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Sample records for building design floor

  1. Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaResidential Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Residential Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaResidential"...

  2. Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BuildingFloorAreaHotels Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Hotels Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHotels" Showing 1 page...

  3. Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the property "BuildingFloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 +...

  4. Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but...

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 C)...

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property...

  7. Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the...

  8. Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property...

  9. Property:Building/FloorAreaWarehouses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaWarehouses Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Warehouses Pages using the...

  10. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  11. Property:Building/FloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaTheatresConcertHallsCinemas Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Theatres,...

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

  13. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaSportCenters" Showing 2 pages...

  14. Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Schools, including...

  15. Passive Energy Building Design Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    SOLAR5 is a computer aided design tool to help architects design better, more energy efficient buildings. It is intended for use at the beginning of the design process. To get started, only four pieces of information are necessary to compute the energy needed: the square footage, the number of stories, the kind of building (such as school, home, hotel, or any one of 20 types), and its location (the program stores the temperature ranges formore » fourty major cities). Additional information may be given later to fine tune the design. An expert system using heuristics from a wide range of sources, automatically creates a passive solar baseline building from the four facts specified for that project. By modifying and adapting prior designs the user can create and work upon as many as nine schemes simultaneously. SOLAR5 can analyze the buildings thermal performance for each hour of each month and plot its total heat gain or loss as a three-dimensional surface. After reading the plot, the user can immediately redesign the building and rerun the analysis. Separate heat gain/loss surfaces can be plotted for each of the different parts of the building or schemes that add together to make up the total, including walls, roof, windows, skylights, floor, slab on grade, people, lights, equipment, and infiltration. Two different schemes can be instantly compared by asking for a three-dimensional plot showing only the difference in their performances. The objective of SOLAR5 is to allow the designer to make changes easily and quickly with detailed instantaneous pictorial feedback of the implications of the change.« less

  16. Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 16,900 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,541 + Sweden Building...

  17. Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building 05K0019 + 24,000 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 2,761 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 5,100 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 17,000 + Sweden Building 05K0023 + 9,500 + Sweden Building...

  18. Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

  19. Passive Solar Building Design Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes & Buildings » Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The difference between a passive solar home and a conventional home is design. Passive solar homes and other buildings are designed to take advantage of the local climate. Passive solar design-also known as climatic design-involves using a building's windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject

  20. Building Design & Construction - Sustainability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-11-01

    Offers a brief history of green building; presents the results of a specially commissioned survey; and analyzes the chief trends, issues, and published research, based on interviews with dozens of experts and participants in green building.

  1. Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Office Buildings, Advanced Energy Design Guides: Office Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing new office buildings that result in 50% less energy use than conventional designs meeting minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use office buildings with gross floor areas up to 100,000 ft2 (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller office buildings with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of office buildings.

  2. Sustainable Building Design Training | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Design Training AgencyCompany Organization: United States Department of Energy Focus Area: Buildings Resource Type: Training materials Website:...

  3. Design & Construct New Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design & Construct New Buildings Design & Construct New Buildings Photo of NREL's Research Support Facility under construction, with two workers straddling I-beams. Establishing ...

  4. China Building Design Consultants | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Design Consultants Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Building Design Consultants Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: Beijing-based architecture...

  5. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-12-31

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  6. Effects of different SSI parameters on the floor response spectra of a nuclear Reactor Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kabir, A.F.; Maryak, M.E.; Malik, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of several critical soil-structure interaction (SSI) parameters on the floor response spectra (FRS) of a typical nuclear Reactor Building have been examined. These parameters are deconvolution effects (reductions in ground motion with depth), strain dependency of soil dynamic properties and calculation of impedance functions using different approaches. The significant conclusions of the study, which are applicable to a deeply embedded very rigid nuclear Reactor Building, are as follows: (1) FRS generated without considering scattering effects are highly conservative; (2) Differences between FRS, generated considering strain-dependency of soil dynamic properties, and those generated using low-strain values, are not significant; and (3) the lumped-parameter approach of SSI calculations, which only uses a single value of soil shear modulus in impedance calculations, may not be able to properly compute the soil impedances for a soil deposit with irregularly varying properties with depth. An SSI approach, which can explicitly consider these variations, needs to be used in FRS calculations in such cases.

  7. Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide featuring schematic design, designing using ...

  8. Analyzing Design Heating Loads in Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois

    2015-06-01

    Super-insulated homes offer many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. During the winter of 2013/2014, CARB monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for super insulated homes.

  9. Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Full Document ...

  10. Y-12 Sustainable Design Principles for Building Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. G.

    2008-11-01

    B&W Y-12 is committed to modernizing the Y-12 complex to meet future needs with a sustainable and responsive infrastructure and to integrating sustainability principles and practices into Y-12 work (Y72-001, B&W Y-12 Environmental, Safety and Health Policy). This commitment to sustainability and specifically sustainable design of buildings is also incorporated into Presidential Executive Orders (EO), DOE Orders (DOE O), and goals. Sustainable building design is an approach to design, construct, and operate facilities in an efficient and environmentally sound manner that will produce a healthful, resource-efficient and productive working environment that is inherently protective of the environment. The DOE has established the following 5 Guiding Principles for High Performance Sustainable Building (HPSB), and has issued directives that require Y-12 to incorporate the principles and a number of supporting specific practices and techniques into building design, construction and renovation projects: (1) Employ Integrated Design Principles; (2) Optimize Energy Performance; (3) Protect and Conserve Water; (4) Enhance Indoor Environmental Quality; and (5) Reduce Environmental Impact of Materials. The purpose of this document is to present the required sustainable building principles, practices and techniques, summarize the key drivers for incorporating them into Y-12 projects, and present additional recommendations and resources that can be used to support sustainable buildings to enhance the environmental and economic performance of the Y-12 Complex.

  11. Testing the Floor Scale Designated for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2009-03-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) obtained a Mettler Toledo floor scale for the purpose of testing it to determine whether it can replace the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) cumbersome, hanging load cell. The floor scale is intended for use as a subsystem within PNNL’s nascent UF6 Cylinder Portal Monitor. The particular model was selected for its accuracy, size, and capacity. The intent will be to use it only for 30B cylinders; consequently, testing did not proceed beyond 8,000 lb.

  12. Building design guidelines for solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Givoni, B.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main objectives to this publication. The first is to find out the communalities in the experience gained in previous studies and in actual applications of solar technologies in buildings, residential as well as nonresidential. The second objective is to review innovative concepts and products which may have an impact on future developments and applications of solar technologies in buildings. The available information and common lessons were collated and presented in a form which, hopefully, is useful for architects and solar engineers, as well as for teachers of solar architecture'' and students in Architectural Schools. The publication is based mainly on the collection and analysis of relevant information. The information included previous studies in which the performance of solar buildings was evaluated, as well as the personal experience of the Author and the research consultants. The state of the art, as indicated by these studies and personal experience, was summarized and has served as basis for the development of the Design Guidelines. In addition to the summary of the state of the art, as was already applied in solar buildings, an account was given of innovative concepts and products. Such innovations have occurred in the areas of thermal storage by Phase Change Materials (PCM) and in glazing with specialized or changeable properties. Interesting concepts were also developed for light transfer, which may enable to transfer sunlight to the core areas of large multi story nonresidential buildings. These innovations may have a significant impact on future developments of solar technologies and their applications in buildings. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji; Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi; Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi

    2013-07-01

    Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

  14. Building and Home Design Products and Services | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Home Design Products and Services Building and Home Design Products and Services ... Program U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development> The Energy Efficient ...

  15. Building the Next Generation of Parallel Applications: Co-Design...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Applications: Co-Design Opportunities and Challenges. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building the Next Generation of Parallel Applications: Co-Design Opportunities and ...

  16. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Buildings | Department of Energy Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is an attendee list for the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010. PDF icon nopr_attendees072810.pdf More Documents & Publications Directory of Potential Stakeholders for DOE Actions under NEPA (DOE, 2015) Diversity

  17. Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design Chapter 4 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide featuring schematic design, designing using computer simulations, design of high performance featurea and systems, daylighting, passive and active solar systems, and accommodating recycling activities. PDF icon sustainable_guide_ch4.pdf More Documents & Publications LANL Sustainable Design Guide - Appendices Chapter 5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing National Best

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building Design &

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Passive Solar Transcript | Department of Energy Building Design & Passive Solar Transcript Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building Design & Passive Solar Transcript Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about residential passive solar building design and solar thermal heating applications PDF icon passive_solar_webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Webinar (text version) February 13, 2013 Webinar:

  19. New Design Tool Can Help Cut building Energy Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Tool Can Help Cut Building Energy Use By Up to 50 Percent Energy Efficient Buildings Can Substantially Reduce Global Warming For information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, CO, January 22, 1998 — Designing state-of-the-art, energy efficient buildings just got easier. A new, upgraded software package can help almost any architect or engineer evaluate passive solar and efficiency design strategies in a matter of minutes on an office personal computer. The new software - Energy-10

  20. Passive Solar Building Design and Solar Thermal Space Heating Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Senior Engineer Andy Walker's presentation about passive solar building design and solar thermal space heating technologies and applications.

  1. New tools for the analysis and design of building envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papamichael, K.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Buhl, W.F.; Chauvet, H.

    1994-08-01

    We describe the integrated development of PowerDOE, a new version of the DOE-2 building energy analysis program, and the Building Design Advisor (BDA), a multimedia-based design tool that assists building designers with the concurrent consideration of multiple design solutions with respect to multiple design criteria. PowerDOE has a windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that makes it easier to use than DOE-2, while retaining DOE-2`s calculation power and accuracy. BDA, with a similar GUI, is designed to link to multiple analytical models and databases. In its first release it is linked to PowerDOE and a Daylighting Analysis Module, as well as to a Case Studies Database and a Schematic Graphic Editor. These allow building designers to set performance goals and address key building envelope parameters from the initial, schematic phases of building design to the detailed specification of building components and systems required by PowerDOE. The consideration of the thermal performance of building envelopes through PowerDOE and BDA is integrated with non-thermal envelope performance aspects, such as daylighting, as well as with the performance of non-envelope building components and systems, such as electric lighting and HVAC. Future versions of BDA will support links to CAD and electronic product catalogs, as well as provide context-dependent design advice to improve performance.

  2. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is an attendee list for the public meeting to discuss sustainable design standards for Federal buildings held on July 28, 2010.

  3. Solar Design Standards for State Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 2010 to 2012, solar photovoltaic systems have been installed at seven state government facilities, providing an estimated 650 kW of power. In one building, a 50 kW system has reduced energy ...

  4. Simple procedure for schematic design of passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, W.O.; Kosiewicz, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple procedure for use during the schematic phase of passive solar building design is presented in this article. The procedure is quantitative and accurate enough to insure that designs based on the provided starting point values of the primary building parameters will be cost effective.

  5. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Design Guidance for Passive Vents in New Construction, Multifamily Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an effort to improve indoor air quality in high-performance, new construction, multifamily buildings, dedicated sources of outdoor air are being implemented. Passive vents are being selected by some design teams over other strategies because of their lower first costs and operating costs. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings constructed eight steps, which outline the design and commissioning required for these passive vents to perform as intended.

  6. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  7. Analyzing Design Heating Loads in Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, Lois

    2015-06-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) worked with the EcoVillage cohousing community in Ithaca, New York, on the Third Residential EcoVillage Experience neighborhood. This communityscale project consists of 40 housing units—15 apartments and 25 single-family residences. Units range in size from 450 ft2 to 1,664 ft2 and cost from $80,000 for a studio apartment to $235,000 for a three- or four-bedroom single-family home. For the research component of this project, CARB analyzed current heating system sizing methods for superinsulated homes in cold climates to determine if changes in building load calculation methodology should be recommended. Actual heating energy use was monitored and compared to results from the Air Conditioning Contractors of America’s Manual J8 (MJ8) and the Passive House Planning Package software. Results from that research indicate that MJ8 significantly oversizes heating systems for superinsulated homes and that thermal inertia and internal gains should be considered for more accurate load calculations.

  8. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  9. Canister storage building design basis accident analysis documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOPELIC, S.D.

    1999-02-25

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  10. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.

    1999-09-09

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Atlanta, GA More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group, Serenbe, GA ...

  12. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Design Guidance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passive vents are being selected by some design teams over other strategies because of their lower first costs and operating costs. The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America ...

  13. Building the Next Generation of Parallel Applications: Co-Design

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Opportunities and Challenges. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Building the Next Generation of Parallel Applications: Co-Design Opportunities and Challenges. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building the Next Generation of Parallel Applications: Co-Design Opportunities and Challenges. Abstract not provided. Authors: Heroux, Michael Allen Publication Date: 2011-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1108313 Report Number(s): SAND2011-2822C 470544 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type:

  14. Technology Solutions Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  15. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build

  16. Architecture earth-sheltered buildings. Design manual 1. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    Design guidance is presented for use by experienced engineers and architects. The types of buildings within the scope of this manual include slab-on-grade, partially-buried (bermed) or fully-buried, and large (single-story or multistory) structures. New criteria unique to earth-sheltered design are included for the following disciplines: Planning, Landscape Design, Life-Cycle Analysis, Architectural, Structural, Mechanical (criteria include below-grade heat flux calculation procedures), and Electrical.

  17. READ THIS: Before You Design, Build or Renovate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Lstiburek

    2006-12-07

    This pamphlet is designed for members of the residential construction and remodeling industries, as well as owners and managers who work in affordable housing, and presents building guidance for both new construction and rehabilitation, as well as practices that can be used by property maintenance personnel.

  18. Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Designs for Commercial and Institutional Structures: A Sourcebook for Architects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Sourcebook for architects on building-integrated photovoltaic designs covering commercial and institutional structures.

  19. CXD 4600, 9103 Second Floor Refurbishment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9103 Second Floor Refurbishment (4600) Y-12 Site Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action include: (1) development of the project baseline, design, and and...

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Case Study, The Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio (Education) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Footprint: 3 Classrooms (1) 1 Conference Room 1 Adminstration Office Auditorium, 100 seats 6 Small Offices Atrium Wastewater Treatment Facility Shell Windows Material: Green Tint Triple Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Grey Tint Double Pane Argon Fill Insulating Glass Fenestration(square feet) Window Wall (2) window/wall l Atrium, Triple Pane (3)

  1. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

  2. Healthy and Affordable Housing: Practical Recommendations for Building, Renovating and Maintaining Housing: Read This Before You Design, Build or Renovate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-09-06

    This document helps builders design, build, or renovate homes, keeping in mind the issues of asthma, health, indoor air quality, dust, and living creatures.

  3. Building America Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings, Ithaca, New York; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, CARB monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  4. DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants DOE, RTI to Design and Build Gas Cleanup System for IGCC Power Plants July 13, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis ...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in ...

  6. Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Light Inspires Energy Efficient Building Design March 1, 2010 Photo of a man and a woman in a lab holding a window with tinted glass. Enlarge image NREL Researchers Dane Gillespie and Erin Whitney will get to see the windows they normally test in the lab used in a real world environment at the RSF. Credit: Pat Corkery Artists find inspiration in many ways. But for the artists (architects and researchers) working collaboratively to create the most energy efficient office space in the U.S., the

  7. Port Graham Community Building Biomass Heating Design Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, Patrick; Sink, Charles

    2015-04-30

    Native Village of Port Graham completed preconstruction activities to prepare for construction and operations of a cord wood biomass heating system to five or more community buildings in Port Graham, Alaska. Project Description Native Village of Port Graham (NVPG) completed preconstruction activities that pave the way towards reduced local energy costs through the construction and operations of a cord wood biomass heating system. NVPG plans include installation of a GARN WHS 3200 Boiler that uses cord wood as fuel source. Implementation of the 700,000 Btu per hour output biomass community building heat utility would heat 5-community buildings in Port Graham, Alaska. Heating system is estimated to displace 85% of the heating fuel oil or 5365 gallons of fuel on an annual basis with an estimated peak output of 600,000 Btu per hour. Estimated savings is $15,112.00 per year. The construction cost estimate made to install the new biomass boiler system is estimated $251,693.47 with an additional Boiler Building expansion cost estimated at $97,828.40. Total installed cost is estimated $349,521.87. The WHS 3200 Boiler would be placed inside a new structure at the old community Water Plant Building site that is controlled by NVPG. Design of the new biomass heat plant and hot water loop system was completed by Richmond Engineering, NVPG contractor for the project. A hot water heat loop system running off the boiler is designed to be placed underground on lands controlled by NVPG and stubbed to feed hot water to existing base board heating system in the following community buildings: 1. Anesia Anahonak Moonin Health and Dental Clinic 2. Native Village of Port Graham offices 3. Port Graham Public Safety Building/Fire Department 4. Port Graham Corporation Office Building which also houses the Port Graham Museum and Head Start Center 5. North Pacific Rim Housing Authority Workshop/Old Fire Hall Existing community buildings fuel oil heating systems are to be retro-fitted to accommodate hot water from the proposed wood-burning GARN Boiler, once installed, and rely on the existing fuel oil-fired hot water heating equipment for backup. The boiler would use an estimated 125 bone dry tons, equivalent to 100 cords, woody biomass feedstock obtained from local lands per year. Project would use local labor as described in the Port Graham Biomass Project, report completed by Chena Power, Inc. and Winters and Associates as part of the in-kind support to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) project for work on a project for State of Alaska’s Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). NVPG will likely initiate operations of the biomass boiler system even though several operational variations were studied. Obtaining the fuel source could be done by contractors, PGVC employees, or NVPG employees. Feeding the system would likely be done by NVPG employees. A majority of the buildings heated would be owned by NVPG. The PGVC office would be heated as well as the Old Fire Hall used as a workshop and storage area for North Pacific Rim Housing Authority. One methodology studied to charge for cost of utilizing the community building biomass system would use a percentage of use of hot water generated by the biomass hot water system based on past heating oil usage in relation to all buildings heated by biomass hot water. The method is better described in the Port Graham Biomass Project report. Fuel source agreements have been drafted to enter into agreements with area landowners. One Native allotment owner has asked Chugachmiut Forestry to begin a timber sale process to sell timber off her lands, specifically wind thrown timber that was determined to be of sufficient quantity to supply to the proposed biomass heating system for approximately 5-years. On NVPG’s behalf, Chugachmiut has presented to PGVC three different documents, attached, that could lead to a sale of woody biomass fuel for the project for up to 25-years, the expected life of the project. PGVC has signed a letter of intent to negotiate a sale of woody biomass material April 30, 2015. Chugachmiut Forestry has conducted two different field forest measurements of Native allotment lands and PGVC forest and timber lands. Lands deemed road accessible for biomass harvest were analyzed for this project. Forestry then conducted three different analyses and developed two reports to determine forest biomass on a tons per acre basis in addition to timber volume measurements taken for forest management purposes. Permits required were limited. For the biomass building, the Kenai Peninsula Borough did not require a permit. State of Alaska, Department of Public Safety, Division of Fire and Life Safety requires a plan review for fire and life safety requirements called an application for Fire and Life Safety Plan Review that would require a registered design professional to sign the document. State of Alaska State Forest Practices Act is required to be followed for any timber sale or harvest. This Act also requires consultation with Alaska Department of Fish and Game when operations are in close proximity or cross anadromous waters. Native allotment lands require following U. S. Bureau of Indian Affairs timber sale contracting process and approval.

  8. Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

    2012-08-26

    This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

  9. Energy-Performance-Based Design-Build Process: Strategies for Procuring High-Performance Buildings on Typical Construction Budgets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-08-01

    NREL experienced a significant increase in employees and facilities on our 327-acre main campus in Golden, Colorado over the past five years. To support this growth, researchers developed and demonstrated a new building acquisition method that successfully integrates energy efficiency requirements into the design-build requests for proposals and contracts. We piloted this energy performance based design-build process with our first new construction project in 2008. We have since replicated and evolved the process for large office buildings, a smart grid research laboratory, a supercomputer, a parking structure, and a cafeteria. Each project incorporated aggressive efficiency strategies using contractual energy use requirements in the design-build contracts, all on typical construction budgets. We have found that when energy efficiency is a core project requirement as defined at the beginning of a project, innovative design-build teams can integrate the most cost effective and high performance efficiency strategies on typical construction budgets. When the design-build contract includes measurable energy requirements and is set up to incentivize design-build teams to focus on achieving high performance in actual operations, owners can now expect their facilities to perform. As NREL completed the new construction in 2013, we have documented our best practices in training materials and a how-to guide so that other owners and owner's representatives can replicate our successes and learn from our experiences in attaining market viable, world-class energy performance in the built environment.

  10. RSF Workshop Session II: Performance-Based Design-Build Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    perform design from conceptual through final design, and all construction, under the umbrella of a single contract? 6 Energy Consumption Energy Supply Buildings are Strategically...

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Case Study, The Cambria Department of Environmental Protection Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania (Office) Building Design Floor Area: Floors: 2 Open office space (1) File storage area Two small labratories Conference rooms Break room Storage areas Two mechanical rooms Telecom room Shell Windows Material: Triple Pane, low-e with Aluminum Frames and Wood Frames Triple Pane Triple Pane Aluminum Frames Wood Frames U-Factor 0.24 U-Factor 0.26 Wall/Roof Primary Material R-Value Wall :

  12. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ... SEP program, including associated standards, protocols, and application may be used ...

  13. Calibration and Collaboration: Important Tools to Design high-Performance Affordable Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Snell, John; Helmes, Dan

    2008-03-31

    When new technologies are installed in a building, it is difficult to know how various systems will interact and if the building will perform as well as expected. A widely used technique to verify and quantify the actual energy savings from the energy-efficient features in high-performance buildings is to use the calibrated energy simulation approach. Maverick Gardens Mid-Rise A is a six-story apartment building located in East Boston, Massachusetts. The building was designed and constructed to meet the ENERGY STAR Homes Program rating and the U.S. Green Building Councils Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. During the design phase, DOE-2.1E energy models for both budget building design and proposed building design were developed by the design team to demonstrate energy savings potential from various energy efficient technologies installed in this high-performance building. When comparing the energy use predicted by the proposed design energy model with utility bills, the design team observed that this buildings actual energy consumption was about one-third of what was estimated from the proposed design model, and therefore requested help from the authors through the U.S. Department of Energys Rebuild America Program to calibrate the proposed design energy model. This paper describes the energy simulation calibration approach using short-term metering data and utility bills. Details of the analysis, calibration results and the actual building energy performance are presented. This study also discusses lessons learned during the simulation calibration process and demonstrates the importance of collaboration among design professionals throughout the design, building, and commissioning process, as a way to ensure that high-performing building goals are met.

  14. City of Phoenix- Design Standards for City Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Phoenix has had energy standards for public buildings in place since 2005. In June 2005, the Phoenix City Council adopted a policy requiring all new city buildings built with 2006 bond...

  15. BEopt: Software for Identifying Optimal Building Designs on the Path to Zero Net Energy; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.; Givler, T.; Courtney, A.; Barker, G.

    2005-04-01

    A zero net energy (ZNE) building produces as much energy on-site as it uses on an annual basis--using a grid-tied, net-metered photovoltaic (PV) system and active solar. The optimal path to ZNE extends from a base case to the ZNE building through a series of energy-saving building designs with minimal energy-related owning and operating costs. BEopt is a computer program designed to find optimal building designs along the path to ZNE. A user selects from among predefined options in various categories to specify options to be considered in the optimization. Energy savings are calculated relative to a reference. The reference can be either a user-defined base-case building or a climate-specific Building America Benchmark building automatically generated by BEopt. The user can also review and modify detailed information on all available options and the Building America Benchmark in a linked options library spreadsheet.

  16. Building and Home Design Products and Services | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and developers that build ENERGY STAR qualified new homes; lenders that offer energy efficient mortgages; utilities that offer special incentives to buyers, builders and...

  17. Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

  18. Building America Update - October 9, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 9, 2014 Building America Update - October 9, 2014 October 9, 2014 - 9:44am Addthis Presenting the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards! Registration and Webinar for the 2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Deadline is December 15, 2014 Notice of Intent: Building America Industry Partnership for High Performance Housing Innovation New Building America Code Compliance Brief-Floor Insulation Building America Webinar-October 23: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems: Part I Zero

  19. Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    Passive solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed. Design guidelines are given.

  20. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder In this ...

  1. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Medium Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Lane, Michael D.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Offices (AEDG-MO or the Guide), a design guidance document which intends to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in medium office buildings that just meet the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  2. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei; Gowri, Krishnan; Lane, Michael D.; Thornton, Brian A.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-28

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process, methodology and assumptions for development of the 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Highway Lodging Buildings, a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in highway lodging properties over the energy-efficiency levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  3. Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, EEREs Federal Energy Management Program issued a final rule that requires verified energy and water performance for new and retrofitted federal buildings that are certified by private...

  4. OpenStudio: Building Design Expertise at Your Fingertips

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The newest version of the OpenStudio Application Suite and Development Platform developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory helps architects and engineers model whole-building energy use.

  5. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External...

  6. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 2, Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-08-01

    This is the second volume of the Phase 1 report and discusses the 10 tasks performed in Phase 1. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for setting energy design targets to provide voluntary guidelines for the buildings industry. The whole-building energy targets project is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage the construction of energy-efficient buildings by informing designers and owners about cost-effective goals for energy use in new commercial buildings. The outcome of this research will be a flexible methodology for setting such targets. The tasks are listed and discussed in this report as follows: Task 1 - Develop Detailed Project Goals and Objectives; Task 2 - Establish Buildings-Industry Liaison; Task 3 - Develop Approaches to the Energy Targets Model, Building Operations, and Climate; Task 4 - Develop an Approach for Treating Economic Considerations; Task 5 - Develop an Approach for Treating Energy Sources; Task 6 - Collect Energy-Use Data; Task 7 - Survey Energy Expert Opinion; Task 8 - Evaluation Procedure Specification and Integration; Task 9 - Phase 1 Report Development; and Task 10 - Phase 1 Review Planning.

  7. Control of solar radiation in buildings: a selected bibliography. [Over 70 references on fenestration design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Fenestration design synthesizes many factors, including solar radiation control, daylight illumination, direct and reflected glare, the view out of the building, services, and the structure and fabric of the building in terms of energy conservation and costs. This bibliography includes books and articles related to these aspects of fenestration design in various types of structures.

  8. Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

    2011-03-01

    The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

  9. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Case Study, The Thermal Test Facility, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (Office/Laboratory) Building Design Floor Area: 10,000 SF Floors(1): 2 Aspect Ratio: 1.75 Offices Laboratories Conference Room Mechanical Level Shell Windows Material U-factor SHGC(2) Viewing Windows: Double Pane, Grey Tint, Low-e 0.42 0.44 Clerestory Windows: Double Pane, Clear, Low-e 0.45 0.65 Window Area(SF) North 38 South(3) 1,134 East 56 West 56 Wall/Roof Material Effective R-Value North Wall

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 9.4 High Performance Buildings

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Case Study, The Solaire, New York, New York (Apartments/Multi-Family) Building Design Floor Area: 357,000 SF Units: 293 Maximum Occupancy: 700 Floors: 27 Site Size: 0.38 Acres Typical Occupancy(1): 578 Black-Water Treatment Facility (2) Shell Windows Material: Double Glazed, Low-e, Thermal Breaks with Insulated Spacers Operable Windows Fixed Windows Visual Transminttance 0.68 0.68 Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.35 0.35 U-Factor 0.47 0.41 Wall/Roof Material R-Value Exterior Walls: Insulated

  12. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build Addthis 1 of 12 Heirloom Design Build built this 4,840-square-foot home in Atlanta, Georgia, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 While the two-story home was designed to fit aesthetically into the historic neighborhood, energy-efficiency features will save the homeowners $1,909 a year in utility bills compared to a home

  13. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build 1 of 12 Heirloom Design Build built this 4,840-square-foot home in Atlanta, Georgia, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 While the two-story home was designed to fit aesthetically into the historic neighborhood, energy-efficiency features will save the homeowners $1,909 a year in utility bills compared to a home built

  14. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively used for both heating and cooling. The same examination was done for the 5,000 m{sup 2} buildings. Although CHP installation capacity is smaller and the payback periods are longer, economic, fuel efficiency, and environmental benefits are still seen. While these benefits remain even when subsidies are removed, the increased installation costs lead to lower levels of installation capacity and thus benefit.

  15. Joseph Vance Building, The

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Seattle, WA In 2006, the Rose Smart Growth Investment Fund acquired the historic Joseph Vance Building with the purpose of transforming it into "the leading green and historic class B" building in the marketplace. The terra cotta Vance Building was constructed in 1929 and has 14 floors - 13 floors of offices over ground-floor retail with a basement for mechanical equipment and storage. In 2009 the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) awarded the Vance Building LEED for Existing Buildings (EB) Gold certification.

  16. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  17. The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  19. Using an Energy Performance Based Design-Build Process to Procure a Large Scale Low-Energy Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Shelton, D.

    2011-05-01

    This paper will review a procurement, acquisition, and contract process of a large-scale replicable net zero energy (ZEB) office building. The owners developed and implemented an energy performance based design-build process to procure a 220,000 ft2 office building with contractual requirements to meet demand side energy and LEED goals. We will outline the key procurement steps needed to ensure achievement of our energy efficiency and ZEB goals. The development of a clear and comprehensive Request for Proposals (RFP) that includes specific and measurable energy use intensity goals is critical to ensure energy goals are met in a cost effective manner. The RFP includes a contractual requirement to meet an absolute demand side energy use requirement of 25 kBtu/ft2, with specific calculation methods on what loads are included, how to normalize the energy goal based on increased space efficiency and data center allocation, specific plug loads and schedules, and calculation details on how to account for energy used from the campus hot and chilled water supply. Additional advantages of integrating energy requirements into this procurement process include leveraging the voluntary incentive program, which is a financial incentive based on how well the owner feels the design-build team is meeting the RFP goals.

  20. Whole-building Design Increases Energy Efficiency in a Mixed-Humid Climate: Ideal Homes - Norman, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-06-01

    New houses designed by Ideal Homes, with technical support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Program, save their homeowners money by applying the principles of "whole-building" design. The homes are in Norman, Oklahoma.

  1. Enumerating a Diverse Set of Building Designs Using Discrete Optimization: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Long, N.

    2010-08-01

    Numerical optimization is a powerful method for identifying energy-efficient building designs. Automating the search process facilitates the evaluation of many more options than is possible with one-off parametric simulation runs. However, input data uncertainties and qualitative aspects of building design work against standard optimization formulations that return a single, so-called optimal design. This paper presents a method for harnessing a discrete optimization algorithm to obtain significantly different, economically viable building designs that satisfy an energy efficiency goal. The method is demonstrated using NREL's first-generation building analysis platform, Opt- E-Plus, and two example problems. We discuss the information content of the results, and the computational effort required by the algorithm.

  2. Designing and Building Houses that are Solar Ready

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Builders considering adding photovoltaic (PV) systems to new houses after initial construction is completed can save time and money by following new house Solar Ready design guidelines. Solar Ready houses are designed and built with integrated electrical and mechanical features that streamline the integration of PV systems.

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Rethinking Building Design, the SunShot Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prize, and More | Department of Energy Rethinking Building Design, the SunShot Catalyst Prize, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Rethinking Building Design, the SunShot Catalyst Prize, and More July 9, 2015 - 8:38am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also

  4. Design-Build Contract Awarded for Electrical Substation at Los Alamos

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Design-Build Contract Awarded for Electrical Substation at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 27, 2016 LOS ALAMOS, NM - Under an interagency agreement with the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has awarded a design-build contract at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to Gardner Zemke Mechanical and Electrical Contractors of Albuquerque. Under

  5. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business...

  6. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  7. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  8. Passive solar commercial buildings: design assistance and demonstration program. Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-01-26

    The final design of the Mount Airy Public Library is given. Incremental passive design costs are discussed. Performance and economic analyses are made and the results reported. The design process is thoroughly documented. Considerations discussed are: (1) building energy needs; (2) site energy potentials, (3) matching energy needs with site energy potentials, (4) design indicators for best strategies and concepts, (5) schematic design alternatives, (6) performance testing of the alternatives, (7) design selection, and (8) design development. Weather data and Duke Power electric rates are included. (LEW)

  9. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Aki, Hirohisa

    2009-04-07

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems (e.g., PV or fuel cells with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. The interactions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and CO2 emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that can pursue two strategies as its objective function. These two strategies are minimization of its annual energy costs or of its CO2 emissions. The problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, e.g., nursing homes, to obtain not only the optimal investment portfolio, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules for the selected technologies. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in micro-generation optimization on a building level, with example applications in New York State and California. It shows results from a two-year research projectperformed for the U.S. Department of Energy and ongoing work. Contrary to established expectations, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption compete rather than supplement each other considering the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply. The work shows that high electricity tariffs during on-peak hours are a significant driver for the adoption of electric storage technologies. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries have to be charged by grid power during off-peak hours instead of PV during on-peak hours. In contrast, we also show a CO2 minimization strategy where the common assumption that batteries can be charged by PV can be fulfilled at extraordinarily high energy costs for the site.

  10. Design and testing of a control strategy for a large naturallyventilated office building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrilho da Graca, Guilherme; Linden, Paul F.; Haves, Philip

    2004-03-16

    The design for the new Federal Building for San Franciscoincludes an office tower that is to be naturally ventilated. Each flooris designed to be cross-ventilated, through upper windows that arecontrolled by the building management system (BMS). Users have controlover lower windows, which can be as much as 50 percent of the totalopenable area. There are significant differences in the performance andthe control of the windward and leeward sides of the building, andseparate monitoring and control strategies are determined for each side.The performance and control of the building has been designed and testedusing a modified version of EnergyPlus. Results from studies withEnergyPlus and CFD are used in designing the control strategy. EnergyPluswas extended to model a simplified version of the airflow patterndetermined using CFD. Wind-driven cross-ventilation produces a main jetthrough the upper openings of the building, across the ceiling from thewindward to the leeward side. Below this jet, the occupied regions aresubject to a recirculating air flow. Results show that temperatureswithin the building are predicted to be satisfactory, provided a suitablecontrol strategy is implemented uses night cooling in periods of hotweather. The control strategy has 10 window opening modes. EnergyPlus wasextended to simulate the effects of these modes, and to assess theeffects of different forms of user behavior. The results show how userbehavior can significantly influence the buildingperformance.

  11. Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paducah, KY EM Project: Building C400 Thermal Treatment ETR Report Date: August 2007 ETR-8 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation, Paducah Kentucky Why DOE-EM Did This Review The groundwater underlying the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) is contaminated by chlorinated solvents, principally trichloroethylene (TCE), as well as other

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Colorado | Department of Energy Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Boulder ZED Design Build - Boulder, Colorado Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Boulder, Colorado, that scored HERS 38 without PV and 0 with PV. This 2,504 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls with 2 inches closed-cell spray foam, a liquid-applied membrane over the sheathing, 3.5 inches of rigid foam above the roof deck and 1 inch of closed-cell foam below the

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Avenue, Atlanta, GA | Department of Energy Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16" on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump. PDF

  14. NREL: News - New Design Tool Analyzes Cost of Operating a Building Over its

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lifetime Design Tool Analyzes Cost of Operating a Building Over its Lifetime Golden, Colo., August 2, 2002 Imagine being able to estimate the energy life-cycle costs of a new building by simply entering numbers into a software program. Thanks to the new Energy-10 design tool, this is now possible. The new software - Energy-10 Version 1.5 - is an upgrade to the original program developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The new Energy-10

  15. NREL's OpenStudio Helps Design More Efficient Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created the OpenStudio software platform that makes it easier for architects and engineers to evaluate building energy efficiency measures throughout the design process. OpenStudio makes energy modeling more accessible and affordable, helping professionals to design structures with lower utility bills and less carbon emissions, resulting in a healthier environment. OpenStudio includes a user-friendly application suite that makes the U.S. Department of Energy's EnergyPlus and Radiance simulation engines easier to use for whole building energy and daylighting performance analysis. OpenStudio is freely available and runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems.

  16. The Lovejoy Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Portland, Oregon Originally built in 1910 as the stables for the Marshall-Wells Hardware Company, the Lovejoy Building is the home of Opsis Architects. The owner/architects purchased and renovated the historic building to house their growing business and to provide ground-floor office lease space and second-floor offices for their firm. Opsis wanted to use the building to experience and demonstrate the technologies and practices it promotes with clients.

  17. Building America Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Third Residential EcoVillage Experience (TREE) Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Builder: AquaZephyr, LLC Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, carb-swa.com Building Component: Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning Application: New and/or retrofit; single- family and/or multifamily Year tested: 2014 Climate zones: Cold (5-8) PERFORMANCE DATA Accuracy of Sizing Method: PHPP

  18. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  19. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for a Hot-Humid Production Builder | Department of Energy HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder In this project, BSC worked with the builder to develop a cost-effective design for moving the HVAC system into conditioned space and increase the energy performance of future production houses in anticipation of 2015 IECC codes. PDF icon HVAC Design Strategy for a

  20. Role of Computer Simulation in Designing an Energy Efficient Building: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework Preprint Adam Hirsch, Shanti Pless, Rob Guglielmetti, and Paul A. Torcellini National Renewable Energy Laboratory David Okada and Porus Antia Stantec Presented at the ASHRAE Winter Conference Las Vegas, Nevada January 29 - February 2, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-49067 March 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

  1. USDOE energy standard compliance test on two-story office building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.

    1993-11-01

    There exists some skepticism in the design community regarding the ability to design an aesthetically pleasing building that meets the interim energy conservation standard for new commercial buildings initiated by the US Department of Energy. In response to this, a study was undertaken to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean giving up the architectural intent of a building. An unusual and architecturally pleasing building design was chosen for this study. This two-story office building has a large, central atrium, made almost entirely of glass. It is the building`s focal point, lending an inviting atmosphere to the interior spaces but also poses a considerable challenge to the HVAC system to keep the building comfortable. The building was simulated and easily complied with the Standard, based on an annual energy cost comparison. Alterations to the original design affected neither the interior floor plan nor exterior elevations.

  2. Integration of Low Energy Technologies for Optimal Building and Space Conditioning Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.E. Fisher

    2006-01-07

    EnergyPlus is the DOE's newest building energy simulation engine. It was developed specifically to support the design of low energy building systems. This project focused on developing new low energy building simulation models for EnergyPlus, verifying and validating new and existing EnergyPlus models and transferring the new technology to the private sector. The project focused primarily on geothermal and radiant technologies, which are related by the fact that both are based on hydronic system design. As a result of this project eight peer reviewed journal and conference papers were added to the archival literature and five technical reports were published as M.S. theses and are available in the archival literature. In addition, several reports, including a trombe wall validation report were written for web publication. Thirteen new or significantly enhanced modules were added to the EnergyPlus source code and forty-two new or significantly enhanced sections were added to the EnergyPlus documentation as a result of this work. A low energy design guide was also developed as a pedagogical tool and is available for web publication. Finally several tools including a hybrid ground source heat pump optimization program and a geothermal heat pump parameter estimation tool were developed for research and design and are available for web publication.

  3. Building America Case Study: Design Guidance for Passive Vents in New Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York (Fact Sheet), Efficient Solutions for Multifamily Buildings, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multifamily Buildings Building America Case Study Design Guidance for Passive Vents in New Construction, Multifamily Buildings New York, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New dwelling units Type: Multifamily Topic: Passive ventilation performance Date completed: 2014 Climate Zones: Mixed, humid, cold PERFORMANCE CRITERIA * Continuous exhaust: >3 × required ASHRAE 62.2 outdoor air CFM * Apartment airtightness: ≤0.20 CFM50/ft 2 of enclosure * Entry door leakage area: ≤5 in. 2 *

  4. Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility Preprint Rois Langner and Michael Deru National Renewable Energy Laboratory Alexander Zhivov, Richard Liesen, and Dale Herron U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center Presented at the 2012 ASHRAE Winter Conference Chicago, Illinois January 21-25, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-53810 March 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy,

  5. PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine By Raphael Rosen March 7, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL scientists Robert Mozulay and Weiguo Que (Photo by Hans Schneider) PPPL scientists Robert Mozulay and Weiguo Que Gallery: A digital firing generator installed in NSTX-U (Photo by Hans Schneider)

  6. Heat storage and distribution inside passive-solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Passive-solar buildings are investigated from the viewpoint of the storage of solar heat in materials of the building: walls, floors, ceilings, and furniture. The effects of the location, material, thickness, and orientation of each internal building surface are investigated. The concept of diurnal heat capacity is introduced and a method of using this parameter to estimate clear-day temperature swings is developed. Convective coupling to remote rooms within a building is discussed, including both convection through single doorways and convective loops that may exist involving a sunspace. Design guidelines are given.

  7. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, H.N. ); Deringer, J.J. ); Jones, J.W. ); Hall, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    This report documents eight tasks performed as part of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project, in which detailed conceptual approaches were produced for each element of the proposed Targets model. The eight task reports together describe the important modules proposed for inclusion in the Targets model: input module, energy module, characteristic development moduel, building cost module, analysis control module, energy cost module, search routines module, and economic analysis module. 16 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Low floor mass transit vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmons, J. Bruce; Blessing, Leonard J.

    2004-02-03

    A mass transit vehicle includes a frame structure that provides an efficient and economical approach to providing a low floor bus. The inventive frame includes a stiff roof panel and a stiff floor panel. A plurality of generally vertical pillars extend between the roof and floor panels. A unique bracket arrangement is disclosed for connecting the pillars to the panels. Side panels are secured to the pillars and carry the shear stresses on the frame. A unique seating assembly that can be advantageously incorporated into the vehicle taking advantage of the load distributing features of the inventive frame is also disclosed.

  9. Introduction to Cost Control Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings: High-Performance Design and Construction on a Budget (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    Momentum behind zero energy building design and construction is increasing, presenting a tremendous opportunity for advancing energy performance in the commercial building industry. At the same time, there is a lingering perception that zero energy buildings must be cost prohibitive or limited to showcase projects. Fortunately, an increasing number of projects are demonstrating that high performance can be achieved within typical budgets. This factsheet highlights replicable, recommended strategies for achieving high performance on a budget, based on experiences from past projects.

  10. End-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chao, Tian-Jy; Kim, Younghun

    2015-02-10

    An end-to-end interoperability and workflows from building architecture design to one or more simulations, in one aspect, may comprise establishing a BIM enablement platform architecture. A data model defines data entities and entity relationships for enabling the interoperability and workflows. A data definition language may be implemented that defines and creates a table schema of a database associated with the data model. Data management services and/or application programming interfaces may be implemented for interacting with the data model. Web services may also be provided for interacting with the data model via the Web. A user interface may be implemented that communicates with users and uses the BIM enablement platform architecture, the data model, the data definition language, data management services and application programming interfaces to provide functions to the users to perform work related to building information management.

  11. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-04-01

    This report describes background research for preparation of a plan for development of whole-building energy targets for new commercial buildings. The lead laboratory for this program is the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A wide variety of expertise and resources from industry, academia, other government entities, and other DOE laboratories are used in planning, reviewing and conducting research activities. Cooperative and complementary research development, and technology transfer activities with other interested organizations are actively pursued.

  12. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  13. Energy Use Intensity and its Influence on the Integrated Daylighting Design of a Large Net Zero Energy Building: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guglielmetti , R.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini , P.; Petro, R.

    2011-03-01

    Net-zero energy buildings generate as much energy as they consume and are significant in the sustainable future of building design and construction. The role of daylighting (and its simulation) in the design process becomes critical. In this paper we present the process the National Renewable Energy Laboratory embarked on in the procurement, design, and construction of its newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) - particularly the roles of daylighting, electric lighting, and simulation. With a rapid construction schedule, the procurement, design, and construction had to be tightly integrated; with low energy use. We outline the process and measures required to manage a building design that could expect to operate at an efficiency previously unheard of for a building of this type, size, and density. Rigorous simulation of the daylighting and the electric lighting control response was a given, but the oft-ignored disconnect between lighting simulation and whole-building energy use simulation had to be addressed. The RSF project will be thoroughly evaluated for its performance for one year; preliminary data from the postoccupancy monitoring efforts will also be presented with an eye toward the current efficacy of building energy and lighting simulation.

  14. PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab PPPL engineers design and build state-of-the-art controller for AC to DC converter that manages plasma in upgraded fusion machine By Raphael Rosen March 7, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL scientists Robert Mozulay and Weiguo Que (Photo by Hans Schneider) PPPL scientists Robert Mozulay and Weiguo Que Gallery: One of the digital firing generators installed in NSTX-U (Photo by Hans

  15. Extremely Low-Energy Design for Army Buildings: Tactical Equipment Maintenance Facility; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Deru, M.; Zhivov, A.; Liesen, R.; Herron, D.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the integrated energy optimization process for buildings and building clusters and demonstrates this process for new construction projects and building retrofits. An explanation is given of how mission critical building loads affect possible site and source energy use reduction in Army buildings.

  16. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    research team IBACOS worked with S&A Homes to design a compact HVAC layout with all ducts in conditioned space in several homes in Pittsburgh. Poor-quality HVAC design and installation can reduce the overall HVAC system energy efficiency up to 30%. HVAC quality installation practices are essential to realizing the promise of high-performance homes. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.1 Building Science Solutions

  17. Passive solar concepts for multistory buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Multistory buildings long in the east-west direction and short in the north-south direction offer good opportunity for passive solar application. If each unit within the building is designed so that the Solar Savings Fraction is the same, each will respond to the weather the same way and no unit-to-unit heat distribution is needed. A numerical example for Denver is given indicating excellent thermal performance and a several-day thermal response time. Solutions involving distribution of heat from unit to unit are also discussed as well as top-floor and south-wall variations.

  18. Passive solar concepts for multistory buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Multistory buildings long in the east-west direction and short in the north-south direction offer good opportunity for passive solar application. If each unit within the building is designed so that the solar Savings Fraction is the same, each will respond to the weather the same way and no unit-to-unit heat distribution is needed. A numerical example for Denver is given indicating excellent thermal performance and a several-day thermal response time. Solutions involving distribution of heat from unit to unit are also discussed as well as top-floor and south-wall variations.

  19. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Habitat Metro Denver -- Perfecting Award-Winning Affordable Homes Using Building America's Integrated Design Approach; Building America (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-12-01

    Habitat for Humanity’s goal is to supply quality housing to poor families while reducing their energy cost burden, especially in light of ever-increasing energy prices. Habitat Metro Denver partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America P

  2. Virtual Design Studio (VDS) - Development of an Integrated Computer Simulation Environment for Performance Based Design of Very-Low Energy and High IEQ Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yixing; Zhang, Jianshun; Pelken, Michael; Gu, Lixing; Rice, Danial; Meng, Zhaozhou; Semahegn, Shewangizaw; Feng, Wei; Ling, Francesca; Shi, Jun; Henderson, Hugh

    2013-09-01

    Executive Summary The objective of this study was to develop a “Virtual Design Studio (VDS)”: a software platform for integrated, coordinated and optimized design of green building systems with low energy consumption, high indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and high level of sustainability. This VDS is intended to assist collaborating architects, engineers and project management team members throughout from the early phases to the detailed building design stages. It can be used to plan design tasks and workflow, and evaluate the potential impacts of various green building strategies on the building performance by using the state of the art simulation tools as well as industrial/professional standards and guidelines for green building system design. Engaged in the development of VDS was a multi-disciplinary research team that included architects, engineers, and software developers. Based on the review and analysis of how existing professional practices in building systems design operate, particularly those used in the U.S., Germany and UK, a generic process for performance-based building design, construction and operation was proposed. It distinguishes the whole process into five distinct stages: Assess, Define, Design, Apply, and Monitoring (ADDAM). The current VDS is focused on the first three stages. The VDS considers building design as a multi-dimensional process, involving multiple design teams, design factors, and design stages. The intersection among these three dimensions defines a specific design task in terms of “who”, “what” and “when”. It also considers building design as a multi-objective process that aims to enhance the five aspects of performance for green building systems: site sustainability, materials and resource efficiency, water utilization efficiency, energy efficiency and impacts to the atmospheric environment, and IEQ. The current VDS development has been limited to energy efficiency and IEQ performance, with particular focus on evaluating thermal performance, air quality and lighting environmental quality because of their strong interaction with the energy performance of buildings. The VDS software framework contains four major functions: 1) Design coordination: It enables users to define tasks using the Input-Process-Output flow approach, which specifies the anticipated activities (i.e., the process), required input and output information, and anticipated interactions with other tasks. It also allows task scheduling to define the work flow, and sharing of the design data and information via the internet. 2) Modeling and simulation: It enables users to perform building simulations to predict the energy consumption and IEQ conditions at any of the design stages by using EnergyPlus and a combined heat, air, moisture and pollutant simulation (CHAMPS) model. A method for co-simulation was developed to allow the use of both models at the same time step for the combined energy and indoor air quality analysis. 3) Results visualization: It enables users to display a 3-D geometric design of the building by reading BIM (building information model) file generated by design software such as SketchUp, and the predicted results of heat, air, moisture, pollutant and light distributions in the building. 4) Performance evaluation: It enables the users to compare the performance of a proposed building design against a reference building that is defined for the same type of buildings under the same climate condition, and predicts the percent of improvements over the minimum requirements specified in ASHRAE Standard 55-2010, 62.1-2010 and 90.1-2010. An approach was developed to estimate the potential impact of a design factor on the whole building performance, and hence can assist the user to identify areas that have most pay back for investment. The VDS software was developed by using C++ with the conventional Model, View and Control (MVC) software architecture. The software has been verified by using a simple 3-zone case building. The application of the VDS concepts and framework for building design and performance analysis has been illustrated by using a medium-sized, five story office building that received LEED Platinum Certification from USGBC.

  3. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  4. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

  5. Waste Assessment Baseline for the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel A

    2015-04-01

    Following a building-wide waste assessment in September, 2014, and subsequent presentation to Sandia leadership regarding the goal of Zero Waste by 2025, the occupants of the IPOC Second Floor, West Wing contacted the Materials Sustainability and Pollution Prevention (MSP2) team to guide them to Zero Waste in advance of the rest of the site. The occupants are from Center 3600, Public Relations and Communications , and Center 800, Independent Audit, Ethics and Business Conduct . To accomplish this, MSP2 conducted a new limited waste assessment from March 2-6, 2015 to compare the second floor, west wing to the building as a whole. The assessment also serves as a baseline with which to mark improvements in diversion in approximately 6 months.

  6. Sweden Building 05K0005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1940 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area...

  7. Sweden Building 05K0075 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1996 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area...

  8. Cost Control Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings: High-Performance Design and Construction on a Budget (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    There is mounting evidence that zero energy can, in many cases, be achieved within typical construction budgets. To ensure that the momentum behind zero energy buildings and other low-energy buildings will continue to grow, this guide assembles recommendations for replicating specific successes of early adopters who have met their energy goals while controlling costs. Contents include: discussion of recommended cost control strategies, which are grouped by project phase (acquisition and delivery, design, and construction) and accompanied by industry examples; recommendations for balancing key decision-making factors; and quick reference tables that can help teams apply strategies to specific projects.

  9. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore » feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  10. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  11. EA-1872: Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluated the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend the current rule for commercial and high-rise multi-family residential buildings, 10 CFR 433 “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings,” to replace ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 with the more stringent ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, incorporated by reference. This EA also evaluated the environmental impacts with regard to low-rise residential buildings; this rulemaking updated 10 CFR 435 Subpart A, “Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings,” to replace the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2004 with the more stringent IECC 2009, incorporated by reference. This EA was completed as DOE/EA-1871.

  12. From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency, which describes leading corporate energy efficiency programs.

  13. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950`s and 1960`s for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970`s, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled.

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

  15. EERE's Building Technologies PowerPoint Presentation Template

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    08 1 Application of Building Energy Consumption Data in Low-Energy Building Research Drury B. Crawley U. S. Department of Energy April 2008 2 Key Areas of Interest * Energy Use Intensity * What is energy use per floor area? * Floor-area weighting * What is average square foot vs. average building? * End use * What equipment is using the energy? * Climate zone distributions * How are buildings distributed in climate zones per ASHRAE Standard 169-2006? April 2008 3 * Mechanical equipment detail *

  16. Building America Solution Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Android app - iOS app (Apple) * Building Science Publications feature fully populated ... * Building America review 2012 Design * Web tool platform built using Drupal * Taxonomy ...

  17. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ventilation strategies for multifamily buildings, including how to successfully implement those strategies through smart design, specification, and construction techniques. ...

  18. Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 User ProgramBeam...

  19. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods.

  20. Advanced Energy Design Guides Slash Energy Use in Schools and Retail Buildings by 50% (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Results Achievement NREL's Commercial Buildings Group executed advanced energy modeling simulations and optimized the design of schools and retail buildings to develop recommendations that result in 50% energy savings over code. NREL developed the simulation tools and led the committee that produced the guides. Key Result The Advanced Energy Design Guides, based on the work of NREL's researchers, provide owners, contractors, engineers, and architects user-friendly, how-to guidance by

  1. A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Ming; Yin, Hongxi; Archer, David H.

    2010-02-15

    A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

  2. Extend EnergyPlus to Support Evaluation, Design, and Operation of Low Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Heejin; Wang, Weimin; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Yun, Kyung Tae; Glazer, Jason; Scheier, Larry; Srivastava, Viraj; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-12-21

    During FY10-11, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in collaboration with the EnergyPlus development team implemented the following high priority enhancements to support the simulation of high performance buildings: (1) Improve Autosizing of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Components; (2) Life-Cycle Costing to Evaluate Energy Efficiency Upgrades; (3) Develop New Model to Capture Transformer Losses; (4) Enhance the Model for Electric Battery Storage; and (5) Develop New Model for Chiller-Tower Optimization. This report summarizes the technical background, new feature development and implementation details, and testing and validation process for these enhancements. The autosizing, life-cycle costing and transformer model enhancements/developments were included in EnergyPlus release Version 6.0, and the electric battery model development will be included in Version 7.0. The model development of chiller-tower optimization will be included in a later version (after Version 7.0).

  3. The Future of Technology Is Hiding on the Ocean Floor | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Future of Technology Is Hiding on the Ocean Floor Gizmodo editor Maddie Stone writes about the potential for mining rare earths from manganese nodules located on the deep sea floor. In the story, Stone talks with Critical Materials Director Alex King about the need and uses for rare earths. The story includes the improbable recruitment of billionaire industrialist and recluse Howard Hughes by the CIA to build a ship to supposedly harvest these nodules. In fact, that was just a cover story to

  4. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-12

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  6. Utilizing object-oriented design to build advanced optimization strategies with generic implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldred, M.S.; Hart, W.E.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Romero, V.J.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    the benefits of applying optimization to computational models are well known, but their range of widespread application to date has been limited. This effort attempts to extend the disciplinary areas to which optimization algorithms may be readily applied through the development and application of advanced optimization strategies capable of handling the computational difficulties associated with complex simulation codes. Towards this goal, a flexible software framework is under continued development for the application of optimization techniques to broad classes of engineering applications, including those with high computational expense and nonsmooth, nonconvex design space features. Object-oriented software design with C++ has been employed as a tool in providing a flexible, extensible, and robust multidisciplinary toolkit with computationally intensive simulations. In this paper, demonstrations of advanced optimization strategies using the software are presented in the hybridization and parallel processing research areas. Performance of the advanced strategies is compared with a benchmark nonlinear programming optimization.

  7. REVIEW REPORT: BUILDING C-400 THERMAL TREATMENT 90 PERCENT REMEDIAL DESIGN REPORT AND SITE INVESTIGATION, PGDP, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; Jed Costanza, J; Eva Davis, E; Joe Rossabi, J; Lloyd Stewart, L; Hans Stroo, H

    2007-08-15

    On 9 April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation (EM-22) initiated an Independent Technical Review (ITR) of the 90% Remedial Design Report (RDR) and Site Investigation (RDSI) for thermal treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the soil and groundwater in the vicinity of Building C-400 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The general ITR goals were to assess the technical adequacy of the 90% RDSI and provide recommendations sufficient for DOE to determine if modifications are warranted pertaining to the design, schedule, or cost of implementing the proposed design. The ultimate goal of the effort was to assist the DOE Paducah/Portsmouth Project Office (PPPO) and their contractor team in ''removing'' the TCE source zone located near the C-400 Building. This report provides the ITR findings and recommendations and supporting evaluations as needed to facilitate use of the recommendations. The ITR team supports the remedial action objective (RAO) at C-400 to reduce the TCE source area via subsurface Electrical Resistance Heating (ERH). Further, the ITR team commends PPPO, their contractor team, regulators, and stakeholders for the significant efforts taken in preparing the 90% RDR. To maximize TCE removal at the target source area, several themes emerge from the review which the ITR team believes should be considered and addressed before implementing the thermal treatment. These themes include the need for: (1) Accurate and site-specific models as the basis to verify the ERH design for full-scale implementation for this challenging hydrogeologic setting; (2) Flexible project implementation and operation to allow the project team to respond to observations and data collected during construction and operation; (3) Defensible performance metrics and monitoring, appropriate for ERH, to ensure sufficient and efficient clean-up; and (4) Comprehensive (creative and diverse) contingencies to address the potential for system underperformance, and other unforeseen conditions These themes weave through the ITR report and the various analyses and recommendations. The ITR team recognizes that a number of technologies are available for treatment of TCE sources. Further, the team supports the regulatory process through which the selected remedy is being implemented, and concurs that ERH is a potentially viable remedial technology to meet the RAOs adjacent to C-400. Nonetheless, the ITR team concluded that additional efforts are needed to provide an adequate basis for the planned ERH design, particularly in the highly permeable Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA), where sustaining target temperatures present a challenge. The ERH design modeling in the 90% RDR does not fully substantiate that heating in the deep RGA, at the interface with the McNairy formation, will meet the design goals; specifically the target temperatures. Full-scale implementation of ERH to meet the RAOs is a challenge in the complex hydrogeologic setting at PGDP. Where possible, risks to the project identified in this ITR report as ''issues'' and ''recommendations'' should be mitigated as part of the final design process to increase the likelihood of remedial success. The ITR efforts were organized into five lines of inquiry (LOIs): (1) Site investigation and target zone delineation; (2) Performance objectives; (3) Project and design topics; (4) Health and safety; and (5) Cross cutting and independent cost evaluation. Within each of these LOIs, the ITR team identified a series of unresolved issues--topics that have remaining uncertainties or potential project risks. These issues were analyzed and one or more recommendations were developed for each. In the end, the ITR team identified 27 issues and provided 50 recommendations. The issues and recommendations are briefly summarized below, developed in Section 5, and consolidated into a single list in Section 6. The ITR team concluded that there are substantive unresolved issues and system design uncertainties, resulting in technical and financial risks to DOE.

  8. Improved Design of Motors for Increased Efficiency in Residential Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pragasen Pillay

    2008-12-31

    Research progress on understanding magnetic steel core losses is presented in this report. Three major aspects have been thoroughly investigated: 1, experimental characterization of core losses, 2, fundamental physical understanding of core losses and development of core loss formulas, and 3, design of more efficient machine based on the new formulations. Considerable progress has been achieved during the four years of research and the main achievements are summarized in the following: For the experimental characterization, a specially designed advanced commercial test bench was commissioned in addition to the development of a laboratory system with advanced capabilities. The measured properties are core losses at low and higher frequencies, with sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal excitations, at different temperatures, with different measurement apparatus (Toroids, Epstein etc). An engineering-based core loss formula has been developed which considers skin effect. The formula can predict core losses for both sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal flux densities and frequencies up to 4000 Hz. The formula is further tested in electric machines. The formula error range is 1.1% - 7.6% while the standard formulas can have % errors between -8.5% {-+} 44.7%. Two general core loss formulas, valid for different frequencies and thickness, have been developed by analytically and numerically solving Maxwell's equations based on a physical investigation of the dynamic hysteresis effects of magnetic materials. To our knowledge, they are the first models that can offer accurate core loss prediction over a wide range of operating frequencies and lamination thicknesses without a massive experimental database of core losses. The engineering core loss formula has been used with commercial software. The formula performs better than the modified Steinmetz and Bertotti's model used in Cedrat/Magsoft Flux 2D/3D. The new formula shows good correlation with measured results under both sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal excitations. A permanent magnet synchronous motor has been designed with the use of the engineering formula with Flux2D. There was acceptable agreement between predictions and measurements. This was further tested on an induction motor with toroid results.

  9. Buildings Performance Database Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Buildings.energy.gov/BPD BuildingsPerformanceDatabase@ee.doe.gov 2 * The BPD statistically analyzes trends in the energy performance and physical & operational characteristics of real commercial and residential buildings. The Buildings Performance Database 3 Design Principles * The BPD contains actual data on existing buildings - not modeled data or anecdotal evidence. * The BPD enables statistical analysis without revealing information about individual buildings. * The BPD cleanses

  10. Building Awards | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Awards NREL's high-performance buildings are sustainability models for the use of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Each building on NREL's South Table Mountain campus is designed to meet the Gold or Platinum standards of the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) program. Find information about awards for NREL's exceptional buildings below. Energy Systems Integration Facility Energy Systems Integration Facility 2014

  11. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings This webinar was presented by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), and discussed ventilation strategies for multifamily buildings, including how to successfully implement those strategies through smart design, specification, and construction techniques. File webinar_ventilation_multifamily_20111101.wmv More Documents & Publications Building America

  12. Earthquake response of storey building in Jakarta using accelerographs data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julius, Admiral Musa; Sunardi, Bambang

    2015-04-24

    As seismotectonic, the Jakarta city will be greatly affected by the earthquake which originated from the subduction zone of the Sunda Strait and south of Java. Some occurrences of earthquakes in these location are often perceived by the occupants in the upper floors of multi-storey buildings in Jakarta but was not perceived by the occupants on the ground floor. The case shows the difference in ground-motion parameters on each floor height. The analysis of the earthquake data recorded by accelerographs on different floors need to be done to know the differences in ground-motion parameters. Data used in this research is accelerograph data installed on several floors in the main building of Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics Agency with a case study of Kebumen earthquake on January 25{sup th} 2014. Parameters analyzed include the Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Peak Ground Displacement (PGD), Peak Spectral Acceleration (PSA), Amplification (Ag), and the Effective Duration of earthquake (t{sub e}). Research stages include accelerographs data acquisition in three (3) different floors, conversion and data partition for each component, conversion to units of acceleration, determination of PGA, PGD, PSA, Ag and t{sub e} as well as data analysis. The study shows the value of PGA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floors, respectively are 0.016 g, 0.053 g and 0.116 g. PGD on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 2.15 cm, 2.98 cm and 4.92 cm. PSA on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 0.067 g, 0.308 g and 0.836 g. Amplification of the peak acceleration value on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor to the surface rock are 4.37, 6.07 and 7.30. Effective duration of the earthquake on the ground floor, 7{sup th} floor and 15{sup th} floor respectively are 222.28 s, 202.28 s and 91.58 s. In general, with increasing floor of the building, the value of the peak ground acceleration, peak ground displacement, peak spectral acceleration and amplification growing, contrary to the value of the effective duration of earthquake decreases. The difference in this parameter is strongly influenced by local soil conditions and building construction.

  13. EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

  14. ancient building system | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer...

  15. building technology | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer...

  16. Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System ...

  17. RH-LLW Disposal Facility Project CD-2/3 to Design/Build Proposal Reconciliation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer

    2012-06-01

    A reconciliation plan was developed and implemented to address potential gaps and responses to gaps between the design/build vendor proposals and the Critical Decision-2/3 approval request package for the Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Project. The plan and results of the plan implementation included development of a reconciliation team comprised of subject matter experts from Battelle Energy Alliance and the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, identification of reconciliation questions, reconciliation by the team, identification of unresolved/remaining issues, and identification of follow-up actions and subsequent approvals of responses. The plan addressed the potential for gaps to exist in the following areas: • Department of Energy Order 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” requirements, including the performance assessment, composite analysis, monitoring plan, performance assessment/composite analysis maintenance plan, and closure plan • Environmental assessment supporting the National Environmental Policy Act • Nuclear safety • Safeguards and security • Emplacement operations • Requirements for commissioning • General project implementation. The reconciliation plan and results of the plan implementation are provided in a business-sensitive project file. This report provides the reconciliation plan and non-business sensitive summary responses to identified gaps.

  18. Energy efficiency indicators for high electric-load buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aebischer, Bernard; Balmer, Markus A.; Kinney, Satkartar; Le Strat, Pascale; Shibata, Yoshiaki; Varone, Frederic

    2003-06-01

    Energy per unit of floor area is not an adequate indicator for energy efficiency in high electric-load buildings. For two activities, restaurants and computer centres, alternative indicators for energy efficiency are discussed.

  19. Solar Ready Buildings Planning Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisell, L.; Tetreault, T.; Watson, A.

    2009-12-01

    This guide offers a checklist for building design and construction to enable installation of solar photovoltaic and heating systems at some time after the building is constructed.

  20. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  1. EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA was to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings. DOE has canceled this EA and is replacing it with EA-2020.

  2. EA-2020: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AD56)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

  3. Radon in multi-story residential buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardis, H.M.; MacWaters, J.; Oswald, J.

    1991-12-01

    In September 1989, HUD signed an Interagency Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requesting EPA to measure radon levels and distribution patterns in several multi-story residential buildings. This study was conducted in two phases. The Phase 1 included walk-through investigations of each of the four test buildings. These preliminary investigations were focused on identifying site-specific characteristics that might influence radon entry and distribution. The results of these investigations were used to design and implement short-term screening measurements (diffusion barrier charcoal canisters) of each building's radon potential. Phase 2 consisted of long-term radon measurements with alpha track detectors (approximately 6 months) and investigations of the characteristics of each building. These measurements were made to address the possibility that long-term radon levels might be higher on upper floors than indicated by the short-term basement and ground-level screening tests. The report describes the investigations that were conducted, the data that were gathered for each building, and general observations and discussions about patterns of radon distribution in these specific buildings.

  4. City of Scottsdale- Green Building Policy for Public Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, Scottsdale approved a green building policy for new city buildings and remodels. The resolution requires all new, occupied city buildings of any size to be designed, contracted and built...

  5. On the Use of Integrated Daylighting and Energy Simulations To Drive the Design of a Large Net-Zero Energy Office Building: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    522 August 2010 On the Use of Integrated Daylighting and Energy Simulations To Drive the Design of a Large Net-Zero Energy Office Building Preprint Rob Guglielmetti, Shanti Pless, and Paul Torcellini Presented at SimBuild 2010 New York, New York August 15-19, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance

  6. Hydronic Systems: Designing for Setback Operation, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hydronic Systems: Designing for Setback Operation Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boilers- Optimizing Efficiency and Response Time During Setback Operation Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com HTP, www.htproducts.com Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com Grundfos, www.grundfos.com Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com Consortium for Advanced

  7. Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results

  8. Whole Building Energy Simulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Whole building energy simulation, also referred to as energy modeling, can and should be incorporated early during project planning to provide energy impact feedback for which design considerations...

  9. Desert architecture for educational buildings, a case study: A center for training university graduates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeid, M.

    1996-10-01

    A new program for training graduates in desert development is being implemented by the Desert Development Center (DDC) of the American University in Cairo. The facilities consist of fifty bed/sitting rooms for accommodating 100 students. Each unit consists of two rooms and a bathroom for the use of 4 students; a lecture theater which can house 120 students, with adjoining office for trainers as well as necessary facilities; a general cafeteria which can serve 120--150 persons and an adjoining dining room for teaching staff. The cafeteria building also houses the kitchen; a cold storage area; a laundry room, storerooms, sleeping quarters and services for the labor force of the building complex; a system of solar water heaters; and a special sanitary sewage system for treatment of waste water produced by the building`s activities. When designing and implementing this complex, architectural elements and building philosophy based on the concept of integrating with the environment were considered. Elements included orientation heights and building materials suited to the desert environment, thick walls, outer and inner finishing materials, roofs, malkafs, floors, colors, solar heaters, lighting, green areas, windbreaks, terraces, and furniture. The paper includes a general evaluation of this educational building based on the PRA approach (Participatory Rapid Appraisal) involving those living and working in it. As a result of her position with the project, the author was able to evaluate the original designs, recommend modifications, and evaluate their implementation and fulfillment of the original goals of the projects.

  10. Passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1992-10-01

    Developments in passive solar buildings that took place from the early 1970`s through 1989 are described. Much of the work covered was federally sponsored during the period 1975 through 1986. About half the volume is devoted to quantitative methods for modeling, simulation, and design analysis of passive buildings; the other half summarizes the quantitative results of testing and monitoring of models and buildings. The following are covered: building solar gain modeling, simulation analysis, simplified methods, materials and components, analytical results for specific systems, test modules, building integration, performance monitoring and results, and design tools. (MHR)

  11. Passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Developments in passive solar buildings that took place from the early 1970's through 1989 are described. Much of the work covered was federally sponsored during the period 1975 through 1986. About half the volume is devoted to quantitative methods for modeling, simulation, and design analysis of passive buildings; the other half summarizes the quantitative results of testing and monitoring of models and buildings. The following are covered: building solar gain modeling, simulation analysis, simplified methods, materials and components, analytical results for specific systems, test modules, building integration, performance monitoring and results, and design tools. (MHR)

  12. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on the IECC climate zone map. It may not be intuitively obvious why a U.S. climate zone map is so important to the construction industry. Thanks to this Building America Top Innovation, building science education, energy code development, and residential design can much more effectively integrate

  13. 2012 News | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 News Below are news stories related to Buildings. RSS Learn about RSS. November 20, 2012 NREL's Research Support Facility Garners Second LEED® Platinum The Research Support Facility (RSF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo. has earned its second LEED® Platinum designation for new construction from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable building design and

  14. 2013 News | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 News Below are news stories related to Buildings. RSS Learn about RSS. November 6, 2013 NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED® Platinum The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., has earned a LEED® Platinum designation for new construction from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), a non-profit organization dedicated to sustainable building design and

  15. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  16. Evaluation of Crawlspace Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    In 2011 and early 2012, Building Science Corporation (BSC) collaborated with Innova Services Corporation on a multifamily community unvented crawlspace retrofit project at Oakwood Gardens in Lansdale, Pennsylvania. BSC provided design consulting services and pre- and post-retrofit evaluation, testing, and data monitoring. The existing condition was a vented crawlspace with an uninsulated floor between the crawlspace and the dwelling units above. The crawlspace was therefore a critically weak link in the building enclosure and was ripe for improvement. Saving energy was the primary interest and goal, but the greatest challenge in this unvented crawlspace retrofit project was working through a crawlspace bulk water intrusion problem caused by inadequate site drainage, window well drainage, foundation wall drainage, and a rising water table during rainy periods. While the unvented crawlspace retrofit was effective in reducing heat loss, and the majority of the bulk water drainage problems had been resolved, the important finding was that some of the wood joists embedded in masonry pockets behind the brick veneer were showing signs of moisture damage.

  17. New design concepts for energy-conserving buildings. Results of a national competition among students in schools of architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    The National Student Competition in Energy Conscious Design held among professional schools of architecture in 1976 is documented. Fifty-five schools participated, submitting 115 entries; twelve were chosen as finalists. Details are presented on the twelve winning designs and excerpts from the remaining 103 entries are published. (MCW)

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.2 Commercial Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Number of Floors and Type of Ownership, as of 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) Floors Ownership One 40% Nongovernment Owned 76% Two 25% Owner-Occupied 36% Three 12% Nonowner-Occupied 37% Four to Nine 16% Unoccupied 3% Ten or More 8% Government Owned 24% Total 100% Federal 3% State 5% Local 15% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, Commercial Building Characteristics 2003, June 2006, Table C1

  19. THE FINAL DEMISE OF EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK BUILDING K-33 Health Physics Society Annual Meeting West Palm Beach, Florida June 27, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. King

    2011-06-27

    Building K-33 was constructed in 1954 as the final section of the five-stage uranium enrichment cascade at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). The two original building (K-25 and K-27) were used to produce weapons grade highly enriched uranium (HEU). Building K-29, K-31, and K-33 were added to produce low enriched uranium (LEU) for nuclear power plant fuel. During ORGDP operations K-33 produced a peak enrichment of 2.5%. Thousands of tons of reactor tails fed into gaseous diffusion plants in the 1950s and early 1960s introducing some fission products and transuranics. Building K-33 was a two-story, 25-meters (82-feet) tall structure with approximately 30 hectare (64 acres) of floor space. The Operations (first) Floor contained offices, change houses, feed vaporization rooms, and auxiliary equipment to support enrichment operations. The Cell (second) Floor contained the enrichment process equipment and was divided into eight process units (designated K-902-1 through K-902-8). Each unit contained ten cells, and each cell contained eight process stages (diffusers) for a total of 640 enrichment stages. 1985: LEU buildings were taken off-line after the anticipated demand for uranium enrichment failed to materialize. 1987: LEU buildings were placed in permanent shutdown. Process equipment were maintained in a shutdown state. 1997: DOE signed an Action Memorandum for equipment removal and decontamination of Buildings K-29, K-31, K-33; BNFL awarded contract to reindustrialize the buildings under the Three Buildings D&D and Recycle Project. 2002: Equipment removal complete and effort shifts to vacuuming, chemical cleaning, scabbling, etc. 2005: Decontamination efforts in K-33 cease. Building left with significant {sup 99}Tc contamination on metal structures and PCB contamination in concrete. Uranium, transuranics, and fission products also present on building shell. 2009: DOE targets Building K-33 for demolition. 2010: ORAU contracted to characterize Building K-33 for final disposition at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) in Oak Ridge. ORAU collected 439 samples from May and June. LATA Sharp started removing transite panels in September. 2011: LATA Sharp began demolition in January and expects the last waste shipment to EMWMF in September. Approximately 237,000 m{sup 3} (310,000 yd{sup 3}, bulked) of waste taken to EMWMF in 23,000 truckloads expected by project completion.

  20. Commissioning in Federal Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Federal Buildings Commissioning in Federal Buildings Commissioning in Federal Buildings Commissioning is a quality-assurance process used to verify that a building performs according to the original design and intent, and meets the needs of the owners and occupants. The commissioning process also prepares building staff to operate and maintain the building. Federal agencies are required to make sure building systems and equipment are commissioned in new construction and existing buildings.

  1. Building Science Education | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Education Building Science Education The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. The Building Science Education Roadmap, developed by DOE and leaders of the building science community,

  2. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are criticalmore » to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated laser range finder which uses the PDA drawings to accurately measure position relative to nearby walls or other interior structures. The PDA and desktop application exchange information over a secure wireless network, Through this network, the progress of sampling activities may be monitored in real-time. PDA-acquired data is ultimately transferred over the network to the desktop where it is stored permanently in the project database. Once in the database, the data may be viewed, analyzed, or reported from the desktop. Mapping A picture is worth a thousand words. BROOM includes both inverse distance and kriging interpolation algorithms which are used to generate continuous contamination maps and display underlying confidence. Such maps greatly assist in interpreting discrete sample data and communicating results to others. Data Management The BROOM database provides a streamlined means of storing. retrieving, viewing, and analyzing the various data associated with recovery operations. Critical floor plan drawings and other pertinent images may be organized and stored in the database before an event occurs. History indicates that thousands of samples will need to be collected and analyzed by contractors, laboratories, government agencies. and other stakeholders. The BROOM database provides a secure, easy to use plafform, where these data may be centrally stored and shared among all concerned parties.« less

  3. Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Savings Project: Insulate and Air Seal Floors Over Unconditioned Garages Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings Depend on energy cost, R-value increase, and airtightness of newly insulated floor compared to existing. Time to Complete 4-8 hours Overall Cost $0.60 to $1.00 PER SQUARE FOOT FOR R-30 BATTS Careful air sealing and insulation between an unconditioned garage and the conditioned space above can increase comfort,

  4. green building | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy...

  5. Priority Permit Processing for Green Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buildings eligible for priority processing are those that meet the "energy and environmental design building standards". These standards can be achieved by earning either a Leadership in Energy...

  6. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    list of buildings from which the buildings to be surveyed were selected. See Sample Design and Technical Information on CBECS for additional information about the 2003 survey....

  7. Natural Building Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NBT is a technical sales and product development business bringing a new generation of building materials and designs into the mainstream market. References: Natural Building...

  8. Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green...

  9. Building America Update - August 9, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanley Wood's Home for Life website and virtual tour uses universal design principles to ... New Publications from Building America The Building America Publications Library offers an ...

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of Green Coast Enterprises, who worked with Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to build moisture- and flood-resistant HERS- 65 affordable homes on pier foundations, with borate pressure-treated lumber, wind-resistant OSB sheathing, hurricane strapping, roofing membrane, and closed-cell spray foam in attic, walls, and under floor.

  11. Better Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Initiative aims to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient by 2020 and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency.

  12. Mercantile Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are...

  13. Education Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high...

  14. Passive solar buildings research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    This chapter covers research advances in passive solar buildings research during the time span from 1982 through 1991. These advances fall within the following categories: (1) short-term energy monitoring, (2) heat transport by natural convection within buildings, and (3) design guidelines and design tools. In short-term energy monitoring, a simulation model of the building is calibrated, based on data taken in a 3-day test. The method accurately predicts performance over an extended period. Heat transport through doorways is characterized for complex situations that arise in passive solar buildings. Simple concepts and models adequately describe the energy transport in many situations of interest. In a new approach, design guidelines are automatically generated for any specific locality. Worksheets or an accompanying computer program allow the designer to quickly and accurately evaluate performance and investigate design alternatives. 29 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Repairing Walls & Floors: How To's for the Handy Homeowner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-09

    This brochure provides handy homeowners with tips on how to properly repair walls and floors in their homes that sustained damage during a hurricane. This publications is a part of the How To's for the Handy Homeowner Series.

  16. Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

    1984-01-01

    A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and

  18. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34

  19. Computational Design of Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Stable Zirconium Building Units for Storage and Delivery of Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Gualdron, DA; Gutov, OV; Krungleviciute, V; Borah, B; Mondloch, JE; Hupp, JT; Yildirim, T; Farha, OK; Snurr, RQ

    2014-10-14

    A metal organic framework (MOF) with high volumetric deliverable capacity for methane was synthesized after being identified by computational screening of 204 hypothetical MOF structures featuring (Zr6O4)(OH)(4)(CO2)(n) inorganic building blocks. The predicted MOF (NU-800) has an fcu topology in which zirconium nodes are connected via ditopic 1,4-benzenedipropynoic acid linkers. Based on our computer simulations, alkyne groups adjacent to the inorganic zirconium nodes provide more efficient methane packing around the nodes at high pressures. The high predicted gas uptake properties of this new MOF were confirmed by high-pressure isotherm measurements over a large temperature and pressure range. The measured methane deliverable capacity of NU-800 between 65 and 5.8 bar is 167 cc(STP)/cc (0.215 g/g), the highest among zirconium-based MOFs. High-pressure uptake values of H-2 and CO2 are also among the highest reported. These high gas uptake characteristics, along with the expected highly stable structure of NU-800, make it a promising material for gas storage applications.

  20. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Sustainable Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainable Buildings FY15 High Performance Sustainable Buildings. The South Table Mountain campus reported the 2009 addition to the Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility is LEED Gold, the South Site Entrance Building, Café, Science & Technology Facility, Energy Systems Integration Facility, and Research Support Facility are LEED Platinum. The parking garage is designed to LEED Platinum. The South Site Entrance Building and the Research Support Facility are also designed to net zero. The

  1. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  2. Building Cost and Performance Metrics: Data Collection Protocol, Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Solana, Amy E.; Spees, Kathleen L.

    2005-09-29

    This technical report describes the process for selecting and applying the building cost and performance metrics for measuring sustainably designed buildings in comparison to traditionally designed buildings.

  3. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  4. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace"

  5. NREL Buildings Research Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Through research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed many strategies and design techniques to ensure both commercial and residential buildings use as little energy as possible and also work well with the surroundings. Here you will find a video that introduces the work of NREL Buildings Research, highlights some of the facilities on the NREL campus, and demonstrates these efficient building strategies. Watch this video to see design highlights of the Science and Technology Facility on the NREL campus?the first Federal building to be LEED® Platinum certified. Additionally, the video demonstrates the energy-saving features of NRELs Thermal Test Facility. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/buildings/about_research_text_version.html

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on Buildings of the Future, Building America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    natural systems and place-based building design can create sustainable and resilient ... ecosystem approach can be integrated into the urban environment. Register for the webinar. ...

  7. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  8. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Department of Environmental Protection-Cambria Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-11-01

    The 36,000-square-foot Cambria Office building used integrated design to minimize energy use, pollution and environmental impact the building will create over its lifetime.

  9. Floor-supply displacement air-conditioning: Laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Tanabe, Shinichi; Kimura, Kenichi

    1999-07-01

    The results of laboratory measurements on the performance of a floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system in comparison to a displacement ventilation system with a side-wall-mounted diffuser and a ceiling-based distribution system are described. Thermal stratification was observed, as there were greater vertical air temperature differences in both of the displacement systems than in the ceiling-based system. The floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system produced a uniformly low air velocity at each measurement height, while a rather high air velocity near the floor was observed for the displacement ventilation system with a sidewall-mounted diffuser. Local mean age of air of the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system was lower than that of the other systems, especially in the lower part of the room. According to the simulation results, the floor-supply displacement air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling requires 34% less energy than the conventional air-conditioning system with outdoor air cooling.

  10. Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Platinum Certified Building in Ohio (September 2008). Fernald Preserve-Hamilton, Ohio Read more Mission The team evaluates and ...

  11. Energy Efficient State Building Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOA has incorporated the requirements of the Executive Order into Indiana's standard instructions to designers for projects on state-owned buildings. Efficiency can be demonstrated through...

  12. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  13. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  14. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  15. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  16. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113

  17. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  18. Hawaii-Okinawa Building Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Salasovich, J.

    2013-05-01

    NREL conducted energy evaluations at the Itoman City Hall building in Itoman, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the Hawaii State Capitol building in Honolulu, Hawaii. This report summarizes the findings from the evaluations, including the best practices identified at each site and opportunities for improving energy efficiency and renewable energy. The findings from this evaluation are intended to inform energy efficient building design, energy efficiency technology, and management protocols for buildings in subtropical climates.

  19. Residential Building Energy Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    PEAR (Program for Energy Analysis of Residences) provides an easy-to-use and accurate method of estimating the energy and cost savings associated with various energy conservation measures in site-built single-family homes. Measures such as ceiling, wall, and floor insulation; different window type and glazing layers; infiltration levels; and equipment efficiency can be considered. PEAR also allows the user to consider the effects of roof and wall color, movable night insulation on the windows, reflective and heatmore » absorbing glass, an attached sunspace, and use of a night temperature setback. Regression techniques permit adjustments for different building geometries, window areas and orientations, wall construction, and extension of the data to 880 U.S. locations determined by climate parameters. Based on annual energy savings, user-specified costs of conservation measures, fuel, lifetime of measure, loan period, and fuel escalation and interest rates, PEAR calculates two economic indicators; the Simple Payback Period (SPP) and the Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR). Energy and cost savings of different sets of conservation measures can be compared in a single run. The program can be used both as a research tool by energy policy analysts and as a method for nontechnical energy calculation by architects, home builders, home owners, and others in the building industry.« less

  20. Why build below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlings, R.

    1982-01-01

    Building homes underground is a rapidly growing concept. From less than 200 in 1977 to about 6000 homes at present, this trend is discussed in detail. Although dirt is a poor insulator, its temperature moderating properties offer advantages. The need for insulating an underground house is discussed as well as the advantages of this type of home: (1) security advantages (fewer entrances); (2) storm resistance; (3) protection against fire; (4) lower maintenance costs; (5) space for lawn and garden is greater; and (6) these homes are quieter. The three principle types of underground homes are discussed in detail and illustrated with drawings and floor plans. These are: (1) the elevational type (most popular) with all doors and windows on one wall with other walls and roof completely covered; (2) penetrational homes with windows and doors on more than one side; and (3) the atrium home which is built around an open courtyard or atrium. Problems associated with earth-sheltered homes (underground water, structural strength requirements, building codes, indoor air pollution, costs, and financing) are discussed and suggestions are made for cutting costs. 4 references. (MJJ)

  1. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

  2. Building America Research Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools & Resources » Building America Research Tools Building America Research Tools Building America provides technical tools to support researchers and building industry professionals in ensuring consistent research results for new and existing homes. The following resources can be used to evaluate optimal building designs, access performance and cost data, execute field tests, and track research progress. Image is a rendering of a two-story residential building with an entrance on the

  3. Hot Cell Complex Building

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Hot Cell Complex Building Engineering Contract (REVISED) Call for Nomination It is important to note that participation in this tender process will NOT cause a conflict of interest (and hence exclusion) regarding further tenders relating to the Hot Cell Building Complex. This current tender is essentially for a Conceptual Design only. 1 Purpose ITER is a first of a kind mega-project with a wide range of disparate leading edge/high-tech systems to be assembled and installed into buildings at

  4. Better Buildings Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy would like to convene with Champions that are in attendance so please reach out if you or a representative is planning to attend. The Better Buildings Summit is a national meeting where leading organizations across key sectors showcase solutions to cut energy intensity in their buildings portfolio-wide by 20% over the next ten years. This Summit is designed for partners and stakeholders to exchange best practices and highlight demonstrated market solutions with an equal emphasis on discussing future opportunities for greater energy efficiency in America’s homes and buildings.

  5. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Design Options for Locating Ducts within Conditioned Space Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II - Design Options for Locating Ducts ...

  6. California Green Designs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Designs Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Green Designs Place: Encino, California Zip: 91316 Sector: Buildings, Renewable Energy Product: Designs and builds...

  7. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  8. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  9. Buildings Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Buildings Database Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Contact Us Home About All Projects...

  10. Vacant Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vacant Characteristics by Activity... Vacant Vacant buildings are those in which more floorspace was vacant than was used for any single commercial activity at the time of the...

  11. Service Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic...

  12. Other Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics See also: Equipment |...

  13. Recovery Act Helps Y-12 Exceed Cleanup Goal at Manhattan Project-Era Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beta 4, one of the oldest and largest buildings at the Y-12 National Security Complex, recently reached a significant cleanup milestone. The second floor of the building, more than 82,000 square feet, has been cleared of large equipment and waste from Cold War operations.

  14. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  15. Sustainability in Federal Building New Construction or Modernization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Sustainability in Federal Building New Construction or Modernization Sustainability in Federal Building New Construction or Modernization Sustainability in Federal Building New Construction or Modernization The Guiding Principles require agencies to design, construct, and operate sustainable buildings. New construction or modernization offers agencies opportunities to incorporate energy-efficient designs, sustainable siting and

  16. Historic Building Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When a Federal agency undertakes a renovation to an historic building, the renovation team must consider not only the uses and needs of the facility, but also a range of issues related to historic preservation. Integrating renewable energy such as solar and wind into an historic renovation has been accomplished successfully by agencies; the design and placement of any renewable energy system must be closely integrated with the overall design plans. Any renewable energy additions must maintain the integrity and defining characteristics of the building.

  17. High Performance Buildings Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry, a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses. The database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site.

  18. Intelligent Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Pratt, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2001-01-01

    The topic of "intelligent buildings" (IBs) emerged in the early 1980s. Since, the term has been used to represent a variety of related, yet differing topics, each with a slightly different focus and purpose. Wiring and networking-infrastructure companies emphasize the cabling requirements for communication in intelligent buildings and the need to accommodate future needs for higher-speed broadband. Lucent (Lucent 2000) for example, defines an IB as "...one with a completely integrated wiring architecture. A single cabling system that handles all information traffic - voice, data, video, even the big building management systems."

  19. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-03-14

    Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

  20. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design.

  1. Office Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    page, please call 202-586-8800. There were enough buildings in the responding sample to report statistics for all of these types except for research and development, which has...

  2. Lodging Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    were then asked to place the building into the following more specific categories: a hotel a motel, inn, or resort a retirement home a shelter, orphanage, or children's home a...

  3. Energy Conservation in Public Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mandating that buildings constructed and financed by the state must comply with the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)...

  4. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:Hydronic Systems Designing for Setback Operations Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing...

  5. GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Approaches: Recommendations for the Design of a Long -Term Capacity Building Strategy for the Wind and Solar Sectors by the MEF Working Group AgencyCompany Organization:...

  6. Sustainable Buildings Industry Council SBIC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nonprofit organization whose mission is to advance the design, affordability, energy performance of buildings in the US. References: Sustainable Buildings Industry...

  7. Shenzhen Institute of Building Research SIBR | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technology research institute for buildings and urban development. The body is working on solar panel design and installation in China. References: Shenzhen Institute of Building...

  8. Research Support Facility (RSF): Leadership in Building Performance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Through a whole-building integrated design approach, the building incorporates sustainable ... Warmed air drawn into labyrinth 8" airspace Cool outside air Perforated black metal panel ...

  9. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed thereabove. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define therebetween an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin.

  10. Nuclear reactor building

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gou, P.F.; Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-04-05

    A reactor building for enclosing a nuclear reactor includes a containment vessel having a wetwell disposed therein. The wetwell includes inner and outer walls, a floor, and a roof defining a wetwell pool and a suppression chamber disposed there above. The wetwell and containment vessel define a drywell surrounding the reactor. A plurality of vents are disposed in the wetwell pool in flow communication with the drywell for channeling into the wetwell pool steam released in the drywell from the reactor during a LOCA for example, for condensing the steam. A shell is disposed inside the wetwell and extends into the wetwell pool to define a dry gap devoid of wetwell water and disposed in flow communication with the suppression chamber. In a preferred embodiment, the wetwell roof is in the form of a slab disposed on spaced apart support beams which define there between an auxiliary chamber. The dry gap, and additionally the auxiliary chamber, provide increased volume to the suppression chamber for improving pressure margin. 4 figures.

  11. Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Building Enclosures: Part I, Existing Homes Building America Webinar: High Performance Building Enclosures: Part I, Existing Homes The webinar, presented on May ...

  12. Computer Model Buildings Contaminated with Radioactive Material

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-19

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material.

  13. PSNC Energy (Gas)- Green Building Rate Discount

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This discounted rate is available to commercial customers whose building meets the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification or equivalent. To...

  14. Building America Research Teams | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Research Teams Building America Research Teams Building America team members are experts in the field of residential building science and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. These teams work with industry partners to design, test, upgrade, and build technologies and high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Learn more about Building America

  15. Guidelines for Building Science Education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, Cheryn E.; Rashkin, Samuel; Huelman, Pat

    2015-03-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) residential research and demonstration program, Building America, has triumphed through 20 years of innovation. Partnering with researchers, builders, remodelers, and manufacturers to develop innovative processes like advanced framing and ventilation standards, Building America has proven an energy efficient design can be more cost effective, healthy, and durable than a standard house. As Building America partners continue to achieve their stretch goals, they have found that the barrier to true market transformation for high performance homes is the limited knowledge-base of the professionals working in the building industry. With dozens of professionals taking part in the design and execution of building and selling homes, each person should have basic building science knowledge relevant to their role, and an understanding of how various home components interface with each other. Instead, our industry typically experiences a fragmented approach to home building and design. After obtaining important input from stakeholders at the Building Science Education Kick-Off Meeting, DOE created a building science education strategy addressing education issues preventing the widespread adoption of high performance homes. This strategy targets the next generation and provides valuable guidance for the current workforce. The initiative includes: • Race to Zero Student Design Competition: Engages universities and provides students who will be the next generation of architects, engineers, construction managers and entrepreneurs with the necessary skills and experience they need to begin careers in clean energy and generate creative solutions to real world problems. • Building Science to Sales Translator: Simplifies building science into compelling sales language and tools to sell high performance homes to their customers. • Building Science Education Guidance: Brings together industry and academia to solve problems related to building science education. This report summarizes the steps DOE has taken to develop guidance for building science education and outlines a path forward towards creating real change for an industry in need. The Guidelines for Building Science Education outlined in Appendix A of this report have been developed for external stakeholders to use to certify that their programs are incorporating the most important aspects of building science at the most appropriate proficiency level for their role. The guidelines are intended to be used primarily by training organizations, universities, and certification bodies. Each guideline can be printed or saved as a stand-alone document for ease-of-use by the respective stakeholder group. In 2015, DOE, with leadership from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is launching a multi-year campaign to promote the adoption of the Guidelines for Building Science Education in a variety of training settings.

  16. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 8.1 8.0 13.9 45 26 44.6 17 508 0.29 500 192 Census Region and

  18. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80

  19. Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman

    2009-09-01

    Information technology (IT) is becoming increasingly pervasive throughout society as more data is digitally processed, stored, and transferred. The infrastructure that supports IT activity is growing accordingly, and data center energy demands haveincreased by nearly a factor of four over the past decade. Data centers house IT equipment and require significantly more energy to operate per unit floor area thanconventional buildings. The economic and environmental ramifications of continued data center growth motivate the need to explore energy-efficient methods to operate these buildings. A substantial portion of data center energy use is dedicated to removing the heat that is generated by the IT equipment. Using economizers to introduce large airflow rates of outside air during favorable weather could substantially reduce the energy consumption of data center cooling. Cooling buildings with economizers is an established energy saving measure, but in data centers this strategy is not widely used, partly owing to concerns that the large airflow rates would lead to increased indoor levels of airborne particles, which could damage IT equipment. The environmental conditions typical of data centers and the associated potential for equipment failure, however, are not well characterized. This barrier to economizer implementation illustrates the general relationship between energy use and indoor air quality in building design and operation. This dissertation investigates how building design and operation influence energy use and indoor air quality in data centers and provides strategies to improve both design goals simultaneously.As an initial step toward understanding data center air quality, measurements of particle concentrations were made at multiple operating northern California data centers. Ratios of measured particle concentrations in conventional data centers to the corresponding outside concentrations were significantly lower than those reported in the literature for office or residential buildings. Estimates using a material-balance model match well with empirical results, indicating that the dominant particle sources and losses -- ventilation and filtration -- have been characterized. Measurements taken at a data center using economizers show nearly an order of magnitude increase in particle concentration during economizer activity. However, even with the increase, themeasured particle concentrations are still below concentration limits recommended in most industry standards. The research proceeds by exploring the feasibility of using economizers in data centers while simultaneously controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air filtration. Physical and chemical properties of indoor and outdoor particles were analyzed at a data center using economizers and varying levels of air filtration efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios for most measured particle types were similar to the measurements when using conventional filtration without economizers. An energy analysis of the data center reveals that, even during the summer months, chiller savings from economizer use greatly outweigh the increase in fan power associated with improved filtration. These findings indicate that economizer use combined with improved filtration couldsignificantly reduce data center energy demand while providing a level of protection from particles of outdoor origin similar to that observed with conventional design. The emphasis of the dissertation then shifts to evaluate the energy benefits of economizer use in data centers under different design strategies. Economizer use with high ventilation rates is compared against an alternative, water-side economizer design that does not affect indoor particle concentrations. Building energy models are employed to estimate energy savings of both economizer designs for data centers in

  20. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Warehouse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  1. Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To control the construction and design costs associated with new buildings meeting this standard, the goal of Gold can be reduced to Silver for projects where the payback period for earning Gold...

  2. Building Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling Building Energy Modeling About the portfolio Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance

  3. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

    2014-04-09

    The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting, distributed energy resources (DER) comprising of small, modular, electrical renewable or fossil-based electricity generation units placed at or near the point of energy consumption, has gained much attention as a viable alternative or addition to the current energy system. In 2010, China consumed about 30percent of its primary energy in the buildings sector, leading the country to pay great attention to DER development and its applications in buildings. During the 11th Five Year Plan (FYP), China has implemented 371 renewable energy building demonstration projects, and 210 photovoltaics (PV) building integration projects. At the end of the 12th FYP, China is targeting renewable energy to provide 10percent of total building energy, and to save 30 metric tons of CO2 equivalents (mtce) of energy with building integrated renewables. China is also planning to implement one thousand natural gas-based distributed cogeneration demonstration projects with energy utilization rates over 70percent in the 12th FYP. All these policy targets require significant DER systems development for building applications. China?s fast urbanization makes building energy efficiency a crucial economic issue; however, only limited studies have been done that examine how to design and select suitable building energy technologies in its different regions. In the U.S., buildings consumed 40percent of the total primary energy in 2010 [1] and it is estimated that about 14 billion m2 of floor space of the existing building stock will be remodeled over the next 30 years. Most building?s renovation work has been on building envelope, lighting and HVAC systems. Although interest has emerged, less attention is being paid to DER for buildings. This context has created opportunities for research, development and progressive deployment of DER, due to its potential to combine the production of power and heat (CHP) near the point of consumption and delivering multiple benefits to customers, such as cost

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the construction, testing and deployment of the horizontal line arrays, not yet funded. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  5. Bagley University Classroom Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Duluth, MN, MN LEED PLATINUM CERTIFIED AND PASSIVHAUS ( certification pending) CLASSROOM BUILDING The Nature Preserve where this building is located is a contiguous natural area, 55 acres in size, deeded to the University in the 1950's for educational and recreational use. The site has hiking trails through old growth hard woods frequented by the university students as well as the public. We were charged with designing a facility to serve eight different departments for the nature portions of their teaching and study at a regional University.

  6. Demonstration of a new ICPC design with a double-effect absorption chiller in an office building in Sacramento, California[Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, W.S.; Winston, R.; O'Gallagher, J.J.; Henkel, T.; Muschaweck, J.; Christiansen, R.; Bergquam, J.

    1999-07-01

    In 1998 two new technologies, a new ICPC solar collector and the solar operation of a double effect chiller, have been demonstrated for the first in an office building in Sacramento, California. This paper describes the demonstration project and reports on component and system performance.

  7. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  8. Building a Stronger Foundation for Philanthropic Energy Investments |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Up Home Energy-Efficiency Building Up Home Energy-Efficiency August 26, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis Building or remodeling a home provides an opportunity to build energy-efficiency into your design from the ground up. | Photo courtesy of Paul Norton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Building or remodeling a home provides an opportunity to build energy-efficiency into your design from the ground up. | Photo courtesy of Paul Norton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Paige Terlip Paige

  9. Building Up Home Energy-Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Up Home Energy-Efficiency Building Up Home Energy-Efficiency August 26, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis Building or remodeling a home provides an opportunity to build energy-efficiency into your design from the ground up. | Photo courtesy of Paul Norton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Building or remodeling a home provides an opportunity to build energy-efficiency into your design from the ground up. | Photo courtesy of Paul Norton, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Paige Terlip Paige

  10. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  11. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  12. Building America System Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  13. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  14. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  15. Commercial Buildings Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  16. Building America Update - August 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2013 Building America Update - August 2013 Here you can link to the August 2013 edition of the Building America Update, which features articles on: Building America supports Home for Life DOE Challenge Home Innovation Awards and Student Design Competition announcement EEBA conference and Building America sessions Solar Decathlon call for volunteers New publications PDF icon building_america_update_aug2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America Update - July 2013 Building

  17. Pharmacia Building Q, Skokie, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-12-01

    This case study was prepared as one in a series for the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new and retrofit laboratory buildings in both the public and the private sectors. The energy-efficient elements of the laboratory featured in this case study-Pharmacia Corporation's new Building Q in Skokie, Illinois-include sustainable design, light-filled interior spaces for daylighting, energy-efficient fume hoods and other equipment, occupancy sensors to reduce lighting loads, and spectrally selective glazing to allow more light and less heat into the building. Water-saving fixtures are used, as well. Building Q has been certified Gold (the second highest rating) through the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) system.

  18. A DISTRIBUTED INTELLIGENT AUTOMATED DEMAND RESPONSE BUILDING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auslander, David; Culler, David; Wright, Paul; Lu, Yan; Piette, Mary

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the 2.5 year Distributed Intelligent Automated Demand Response (DIADR) project was to reduce peak electricity load of Sutardja Dai Hall at UC Berkeley by 30% while maintaining a healthy, comfortable, and productive environment for the occupants. We sought to bring together both central and distributed control to provide “deep” demand response1 at the appliance level of the building as well as typical lighting and HVAC applications. This project brought together Siemens Corporate Research and Siemens Building Technology (the building has a Siemens Apogee Building Automation System (BAS)), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (leveraging their Open Automated Demand Response (openADR), Auto-­Demand Response, and building modeling expertise), and UC Berkeley (related demand response research including distributed wireless control, and grid-­to-­building gateway development). Sutardja Dai Hall houses the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), which fosters collaboration among industry and faculty and students of four UC campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Merced, and Santa Cruz). The 141,000 square foot building, occupied in 2009, includes typical office spaces and a nanofabrication laboratory. Heating is provided by a district heating system (steam from campus as a byproduct of the campus cogeneration plant); cooling is provided by one of two chillers: a more typical electric centrifugal compressor chiller designed for the cool months (Nov-­ March) and a steam absorption chiller for use in the warm months (April-­October). Lighting in the open office areas is provided by direct-­indirect luminaries with Building Management System-­based scheduling for open areas, and occupancy sensors for private office areas. For the purposes of this project, we focused on the office portion of the building. Annual energy consumption is approximately 8053 MWh; the office portion is estimated as 1924 MWh. The maximum peak load during the study period was 1175 kW. Several new tools facilitated this work, such as the Smart Energy Box, the distributed load controller or Energy Information Gateway, the web-­based DR controller (dubbed the Central Load-­Shed Coordinator or CLSC), and the Demand Response Capacity Assessment & Operation Assistance Tool (DRCAOT). In addition, an innovative data aggregator called sMAP (simple Measurement and Actuation Profile) allowed data from different sources collected in a compact form and facilitated detailed analysis of the building systems operation. A smart phone application (RAP or Rapid Audit Protocol) facilitated an inventory of the building’s plug loads. Carbon dioxide sensors located in conference rooms and classrooms allowed demand controlled ventilation. The extensive submetering and nimble access to this data provided great insight into the details of the building operation as well as quick diagnostics and analyses of tests. For example, students discovered a short-­cycling chiller, a stuck damper, and a leaking cooling coil in the first field tests. For our final field tests, we were able to see how each zone was affected by the DR strategies (e.g., the offices on the 7th floor grew very warm quickly) and fine-­tune the strategies accordingly.

  19. INL High Performance Building Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2010-02-01

    High performance buildings, also known as sustainable buildings and green buildings, are resource efficient structures that minimize the impact on the environment by using less energy and water, reduce solid waste and pollutants, and limit the depletion of natural resources while also providing a thermally and visually comfortable working environment that increases productivity for building occupants. As Idaho National Laboratory (INL) becomes the nation’s premier nuclear energy research laboratory, the physical infrastructure will be established to help accomplish this mission. This infrastructure, particularly the buildings, should incorporate high performance sustainable design features in order to be environmentally responsible and reflect an image of progressiveness and innovation to the public and prospective employees. Additionally, INL is a large consumer of energy that contributes to both carbon emissions and resource inefficiency. In the current climate of rising energy prices and political pressure for carbon reduction, this guide will help new construction project teams to design facilities that are sustainable and reduce energy costs, thereby reducing carbon emissions. With these concerns in mind, the recommendations described in the INL High Performance Building Strategy (previously called the INL Green Building Strategy) are intended to form the INL foundation for high performance building standards. This revised strategy incorporates the latest federal and DOE orders (Executive Order [EO] 13514, “Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance” [2009], EO 13423, “Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management” [2007], and DOE Order 430.2B, “Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy, and Transportation Management” [2008]), the latest guidelines, trends, and observations in high performance building construction, and the latest changes to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Green Building Rating System (LEED 2009). The document employs a two-level approach for high performance building at INL. The first level identifies the requirements of the Guiding Principles for Sustainable New Construction and Major Renovations, and the second level recommends which credits should be met when LEED Gold certification is required.

  20. Passive solar heating and natural cooling of an earth-integrated design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research is being designed with innovative features that will greatly reduce its energy consumption for heating, cooling, and lighting. A reference design has been studied and the effects of extending the overhang during summer and fall, varying glazing area, employing RIB, and reducing internal heat by natural lighting have been considered. The use of RIB and the extendable overhang increases the optimum window glazing area and the solar heating fraction. A mass-storage wall which will likely be included in the final design has also been considered. A figure of merit for commercial buildings is the total annual energy consumption per unit area of floor space. A highly efficient office building in the Oak Ridge area typically uses 120 to 160 kWhr/m/sup 2/. The Joint Institute reference design with natural lighting, an annual average heat pump coefficient of performance (COP) equal to 1.8, RIB, and the extendable overhang uses 71 kWhr/m/sup 2/. This figure was determined from NBSLD simulations corrected for the saving from RIB. The internal heat energy from lighting and equipment used in the simulation was 1653 kWhrs/month (high natural lighting case) which is much lower than conventional office buildings. This value was adopted because only a portion of the building will be used as office space and efforts will be made to keep internal heat generation low. The mass-storage wall and ambient air cooling will reduce energy consumption still further. The combined savings of the innovative features in the Joint Institute building are expected to result in a very energy efficient design. The building will be instrumented to monitor its performance and the measured data will provide a means of evaluating the energy-saving features. The efficiency of the design will be experimentally verified over the next several years.

  1. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings | Department of Energy Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings During the winter of 2013-2014, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings monitored the energy use of three homes in the EcoVillage community in climate zone 6 to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical

  2. Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design | Department of Energy Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design Energy Department Issues Green Building Certification System Final Rule to Support Increased Energy Measurement and Efficient Building Design October 10, 2014 - 9:37am Addthis Supporting the Obama Administration's goal to reduce carbon emissions and protect the environment, the Energy

  3. Chapter 8: Constructing the Building | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Constructing the Building Chapter 8: Constructing the Building Chapter 8 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide contains information for construction of the building so it will perform as intended and protect the environment. PDF icon sustainable_guide_ch8.pdf More Documents & Publications LANL Sustainable Design Guide - Appendices Chapter 6: Materials Chapter 3: Building Siting

  4. Better Buildings Network View, April 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... systems Better Buildings Network View financial sector. ... Sunnovations, Inc., is a McLean, Virginia-based firm offering ... as featured in the new Resource Corner Designing ...

  5. Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment Overview - 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office's Commercial Building Demonstration and Deployment activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. ...

  6. Building America Solution Center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    design and construction topics, including air sealing and insulation, HVAC components, windows, indoor air quality, and much more. Explore the Building America Solution Center. ...

  7. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of your whole-house design -- an approach for building an energy-efficient home. Indoor Lighting Design When designing indoor lighting for energy efficiency,...

  8. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

  9. Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

  10. Building Science Solutions … Faster and Better

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar provides an overview of the DOE Building America Solution Center„a digital communication tool designed to serve building industry professionals, researchers, and market transformation programs by making world-class building science research and information quickly and easily accessible.

  11. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01

    Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

  12. Experimental study on the floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimoto, Takashi; Nobe, Tatsuo; Takebayashi, Yoshihisa

    1995-12-31

    These results are presented from a research project to investigate the effects of a floor-supply displacement ventilation system with practical indoor heat loads. The experiments were performed in an experimental chamber (35.2 m{sup 2}) located in a controlled environment chamber. Temperature distributions were measured at seven heights throughout the experimental chamber for each test condition. Data were analyzed to observe thermal stratification as affected by lighting, occupants, and heat loads (personal computers), and its disruption caused by walking and change of air volume. In addition, airflow characteristics and ventilation efficiencies were investigated using a smoke machine, tobacco smoke, dust for industrial testing, and a tracer gas (CO{sub 2}) step-up procedure.

  13. HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder, Houston, Texas (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder Houston, Texas PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New Home Type: Single-family, production builder Builder: David Weekley Homes - Houston www.davidweekleyhomes.com/ new-homes/tx/houston Size: 1,757 ft 2 to 4,169 ft 2 Price Range: about $260,000 to $450,000 Date Completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Hot-humid PERFORMANCE DATA HERS index: Builder standard practice = 66; case study 1,757-ft 2 house = 54 Projected annual energy cost savings: $375

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

  15. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee adopts, promulgates and administers the state building code. Compliance is determined through the building permit and inspection process by local...

  17. Residential Buildings Integration (RBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Lee Program Manager Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) April 22, 2014 Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) MissionVision The Residential Buildings ...

  18. Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arah Schuur Program Manager Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) April 22, 2014 Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) 2 Commercial Buildings Integration (CBI) Mission...

  19. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption SurveyCommercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy...

  20. Building America Building Science Translator

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Science Translator February 2015 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affliated partners, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represent that its use

  1. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  2. Renewable Energy Applications for Existing Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayter, S. J.; Kandt, A.

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces technical opportunities, means, and methods for incorporating renewable energy (RE) technologies into building designs and operations. It provides an overview of RE resources and available technologies used successfully to offset building electrical and thermal energy loads. Methods for applying these technologies in buildings and the role of building energy efficiency in successful RE projects are addressed along with tips for implementing successful RE projects.

  3. New Lab facility receives green building recognition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Lab Facility Receives Green Building Recognition Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit New Lab facility receives green building recognition The Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building is the first to achieve Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design status and LEED Gold certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. August 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives

  4. Making America's Buildings Better (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies program. Buildings use more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy? In fact, buildings consume more than 70% of the electricity and more than 50% of the natural gas Americans use. That's why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Technologies Program (BTP) is working to improve building energy performance through high-impact research, out-reach, and regulatory efforts. These efforts will result in affordable, high-performance homes and commercial buildings. These grid-connected buildings will be more energy efficient than today's typical buildings, with renewable energy providing a portion of the power needs. They will combine energy-smart 'whole building' design and construction, appliances and equipment that minimize plug loads, and cost-effective photovoltaics or other on-site energy systems.

  5. Solar Design Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  6. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of: * increasing cost-effective minimum requirements ... code development bodies, building design and construction representatives, the code enforcement community, product ...

  7. Buildings Interoperability Planning: Connected Buildings Interoperabil...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vision Context Steve Widergren PNNL 11 March 2015 Topics Purpose of meeting Buildings automation in the transformative time of connectivity Interoperability - a connected buildings...

  8. Building America Expert Meeting: Transforming Existing Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon exptmtgideaexchange.pdf More Documents & Publications Valuing Green in the Appraisal Process - Building America Top Innovation Building America Residential Energy ...

  9. Building America Building Science Education Roadmap

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This roadmap outlines steps that U.S. Department of Energy Building America program must take to develop a robust building science education curriculum in coming years.

  10. Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    administration building Insurance company headquarters building Local insurance agency Social services office Attorney's office Real estate sales office Government office State...

  11. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  12. Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and existing homes provided by the Building America Program.You may also visit the new Solution Center to find expert building science and energy efficiency resources. RSS...

  13. Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anita Lewis

    2012-07-01

    This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

  14. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Building Activity Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building Activity Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity,...

  15. BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Joe Lstiburek, Building ...

  16. Integrating affordability, energy and environmental efficiency, air quality and disaster resistance into residential design and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Much has been researched and written about the individual qualities of good home design and construction in terms of: energy efficiency; affordability; indoor air quality; sustainability; and wind, fire, and flood resistance. The real challenge is to integrate all these characteristics into the ideal house. The purpose of this paper is to review the characteristics of each of the above features and explore the integration of them into the ideal residential structure. The house would take the shape of a compact two story structure. A geometrically compact structure uses less construction materials per floor area, presents less area for improved thermal efficiency, and less profile for wind and flood resistance. The first floor would be constructed using insulated strong high thermal mass masonry system resistant to flood, wind, fire, and termite damage. The second story would be constructed using a lighter reinforced wood frame system with between stud insulation coupled with exterior insulated sheathing to minimize thermal bridging across studs. Optimizing floor plan such as separating living and sleeping areas present opportunities for efficient split HVAC zoning, natural ventilation, and solar passive adaptation. The design would emphasize the 4, 8, and 12 foot dimensioning for waste reduction; selection of environmentally friendly building materials, such as cellulose insulation; and efficient lighting and appliances. Features providing improved indoor air quality such as prudent duct selection, design and location, use of radon barriers, omission of carpeting, and control of moisture would be addressed. The design philosophy, concepts and rationale for the integration of these and many other features of the ideal residence will be addressed and illustrated.

  17. Building Envelope Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is hosting a building envelope stakeholder workshop on behalf of the DOE Building Technologies Office.

  18. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office ... Overview of the Residential Integration Program Research Implementation tools ...

  19. Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    influence a building, including incentives, utilities, weather, climate, and locationground temperature. Municipalities and Renewable Energy Opportunities Building...

  20. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Energy 101: Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Addthis Description Learn how commercial buildings can incorporate whole-building design to save energy and money while enhancing performance and comfort. This video highlights several energy-saving features of the Research Support Facility at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory-a model for high-performance office building design. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy

  1. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  2. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

  3. Attributes of the Federal Energy Management Program's Federal Site Building Characteristics Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loper, Susan A.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-12-31

    Typically, the Federal building stock is referred to as a group of about one-half million buildings throughout the United States. Additional information beyond this level is generally limited to distribution of that total by agency and maybe distribution of the total by state. However, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is required as the Federal sector seeks ways to implement efficiency projects to reduce energy and water use intensity as mandated by legislation and Executive Order. Using a Federal facility database that was assembled for use in a geographic information system tool, additional characterization of the Federal building stock is provided including information regarding the geographical distribution of sites, building counts and percentage of total by agency, distribution of sites and building totals by agency, distribution of building count and floor space by Federal building type classification by agency, and rank ordering of sites, buildings, and floor space by state. A case study is provided regarding how the building stock has changed for the Department of Energy from 2000 through 2008.

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  5. Berkeley Lab to Help Build Straw Bale Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worsham, S.A.; Van Mechelen, G.

    1998-12-01

    The Shorebird Environmental Learning Center (SELC) is a new straw bale building that will showcase current and future technologies and techniques that will reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations. The building will also serve as a living laboratory to test systems and monitor their performance. The project will be the model for a building process that stops using our precious resources and reduces waste pollution. The rice straw that will be used for the bale construction is generally waste material that is typically burned--millions of tons of it a year--especially in California's San Joaquin Valley. Buildings have significant impacts on the overall environment. Building operations, including lighting, heating, and cooling, consume about 30% of the energy used in the United States. Building construction and the processes into making building materials consume an additional 8% of total energy. Construction also accounts for 39% of wood consumed in the U S, while 25% of solid waste volume is construction and demolition (C &D) debris. The SELC will incorporate a variety of materials and techniques that will address these and other issues, while providing a model of environmentally considered design for Bay Area residents and builders. Environmental considerations include energy use in construction and operations, selection of materials, waste minimization, and indoor air quality. We have developed five major environmental goals for this project: (1) Minimize energy use in construction and operations; (2) Employ material sources that are renewable, salvaged, recycled, and/or recyclable; (3) Increase building lifespan with durable materials and designs that permit flexibility and modification with minimal demolition; (4) Reduce and strive to eliminate construction debris; and (5) Avoid products that create toxic pollutants and make a healthy indoor environment.

  6. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  7. Building technologies program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

  8. Advanced Energy Design Guides | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » Design & Decision Support Tools » Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Design Guides Cover of Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings The 50% AEDGs provide practical approaches to achieve 50% energy savings compared to base code requirements. Download them free from ASHRAE: Small to Medium Office Buildings K-12 School Buildings Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings Large Hospitals Grocery Stores The Advanced Energy Design Guides

  9. Building energy analysis tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brackney, Larry; Parker, Andrew; Long, Nicholas; Metzger, Ian; Dean, Jesse; Lisell, Lars

    2016-04-12

    A building energy analysis system includes a building component library configured to store a plurality of building components, a modeling tool configured to access the building component library and create a building model of a building under analysis using building spatial data and using selected building components of the plurality of building components stored in the building component library, a building analysis engine configured to operate the building model and generate a baseline energy model of the building under analysis and further configured to apply one or more energy conservation measures to the baseline energy model in order to generate one or more corresponding optimized energy models, and a recommendation tool configured to assess the one or more optimized energy models against the baseline energy model and generate recommendations for substitute building components or modifications.

  10. Whole Building Performance-Based Procurement Training | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Performance-Based Procurement Training Whole Building Performance-Based Procurement Training Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon commlbldgs12_pless_040413.pdf More Documents & Publications Best Practices for Controlling Capital Costs in Net Zero Energy Design and Construction - 2014 BTO Peer Review Solar Decathlon Building America System Research

  11. The BEAM Project: Building Efficient Architectural Models

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    This activity allows students the opportunity to explore materials used in architectural engineering and gain an understanding of their insolating properties. Students will research, design, build, test and improve a structure as to achieve the highest energy efficiency possible. Structures will be tested outside on a sunny day for eight hours with temperature changes being recorded each hour. Students will gain an understanding of how the combination of building location and orientation along with building design and materials can greatly affect the energy efficiency of a building.

  12. Modelica buildings library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael; Zuo, Wangda; Nouidui, Thierry S.; Pang, Xiufeng

    2013-03-13

    This paper describes the Buildings library, a free open-source library that is implemented in Modelica, an equation-based object-oriented modeling language. The library supports rapid prototyping, as well as design and operation of building energy and control systems. First, we describe the scope of the library, which covers HVAC systems, multi-zone heat transfer and multi-zone airflow and contaminant transport. Next, we describe differentiability requirements and address how we implemented them. We describe the class hierarchy that allows implementing component models by extending partial implementations of base models of heat and mass exchangers, and by instantiating basic models for conservation equations and flow resistances. We also describe associated tools for pre- and post-processing, regression tests, co-simulation and real-time data exchange with building automation systems. Furthermore, the paper closes with an example of a chilled water plant, with and without water-side economizer, in which we analyzed the system-level efficiency for different control setpoints.

  13. Modelica buildings library

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetter, Michael; Zuo, Wangda; Nouidui, Thierry S.; Pang, Xiufeng

    2013-03-13

    This paper describes the Buildings library, a free open-source library that is implemented in Modelica, an equation-based object-oriented modeling language. The library supports rapid prototyping, as well as design and operation of building energy and control systems. First, we describe the scope of the library, which covers HVAC systems, multi-zone heat transfer and multi-zone airflow and contaminant transport. Next, we describe differentiability requirements and address how we implemented them. We describe the class hierarchy that allows implementing component models by extending partial implementations of base models of heat and mass exchangers, and by instantiating basic models for conservation equations andmore » flow resistances. We also describe associated tools for pre- and post-processing, regression tests, co-simulation and real-time data exchange with building automation systems. Furthermore, the paper closes with an example of a chilled water plant, with and without water-side economizer, in which we analyzed the system-level efficiency for different control setpoints.« less

  14. Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building America Top Innovation Integration of HVAC System Design with Simplified Duct Distribution - Building ...

  15. Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Transcript: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This transcript is from ...

  16. Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings Public Meeting Attendee List: Sustainable Design Standards for Federal Buildings This document is ...

  17. Building Controls Virtual Test Bed

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    The Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is a modular software environment that is based on the Ptolemy II software environment. The BCVTB can be used for design and analysis of heterogenous systems, such as building energy and controls systems. Our additions to Ptolemy II allow users to Couple to Ptolemy II simulation software such as EnergyPlus, MATLAB/Simulink or Dymola for data exchange during run-time. Future versions of the BCVTS will also contain an interfacemore » to BACnet which is a communication protocol for building Control systems, and interfaces to digital/analog converters that allow communication with controls hardware. Through Ptolemy II, the BCVTB provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run- time.« less

  18. Wet buildings: A moisture primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotz, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This article will attempt to clarify the various issues that must be solved when investigating the cause of a building moisture problem. Several classic errors that result in mechanical engineers and contractors defending themselves in lawsuits will be reviewed. Moisture from internal and external sources is the most frequent cause of building problems and subsequent legal action. Many reported roof leaks are, in reality, condensation problems that have nothing to do with the roofing contractor. Mechanical design engineers need to work closely with the building owner, architect, and contractors to insure a dry, durable building. The first issue to examine is if the moisture is coming from the outside--i.e. rain. Other leaks discussed are ice dams, groundwater leaks, and roof leaks. Also discussed are vapor barriers, continuity of insulation, humidification chilled water, warehouses, trash plants, indoor pools, and hot or humid climates.

  19. design problem | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    design problem Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(266) Contributor 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu...

  20. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  1. Voluntary Green Building Standards for Public Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: The program described below is a voluntary program that encourages state agencies to consider using green building standard. The State of Alabama does not have mandatory Green Building...

  2. Chapter 3: Building Siting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Building Siting Chapter 3: Building Siting Chapter 3 of the LANl Sustainable Design Guide features site issues, site inventory and analysis, site design, and transportation and parking at LANL. PDF icon sustainable_guide_ch3.pdf More Documents & Publications Chapter 7: Landscape Design and Management Chapter 1: Sustainable Development--What and Why? EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement

  3. Effective Design Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As described in the Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG), all Federal agencies are required to follow the Guiding Principles for New Construction and Major Renovations, which include considerations...

  4. Passive Solar Home Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design » Design for Efficiency » Passive Solar Home Design Passive Solar Home Design This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot water and a secondary radiant floor heating system. | Photo courtesy of Jim Schmid Photography. This North Carolina home gets most of its space heating from the passive solar design, but the solar thermal system (top of roof) supplies both domestic hot

  5. Photovoltaics for Buildings: New Applications and Lessons Learned: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayter, S.; Torcellini, P.; Deru, M.

    2002-07-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) for buildings system applications are experiencing exponential growth. This increased activity is the result of building owners becoming more confident with this new technology, designers becoming more comfortable incorporating PV into architectural and building electrical designs, decreasing PV system cost, the heightened public awareness of depleting conventional energy resources, and issues related to power reliability and stability. Usually, these systems meet primary objectives to offset building electrical loads, decrease building electrical demand, or provide continuous power supply during utility grid outages; but because of design flaws, installation errors, or improper maintenance, these systems can perform below the design expectations.

  6. Office Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Type of Office Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per Million Btu All Office Buildings 1,089 1,475 90.5 16.32...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006 Iowa enacted H.F. 2361, requiring the State Building Commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized building energy code. The State Building Code...

  8. 324 Building - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  9. 325 Building - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 AreaFast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim ...

  10. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    commercial buildings. Note: Data are for non-mall buildings. Source: Energy Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings and...

  11. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building Energy...

  12. U.S.-India Centre for Building Energy Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As part of the building information technologies (BIT) portfolio, CBERD is developing design and operation software tools, integrated controls platforms, building energy monitoring ...

  13. Highlighting High Performance: Department of Environmental Protection; Cambria Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-11-01

    The 36,000-square-foot Cambria Office building used integrated design to minimize energy use, pollution and environmental impact the building will create over its lifetime.

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: David Weekely...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    David Weekley Homes, who worked with Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to design HERS-59 homes with advanced framed walls, airtight drywall, and rigid ...

  15. Building Energy Modeling Library

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eere.energy.gov Project Overview Building Energy Modeling (BEM) Library * Define and ... currently applied to potential energy efficiency measures by building owners when ...

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Building Standards Commission (BSC) is responsible for administering California's building standards adoption, publication, and implementation. Since 1989, the BSC has published tr...

  17. NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL...

  18. Office Buildings - Full Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    administration building Insurance company headquarters building Local insurance agency Social services office Attorney's office Real estate sales office Government office State...

  19. Commercial Building Partnership

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    goals: - show that 50% savings in new construction and 30% savings in existing buildings ... level of savings standard practice Brief History 3 | Building Technologies Office ...

  20. Model Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Building Performance Standards (EEBPS) are statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include...

  1. Building-Level Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  2. Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    work, live, learn, govern, heal, worship, and play in buildings-and they require enormous energy resources. Related Links Buildings Gateway Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Commercial Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, ... Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of ...

  4. Better Buildings Workforce Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETTER BUILDINGS WORKFORCE ACTIVITIES Benjamin Goldstein, Better Buildings Workforce Project Manager, U.S. Department of Energy April 24, 2014 Housekeeping and Overview 1) ...

  5. Building Energy Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...Impacts * Priorities for FY15 and Beyond 2 Building Energy Codes - Mission Support the building energy code and standard development, adoption, implementation and enforcement ...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Act 093-0936 (Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings) was signed into law in August, 2004. The Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings became...

  7. Food Sales Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Characteristics by Activity... Food Sales Food sales buildings are buildings that are used for retail or wholesale sale of food. Basic Characteristics See also: Equipment |...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Connecticut Office of the State Building Inspector establishes and enforces building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing and energy code requirements by reviewing, developing, adopting and...

  9. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  10. Buildings Performance Database

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Enable public access to general statistical information about buildings, without ... of real buildings. * The BPD enables statistical analysis without revealing information ...

  11. Building Technologies Program Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program Jerry Dion Acting Program Manager Building Technologies Program State Energy Advisory Board Meeting October 17, 2007 The investment ...

  12. SUNREL Energy Simulation Software | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUNREL Energy Simulation Software SUNREL® is a hourly building energy simulation program that aids in the design of small energy-efficient buildings where the loads are dominated by the dynamic interactions between the building's envelope, its environment, and its occupants. The program is based on fundamental models of physical behavior and includes algorithms specifically for passive technologies, such as Trombe walls, programmable window shading, advanced glazings, and natural ventilation.

  13. Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

  14. 1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  15. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the...

  16. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  17. Building Energy Modeling Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building Energy Modeling Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  18. Building America Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building America Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  19. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Commercial Buildings Integration Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  20. Building Green in Greensburg: Dwane Shank Motors GM Dealership

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    also hurried to build their new 8,300-square-foot building and designed it to maximize energy efficiency and green strategies. This was vital to telling the story and...

  1. UPGRADES WORK IN PHILADELPHIA’S HISTORIC BUILDINGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia’s buildings are among the oldest and most historic in the country, and many predate modern energy-efficient designs by centuries. Energy improvements to older buildings are often...

  2. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Building Energy Codes Program activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation PDF icon Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet DOE Codes Program

  3. The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- February 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy February 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- February 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program. PDF icon BB Neighborhood View -- February 2012 More Documents & Publications The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- March 2012 The Better Buildings Neighborhood View -- January 2012 Microsoft Word - T4_VEIC_TO2_ Sub3_Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Play Book_TEAM 4

  4. Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's buildings consume more energy than any other sector of the U.S. economy, including transportation and industry. Learn more about: Heating and Cooling Passive Solar Design Water Heating Lighting and Daylighting Energy Basics Home Renewable Energy Homes & Buildings Lighting

  5. BTO Seeks Comments on Draft Building Energy Modeling Roadmap | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy BTO Seeks Comments on Draft Building Energy Modeling Roadmap BTO Seeks Comments on Draft Building Energy Modeling Roadmap The Department of Energy's Building Technologies Office (BTO) seeks input from stakeholders on a draft Building Energy Modeling Roadmap. The draft Roadmap provides background and context, then outlines steps that BTO's contractor recommends to help increase the use of BEM tools for the design and operation of energy-efficient buildings. The draft Roadmap is

  6. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Heritage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings, Inc., and Energy Smart Home Plans, Leland, North Carolina | Department of Energy Heritage Buildings, Inc., and Energy Smart Home Plans, Leland, North Carolina Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Heritage Buildings, Inc., and Energy Smart Home Plans, Leland, North Carolina PNNL worked with North Carolina Heritage Buildings and Energy Smart Home Plans to design zero-energy ready homes that score under HERS 60 for less than 2% added cost over code

  7. Building America Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building America Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Eric Werling, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building America activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation PDF icon Building America Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building America

  8. Building America Update - May 9, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9, 2014 Building America Update - May 9, 2014 May 9, 2014 - 10:22am Addthis Top Innovation Spotlight: Building America Solution Center and New Features DOE "Race to Zero" Student Design Competition Results 2014 Housing Innovation Awards-Application Period Open May Building America Webinar DOE Challenge Home Technical Webinars, Events, and News New Building America Publications Top Innovation Spotlight: Building America Solution Center and New Features Whole House Performance This

  9. Commerce RISE Program Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commerce RISE Program Design Commerce RISE Program Design Community Power Works program design, a document posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  10. Chapter 2: Whole-Buildling Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainable design is most effective when applied at the earliest stages of a design. This philosophy of creating a good building must be maintained throughout design and ...

  11. Physical Infrastructure Integration for Trinity, ASC L2 Milestone Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sena, Phillip A.

    2015-09-11

    Design, build, and integrate under-floor electrical and water-cooling distribution system for Trinity/ATS-1 platform.

  12. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  13. Building Energy Efficiency in Rural China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Yu, Sha; Song, Bo; Deng, Qinqin; Liu, Jing; Delgado, Alison

    2014-04-01

    Rural buildings in China now account for more than half of Chinas total building energy use. Forty percent of the floorspace in China is in rural villages and towns. Most of these buildings are very energy inefficient, and may struggle to meet basic needs. They are cold in the winter, and often experience indoor air pollution from fuel use. The Chinese government plans to adopt a voluntary building energy code, or design standard, for rural homes. The goal is to build on Chinas success with codes in urban areas to improve efficiency and comfort in rural homes. The Chinese government recognizes rural buildings represent a major opportunity for improving national building energy efficiency. The challenges of rural China are also greater than those of urban areas in many ways because of the limited local capacity and low income levels. The Chinese government wants to expand on new programs to subsidize energy efficiency improvements in rural homes to build capacity for larger-scale improvement. This article summarizes the trends and status of rural building energy use in China. It then provides an overview of the new rural building design standard, and describes options and issues to move forward with implementation.

  14. Energy Savings Potential of Flexible and Adaptive HVAC Distribution Systems for Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftness, Vivian; Brahme, Rohini; Mondazzi, Michelle; Vineyard, Edward; MacDonald, Michael

    2002-06-01

    It has been understood by architects and engineers that office buildings with easily re-configurable space and flexible mechanical and electrical systems are able to provide comfort that increases worker productivity while using less energy. Raised floors are an example of how fresh air, thermal conditioning, lighting needs, and network access can be delivered in a flexible manner that is not ''embedded'' within the structure. What are not yet documented is how well these systems perform and how much energy they can save. This area is being investigated in phased projects of the 21st Century Research Program of the Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute. For the initial project, research teams at the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, documented the diversity, performance, and incidence of flexible and adaptive HVAC systems. Information was gathered worldwide from journal and conference articles, case studies, manufactured products and assemblies, and interviews with design professionals. Their report thoroughly describes the variety of system types along with the various design alternatives observed for plenums, diffusers, individual control, and system integration. Many of the systems are illustrated in the report and the authors provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons. Among conclusions regarding key design issues, and barriers to widespread adoption, the authors state that flexible and adaptive HVAC systems, such as underfloor air, perform as well if not better than ceiling-based systems. Leading engineers have become active proponents after their first experience, which is resulting in these flexible and adaptive HVAC systems approaching 10 percent of the new construction market. To encourage adoption of this technology that improves thermal comfort and indoor air quality, follow-on work is required to further document performance. Architects, professional engineers, and commercial real estate developers will benefit from the availability of information that quantifies energy savings, first cost construction differences, and additional operating costs created when office space must be reconfigured to accommodate new tenants.

  15. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: BetterBuildings Lowell Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heslin, Thomas

    2014-01-31

    The City of Lowell set four goals at the beginning of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: 1. Improve the Downtown Historic Park District’s Carbon Footprint 2. Develop a sustainable and replicable model for energy efficiency in historic buildings 3. Create and retain jobs 4. Promote multi‐stakeholder partnerships The City of Lowell, MA was awarded $5 million in May 2010 to conduct energy efficiency retrofits within the downtown National Historical Park (NHP). The City’s target was to complete retrofits in 200,000 square feet of commercial space and create 280 jobs, while adhering to the strict historical preservation regulations that govern the NHP. The development of a model for energy efficiency in historic buildings was successfully accomplished. BetterBuildings Lowell’s success in energy efficiency in historic buildings was due to the simplicity of the program. We relied strongly on the replacement of antiquated HVAC systems and air sealing and a handful of talented energy auditors and contractors. BetterBuildings Lowell was unique for the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program because it was the only program that focused solely on commercial properties. BetterBuildings Lowell did target multi‐family properties, which were reported as commercial, but the majority of the building types and uses were commercial. Property types targeted were restaurants, office buildings, museums, sections of larger buildings, mixed use buildings, and multifamily buildings. This unique fabric of building type and use allows for a deeper understanding to how different properties use energy. Because of the National Historical Park designation of downtown Lowell, being able to implement energy efficiency projects within a highly regulated historical district also provided valuable research and precedent proving energy efficiency projects can be successfully completed in historical districts and historical buildings. Our program was very successful in working with the local Historic Board, which has jurisdiction in the NHP. The Historic Board was cooperative with any exterior renovations as long as they were not changing the existing aesthetics of the property. If we were replacing a rooftop condenser it needed to be placed where the existing rooftop condenser was located. Receiving proper approval from the Historic Board for any external energy conservation measures was known by all the participating contractors. One area of the retrofits that was contentious regarded venting of the new HVAC equipment. Installing external stacks was not allowed so the contractors had to negotiate with the Historic Board regarding the proper way to vent the equipment that met the needs mechanically and aesthetically. Overall BetterBuildings Lowell was successful at implementing energy and cost saving measures into 31 commercial properties located within the NHP. The 31 retrofits had 1,554,768 square feet of commercial and multifamily housing and a total predicted energy savings exceeding 22,869 a year. Overall the City of Lowell achieved its target goals and is satisfied with the accomplishments of the BetterBuildings program. The City will continue to pursue energy efficient programs and projects.

  16. DEA 6250: Collaborative Sustainable Building Practice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This course is designed to respond to one of the biggest barriers to the transformation of the building sector from current business-as-usual mode towards sustainable practice, i.e. the complex stakeholder structure and the fragmented delivery value chain in the building sector.

  17. Building Energy Transparency Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This report discusses best practices in implementing benchmarking policies. It includes policy profiles from several cities and states. PDF icon Building Energy Transparency Report More Documents & Publications New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report Benchmarking and Disclosure: State and Local Policy Design Guide and Sample Policy Language Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies

  18. Building Technologies Office 2016 Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling Building Energy Modeling About the portfolio Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance

  19. Events | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events Below are upcoming events related to buildings research. No current events have been scheduled

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Business Models Guide, October 27, 2011.

  1. 2005 Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Buildings Energy Data Book Prepared for the Offi ce of Energy Effi ciency and Renewable Energy 2005 Buildings Energy Data Book August 2005 Prepared for the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation and Analysis Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy by D&R International, Ltd. under contract to Oak Ridge National Laboratory This version is dated: August 2005 D I S C L A I M E R This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy.

  2. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the ...

  3. San Diego County- Green Building Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of San Diego has a Green Building Incentive Program designed to promote the use of resource efficient construction materials, water conservation and energy efficiency in new and...

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    Current and Past EditionsGlossaryPopular TablesQuery Tools Contact Us Search What Is the Buildings Energy Data Book? The Data Book includes statistics on residential and commercial building energy consumption. Data tables contain statistics related to construction, building technologies, energy consumption, and building characteristics. The Building Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy developed this resource to provide a

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Type Definition Includes These Sub-Categories from 2003 CBECS Questionnaire Education Buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Buildings on education campuses for which the main use is not classroom are included in the category relating to their use. For example, administration buildings are part of "Office", dormitories are "Lodging", and

  7. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  9. House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House Simulation Protocols have helped ensure consistent and accurate energy-efficiency assessments for tens of thousands of new and retrofit homes supported by the Building ...

  10. Building America Building Science Education Roadmap

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... (district heating and cooling, landfill gas generation, etc.) 14. Putting it all ... building performance to financing and insurance: e.g. energy improvement mortgages ...

  11. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Differences between the...

  12. Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing SunChips Business Incubator building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  14. Building America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market New Building America Fact Sheet Highlights Program New Building America Fact Sheet Highlights Program Read more Building America Research-to-Market Plan Released Building America Research-to-Market Plan Released Read the plan that will guide Building America's research and development activities over the coming years. Read more Building America Projects Focus on Building

  15. Building international genomics collaborations for global biosecurity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building and Home Design Products and Services Building and Home Design Products and Services Production builder Centex Homes built ultra-efficient model homes in San Ramon, California.’s Aventura and Lunaria community developments. Credit: Davis Energy Group. Production builder Centex Homes built ultra-efficient model homes in San Ramon, California.'s Aventura and Lunaria community developments. Credit: Davis Energy Group. Here you'll find a list of products and services for buyers and

  16. Dark matter vs. neutrinos: the effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jonathan H.

    2015-03-09

    Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments are said to run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that, using only spectral information, the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions it can still be surpassed using timing information, and so the neutrino floor is not an absolute limit on the sensitivity of Direct Detection experiments.

  17. Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

    2010-06-01

    2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

  18. Prototype simplified daylighting design tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treado, S.J.; Goodin, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    The report describes a prototype simplified design tool which has been developed to provide information for developing effective building fenestration systems. A computer software system was developed to search through and select the best available fenestration designs from a large database of previously simulated buildings. Fenestration designs can be selected based on energy usage, energy cost or peak loads. The determination of fenestration energy costs is discussed. The design tool is primarily intended for commercial, industrial or institutional buildings of any type.

  19. Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arkansas Program Type Loan Program Summary The ABA Revolving Loan Fund is an interest free loan program adopted by the Arkansas General Assembly through Act 1372 of 2009. The...

  20. High Performance Sustainable Building Design RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report Health and Productivity Questionnaire (HPQ) Survey Report Final Report - 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been concerned about employees' health and well-being for several years, especially as they relate to workplace productivity and safety. Additionally, the DOE's reliance on an aging workforce makes it even more critical for the Department to ensure that its programs and policies support employees, regardless of

  1. Proceedings: earth sheltered building design innovations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, L.L. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are prepared for 22 papers presented at the conference. One paper has previously appeared in the appropriate DOE Energy Data Base. (MCW)

  2. Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ventilation, more than compensate for the increased skin losses. natural ventilation. ... Technology Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. ...

  3. Designing and Building Hurricane-Resistant Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-05-25

    A production builders efforts to identify better wall systems to use in homes led to the development of a disaster-resistant housing solution for the southeastern United States.

  4. Designing Incentives Toolkit Better Buildings Residential Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    When aligned with program goals, incentives can be a very useful tool in achieving home energy upgrades. Definition Incentives provide motivation to potential customers to take a ...

  5. Building Performance Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Performance Database (BPD) unlocks the power of building data by providing access to the largest publicly-available dataset of information about the physical and operational characteristics of real buildings. The BPD enables users to perform statistical analysis on an anonymous dataset of hundreds of thousands of commercial and residential buildings from across the country. Users can examine specific building types and geographic areas, compare performance trends among similar buildings, identify and prioritize cost-saving energy efficiency improvements, and assess the range of likely savings from these improvements.

  6. FEMP Resources for Sustainable Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rating System Green Globes Rating System High Performance Federal Buildings Database Business Case for Sustainable Design in Federal Facilities Sustainability and Security...

  7. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Video recording transcript of a Webinar on Nov. 16, 2010 about residential passive solar building design and solar thermal heating applications PDF icon passivesolarwebinar.pdf ...

  8. Discover the New Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (text version) Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Building Design & Passive Solar Transcript February 13, 2013 Webinar: Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation ...

  9. Buildings.Energy.gov Zero Energy Ready Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: Transforming the Energy Efficiency Market Buildings.Energy.gov * Design * Performance * Cost * ... Risk 1: Ensured Comfort * Lower Htg.Clg. Loads * Lower Air ...

  10. DOE Announces Webinars on Buildings of the Future, Overcoming...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... from three unique perspectives: urban planning, the internet of things, and security. ... how these factors can influence building design and operation. Register for the webinar. ...

  11. Idaho Power - New Building Efficiency Program | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for lighting controls, HVAC equipment and controls, building shell measures, and energy controlventilation equipment. Incentives are designed to average about half the...

  12. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing ... high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs that will meet stringent energy code requirements. ...

  13. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Economic Opportunity Studies * Elevate Energy * Emerald Cities Seattle * Efficiency Maine Trust * Energy Smart Colorado * EnergySavvy * Environmental DesignBuild * Eterna ...

  14. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this project, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership evaluated a retrofit insulation strategy for foundations that is designed for use with open-core concrete block ...

  15. Building America Update - May 9, 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Innovation Spotlight: Building America Solution Center and New Features DOE "Race to Zero" Student Design ... and introduce new mobile apps to enhance user experience. ...

  16. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Programs for Buildings and Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are best practices, project resources, and other tools to help you develop and implement programs for designing, building, and operating energy efficient government, commercial, and...

  17. The following organizations recognize that the Commercial Buildings...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and the Environment Cushman & Wakefield Duke Realty Energy Design Service Systems Forest City Enterprises Green Building Initiative (GBI) Grundfos Illuminating Engineering ...

  18. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Challenges...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    design and implementation strategy for air sealing in low-rise multifamily buildings ... PDF icon Challenges of Achieving 2012 IECC Air Sealing Requirements in Multifamily ...

  19. BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Joe Lstiburek, Building Science Corp. View the Presentation PDF icon BSC: Building America, Building Science Consortium - 2015 Peer Review More Documents & Publications Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles Building

  20. Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report Waste Solidification Building Project Lessons Learned Report This report addresses lessons learned from the Waste Solidification Building project at the Savannah River Site relative to design, procurement, construction, startup, and commissioning. The objective is to identify successes, issues encountered, opportunities for improvement, and recommendations for implementation on future projects. (October 2015) PDF icon

  1. Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Tool User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Matsumoto, Steven W.

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Tool is a web-based system that is designed to allow building owners, managers, and operators to more accurately assess the energy performance of their commercial buildings. This document provide a step-by-step instruction on how to use the tool.

  2. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  3. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Dave B.; Stephan, Eric G.; Wang, Weimin; Corbin, Charles D.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) is a statewide minimum requirement that local jurisdictions cannot amend. The code is applicable to all new buildings in the commonwealth. The...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more deta...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority to promulgate the Massachusetts State Building Code (MSBC). The energy provisions in the MSBC were developed by the Boa...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Building Commission (FBC) is directed to adopt, revise, update, and maintain the Florida Building Code in accordance with Chapter 120 of the state statutes. The code is mandatory...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  11. 2015 Better Buildings Summit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Summit is a national meeting where leading organizations across key sectors showcase solutions to cut energy intensity in their buildings portfolio...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2012 IECC is in effect for all residential and commercial buildings, Idaho schools, and Idaho jurisdictions that adopt and enforce building codes, unless a local code exists that is more...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Building Code (KBC) is updated every three years on a cycle one year behind the publication year for the International Building Code. Any changes to the code by the state of Kentucky...

  14. Guam- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  15. Better Buildings Summit 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Summit is a national meeting where Better Buildings partners, including AMO’s Better Plants Program partners, and leading organizations can exchange best practices and showcase...

  16. Food Service Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    was a food service building were only asked whether the building was a restaurant, bar, fast food chain, or cafeteria (all the same category) or some other type of food service...

  17. Building Efficiency Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States – more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials...

  18. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri does not have a statewide building or energy code for private residential and commercial buildings, and there currently is no state regulatory agency authorized to promulgate, adopt, or...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects the public's safety by: adopting rules governing the construction, repair, and rehabilitation of buildings in the state;...

  20. Special Building Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A number of building types have specific energy uses and needs, and as such the renewable opportunities may be different from a typical office building. This section briefly discusses the following...

  1. Building Materials Property Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-16

    This information sheet describes a table of some of the key technical properties of many of the most common building materials taken from ASHRAE Fundamentals - 2001, Moisture Control in Buildings, CMHC, NRC/IRC, IEA Annex 24, and manufacturer data.

  2. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  3. Health Care Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    also tended to be larger than those not on complexes. The average building on a complex was 79.9 thousand square feet, compared to 11.2 thousand square feet for buildings...

  4. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Shell and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    & Practices > Building Shell & Lighting Conservation Features Building Shell and Lighting Conservation Features The 1999 CBECS collected information on two types of building shell...

  5. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile - Building America's Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame ...

  6. Building America Webinar: Building America: Research for Real...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: Building America: Research for Real-World Results This presentation was delivered on Dec. 17, 2014, by Eric Werling, Building America Research ...

  7. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

  8. Building America Solution Center - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Solution Center - Building America Top Innovation SCimagemale.jpg The Building America Solution Center is a Web-based tool connecting users to fast, free, and ...

  9. Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile - Building America Solution Center PNNL set up the framework for the Building America Solution Center, a web tool connecting users to ...

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    The Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected

  12. Buildings Energy Databook

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 BUILDINGS ENERGY DATABOOK U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Buildings Energy Databook The United States Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has developed this Buildings Energy Databook to provide a current and accurate set of comprehensive buildings-related data and to promote the use of such data for consistency throughout DOE programs. The Databook is considered

  13. BUILDING AMERICA PROGRAM EVALUATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Examples include changing local building codes, creating ... the program held monthly education classes for any ... errors including systematic and experimental ...

  14. Autotune Building Energy Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    quantification to determine importance of individual parameters * Suite of machine learning algorithms to generate calibration functions based on building dynamics * ...

  15. Kiowa County Commons Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Kiowa County Commons Building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  16. High Performance Sustainable Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buildings Goal 3: High Performance Sustainable Buildings Maintaining the conditions of a building improves the health of not only the surrounding ecosystems, but also the well-being of its occupants. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL The Radiological Laboratory

  17. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2006, SB 459 was enacted to promote renewable energy and update the state's building energy codes.

  18. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BTO) Ecosystem Emerging Technologies ... Heat Flow + Air Flow + Water Flow Ventilation Thermal ... and related services 3. Enable buildings to ...

  19. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.2: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes the climate zone designations used by the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program, and is intended to help builders to identify the appropriate climate designation for the counties in which they are building.

  20. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Inverted Attic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork | Department of Energy Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Inverted Attic Bulkhead for HVAC Ductwork This occupied test home received a modified truss system to accommodate ductwork within an inverted insulated bulkhead along the attic floor, which saves energy by placing heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork within the home's thermal boundary. PDF icon Inverted Attic Bulkhead for