithm is tested on two buildings from a locally acquired LIDAR data sets. The test results show some success in extracting urban area buildings. 1.

Ahmed F. Elaksher; James S. Bethel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Buildings Technology Research and Development ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is to require that electrical distribution panels be ... energy use of their devices is generally ... with whole building automation systems Benchmarking ...

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Boulder Laboratories Building 1 Renovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fresh air for modern laboratory work, electrical ... of Building 1 at the NIST Boulder laboratories. ... conservation of water, energy, and construction ...

2012-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Component-oriented decomposition for multidisciplinary design optimization in building design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is not sufficiently exploited in current building design practice. I argue that this field of engineering requires a special setup of the optimization model that considers the uniqueness of ... Keywords: Building-design-specific decomposition, Design structure matrix (DSM), Interactive CAD, Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO), Preference criteria

Philipp Geyer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

291

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

292

Fusion of imprecise, uncertain, and conflicting beliefs with DSm rules of combination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper one studies, within Dezert-Smarandache Theory (DSmT), the case when the sources of information provide imprecise belief functions/masses, and we generalize the DSm rules of combination (classic or hybrid rules) from scalar fusion to sub-unitary interval fusion and, more general, to any set of sub-unitary interval fusion. This work generalizes previous works available in literature which appear limited to IBS (Interval-valued belief structures) in the Transferable Belief Model framework. Numerical didactic examples of these new DSm fusion rules for dealing with imprecise information are also presented.

Jean Dezert; Florentin Smarandache

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

293

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

294

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas from PG&E. The electricity tariff has Time-Of-Use (TOU)month) Source: SCE TOU electricity tariff and SoCal naturalthe almost flat electricity tariff ($/kWh) and the seasonal

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)thermal storage (kWh) electricity bill (k$) NG bill (k$)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Case studies in DSM : utilizing the Design Structure Matrix to improve New Product Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a project that applies the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) in support of the Manufacturing Excellence (MX) program at Cisco Systems, Inc to reduce the cycle time of new product development initiatives ...

Go, Julie W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

298

Collaborative Systems for Building Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of new generation of PLC's and WinCC software in creating collaborative systems for managing, controlling and supervising building electric equipment. These systems assure all the requirements of a building and offer to the ... Keywords: Building Automation System, PLC, WinCC, Redundancy, HVAC, HAS, SCADA, HMI

Ioan Valentin Sita

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

300

Customer Response to Day-ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations Windows and Daylighting Electricity Grid Demand Response Distributed Energy Electricity Reliability Energy Analysis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

building | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(10) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 50% (2 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 25% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 25% (1 vote) Total votes: 4 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

302

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Hatziargyriou, N. et al. , Microgrids, An Overview ofand Operation of Microgrids in Commercial Buildings, IEEEequipment combination for microgrids at a few promising

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

304

University of Minnesota (NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections University of Minnesota (NorthernSTAR Building...

305

The Building Research Council at the University of Illinois ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections The Building Research Council at the University of Illinois is...

306

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAP, iSBEM, EPCs, Psychrometrics. CYPE-Building Services building services, single model, energy simulation, sizing, HVAC, plumbing, sewage, electricity, solar, analysis of...

307

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Buildings consume approximately 40% of the energy, and nearly 70% of the electricity used in the United States. Building surfaces are well suited to renewable energy ...

308

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Country -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tool Applications Free Recently Updated CYPE-Building Services building services, single model, energy simulation, sizing, HVAC, plumbing, sewage, electricity, solar, analysis of...

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mandatory Electric Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on

310

Homepage | The Better Buildings Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Logo EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Better Buildings Logo Better Buildings Alliance Sectors Public Private Commercial Real Estate & Hospitality Healthcare Higher Education Retail, Food Service & Grocery Activities Technology Solutions Teams Lighting & Electrical Space Conditioning Plug & Process Loads Food Service Refrigeration Laboratories Energy Management Information Systems Public Sector Teams Energy Savings Performance Contracts Strategic Energy Planning Finance Strategies Data Management Approaches Market Solutions Teams Appraisals & Valuation Data Access Financing Leasing & Split Incentive Workforce Development Events 2014 Better Buildings Summit Better Buildings Webinar Series Efficiency Forum Past Webinars

311

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

312

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a time of use tariff for electrical energy. The CA dataThe ConEd tariffs, with flat electrical energy charges, andenergy from their local utilities at published tariffs. The

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

314

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

315

Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

Hill, L.J.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy for County Government Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Santa Clara County Executive's Office In February 2006, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a Green Building Policy for all county-owned or leased buildings. The standards were revised again in September 2009. All new buildings over 5,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver

317

Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) Place Wilmington, DE Website http://www.prweb.com/releases/ References Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release[1] BMI Website[2] DuPont Website[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Building Media, Inc. (Du Pont) (Building America Retrofit Alliance) is a company located in Wilmington, DE. References ↑ "Building America Retrofit Alliance Press Release" ↑ "BMI Website"

318

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

319

EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Previous reports Previous reports Distributed Generation in Buildings - AEO2005 Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models - July 2002 Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Release date: August 29, 2013 Distributed and dispersed generation technologies generate electricity near the particular load they are intended to serve, such as a residential home or commercial building. EIA defines distributed generation (DG) as being connected to the electrical grid and intended to directly offset retail sales, and dispersed generation as being off-grid and often used for remote applications where grid-connected electricity is cost-prohibitive. Dispersed generation in the buildings sector is not currently gathered by

320

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

322

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Regulations Resource Center About Building Energy Codes U.S. Energy Consumption by Sector (2011) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Annual, U.S. residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in significant cost savings in both the private and public sectors of the U.S. economy. Efficient buildings reduce power demand and have less of an environmental impact. The Purpose of Building Energy Codes Energy codes and standards set minimum efficiency requirements for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and emissions over

323

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

325

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

326

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

327

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

328

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

329

buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

330

Technology data characterizing refrigeration in commercial buildings: Application to end-use forecasting with COMMEND 4.0  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, energy consumption is increasing most rapidly in the commercial sector. Consequently, the commercial sector is becoming an increasingly important target for state and federal energy policies and also for utility-sponsored demand side management (DSM) programs. The rapid growth in commercial-sector energy consumption also makes it important for analysts working on energy policy and DSM issues to have access to energy end-use forecasting models that include more detailed representations of energy-using technologies in the commercial sector. These new forecasting models disaggregate energy consumption not only by fuel type, end use, and building type, but also by specific technology. The disaggregation of the refrigeration end use in terms of specific technologies, however, is complicated by several factors. First, the number of configurations of refrigeration cases and systems is quite large. Also, energy use is a complex function of the refrigeration-case properties and the refrigeration-system properties. The Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Commercial End-Use Planning System (COMMEND 4.0) and the associated data development presented in this report attempt to address the above complications and create a consistent forecasting framework. Expanding end-use forecasting models so that they address individual technology options requires characterization of the present floorstock in terms of service requirements, energy technologies used, and cost-efficiency attributes of the energy technologies that consumers may choose for new buildings and retrofits. This report describes the process by which we collected refrigeration technology data. The data were generated for COMMEND 4.0 but are also generally applicable to other end-use forecasting frameworks for the commercial sector.

Sezgen, O.; Koomey, J.G.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

332

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

333

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

334

American Electric Vehicles Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicles Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name American Electric Vehicles Inc Place Palmer Lake, Colorado Zip 80133 Sector Vehicles Product American Electric Vehicles (AEV) builds...

335

Case Study - National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Rural Electric Cooperative Association Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Helping America's Electric Cooperatives Build a Smarter Grid to Streamline Operations and Improve...

336

Utility DSM Rebates for electronic ballasts: National estimates and assessment of market impact (1992 - 1997)  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present national estimates of utility Demand-Side Management (DSM) rebates for electronic fluorescent lamp ballasts during the period of 1992 - 1997. We then compare these trends with developments in the fluorescent ballast market from 1993 - 1998. The analysis indicates that DSM rebates for electronic ballasts peaked in the mid-1990s and declined sharply in 1996 and 1997. In a parallel trend, electronic ballast sales and market share both increased significantly during 1993 - 1994 and increased more slowly in 1996 -1997.

Busch, C.B.; Atkinson, B.A.; Eto, J.H.; Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff,and building energy loads Solar radiation profiles for PVload profile, citys solar radiation data, electricity and

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Intelligent Buildings Series, Volume 1: Large Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities seek the means to manage supply and demand of electricity, they increasingly look to the demand-side for opportunities. Commercial and institutional buildings represent substantial electrical loads that account for approximately 30% of all electric power consumed in the United States. Given the right circumstances, these energy consumers can act as demand-side resources by reducing their electrical demand in response to conditions on the supply-side. While demand response applications in com...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

340

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Oklahoma Department of Central Services In June 2008, the governor of Oklahoma signed [http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/2007-08bills/HB/hb3394_enr.rtf HB 3394] requiring the state to develop a high-performance building certification program for state construction and renovation projects. The standard, which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing a requirement for all new occupied city buildings larger than 5,000 square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level

342

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily Laboratories America Inc. Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids

343

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

344

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adoption Model distributed generation building energycosts of the DG (distributed generation) equipment, alongcapability: DG (distributed generation, electricity only);

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicted the actual electric usage throughout the summerincluding sub-metering the electric usage of lighting, plug,energy usage and predicting hourly building electric demand.

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Building detection in an urban area using lidar data and QuickBird imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a hierarchical approach to detect buildings in an urban area through the combined usage of lidar data and QuickBird imagery. A normalized digital surface model nDSM was first generated on the basis of the difference between a digital ...

Lei Chen; Shuhe Zhao; Wenquan Han; Yun Li

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reconstructing 3D buildings from Lidar data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate 3D surface models in urban areas are essential for a variety of applications, such as visualization, GIS, and mobile communications. Since manual surface reconstruction is very costly and time consuming, the development of automated algorithms is of great importance. On the other hand LIDAR data is a relatively new technology for obtaining Digital Surface Models (DSM) of the earths surface. It is a fast method for sampling the earths surface with a high density and high point accuracy. In this paper a new approach for building extraction from LIDAR data is presented. The approach utilizes the geometric properties of urban buildings for the reconstruction of the building wire-frames from the LIDAR data. We start by finding the candidate building points that are used to populate a plane parameter space. After filling the plane parameter space, we find the planes that can represent the building roof surfaces. Roof regions are then extracted and the plane parameters are refined using a robust estimation technique and the geometric constraint between adjacent roof facets. The region boundaries are extracted and used to form the building wireframes. The algorithm is tested on two buildings from a locally acquired LIDAR data sets. The test results show some success in extracting urban area buildings. 1.

Ahmed F. Elaksher; James S. Bethel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Building Energy Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer Building Energy Analyzer logo. Provides quick economic analysis for commercial and industrial buildings. Building Energy Analyzer (BEA) estimates annual and monthly loads and costs associated with air-conditioning, heating, on-site power generation, thermal storage, and heat recovery systems for a given building and location. The user can compare the performance of standard and high efficiency electric chillers, variable speed electric chillers, absorption chillers, engine chillers, thermal storage, on-site generators, heat recovery, or desiccant systems. The user can also prepare side-by-side economic comparisons of different energy options and equipment life cycle cost analysis. The BEA is a system screening tool. It is a tool that is

349

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. ... More Tables on New Hampshire's Electricity Profile: Formats;

350

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DAYSIM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free RADIANCE-based daylighting analysis software to predict the annual daylight availability and electric lighting use in arbitrary buildings for manual and automated lighting...

351

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cepenergy Management...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis of the Energy Matrix (Electricity, Water, Fuel), and CO2 emissions in buildings. Energy Problems, Saving and Optimizing. Tool of Management for Energy leakage. Culture and...

352

Nanogrids, Power Distribution, and Building Networks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanogrids, Power Distribution, and Building Networks Speaker(s): Bruce Nordman Date: February 24, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Electricity consumption and information...

353

Building Envelope and HVAC FOA Selection Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

cold climate commercial heat pump system. The system will reduce annual electricity use for commercial building space heating in cold climates by at least 25 percent....

354

Dow Building Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

355

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-DP-09-48.pdf Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs Screenshot References: Cost Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs[1] Abstract "We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payer-funded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy

356

Building load control and optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on load control by improving the operations in existing building HVAC ...

Xing, Hai-Yun Helen, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electric Utility Measurement & Verification Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BC Hydro is an electric utility with a service area covering over 95% of the province of British Columbia in Canada. Power Smart is BC Hydros demand-side-management (DSM) division. Power Smart develops, operates and manages various DSM programs for residential, commercial and industrial customers. The Measurement and Verification (M&V) of applicable Power Smart Industrial projects is the process of verifying the results of the implementation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) at industrial customer facilities. Power Smart M&V activities are based on the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP); a consensus document produced with the international support of industry and government. This paper discusses BC Hydros M&V program and the M&V results from industrial projects. Several case history studies will also be reviewed. The case studies reviewed involve aeration motor speed controls upgrade, steam turbine controls upgrade and natural gas liquid pump speed controls upgrade.

Lau, K.; Henderson, G.; Hebert, D.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

359

A framework for improving the cost-effectiveness of DSM program evaluations  

SciTech Connect

The prudence of utility demand-side management (DSM) investments hinges on their performance, yet evaluating performance is complicated because the energy saved by DSM programs can never be observed directly but only inferred. This study frames and begins to answer the following questions: (1) how well do current evaluation methods perform in improving confidence in the measurement of energy savings produced by DSM programs; (2) in view of this performance, how can limited evaluation resources be best allocated to maximize the value of the information they provide? The authors review three major classes of methods for estimating annual energy savings: tracking database (sometimes called engineering estimates), end-use metering, and billing analysis and examine them in light of the uncertainties in current estimates of DSM program measure lifetimes. The authors assess the accuracy and precision of each method and construct trade-off curves to examine the costs of increases in accuracy or precision. Several approaches for improving evaluations for the purpose of assessing program cost effectiveness are demonstrated. The methods can be easily generalized to other evaluation objectives, such as shared savings incentive payments.

Sonnenblick, R.; Eto, J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Design and Build- Cost-Effective Energy Conservation: An Opportunity for the Competitive Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper expands on concepts presented at the World Energy Congress and DA/DSM earlier this year. In the light of recent developments I have changed the title of the paper, merged some of the issues and updated my comments. The entire energy industry is in a state of flux in anticipation of the deregulation of the electricity supply industry. Utilities are, right now, creating subsidiary companies which will take advantage of the new competitive markets. These companies will trade as Energy Service Providers, offering a wide range of products, including conservation. They will focus on the bills the customers pay, not solely on the rates for energy. As this transition occurs the current methods for implementing energy conservation will be closely examined. We will see some of the aberrant and expensive practices created within a closely regulated Demand Side Management environment disappear. They will be replaced by traditional methodologies used in the construction industry. This paper examined the opportunity for those construction models in the competitive energy supply industry. I contend that an adaptation of the design and build method of construction offers many of the answers needed for cost effective implementation. The Design & Build contract has most of the key features needed in an energy conservation project. It is a proven method, understood by all participants, and it has inherent flexibility, needed to provide the building owner with the optimum solution for the building. Concentrating on the design of comprehensive Energy Conservation Measures (ECM), the D&B firm augments the strengths of its customers, conservation developers. The concepts offered herein are largely speculative; intended to create dialogue on the opportunities suggested. This document is not definitive. Now, can the industry make this work?

McGeown, D. I.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL: Buildings Research - Commercial Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Research Staff Commercial Buildings Research Staff Members of the Commercial Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as computer science, physics, and chemistry. Brian Ball Kyle Benne Eric Bonnema Larry Brackney Alberta Carpenter Michael Deru Ian Doebber Kristin Field Katherine Fleming David Goldwasser Luigi Gentile Polese Brent Griffith Rob Guglielmetti Elaine Hale Bob Hendron Lesley Herrmann Adam Hirsch Eric Kozubal Feitau Kung Rois Langner Matt Leach Nicholas Long Daniel Macumber James Page Andrew Parker Shanti Pless Jennifer Scheib Marjorie Schott Michael Sheppy Greg Stark Justin Stein Daniel Studer Alex Swindler Paul Torcellini Evan Weaver Photo of Brian Ball Brian Ball, Ph.D., Senior Engineer brian.ball@nrel.gov

362

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

363

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

364

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capitalcost.htm). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage foret al. 1996, 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Goldstein, L. etet al. 2003, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003 and at the Electricity

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cost-Effectiveness of Electricity Energy Efficiency Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the cost-effectiveness of electric utility rate payerfunded programs to promote demand-side management (DSM) and energy efficiency investments. We develop a conceptual model that relates demand growth rates to accumulated average DSM capital per customer and changes in energy prices, income, and weather. We estimate that model using nonlinear least squares for two different utility samples. Based on the results for the most complete sample, we find that DSM expenditures over the last 18 years have resulted in a central estimate of 1.1 percent electricity savings at a weighted average cost to utilities (or other program funders) of about 6 cents per kWh saved. Econometrically-based policy simulations find that incremental DSM spending by utilities that had no or relatively low levels of average DSM spending per customer in 2006 could produce 14 billion kWh in additional savings at an expected incremental cost to the utilities of about 3 cents per kWh saved.

Toshi H. Arimura; Richard G. Newell; Karen Palmer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

367

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

368

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

369

Building America  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Reading Comprehension - Charges and Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charges and Electricity Atoms, the basic building blocks of matter, are made of three basic components: protons, neutrons and electrons. The protons and neutrons cluster together...

371

Prototype Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SDC D buildings, designed for Seattle, Washington, used special moment frames (SMFs) with reduced beam section (RBS) connections. ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Building-integrated photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

This is a study of the issues and opportunities for building-integrated PV products, seen primarily from the perspective of the design community. Although some quantitative analysis is included, and limited interviews are used, the essence of the study is qualitative and subjective. It is intended as an aid to policy makers and members of the technical community in planning and setting priorities for further study and product development. It is important to remember that the success of a product in the building market is not only dependent upon its economic value; the diverse group of building owners, managers, regulators, designers, tenants and users must also find it practical, aesthetically appealing and safe. The report is divided into 11 sections. A discussion of technical and planning considerations is followed by illustrative diagrams of different wall and roof assemblies representing a range of possible PV-integration schemes. Following the diagrams, several of these assemblies are then applied to a conceptual test building which is analyzed for PV performance. Finally, a discussion of mechanical/electrical building products incorporating PVs is followed by a brief surveys of cost issues, market potential and code implications. The scope of this report is such that most of the discussion does not go beyond stating the questions. A more detailed analysis will be necessary to establish the true costs and benefits PVs may provide to buildings, taking into account PV power revenue, construction costs, and hidden costs and benefits to building utility and marketability.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/

374

Green Building Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider District Department of the Environment The District of Columbia City Council enacted [http://dcclims1.dccouncil.us/images/00001/20061218152322.pdf B16-515] on December 5, 2006, establishing green building standards for public buildings and privately-owned commercial buildings of 50,000 square feet or

375

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

376

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

377

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

378

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building) Building 41, formally known as the Stafford Cripps Building, has been transformed into a new Learning and Teaching Facility. Proposed ground

379

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

380

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

382

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

383

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

384

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

385

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

?nay, Devrim

386

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

387

Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor space In Occupied Floor space In Vacant Floor space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4,590 2,600 2,563 37 39 42 8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,532 334 331 3 48 51 6 5,001 to 10,000 946 250 247 3 36 38 6 10,001 to 25,000

388

$18.8 Million Award for Power Systems Engineering Research Center Continues Collaboration of 13 Universities and 35 Utilities for Electric Power Research, Building the Nation's Energy Workforce  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy awarded a cooperative agreement on January 16, 2009, to the Arizona State University (ASU) Board of Regents to operate the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC). PSERC is a collaboration of 13 universities with 35 electricity industry member organizations including utilities, transmission companies, vendors and research organizations...

389

Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning Commercial Building Controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

loads. C P P is a new electricity tariff design to promotethe structures of electricity tariffs considering the timeand tariffs provide even greater incentives to consider sophisticated building operational and control strategies that reduce electricity

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 rates. If the SCE electricity rates increase, either duethe Public Works flat rate electricity tariff. Table A- 9:building a flat rate for electricity and gas that is quite

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building 1512s electricity bill on its current direct$500,000 per month electricity bills for Port Hueneme aloneannual out-of-pocket electricity bill is $112,000. Gas bills

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electricity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

393

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

395

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

396

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings...

397

Review of Techniques for Non-Intrusive Electrical Load Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of individual electrical devices in buildings. It generally relies on aggregate power metering (at the whole-building or branch circuit level) and special signal processing...

398

City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greensburg City Hall In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities larger than 4,000

399

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

400

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

familiar electric curren ts are inside materials such as wires or light bulbs. Even though the interactions your track lighting uses. You decide to build models of circuits with two bulbs connected across, bulbs, and batteries. Use the accompanying legend to build the circuits. Legend: light bulb ba

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

402

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

403

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

404

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance with Solar Electric Reduced Peak Demand: Premier Homes Rancho Cordoba, CA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95 homes in Premier Gardens are 95 homes in Premier Gardens are equipped with photovoltaic panels that take advantage of solar energy to offset peak power loads during the hottest part of the day. As the housing market continues to evolve toward zero net-energy ready homes, Building America research has provided essential guidance for integrating renewable energy systems with high-performance homes and showing how they align with utility peak-demand reduction interests. Solar photovoltaic technology is an attractive option for utilities because they can reduce reliance on fossil-fuel energy. More significantly, it reduces peak demand because systems produce the most power on sunny summer afternoons coincident with the highest demand for air conditioning. Photovoltaic systems have been a part of several research projects conducted by

405

Renewable Energy Applications for Existing Buildings: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces technical opportunities, means, and methods for incorporating renewable energy (RE) technologies into building designs and operations. It provides an overview of RE resources and available technologies used successfully to offset building electrical and thermal energy loads. Methods for applying these technologies in buildings and the role of building energy efficiency in successful RE projects are addressed along with tips for implementing successful RE projects.

Hayter, S. J.; Kandt, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

407

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

408

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

409

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

410

Buildings Stock Load Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers and practitioners have proposed a variety of solutions to reduce electricity consumption and curtail peak demand. This research focuses on electricity demand control by applying some strategies in existing building to reduce it during the extreme climate period. The first part of this paper presents the objectives of the study: ? to restrict the startup polluting manufacturing units (power station), ? to limit the environmental impacts (greenhouse emission), ? to reduce the transport and distribution electricity infrastructures The second part presents the approach used to rise the objectives : ? To aggregat the individual loads and to analyze the impact of different strategies from load shedding to reduce peak power demand by: ? Developing models of tertiary buildings stocks (Schools, offices, Shops, hotels); ? Making simulations for different load shedding strategies to calculate potential peak power saving. The third part is dedicated to the description of the developed models: An assembly of the various blocks of the library of simbad and simulink permit to model building. Finally the last part prensents the study results: Graphs and tables to see the load shedding strategies impacts.

Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Clemoncon, B.; Rosenstein, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the countrys greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electrical Demand Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost every building owner or manager is interested in controlling electrical costs. Since the HVAC system is a large user of electricity, this article will discuss what can be done in the HVAC system to influence parts of the utility bill.

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Buildings to Grid Integration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to address the integration and optimization of buildings with the nation's energy grid. Buildings and the Energy Grid As electricity demand continues to increase, integrating buildings and the electricity grid is a key step to increasing energy efficiency. Intermittent and/or variable generation sources and loads, such as those of electric vehicles, are being installed on the grid in increasing numbers and at more distributed locations. For example, the U.S. government, many states, municipalities, and utility service areas are diversifying and distributing their generation mix, including a larger percentage of

414

Buildings to Grid Integration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration Buildings to Grid Integration The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to address the integration and optimization of buildings with the nation's energy grid. Buildings and the Energy Grid As electricity demand continues to increase, integrating buildings and the electricity grid is a key step to increasing energy efficiency. Intermittent and/or variable generation sources and loads, such as those of electric vehicles, are being installed on the grid in increasing numbers and at more distributed locations. For example, the U.S. government, many states, municipalities, and utility service areas are diversifying and distributing their generation mix, including a larger percentage of

415

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

416

An Economic Analysis of Used Electric Vehicle Batteries Integrated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Used Electric Vehicle Batteries Integrated into Commercial Building Microgrids Title An Economic Analysis of Used Electric Vehicle Batteries Integrated into...

417

Photovoltaics for Buildings: Case Studies of High-Performance Buildings with PV  

SciTech Connect

Energy efficiency maximizes the value of photovoltaics (PV) in buildings systems. A fixed-sizre PV system will offset a much larger part of the electrical load in an energy-efficient building than in a building whose energy design has not been optimized.

Hayter, S. J.; Torcellini, P. A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Building Technologies Office: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Contacts on Delicious Rank Building...

419

Building Technologies Office: Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Webmaster on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Webmaster on Delicious Rank Building...

420

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

422

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting in Denver, Colorado, on...

423

Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

424

Building America Building Science Education Roadmap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building America Building America Building Science Education Roadmap April 2013 Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 3 Background ................................................................................................................................. 4 Summit Participants .................................................................................................................... 5 Key Results .................................................................................................................................. 6 Problem ...................................................................................................................................... 7

425

Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

427

Building debris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis relates architectural practices to intelligent use of resources and the reuse of derelict spaces. The initial investigation of rammed earth as a building material is followed by site-specific operations at the ...

Dahmen, Joseph (Joseph F. D.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Bridging the gap: Designing DSM programs based on the difference between utility and consumer economic perspectives  

SciTech Connect

As utilities investigate ways to implement demand-side management (DSM) programs, the differences between customer and utility economic perspectives can play an important role in assessing the economic benefits of the programs. Because utilities directly bear the cost of new energy sources, energy-efficiency investments that are cost-effective to a utility may not be cost-effective to its customers who usually pay average energy prices and have different economic parameters. This paper discusses the relationship between life-cycle costs and the energy efficiency decisions of home buyers and utilities. It discusses the key factors in a life-cycle cost analysis and how they affect the optimum energy efficiency choice. In addition to discount rates, fuel prices, and fuel price escalation rates, risk adjustments influence the selection of an optimum efficiency level. This paper highlights differences between household and utility perspectives and the reasons why a gap often exists between the home owner`s and utility`s optimum efficiency choice. A case study of an innovative Pacific Northwest manufactured (mobile) home DSM program illustrates the role of consumer and utility perspectives. Prior research showed that regional utilities long-term perspective and economics justified higher energy-efficiency investments than most manufactured home buyers were making. This recent DSM program has addressed both market imperfections and basic economic differences between consumers and utilities by employing a conservation acquisition approach, which had led to a significant market transformation. This program has been very successful at closing the gap between the economic interests of the home buyer and utility.

Lee, A.D.; Chin, R.; Onisko, S.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 6 focuses on the U.S. energy supply. Sections 6.1 and 6.2 contain data on electric utilities, including generation capacity, primary fuel consumption, transmission and distribution losses, and electricity prices. Section 6.3 addresses the production, consumption, and storage of natural gas and petroleum. Section 6.4 covers emissions from the utility sector. Section 6.5 provides data on how utilities spend public and system benefit funds. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

430

Building Tomorrow's Smart Grid Workforce Today | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Tomorrow's Smart Grid Workforce Today Building Tomorrow's Smart Grid Workforce Today May 1, 2012 - 11:22am Addthis A student gets hands-on experience in the electric...

431

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

432

Table B24. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water",,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water" "All Buildings...

433

Impact of the Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program structure on the cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency projects  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) analyzed the cost-effective energy efficiency potential of Fort Drum, a customer of the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) in Watertown, New York. Significant cost-effective investments were identified, even without any demand-side management (DSM) incentives from NMPC. Three NMPC DSM programs were then examined to determine the impact of participation on the cost-effective efficiency potential at the Fort. The following three utility programs were analyzed: (1) utility rebates to be paid back through surcharges, (2) a demand reduction program offered in conjunction with an energy services company, and (3) utility financing. Ultimately, utility rebates and financing were found to be the best programs for the Fort. This paper examines the influence that specific characteristics of the DSM programs had on the decision-making process of one customer. Fort Drum represents a significant demand-side resource, whose decisions regarding energy efficiency investments are based on life-cycle cost analysis subject to stringent capital constraints. The structures of the DSM programs offered by NMPC affect the cost-effectiveness of potential efficiency investments and the ability of the Fort to obtain sufficient capital to implement the projects. This paper compares the magnitude of the cost-effective resource available under each program, and the resulting level of energy and demand savings. The results of this analysis can be used to examine how DSM program structures impact the decision-making process of federal and large commercial customers.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Dixon, D.R.; Elliott, D.B.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electric Metering | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the electricity used by equipment that building occupants can control. Data is collected and reported by zones throughout Forrestal's north, south and west buildings. See the Forrestal metering zone map, below, for details on the zones.

435

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of Boulder The Boulder Green Points Building Program is a mandatory residential green building program that requires a builder or homeowner to include a variety of sustainable building components based on the size of the proposed structure. Similar to the US Green Building Council's LEED program, the

436

City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greenprint Denver Executive Order 123, signed in October 2007, established the Greenprint Denver Office and the Sustainability Policy for the city. The Sustainability Policy includes several goals and requirements meant to increase the sustainability of Denver by having the city government lead by

437

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metering technology makes it possible to differentiate electricity usage patterns of buildings on an hourly or sub-

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. Round 2. Measured Performance of Building Integrated Photovoltaic Panels. ...

439

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will

440

Building Technologies Program Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Technologies Program Website Building Technologies Program Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Technologies Program Website Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/building-technologies-program-website Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: "Building Codes,Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ancient building system | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ancient building system ancient building system Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

442

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Oregon Building Codes Division ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/Codes/cdpub.shtml The Oregon Energy

443

NIST WTC 7 Investigation Finds Building Fires Caused ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the building superstructure to the columns of the electric substation (over which ... floor framing and/or composite floor systems." Engineers, the team ...

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Economic model predictive control for building energy systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the United States, buildings account for nearly three quarters of electricity consumption and about 40% of greenhouse gas emissions. The heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (more)

Ma, Jingran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive The City of Portland's...

447

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Buildings account for 73% of the total electricity consumption in the US. To get an in depth view of where this energy is consumed within (more)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient and Comfortable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy consumption in retrofit and new commercial buildings by developing integrated energy optimization control systems for electric lighting, daylight, and local heating,...

449

Bill Robinson (Train2Build) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

450

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has grown. Natural gas is the second largest energy source and petroleum (predominantly heating oil) a distant third. Buildings demand for electricity was the principal force...

451

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EnergyActio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Audience Commercial building owners and managers, engineers and contractors. Input Electrical and gas energy bills and an estimate of energy consumption (watts or therms, and...

452

Microsoft Word - Whitepaper_Building A Smart Grid Business Case...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Strategy BUILDING A SMART GRID BUSINESS CASE Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability by the National Energy...

453

Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building 1512: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power generation could shift the buildings energy source from almost all electricity, as it is now, to mostly natural gaspower generation would shift the buildings energy source from almost all electricity (as it is now) to mostly natural gas

Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Public Service Electric & Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NJ Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

455

OpenEI Community - building load  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Utility Rate OpenEI Community...

456

OpenEI Community - building load data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Utility Rate OpenEI Community...

457

building load data | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL...

458

Adoption Process | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption Process Energy codes are adopted at the state and local jurisdiction levels and, in most cases, are part of a broader set of codes addressing building, fire, electrical...

459

City of San Carlos Building Division  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential: The construction of R2, R3, R3.1, and R4 buildings, except hotels and motels. C. Residential of any or all utilities (water, electrical, natural gas, or sewer); or the project provided no permanent

460

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PVcad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

simple 3D visualisation of the building. Basic electrical data of the modules and the inverter (if not already in the database). Output Energy yield, performance ratio of PV...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools to someone by E-mail Tools to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Tools on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score

462

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

463

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

464

Using consensus building to improve utility regulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry and its regulatory environment are at a crossroads. Utilities, intervenors and even public utility commissions are no longer able to initiate and sustain changes unilaterally. Traditional approaches to regulation are often contentious and costly, producing results that are not perceived as legitimate or practical. Consensus building and alternative dispute resolution have the potential to help utilities, intervenors and regulators resolve a host of regulatory issues. This book traces the decline of consensus in utility regulation and delineates current controversies. It presents the theory and practice of alternative dispute resolution in utility regulation and offers a framework for evaluating the successes and failures of attempts to employ these processes. Four regulatory cases are analyzed in detail: the Pilgrim nuclear power plant outage settlement, the use of DSM collaboratives, the New Jersey resource bidding policy and the formation of integrated resource management rules in Massachusetts.

Raab, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schweitzer, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider The City of Fort Collins The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed and constructed to

467

Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-offs in the building design process, sizing components (e.g., HVAC) for a specific building, optimizing control systemsPlease cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential.03.010 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model ENB-3661; No.of Pages13 Energy and Buildings xxx (2012) xxx­xxx Contents lists

Parker, Lynne E.

468

Standard Interfaces for Smart Building Integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity systems in the United States are changing to accommodate increasing levels of distributed energy resources and demand responsive loads. Commercial buildings are positioned to play a central role in this change. With advances in energy generation and storage technologies, process management, and controls, commercial buildings are increasingly able to provide a range of grid supportive functions. This trend builds upon decades of experience in which the utility industry has provided ...

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

469

OpenEI - buildings  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hourly Energy Emission Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/488 Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers.  Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions.  Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. 

License

470

Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PDF Office Buildings PDF Office Buildings Types of Office Buildings | Energy Consumption | End-Use Equipment Although no one building type dominates the commercial buildings sector, office buildings are the most common and account for more than 800,000 buildings or 17 percent of total commercial buildings. Offices comprised more than 12 billion square feet of floorspace, 17 percent of total commercial floorspace, the most of any building type. Types of Office Buildings The 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables present data for office buildings along with other principal building activities (see Detailed Tables B13 and B14, for example). Since office buildings comprise a wide range of office-related activities, survey respondents were presented with a follow-up list of specific office types to choose from. Although we have not presented the

471

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

472

Where did the money go? The cost and performance of the largest commercial sector DSM program  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the total resource cost (TRC) of energy savings for 40 of the largest 1992 commercial sector DSM programs. The calculation includes the participating customer`s cost contribution to energy saving measures and all utility costs, including incentives received by customers, program administrative and overhead costs, measurement and evaluation costs, and shareholder incentives paid to the utility. All savings are based on post-program savings evaluations. We find that, on a savings-weighted basis, the programs have saved energy at a cost of 3.2 {cents}/kWh. Taken as a whole, the programs have been highly cost effective when compared to the avoided costs faced by the utilities when the programs were developed. We investigate reasons for differences in program costs and examine uncertainties in current utility practices for reporting costs and evaluating savings.

Eto, J.; Kito, S.; Shown, L.; Sonnenblick, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Daylighting, dimming, and the electricity crisis in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption was over 10% lower than in the previous year.electricity consumption at the Federal Building remains relatively constant throughout the year.consumption of electricity is relatively constant over a year,

Rubinstein, Francis; Neils, Danielle; Colak, Nesrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper describes a methodology to design a successful thermal energy storage program for electric utilities. The design process is addressed beginning with the market research phase. The research includes information obtained from utilities having successful thermal storage programs. In addition, information is gathered from interviews with local architects and engineers, air conditioning contractors and potential thermal energy storage customers. From this information a marketing plan is developed that addresses the target market, market penetration, promotional methods, incentive types and levels, internal and external training requirements and optimal organizational structure. The marketing plan also includes various rate structures, program procedures and evaluation techniques. In addition to the marketing plan, several case histories are addressed.

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

DOE Solar Decathlon: Schneider Electric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Photos Videos Product Directory Village Energy Balance Education Sponsors Sustaining - Bosch - Cisco - Edison International - Schneider Electric - Wells Fargo Supporting Contributing Resource Association History FAQs Contacts Schneider Electric Logo of Schneider Electric As a global specialist in energy management with operations in more than 100 countries, Schneider Electric offers integrated solutions across multiple market segments, including leadership positions in utilities and infrastructure, industries and machines manufacturers, nonresidential buildings, data centers and networks, and in residential buildings. Focused on making energy safe, reliable, efficient, productive, and green, the group's 140,000-plus employees achieved sales of $30.8 billion (24 billion

477

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

478

48 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

479

59 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

59 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

480

83 the building is.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

83 the building is. ... Non-Domestic Building Energy Performance Asset Rating ... This certificate shows the energy rating of this building.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building electricity dsm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

482

Building Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

483

Building Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Events on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Events on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

484

Building Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

485

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

486

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future...

487

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our...

488

A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Buildings consume more than one third of the world's total primary...

489

Buildings Performance Database | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database Buildings Performance Database Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV Source Department of Energy's Buildings Performance Database Date Released July 09th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Buildings Performance Database Dayton Electricity Gainesville Natural Gas open data Residential Data application/zip icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential csv files in a zip file (zip, 2.8 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential Building Characteristics data (csv, 1.4 MiB) text/csv icon BPD Dayton and Gainesville Residential data headers (csv, 5.8 KiB)

490

Building America Analysis Spreadsheets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America Analysis Spreadsheets America Analysis Spreadsheets Building America Analysis Spreadsheets The Building America Analysis Spreadsheets are companions to the House Simulation Protocols, and can assist with many of the calculations and look-up tables found in the report. The spreadsheets provide the set of standard operating conditions-including hourly and monthly profiles for occupancy, lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous electric loads (MELs)-developed by Building America to objectively compare energy use before and after a retrofit, and against a Benchmark new construction building. Building America analysts may also find the spreadsheets useful for documenting and comparing building characteristics for the Building America projects (pre-retrofit vs. post-retrofit, or new construction test

491

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Colorado Energy Office ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Colorado is a home rule state so no statewide energy code exists. Voluntary

492

Optimal building-integrated photovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (solar electric) modules are clean, safe and efficient devices that have long been considered a logical material for use in buildings. Recent technological advances have made PVs suitable for direct integration into building construction. PV module size, cost, appearance and reliability have advanced to the point where they can function within the architectural parameters of conventional building materials. A building essentially provides free land and structural support for a PV module, and the module in turn displaces standard building components. This report identifies the highest-value applications for PVs in buildings. These systems should be the first markets for BIPV products in the commercial buildings, and should remain an important high-end market for the foreseeable future.

Kiss, G.; Kinkead, J. [Kiss and Co. Architects, New York, NY (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Santa Monica The City of Santa Monica allows for priority plan check processing for building projects that are registered with the United States Green Building Council for certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. The priority status applies to

495

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Arizona Department of Commerce Arizona law requires that new state building projects over six thousand square feet follow prescribed solar design standards. Solar improvements should be evaluated on the basis of life cycle costs. Affected buildings include buildings designed and constructed by the department of

496

Local Option - Green Building Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 6/11/2009 State North Carolina Program Type Green Building Incentive To encourage sustainable building practices, North Carolina law allows all counties and cities to provide reductions or partial rebates for building permit fees. To qualify for a fee reduction, buildings must meet guidelines established by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)

497

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing incentives for green building in the private sector. Permit applications for buildings registered with the US Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for

498

Guidance for Electric Metering in Federal Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

blank. blank. Executive Summary The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), Section 103, requires all federal agencies to install metering and advanced metering where found to be cost-effective, according to guidelines developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with a number of interest groups. DOE has met with representatives from the metering industry, the utility industry, energy services industry, energy efficiency industry, energy effi- ciency advocacy organizations, national laboratories, universities, and federal facility managers to develop the guidelines set forth in this document. There were several areas in the language of Section 103 that required some level of clarification prior to finaliz- ing these guidelines, as follows: * DOE has determined that Section 103 pertains to

499

Guidance for Electric Metering in Federal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

found to be cost-effective, according to guidelines developed by the Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with a number of interest groups. DOE has met with...

500

Forest Road Building Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Forest Road Building Regulations Forest Road Building Regulations < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 09/2010 State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations inclu